Make-A-Wish continues to bring kids hope during the pandemic – Roanoke Times

Five-year-old Abby Alvey of Richmond, who has Neimann-Pick disease, recently received a backyard playground through Make-A-Wish. Shes pictured with her grandmother, Patricia Savino; her parents, Melissa and Garland Alvey; and her older sister, Claire Alvey. Even with this medication, we dont know at any time when shell get worse. These could be the best years of her life, her dad said. My first thought what can we do to brighten her life a little bit? And of course, everyone thinks of Make-A-Wish.

When Evers Beck was 10, he was diagnosed with a brain tumor. Two years later, Make-A-Wish Greater Virginia sent him and his family to Japan, where they visited Mount Fuji, took sushi-making classes and traveled on the worlds fastest high-speed train.

When Evers Beck was 10, he was diagnosed with a brain tumor. Through Make-A-Wish Greater Virginia, he and his family were able to visit Japan. His mom, Joey Beck, said he loves Pokmon, sushi and anime, so Japan was the perfect trip.

Evers Beck, who traveled to Japan several years ago through Make-A-Wish Greater Virginia, is now a local Wish Ambassador.

When Evers Beck was 10 years old, he was diagnosed with a brain tumor and qualified for a wish through Make-A-Wish Greater Virginia.

Two years later, in 2017, he took a break from his chemotherapy treatments and boarded a plane to Japan.

I didnt really know much about Make-A-Wish other than what youd see on the news, said his mother, Joey Beck of Roanoke. So I was like, my sons not dying, were not applying.

But eventually the Beck family was persuaded. Beck said her son loves Pokmon, sushi and anime, so Japan was the perfect trip.

Evers is 15 now, and although the tumor is still there and is being monitored, he has been off of treatment for three years.

He had a huge boost and it was a nice break for us, for the whole family, his mother said.

But his wish trip wouldnt be possible today.

Make-A-Wish Greater Virginia has paused travel wishes, and anything else that involves a social gathering due to COVID-19 health concerns. The nonprofit organization, which serves critically ill children throughout the state except for counties and cities surrounding Washington, normally sees that about 80% of its wishes involve travel every year, said CEO Sheri Lambert.

Right now, none of those are being granted. Lambert said that families planning to go on trips have been asked to re-imagine their wishes.

The rest is here:

Make-A-Wish continues to bring kids hope during the pandemic - Roanoke Times

Related Post

Comments are closed.