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Wykoff residents recognized for their service to the livestock industry – Fillmore County Journal

In the 86-year history of the Minnesota Livestock Breeders Association Hall of Fame, there have been three inductees from Wykoff. Hog breeder, Henry A. Derenthal was inducted in 1949, and this past March, Normen and Doris Peterson were inducted for providing exceptional service to the livestock industry.

The Petersons are good and honest people who treat their customers very well, describes Doug Tuman, President, Minnesota Livestock Breeders Association, who has known the couple for years. Normen and Doris strive to please their customers.

The Petersons own and operate Petes Auction and Photo Inc., petesauctionandphoto.com, located on the family farm, Toppy Hill, north of Wykoff. The farm has been in the family for close to 150 years.

Normen Petersons interest in the dairy industry began as a charter member of the local 4-H club, which lead to owning a herd of registered Ayrshires and Holsteins. Petersons first business was fitting cattle for sales and shows, followed by a long career as an auctioneer and a livestock photographer.

Peterson proudly pointed out a painting on the wall of a registered Ayrshire and her triplets. Burton Dairymaid, imported from Scotland, was the national grand champion at the National Dairy Cattle Congress in Waterloo, Iowa, in 1959. In 1960, she was reserve grand champion at the International Dairy Show in Chicago just a few days after having the triplets.

At that time, Peterson (22) was told that he was the youngest farmer to win a national grand champion.

The International Dairy Show was held in December, and due to a snowstorm, the official livestock photographer was not able to get to Chicago. Peterson did not get a professional photo of Dairymaid. They did not have the All-American cow that year because they did not have a picture to submit with the nomination. At that time, there were only three or four livestock photographers in the United States.

Peterson realized there was a need for livestock photographers in the Midwest. Sixty years later, Petersons library contains 45,000 photos of dairy cattle from 25 states and four foreign countries.

Normen Petersons wife of 60 years, Doris, grew up on a Wisconsin dairy farm milking shorthorn cattle.

Doris Peterson self-identifies as the companys support staff. Walking into the office and a few minutes chatting with the two of them, it is clear that support staff is not a 100% accurate description of her role. Doris Peterson manages the office and does the bookwork. In the beginning, she developed the film. Now you will see her setting in front of a computer post-processing digital images and designing auction catalogs.

Her husband spoke up and stated that his wife is also a photographer and takes wedding pictures. There are 1,000 wedding photos in their library representing six states and England.

The most memorable stories are frequently the ones when things dont go as planned, as in the following two stories shared by Sue Krahn, the Petersons employee for the last 40 years.

Krahn explained that she and Normen were headed to a photoshoot in North Dakota. It was not the perfect day to take photos as it was windy, causing the camera and tripod to blow over. After a successful shoot, the duo headed back to Wykoff only to find out that all the photos were lost. Getting back in their vehicle, Peterson and Krahn headed back to North Dakota to retake the pictures.

Lesson number two.

Leaving at four in the morning from California, Normen and Krahn headed back to Wykoff to pick up their gear before heading to Wisconsin for a photoshoot. Arriving at the farm in Wisconsin, the farmer immediately told Normen that he needed to call his wife ASAP. He did and found out he forgot his camera. They hit the road and headed to La Crosse to meet Doris. Turning around, they head back to the farm to take photos. Krahn mentioned that they did not tell the farmer why they had to go back to meet his wife.

Doris Peterson believes that her husbands interest in auctioneering began as a young boy attending farm auctions with family members, listening to the auctioneers chant. Peterson began auctioneering as a young man fine-tuning his talent late at night on the drive home after dates with his wife-to-be. A few years later, he attended the World Wide College of Auctioneering in Mason City, Iowa.

Throughout his career, Peterson managed and auctioneered sales in eight states, including five national breed sales. He is now primarily working as a livestock broker.

As an auctioneer, Peterson has served as the auctioneer for the countys 4-H livestock auction for over 25 years. He has also donated his auctioneer services for area fundraisers, including the ever-popular pie auctions.

Peterson shared that at one local fundraiser, he auctioned off three sour cream and raisin pies selling for $600 each.

The Petersons story is not complete without mentioning their three children Brad (Sherry), Jodie (Bill) Jacobson, and Jana (Joe Lieffring) Peterson Groski. The couple also has four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

In 1993, Brad Peterson joined the family business. Along with his parents, they own Toppy Hill Holsteins and White Crest Ayrshires, winners at county, district, and national dairy cattle shows.

Norman Peterson mentioned that last year four generations of the Peterson family showed at the Fillmore County Fair.

In addition to the prestigious Hall of Fame, the Petersons have been recognized for their service by the Fillmore County American Dairy Association (2001), the Minnesota Holstein Association (2001), Fillmore County 4-H (2008), and the Minnesota Purebred Dairy Cattle Association (2018).

The Hall of Fame nomination highlights the Petersons volunteer service. Normen Peterson served nine years on the Minnesota Holstein board of directors, was a member of the executive committee of the 1989 National Holstein Convention held in Minnesota and chairman of the national sale that year. The couple also assisted with the National Holstein Convention sale when it took place on the stage of the Grand Ole Opry in Nashville, Tenn.

The couple has also served on the Fillmore County Extension Committee. Both are lifetime members of the Wykoff Methodist Church.

Doris Peterson summarizes that the most rewarding part of their business is the friends they have made over the years.

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Wykoff residents recognized for their service to the livestock industry - Fillmore County Journal

Arizona Cardinals 2020 cap hits: Patrick Peterson needs to show he can still be great – Revenge of the Birds

When you look at the 2020 Arizona Cardinals youll see something we havent seen in a while.

Contracts that make sense.

Theres no Terrell Suggs, no Sam Bradford, no Michael Crabtree (at least at this point).

Yet, the contracts are not all good.

Weve looked at Haason Reddick on his rookie deal and also Kenyan Drake on the transition tag.

Both are actually not awful contracts, but they do rank highly on the Cardinals and Drakes is among the highest in the NFL at the running back position.

As an aside, only players on the roster count, so no dead money contracts and we are looking at their 2020 cap hits as given to us by Spotrac.

3. Patrick Peterson - 2020 Cap Hit: $13,184,588

Peterson has the second highest cap hit on the Arizona Cardinals, behind only All Pro Chandler Jones.

Thats why he earns the spot as the third worst cap hit heading into 2020.

Its not the Petersons past performances didnt earn him this contract, its that his current performance has not held him up to the standard of his contract.

Petersons cap hit for 2020 is the ninth highest among corners in the NFL.

Yet, youd be hard pressed to find him among the top 10 corners in the NFL in the league based off 2019.

Thats why 2020 is such a pivotal season for Peterson and the Cardinals.

The team cannot justify paying the talented yet nearly 30 year old corner as a top 5-7 player at his position when he has not played that way.

Peterson can quickly rid himself and the team of those concerns if he comes out and plays well in 2020, but he has to show he still has it over 17 weeks if he wants to cash in one more time.

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Arizona Cardinals 2020 cap hits: Patrick Peterson needs to show he can still be great - Revenge of the Birds

Barbara Palumbo and Kate Peterson Provide Retailer Insights and Tips for The Plumb Club’s July Podcasts – INSTORE MAG

(PRESS RELEASE) NEW YORK Two renowned and well-respected jewelry industry experts have lent their voices and wisdom to The Plumb Clubs July podcast additions. Journalist, writer and media personality Barbara Palumbo and author, retail consultant and sales trainer Kate Peterson have each created powerful informational seminars that have been added to The Plumb Clubs library of retailer educational tools and are available for download.

10 Tips To Strengthen Your Social Media: Barbara Palumbo provides 10 Tips to help retailers strengthen their social media presence and gain traction! Barbara explains why Instagram is The King of social media and how a retailers social media should be looked upon as having an additional salesperson. From consistency, to engagement, to the art of the hashtag, these insights and tips will help retailers boost their social media presence across all platforms.

Barbara Palumbo is a full-time editor, writing about both jewelry and watches on her blogs adornmentality.com and whatsonherwrist.com, as well as for nationally recognized publications. Additionally, she is the host of InStore Magazines The Barb Wire podcast and is a frequent speaker at industry events and trade fairs.

Clicks & Mortar Staying Relevant In Todays Marketplace: Kate Peterson provides insights on how the evolution of consumer behavior has been drastically accelerated and how retailers must be innovative in order to stay relevant. She points out the shifting information balance between the consumer and retailer and provides tips and tools on both where and how to meet and work with this new customer in a way that will exceed their expectation and keep the retailer in the forefront of their market. Peterson is the President and CEO of Performance Concepts Inc., a company that provides innovative and effective consultation and training in the luxury industry.

The Plumb Club podcasts, which are added monthly, provide strategies, knowledge and immediately actionable steps that will help retailers across a variety of business areas. The newest podcasts, as well as the previous ones, are available on The Plumb Club website under the Resources

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Barbara Palumbo and Kate Peterson Provide Retailer Insights and Tips for The Plumb Club's July Podcasts - INSTORE MAG

Peterson: Will more college football dominoes tumble this week? Buckle up. It could be a wild ride. – Des Moines Register

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Everyone wants answers. Everyone wants to know immediately the skinny for college football in the 2020 fall. Whos trying to play a full schedule? Whos scrubbing non-conference opponents? What happens if everyone doesnt test for COVID-19 comparably? Will some football programs whose names we actually recognize, shut it down?

The FCS Ivy League said last week that no football will be played this fall. The FCS Patriot League was expected to do likewise Monday. Could the FCS Missouri Valley, of which Northern Iowa is a member, be on the verge of announcingalterations to its fall football schedule?

I posedsome of those questions early Monday to Iowan Troy Dannen, the newest member of the prestigious NCAA Division-I football oversight committee. Hes been the AD at Northern Iowa. Hes now the AD at Tulane. Hes an up-and-comer in the college football administration world. He knows his stuff.

Iowa State Cyclones tight end Chase Allen (11) carries the American Flag on to the field before their game with the Texas Longhorns at Jack Trice Stadium.(Photo: Reese Strickland, Reese Strickland-USA TODAY Sports)

So what about it?Whats the prognosis for fall football, as weve known it for years and years?

Iowa State is doing its darndest to play,as long as it can continueto keepfootball players and staff as healthy as possible.

While we cannot eliminate all of the risk associated with athletic competition, under current conditions we believe that moving forward with fall sports can be accomplished, athletics director Jamie Pollard wrote in a letter to fans. We understand that the COVID-19 pandemic presents a constantly changing decision-making environment and changing health and safety conditions may not allow sports to proceed.This is why it is so important to discuss and develop contingency plans should the pandemic worsen.

In the last six weeks, our football team and medical staff have proven how we can successfully combat the COVID-19 virus if we collectively commit to the necessary precautions.

Since the football team returned to campus in early June for voluntary workouts, we have recorded just three positive cases among 160 football players and staff.

Thats great news. Updates are important. All Power Five conferences should be on the same page or at least reading from the same book. Are all Power Fives testing the same, for example?

How many positive tests equal no game? What happens if someone needs a last-minute opponent replacement, whos in charge?

In a crisis where there is no captain, its every man for himself, Dannen told the Des Moines Register. And basically, thats where were at. Theres five captains the five commissioners.

Tulane athletics director Troy Dannen(Photo: Tulane athletics department)

Hes referring, of course, to the NCAA assuming no leadership in college football. Hes talking about the commissioners of the five major conferencesthe ACC, Big 12, Big Ten, Pac-12 and SEC having their own rules, doing what they want, and like last week, possibly even surprisingtheir peers.

Thats what happened when the Big Ten declared it would play conference football games only, and the Pac-12 followed.

Big 12 Conference commissioner Bob Bowlsby last week told Dennis Dodd of CBSSports.com that its a little early to be making a decision like that.

"We need to do what our doctors and our scientists are telling us, which is move slowly ahead and constantly reevaluate," Bowlsby told CBS after the Big Ten announcement. "The virus is going to decide whether we're ready and able to play."

Conference-only announcements led to a public relations fiasco, people wanting to know why the other Power Five conferenceswerent immediately doing likewise. If its right for the Big Ten and Pac-12 to dramatically shorten schedules, why isnt it right for the others?

No ones in charge, thats why.

Now, its hard to tell what anybodys going to do, Dannen said.

I reached Dannen before he started a round of radio interviews. Hes the new guy at the committee table. And second Iowan, for those keeping score. The other is Mountain West deputy commissioner Bret Gilliland (an Iowa State grad) from Adel.

Everybody wants decisions, but my thought is we have to wait until we get the most information, Dannen said. Even if things seem inevitable, prudence demands you wait as long as you can to make decisions. Get all the available information.

A rainbow lights up the sky during a lightning delay at the Cy-Hawk football game at Jack Trice Stadium on Saturday, Sept. 14, 2019, in Ames. With the Big Ten playing only conference games for the college football 2020 season, the rivalry game between the Hawkeyes and the Cyclones will not happen.(Photo: Brian Powers/The Register)

SEC administrators were expected to meet Monday. Big 12 athletics directors meet Tuesday. Both were planned before the Big Ten/Pac-12 announcements. All conferences have discussed schedules ranging from uninterrupted (long shot) to conference games only (more likely). Theyve talked either formally or informally about moving the 2020 fall football season to the 2021 spring.

There are no guarantees that well be virus-free in the spring, said Dannen, emphasizing that hes speaking for himself and not the committee. All of a sudden will it be fixed? Maybe.

Hopefully.

Theres adverse implications for the fall of 2021 season by adding games to the spring 2021 season, Dannen said. Could it happen? Sure, but a lot more discussion is warranted.

Dannen stressed more than once that hes giving his own opinion, and not the opinion of the committee.

It could be interesting this week, Dannen, of Marshalltown, said. Much like last week, we didnt have expectations. Nobody knows whats going to happen this week.

Tighten your seat belt. It could be a wild ride.

Iowa State columnist Randy Peterson has been writingfor the Des Moines Register for parts of sixdecades. Reach him at rpeterson@dmreg.com, 515-284-8132, and on Twitter at @RandyPete. No one covers the Cyclones like the Register. Subscribe today at DesMoinesRegister.com/Deal to make sure you never miss a moment.

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Peterson: Will more college football dominoes tumble this week? Buckle up. It could be a wild ride. - Des Moines Register

Everyday People: Former band director finds passion in painting – Daily Astorian

As he wandered around the art galleries of Jackson Hole, Wyoming, Edward Peterson found himself admiring the work of a young painter named Carrie Wild. She was painting bison.

Curious, he stopped to talk. He would have never guessed that a year later hed return with his own bison paintings for a solo exhibition at Wilds gallery, Gallery Wild.

Edward Peterson stands with one of his acrylic paintings.

An art career was a new beginning for Peterson after 38 years as Snohomish High Schools celebrated band director.

His exhibition has become one of the fondest moments of his life.It still, you know, brings tears to my eyes, said Peterson, whosework is displayed at Tempo Gallery in Astoria. You couldve painted your whole life and be really good, and never get an opportunity like that.

At 88, hes been painting for nine years.Clocking 12 hours a day, seven days a week at the easel, he attributes his success to practice.

Every painting has tremendous failures, and then finally, it works, he said. He likened the experience to amarriage; you disagree and scrap ideas, but you always end up still madly in love.

Although his art career seemed to have been by accident, Peterson is sure this part of his life is meant to be. Thats how he felt about being a band director, too.

In an adventurous time conducting the Panther Band at Snohomish High School southeast of Everett, Washington, he took his students to play concerts around the world.

Among the highlights, the band played the Montreux Jazz Festival in Switzerland in 1971, the same year as Aretha Franklin. They played for President Ronald Reagan in 1985. Three years later, they were invited to perform a concert on the Great Wall of China.

The band won Washington state championships in 1979, 1989, 1991 and 1992.

Edward Peterson's most recent bison painting.

I look back at that very honestly and I wonder how on earth did all of that really happen? And why did it happen? he said. I gave it everything I had, and thats the same thing that translates into my art. Its the best thing I can do.

For all the accolades the Panther Band earned during his run Peterson is in the Snohomish High School Hall of Fame he feels that part of his life was more about his students.

I got a lot of nice compliments and all that stuff with the bands and choirs I had.You know, it was always the kids, not me," he said. "With painting it was me, and its really been difficult for me to accept compliments.

Now, Peterson finds the most important thing in life is to look forward and be himself. His art career has given him a new level of confidence.

Through the Tempo Gallery, he has met local artists he has a great appreciation for, as well as other people he has encountered in Astoria.

Being in my 80s is the first time in my life that Ive been comfortable in my own skin. I always thought I had to be something better, or I was inferior to, he said.

Ive learned to be happy with me. I wish Id learned that a long time ago.

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Everyday People: Former band director finds passion in painting - Daily Astorian

Peterson: Matt Campbell compares Breece Halls running back skill to David Montgomery and Kareem Hunt – Ames Tribune

Someone asked me from which Iowa State football player (besides quarterback Brock Purdy) I expect big things during the 2020 season. Only one choice was allowed.

No question. Breece Hall.

The sophomore running back has the potential to be the most exciting non-quarterback on a Cyclones team that has the firepower to legitimately contend for the Big 12 Conference championship game, assuming there is one.

In essentially just eight games last season, Hall rushed for 897 yards on 186 carries. Breaking that down, the true freshman averaged 21.0 yards in the first four games, and 101.6 yards during the final eight.

Now that hes figured out college life and big-time football, hell get a full dose of whatever the schedule permits. The acclimation process of being a true freshman is over.

Breece is maybe one of the most gifted, true running backs that Ive had the opportunity to be around, coach Matt Campbell said last week. Hes got very similar qualities, as far as skills, to David Montgomery and Kareem Hunt.

Montgomery, who dazzled ISU fans with 2,925 yards during three seasons between 2016-18, is the starter for the Chicago Bears. Hunt, who Campbell coached at Toledo, plays for the Cleveland Browns.

What allowed Breece to take a step forward was maturity, Campbell said. Its hard as a true freshman to step on campus and know what the expectations and standards to live by day-in and day-out are.

As he matured through the season with those expectations, that God-given ability he had really started to show through.

He made a huge impact the second half of the season. Hes got a bright future.

Hall has star quality right now. His first game of major action resulted in 132 rushing yards on 26 carries against West Virginia. He followed that with 19 carries for 183 yards a week later against Texas Tech.

I wasnt playing as much, and I really had to learn the consistency of working hard all the time, practicing hard, and then managing that with school, Hall told reporters in January. Once I did that, I got my chance. I took off with it, and everybody was behind me.

No longer could defenses load up against Purdys passing and shifty running moves. So much for double-teaming All-American tight end Charlie Kolar.

Breece did a great job from that West Virginia game on, Purdy said. All of our running backs are amazing. In that West Virginia game, it gave us that extra firepower from the offense that we needed.

No longer did Purdy feel pressured to make a big play. He had a game-changer hanging out with him the backfield.

Being able to trust Breece making plays was awesome, Purdy said.

Hall is the star of a running backs room that will rival anyones in the Big 12. Jirehl Brock also played as a true freshman. Kene Nwangwu and Johnnie Lang have a combined 158 carries and 727 yards. Redshirt junior Rory Walling has been impressive, too.

Running back is one of the most impressive positions coming back here, Campbell said. Those five guys have come back really impressive. Thats a high positive for Iowa State football right now.

Starring Hall, the highest of the highs.

Great players want greatness, Campbell said. One of the things I love about Breece is that hes a young man thats trending toward becoming a great player.

I was really proud of his off-the-field habits this winter, and the shape that hes come back in, and the mentality that he approached this summer.

You can tell that hes driven to take the next step.

Iowa State columnist Randy Peterson has been writing for the Des Moines Register for parts of six decades.

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Peterson: Matt Campbell compares Breece Halls running back skill to David Montgomery and Kareem Hunt - Ames Tribune

Judge blocks first federal execution in 17 years after victims’ family raises concerns over virus – CBS News

A judge on Friday blocked what would have been the first federal execution in 17 years after a petition from the victim's family asked the court to consider their risk to COVID-19 by traveling to attend the execution.

Daniel Lewis Lee, a former white supremacist who robbed and murdered a family of three, including their 8-year-old daughter, was scheduled to be executed on Monday. But now his death sentence has been put on hold after the court granted a preliminary injunction from the family of Lee's victims.

Earlene Peterson lost her daughter Nancy Mueller, and her granddaughter, Sarah Powell, in the crime for which Lee was convicted. She, along with her surviving daughter and granddaughter, filed a petition with the court, explaining that traveling across the country during the pandemic to attend the execution would put them at risk of contracting the coronavirus.

Chief Judge Jane Magnus-Stinson, of the Southern District of Indiana, halted the execution, writing that going forward could irreparably harm Peterson. "The harm to Ms. Peterson ... is being forced to choose whether being present for the execution of a man responsible for the death of her daughter and granddaughter is worth defying her doctor's orders and risking her own life," the judge wrote.

As of Friday, the facility where the execution will take place, U.S. Penitentiary Terre Haute, has four inmates who are currently positive for the coronavirus, according to the Bureau of Prisons.

The court's order says a new date for Lee's execution will be set when the Bureau of Prisons can show "reasonable consideration" for Peterson and her family's right to be present at the execution. But late Friday, the Department of Justice appealed the decision and has asked the court to stay its decision pending a ruling from the 7th Circuit.

Peterson, a supporter of President Trump, has been a vocal advocate against the execution of her daughter's killer and has even asked that Mr. Trump commute Lee's sentence to life without parole.

Attorney General William Barr announced he had directed the Bureau of Prisons to restart the enforcement of the death penalty last July. "The Justice Department upholds the rule of law and we owe it to the victims and their families to carry forward the sentence imposed by our justice system," Barr said in a statement at the time.

But as one of those families, Peterson said this has never been what she wanted. "Yes, Daniel Lee damaged my life, but I can't believe taking his life is going to change any of that," Peterson said in avideo statement in September. "I can't see how executing Daniel Lee will honor my daughter in any way. In fact, it kinda, like, dirties her name because she wouldn't want it and I don't want it. That's not the way it should be."

Peterson and her family are not alone in their belief that Lee was improperly sentenced. In 2014, the federal judge who oversaw Lee's trial and the lead prosecutor on the case, wrote separately to then-Attorney General Eric Holder arguing the disparity in Lee's sentence compared to that of his co-defendant.

Lee's co-defendant, Chevie Kehoe, was the mastermind behind the crime and evidence at their joint trial showed he was the one who murdered 8-year-old Sarah Powell after Lee had refused to do so. However, Kehoe was not sentenced to death, a dichotomy that advocates attribute to Kehoe appearing more "clean-cut" at trial, while Lee, who lost an eye in a fight and has a triskelion tattooed on his neck, looked more "like an outlaw."

Lee's execution was not the only one set to take place this summer. Three other men on death row are still scheduled to be executed by lethal injection, two of which are still planned for next week.

Wesley Ira Purkey, who was convicted in 2003 for the rape and murder of a 16-year-old girl, and the violent death of an 80-year-old woman, will be executed on Wednesday. His spiritual advisor of 11 years, Reverend Seigen Hartkemeyer, a 68-year-old Buddhist priest, has filed a similar lawsuit to Peterson's, arguing that he would be at risk of COVID-19 if he attends the execution.

"Rev. Hartkemeyer must decide whether to risk his own life in order to exercise his religious obligation to be present for Mr. Purkey's execution," the lawsuit argues. No ruling has been made yet in this case.

In December, the Supreme Court temporarily blocked the Trump administration's initial attempt to resume the death penalty after a lower court found the execution method may have violated the Federal Death Penalty Act. But in June, the court cleared the way for the executions to go forward after they denied hearing a last-ditch petition brought by four inmates who aimed to block the use of a new protocol used in their executions.

Earlier this month, more than a thousand faith leaders signed a statement calling on Mr. Trump and the attorney general to halt the executions. "As our country grapples with the COVID 19 pandemic, an economic crisis, and systemic racism in the criminal legal system, we should be focused on protecting and preserving life, not carrying out executions," their statement said.

According to the Death Penalty Information Center, there are 62 federal prisoners currently awaiting execution on death row.

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Judge blocks first federal execution in 17 years after victims' family raises concerns over virus - CBS News

Peterson, Catherine M. – Press of Atlantic City

Peterson, Catherine M., - 73, of Villas, passed away suddenly on Thursday, July 9, 2020. Catherine was born in Philadelphia to the late Elvin Minnich and Regina Lee Pettit Minnich and was an area resident for many years. She was a graduate of Lower Township High School and worked for Jamesway Corporation in North Cape May and also for Snows Canning in Lower Township for 18 years. Catherine is survived by her loving husband, of 26 years, Bruce Peterson, her 4 children John Evanson, Collette Veditz, Regina DeGraw and Jerry Jorgenson, Jr., 6 Grandchildren, 8 Great Grandchildren, her brother Elvin Minnich and her fur babies Carmella and Dabella. A funeral service will be held on Wednesday, July 15 at 6 pm at Evoy Funeral Home, 3218 Bayshore Rd., North Cape May, following visitation from 4 pm to 6 pm. Contributions can be made in Catherine's memory to the Animal Humane Society of your choice. Condolences can be shared at http://www.EvoyFuneralHome.com.

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Peterson, Catherine M. - Press of Atlantic City

Peterson: Unique perspectives of Big Ten’s non-conference football decision that engulfs Cy-Hawk – Des Moines Register

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First went the Iowa State Fair. Thursday, coronavirus claimed another of our State of Iowa staples:

The 2020 Cy-Hawk football game.

Talk about a one-two punch to the gut, said Dan McCarney, who has one of the most unique perspectives of the rivalry game thats been played annually since 1977. Those are fabrics of the State of Iowa. Even non-football fans look toward that special Saturday every season, that special fall tradition of the Iowa-Iowa State football game. Itll be a real void, not having it this year.

McCarney, who coached 25 of those games either as the Cyclones head coach or a Hawkeye assistant, was one of three insiders weighing in on Friday, a day after the Big Ten Conference proclaimed that its 14 teams would play conference games only. See ya, for now, anyway, Cy vs. Hawk.

It is certainly a sad time for our country and for college athletics, said Big 12 Conference commissioner Bob Bowlsby, who also has a one-of-a-kind tie to what was announced Thursday.

From the coach to the commissioner and finally, to the longtime radio broadcaster, losing Cyclones vs. Hawkeyes for this fall means something different.

Already, the Ivy League said no fall sports will be played. Voluntary football workouts have shut down temporarily at a number of schools, due to outbreaks of COVID-19, and then came Thursdays announcement:

No Big Ten non-conference games this fall. No Sept. 12 Cy-Hawk in Iowa City. No Sept. 5 Northern Iowa at Iowa.

These games are highly anticipated and substantial economic drivers for the schools and the communities, Bowlsby wrote in an email to The Register. The games never disappoint; they are typically closer than anticipated, and lots of fun under any circumstances.

Bob Bowlsby, left, outgoing University of Iowa athletic director, congratulates his replacement and longtime friend, Gary Barta, after a news conference Friday, June 23, 2006, in Iowa City, Iowa, where Barta was named Bowlsby's replacement.(Photo: Register file photo)

Bowlsby knows more about our in-state rivalries than most. Hes a former Northern Iowa athletics director. Hes a former athletics director at Iowa. From financial to fun-loving, he understands the ramifications the Big Tens decision has on our state.

Northern Iowa, for example, stood to make $650,000 to play at Iowa. Thats big bucks for any athletics department, especially an FCS department that relies on big non-conference game revenues to help pay the bills. Already some financially-strapped schools have cut sports. More could follow, as everyone is bracing for a financial hit.

The Cy-Hawk game, which rotates annually between Ames and Iowa City, brings millions of dollars into communities. Hotels from miles around the stadiums are filled. As many fans party in parking lots, as ticket-owning people actually watch from inside. Independent street-side vendors will suffer financially. Restaurants will be empty. Bars, too. Radio advertisers. Television advertisers. Everyone suffers.

Having been involved in many of the (Cy-Hawk and UNI-Iowa) games, I feel bad for the players and coaches who will not have the fun of the competition, Bowlsby said. I feel bad for all of the fans, both in-stadium and those consuming by radio or television."

**

I feel absolutely horrible for the seniors, McCarney, an Iowa City native and former Hawkeye player, said. Memories of careers are easy to forget after time, but I guarantee you that every senior knows what happened the last time he played in the Cy-Hawk game. I feel like I missed a lot never having played in the game. A lot.

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McCarneys unique view of this game was from the sidelines as an Iowa assistant coach between 1977-1989, and as Iowa States head coach while leading the Cyclones to five bowl games between 1995 and 2005. His playing days included the rivalrys interruption. His head coaching days included leading the Cyclones to one of the biggest upsets in school history.

Iowa State lost 15 games against Iowa in a row when McCarney took his four-touchdown underdog squad to Iowa City in 1998. Hed not beaten the school for whom he played and coached. Hayden Fry, on the other sidelines, hadnt lost against the Cyclones anywhere since 1982.

That 27-9 Iowa State win was something for the ages, indeed.

Ill never forget the look on the seniors faces, McCarney said. Theyd finally beaten Iowa.

And to you who say Iowa didnt take the game as seriously as Iowa State? Bunk.

Hayden, God bless him, was all about the Iowa-Iowa State game, McCarney recalled. In staff meetings during that week, hes always say something about players not looking focused in practice, the position coaches not coaching them well enough, and motivational things like that. Hed never mention names. We nudged each other under the table, wondering which coach he was talking about? Was it me, was it Kirk (Ferentz), (Bill) Snyder, Barry (Alvarez), Donnie Patterson? We never knew which one he was actually talking about, which made us make sure we worked harder the next day.

**

So Dolph, what do you now have planned for Sept. 12?

Wanna play golf? he asked Friday. Im in my 49th year of broadcasting, and Ive never had a stretch of three weeks in a row off during a football season.

None of us who for decades have set our fall schedules around college football in the fall have.

Theres just so many unknowns, said Dolphin, who just happened to be golfing in Iowa City during our conversation. Look at the lost revenue, not only from the schools standpoint, but also the hotels and restaurants and the advertising. Devastating.

**

Our college football fall wasnt going to feel the same, anyway, but no Cy-Hawk?

It was a prudent decision.It was expected that some conferences would skip the non-conference portions of schedules. Other conferences may even follow, including the Big 12.

That doesnt lessen the blow for Iowans who have planned weddings and funerals around the Iowa State-Iowa football games.

As Dolphin said:

Its a punch to the belly-button.

Iowa State columnist Randy Peterson has been writingfor the Des Moines Register for parts of sixdecades. Reach him at rpeterson@dmreg.com, 515-284-8132, and on Twitter at @RandyPete. No one covers the Cyclones like the Register. Subscribe today at DesMoinesRegister.com/Deal to make sure you never miss a moment.

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Peterson: Unique perspectives of Big Ten's non-conference football decision that engulfs Cy-Hawk - Des Moines Register

Man accused of murder after body found at homeless camp in Mead – The Spokesman-Review

Deputies have arrested a man on suspicion of murdering another man at a homeless camp in Mead.

The Spokane County Sheriffs Office said deputies responded to the camp in the 2300 block of East Farwell Road near Northwood Middle School and the Newport Highway at about 10:40 p.m. Saturday.

According to the sheriffs office, the caller, Robert J. Tolliver, 37, said he had discovered his friend was deceased, then waited at the roadway and walked deputies and firefighters to the camp.

There, deputies found a man lying partially on a couch inside a tent with significant head trauma, according to court records.

The victim was identified in court records as 41-year-old James H. Peterson, who had lived at the camp for about 10 months.

A witness told deputies that Peterson and Tolliver had been fighting recently because Petersons bike had gone missing.

Another witness told deputies Tolliver texted her multiple times Saturday, saying he had an emergency and needed help.

According to court records, Tolliver told the witness he and a friend had gone to Petersons camp to look for stolen bike parts. Tolliver told the witness he left the friend at Petersons camp after Tolliver found his missing bike parts.

Tolliver claimed his friend contacted him hours later, saying things had gotten out of hand and Peterson was dead, the witness told deputies.

Tolliver repeatedly told the witness, Youre my alibi, on Saturday night, according to court records. Tolliver also sent the witness a video in which he threatened to cut off Petersons thumb, according to court records.

Tolliver was arrested Sunday afternoon. In an interview, he allegedly told deputies he had been in a fight with Peterson over the stolen bike parts several months prior but had not been to Petersons camp in several months. Tolliver said he had planned to confront Peterson but backed out.

Tolliver was jailed in lieu of a $500,000 bond and faces a charge of first-degree murder. Petersons death remains under investigation. The sheriffs office said anyone with information should call Crime Check at (509) 456-2233 with the reference number 10086228.

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Man accused of murder after body found at homeless camp in Mead - The Spokesman-Review

Peterson: No matter the obstacles and unknowns, Matt Campbell says his Cyclones will be ready – Des Moines Register

Iowa State Cyclones head coach Matt Campbell runs out with teammates prior to the game against the Notre Dame Fighting Irish at Camping World Stadium.(Photo: Kim Klement/USA TODAY Sports)

Matt Campbell isnt a huge fan of playing a college football season during the spring. His brand of football starts in late August or early the first week of September. It ends in December or January.

Hes a coach, and a darn good one. Campbell willadapt to whatpeople trying to combat the coronavirus mandate because he has to.

But unlike in past years, coaches aren't in charge of college football. The virus is in charge.

If its starting what could be a very good Iowa State season Sept. 5 against South Dakota at Jack Trice Stadium, thats super. If its starting later? Thats all right, too. Conference games only? CommissionerBob Bowlsby simply responded"No," when asked Thursday if an announcement would be coming soon.

No Cy vs. Hawk? No problem. This season, whenever it starts, is about adapting. It's not about tradition.

You just stay ready, Campbell told reporters Thursday. Anywhere, anytime, anyplace has always been our motto, anyways.

Whatever comes our way, well be able to handle it. Whether thats Sept. 5, whether thats in the winter, or whether thats in the spring of 2021 our kids want to play football. Our kids want to have the opportunity to get on the football field and play. I know well be ready for that.

Iowa State quarterback Brock Purdy (15) passes to a teammate during the first half of an NCAA college football game against Kansas State in Manhattan, Kan., Saturday, Nov. 30, 2019. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)(Photo: Orlin Wagner, AP)

When, however, is a gigantic question. The Ivy League announced Wednesday that it will not sponsor any fall sports. Many programs have been temporarily shut down because of positive COVID-19 tests.

Coaches, like Campbell, are doing their best to keep players minds on what they can control.Wearing masks. Staying away from social gatherings. Hunkering down in apartments when not at the football facility. Staying away from people you dont know.

Maybe itll pay off with some semblance of a season that starts in around Labor Day. Maybe. Its a topic thats been discussed everywhere the past few months. Now its even in the locker room.

As a player, you question with all this work that were putting in now, is it going to be worth it down the road? quarterback Brock Purdy wondered. Are we going to have a season? Its real. Its a real question, to be honest, that the whole team has.

College teams are working toward a normal start. What happens after thatis one of the great unknowns. Campbell spoke with reporters, by the way, before the news swirled Thursday about the Big Ten playing only conference games, which means no Cy-Hawk game for 2020.

We cant control whats going on outside, Campbell said during his first extensive interview in a while. We cant control what we dont know. What we can control is whats going on in our bubble.

You can get so caught up in everything else thats going on outside of our walls, that you can deviate from where you need to be. Where we all need to be right now is to stay ready, and prepare our young people.

Iowa State freshman running back Breece Hall breaks a tackle in the second quarter against Kansas on Saturday, Nov. 23, 2019, at Jack Trice Stadium in Ames.(Photo: Bryon Houlgrave/The Register)

Just four people associated with the Iowa State football program have tested positive for COVID-19, according to a letter to fans from athletics director Jamie Pollard two weeks ago. Thats far fewer than many other Big 12 programs. All are back with the program, Campbell said.

It started with a great medical plan. It included sacrifice by players.

Those are life choices where the 21 or 22 hours (players) are not in the facility that theyre going to have to make, Campbell said. Its really easy to say that, but its hard to do that.

Were dealing with 18- to 22-year-old young people that are continuing to grow. Were continuing to educate them on what its going to take to be able to train and continue to prepare for our football season. Our kids so far have done a great job investing.

They're giving up a lot of personal sacrifice for the betterment of the whole, but they've done a great job, and I'm really proud of them.

Some players will test positive during the season, regardless of how well programs mitigate risk. Some scheduled games wont be played. Some teams may play 12 regular-season games, and some might play only conference opponents.

Theres no book for this, Campbell said.

He knows that he cant keep star players, like Purdy, in bubble wrap between now and whenever what would be his junior season ends.

We play a sport where injuries do occur, Campbell said. All 105 players are critical to your success, because you never know when your number is going to get called. That's how we built our program. And it's going to be really critical to our success going forward, whether were dealing with a virus that could hold a player out a week or two weeks, or whether you're dealing with an injury.

Purdy summed up best, the great unknowns:

The only thing we can control is whats in front of us. Whatever the calls going to be as far as having the season now, or in the spring or if were not going to have one thatll come.

To be honest, if we freak out about it right now, thats not going to do us any good.

Iowa State columnist Randy Peterson has been writingfor the Des Moines Register for parts of sixdecades. Reach him at rpeterson@dmreg.com, 515-284-8132, and on Twitter at @RandyPete. No one covers the Cyclones like the Register. Subscribe today at DesMoinesRegister.com/Deal to make sure you never miss a moment.

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Peterson: No matter the obstacles and unknowns, Matt Campbell says his Cyclones will be ready - Des Moines Register

Robin Yvonne Ingbretson Peterson | Obituaries – Ashland Daily Press

Robin Yvonne Ingbretson Peterson, 61, who resided in Manning, South Carolina, passed away at home with loved ones by her side on June 13, 2020, in Manning.

Robin Peterson was born April 5, 1959, in Shell Lake to Bernard and Barbra Ingbretson. She grew up in Hayward. She was a bartender by trade and worked at several establishments through the years. She enjoyed cooking and loved having her grandkids help. She also enjoyed computers, puzzles and reading.

She is survived by her husband, Gary Peterson, of Manning; children, Bridget (Travis) Wisner of Baraboo, Wisconsin, Nicole (Ben) Boaz of Manning, and Brooke Peterson (Brandon) Petty of Columbia, South Carolina; nine grandchildren; her mother, Barbara Bjorklund of Wisconsin; sisters, Barbara McNemer of Arizona and Peggy Ingbretson of Wisconsin; and brother, Pete Ingbretson of Oregon.

Per Robins wishes she was cremated and there will be no services. A private family

gathering will be held later this summer in Wisconsin.

She will be dearly missed but never forgotten.

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Robin Yvonne Ingbretson Peterson | Obituaries - Ashland Daily Press

Arizona Cardinals 2020 cap hits: Patrick Peterson needs to show he can still be great – Revenge of the Birds

When you look at the 2020 Arizona Cardinals youll see something we havent seen in a while.

Contracts that make sense.

Theres no Terrell Suggs, no Sam Bradford, no Michael Crabtree (at least at this point).

Yet, the contracts are not all good.

Weve looked at Haason Reddick on his rookie deal and also Kenyan Drake on the transition tag.

Both are actually not awful contracts, but they do rank highly on the Cardinals and Drakes is among the highest in the NFL at the running back position.

As an aside, only players on the roster count, so no dead money contracts and we are looking at their 2020 cap hits as given to us by Spotrac.

3. Patrick Peterson - 2020 Cap Hit: $13,184,588

Peterson has the second highest cap hit on the Arizona Cardinals, behind only All Pro Chandler Jones.

Thats why he earns the spot as the third worst cap hit heading into 2020.

Its not the Petersons past performances didnt earn him this contract, its that his current performance has not held him up to the standard of his contract.

Petersons cap hit for 2020 is the ninth highest among corners in the NFL.

Yet, youd be hard pressed to find him among the top 10 corners in the NFL in the league based off 2019.

Thats why 2020 is such a pivotal season for Peterson and the Cardinals.

The team cannot justify paying the talented yet nearly 30 year old corner as a top 5-7 player at his position when he has not played that way.

Peterson can quickly rid himself and the team of those concerns if he comes out and plays well in 2020, but he has to show he still has it over 17 weeks if he wants to cash in one more time.

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Arizona Cardinals 2020 cap hits: Patrick Peterson needs to show he can still be great - Revenge of the Birds

Peterson: Matt Campbell compares Breece Halls running back skill to David Montgomery and Kareem Hunt – Ames Tribune

Someone asked me from which Iowa State football player (besides quarterback Brock Purdy) I expect big things during the 2020 season. Only one choice was allowed.

No question. Breece Hall.

The sophomore running back has the potential to be the most exciting non-quarterback on a Cyclones team that has the firepower to legitimately contend for the Big 12 Conference championship game, assuming there is one.

In essentially just eight games last season, Hall rushed for 897 yards on 186 carries. Breaking that down, the true freshman averaged 21.0 yards in the first four games, and 101.6 yards during the final eight.

Now that hes figured out college life and big-time football, hell get a full dose of whatever the schedule permits. The acclimation process of being a true freshman is over.

Breece is maybe one of the most gifted, true running backs that Ive had the opportunity to be around, coach Matt Campbell said last week. Hes got very similar qualities, as far as skills, to David Montgomery and Kareem Hunt.

Montgomery, who dazzled ISU fans with 2,925 yards during three seasons between 2016-18, is the starter for the Chicago Bears. Hunt, who Campbell coached at Toledo, plays for the Cleveland Browns.

What allowed Breece to take a step forward was maturity, Campbell said. Its hard as a true freshman to step on campus and know what the expectations and standards to live by day-in and day-out are.

As he matured through the season with those expectations, that God-given ability he had really started to show through.

He made a huge impact the second half of the season. Hes got a bright future.

Hall has star quality right now. His first game of major action resulted in 132 rushing yards on 26 carries against West Virginia. He followed that with 19 carries for 183 yards a week later against Texas Tech.

I wasnt playing as much, and I really had to learn the consistency of working hard all the time, practicing hard, and then managing that with school, Hall told reporters in January. Once I did that, I got my chance. I took off with it, and everybody was behind me.

No longer could defenses load up against Purdys passing and shifty running moves. So much for double-teaming All-American tight end Charlie Kolar.

Breece did a great job from that West Virginia game on, Purdy said. All of our running backs are amazing. In that West Virginia game, it gave us that extra firepower from the offense that we needed.

No longer did Purdy feel pressured to make a big play. He had a game-changer hanging out with him the backfield.

Being able to trust Breece making plays was awesome, Purdy said.

Hall is the star of a running backs room that will rival anyones in the Big 12. Jirehl Brock also played as a true freshman. Kene Nwangwu and Johnnie Lang have a combined 158 carries and 727 yards. Redshirt junior Rory Walling has been impressive, too.

Running back is one of the most impressive positions coming back here, Campbell said. Those five guys have come back really impressive. Thats a high positive for Iowa State football right now.

Starring Hall, the highest of the highs.

Great players want greatness, Campbell said. One of the things I love about Breece is that hes a young man thats trending toward becoming a great player.

I was really proud of his off-the-field habits this winter, and the shape that hes come back in, and the mentality that he approached this summer.

You can tell that hes driven to take the next step.

Iowa State columnist Randy Peterson has been writing for the Des Moines Register for parts of six decades.

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Peterson: Matt Campbell compares Breece Halls running back skill to David Montgomery and Kareem Hunt - Ames Tribune

Peterson, Catherine M. – Press of Atlantic City

Peterson, Catherine M., - 73, of Villas, passed away suddenly on Thursday, July 9, 2020. Catherine was born in Philadelphia to the late Elvin Minnich and Regina Lee Pettit Minnich and was an area resident for many years. She was a graduate of Lower Township High School and worked for Jamesway Corporation in North Cape May and also for Snows Canning in Lower Township for 18 years. Catherine is survived by her loving husband, of 26 years, Bruce Peterson, her 4 children John Evanson, Collette Veditz, Regina DeGraw and Jerry Jorgenson, Jr., 6 Grandchildren, 8 Great Grandchildren, her brother Elvin Minnich and her fur babies Carmella and Dabella. A funeral service will be held on Wednesday, July 15 at 6 pm at Evoy Funeral Home, 3218 Bayshore Rd., North Cape May, following visitation from 4 pm to 6 pm. Contributions can be made in Catherine's memory to the Animal Humane Society of your choice. Condolences can be shared at http://www.EvoyFuneralHome.com.

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Peterson, Catherine M. - Press of Atlantic City

Adrian Peterson says NFL running back pay is ‘disrespectful,’ but thinks ‘a change is going to come’ – CBS Sports

If there's one thing we have learned over the past few years, it's that you should think twice before resetting the running back market. Devonta Freeman and Todd Gurley didn't live up to their big extensions, and holdouts byLe'Veon Bell and Melvin Gordon'sdid not bring forth the results they were hoping for. Adrian Peterson of the Washington Redskins has been one of those rare exceptions when it comes to durability as a running back, however, as the future Pro Football Hall of Famer is entering season No. 14 and still making major contributions on the field. This week, Peterson was asked by TMZ why running backs aren't valued as highly as other positions such as quarterback, and Peterson responded saying he still hasn't been able to figure it out.

"I still haven't been able to answer that question, man," said Peterson. "It's disrespectful to be honest with you, it really is. But I think a change is going to come, I think this young core of guy and you know me and Frank Gore continue to show guys, 'Hey, we are valuable. We can have 10, 14-year careers as well, so value us as well like you would value a quarterback.'"

While the NFL is considered more of a passing league now, the top rushing team (Baltimore Ravens) finished with the best regular-season record in 2019, and the No. 2 rushing team (San Francisco 49ers) made it all the way to the the Super Bowl. The third best rushing offense in the Tennessee Titansmade it to the AFC Championship game, as Derrick Henry quite literally carried his team through the postseason. Henry received the franchise tag earlier this offseason, but is still hopeful he will be able to secure an extension in the coming months.

Peterson is hopeful for the future of the running back position because of young talented players like Henry and Christian McCaffrey of the Carolina Panthers. In April, the Panthersreset the running back marketby signing McCaffrey to a four-year deal worth $16 million per season. It was hard to challenge the Panthers on this decision, since McCaffrey has recorded two straight 1,000-yard rushing seasons to go along with two straight 100-catch performances, totaling nearly 2,400 total yards and 19 touchdowns in 2019.

"This young core of backs are really changing the game for the better," said Peterson. "You look at McCaffrey and all he was able to do. So I feel like you're going to continue to get guys like that that are going to help raise the value of the running back position."

Not everyone can have a stellar career like Peterson has had. He is currently No. 5 on the all-time rushing list. It's pretty incredible that he was able to record a 1,000-yard rushing season at the age of 33 and thinks he can play until he's 39 or so. It will be interesting to see if players like Henry and McCaffrey can change the narrative when it comes to paying running backs in the future. Peterson certainly thinks they can.

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Adrian Peterson says NFL running back pay is 'disrespectful,' but thinks 'a change is going to come' - CBS Sports

Peterson: Unique perspectives of Big Ten’s non-conference football decision that engulfs Cy-Hawk – Des Moines Register

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First went the Iowa State Fair. Thursday, coronavirus claimed another of our State of Iowa staples:

The 2020 Cy-Hawk football game.

Talk about a one-two punch to the gut, said Dan McCarney, who has one of the most unique perspectives of the rivalry game thats been played annually since 1977. Those are fabrics of the State of Iowa. Even non-football fans look toward that special Saturday every season, that special fall tradition of the Iowa-Iowa State football game. Itll be a real void, not having it this year.

McCarney, who coached 25 of those games either as the Cyclones head coach or a Hawkeye assistant, was one of three insiders weighing in on Friday, a day after the Big Ten Conference proclaimed that its 14 teams would play conference games only. See ya, for now, anyway, Cy vs. Hawk.

It is certainly a sad time for our country and for college athletics, said Big 12 Conference commissioner Bob Bowlsby, who also has a one-of-a-kind tie to what was announced Thursday.

From the coach to the commissioner and finally, to the longtime radio broadcaster, losing Cyclones vs. Hawkeyes for this fall means something different.

Already, the Ivy League said no fall sports will be played. Voluntary football workouts have shut down temporarily at a number of schools, due to outbreaks of COVID-19, and then came Thursdays announcement:

No Big Ten non-conference games this fall. No Sept. 12 Cy-Hawk in Iowa City. No Sept. 5 Northern Iowa at Iowa.

These games are highly anticipated and substantial economic drivers for the schools and the communities, Bowlsby wrote in an email to The Register. The games never disappoint; they are typically closer than anticipated, and lots of fun under any circumstances.

Bob Bowlsby, left, outgoing University of Iowa athletic director, congratulates his replacement and longtime friend, Gary Barta, after a news conference Friday, June 23, 2006, in Iowa City, Iowa, where Barta was named Bowlsby's replacement.(Photo: Register file photo)

Bowlsby knows more about our in-state rivalries than most. Hes a former Northern Iowa athletics director. Hes a former athletics director at Iowa. From financial to fun-loving, he understands the ramifications the Big Tens decision has on our state.

Northern Iowa, for example, stood to make $650,000 to play at Iowa. Thats big bucks for any athletics department, especially an FCS department that relies on big non-conference game revenues to help pay the bills. Already some financially-strapped schools have cut sports. More could follow, as everyone is bracing for a financial hit.

The Cy-Hawk game, which rotates annually between Ames and Iowa City, brings millions of dollars into communities. Hotels from miles around the stadiums are filled. As many fans party in parking lots, as ticket-owning people actually watch from inside. Independent street-side vendors will suffer financially. Restaurants will be empty. Bars, too. Radio advertisers. Television advertisers. Everyone suffers.

Having been involved in many of the (Cy-Hawk and UNI-Iowa) games, I feel bad for the players and coaches who will not have the fun of the competition, Bowlsby said. I feel bad for all of the fans, both in-stadium and those consuming by radio or television."

**

I feel absolutely horrible for the seniors, McCarney, an Iowa City native and former Hawkeye player, said. Memories of careers are easy to forget after time, but I guarantee you that every senior knows what happened the last time he played in the Cy-Hawk game. I feel like I missed a lot never having played in the game. A lot.

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McCarneys unique view of this game was from the sidelines as an Iowa assistant coach between 1977-1989, and as Iowa States head coach while leading the Cyclones to five bowl games between 1995 and 2005. His playing days included the rivalrys interruption. His head coaching days included leading the Cyclones to one of the biggest upsets in school history.

Iowa State lost 15 games against Iowa in a row when McCarney took his four-touchdown underdog squad to Iowa City in 1998. Hed not beaten the school for whom he played and coached. Hayden Fry, on the other sidelines, hadnt lost against the Cyclones anywhere since 1982.

That 27-9 Iowa State win was something for the ages, indeed.

Ill never forget the look on the seniors faces, McCarney said. Theyd finally beaten Iowa.

And to you who say Iowa didnt take the game as seriously as Iowa State? Bunk.

Hayden, God bless him, was all about the Iowa-Iowa State game, McCarney recalled. In staff meetings during that week, hes always say something about players not looking focused in practice, the position coaches not coaching them well enough, and motivational things like that. Hed never mention names. We nudged each other under the table, wondering which coach he was talking about? Was it me, was it Kirk (Ferentz), (Bill) Snyder, Barry (Alvarez), Donnie Patterson? We never knew which one he was actually talking about, which made us make sure we worked harder the next day.

**

So Dolph, what do you now have planned for Sept. 12?

Wanna play golf? he asked Friday. Im in my 49th year of broadcasting, and Ive never had a stretch of three weeks in a row off during a football season.

None of us who for decades have set our fall schedules around college football in the fall have.

Theres just so many unknowns, said Dolphin, who just happened to be golfing in Iowa City during our conversation. Look at the lost revenue, not only from the schools standpoint, but also the hotels and restaurants and the advertising. Devastating.

**

Our college football fall wasnt going to feel the same, anyway, but no Cy-Hawk?

It was a prudent decision.It was expected that some conferences would skip the non-conference portions of schedules. Other conferences may even follow, including the Big 12.

That doesnt lessen the blow for Iowans who have planned weddings and funerals around the Iowa State-Iowa football games.

As Dolphin said:

Its a punch to the belly-button.

Iowa State columnist Randy Peterson has been writingfor the Des Moines Register for parts of sixdecades. Reach him at rpeterson@dmreg.com, 515-284-8132, and on Twitter at @RandyPete. No one covers the Cyclones like the Register. Subscribe today at DesMoinesRegister.com/Deal to make sure you never miss a moment.

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Peterson: Unique perspectives of Big Ten's non-conference football decision that engulfs Cy-Hawk - Des Moines Register

Judge blocks first federal execution in 17 years after victims’ family raises concerns over virus – CBS News

A judge on Friday blocked what would have been the first federal execution in 17 years after a petition from the victim's family asked the court to consider their risk to COVID-19 by traveling to attend the execution.

Daniel Lewis Lee, a former white supremacist who robbed and murdered a family of three, including their 8-year-old daughter, was scheduled to be executed on Monday. But now his death sentence has been put on hold after the court granted a preliminary injunction from the family of Lee's victims.

Earlene Peterson lost her daughter Nancy Mueller, and her granddaughter, Sarah Powell, in the crime for which Lee was convicted. She, along with her surviving daughter and granddaughter, filed a petition with the court, explaining that traveling across the country during the pandemic to attend the execution would put them at risk of contracting the coronavirus.

Chief Judge Jane Magnus-Stinson, of the Southern District of Indiana, halted the execution, writing that going forward could irreparably harm Peterson. "The harm to Ms. Peterson ... is being forced to choose whether being present for the execution of a man responsible for the death of her daughter and granddaughter is worth defying her doctor's orders and risking her own life," the judge wrote.

As of Friday, the facility where the execution will take place, U.S. Penitentiary Terre Haute, has four inmates who are currently positive for the coronavirus, according to the Bureau of Prisons.

The court's order says a new date for Lee's execution will be set when the Bureau of Prisons can show "reasonable consideration" for Peterson and her family's right to be present at the execution. But late Friday, the Department of Justice appealed the decision and has asked the court to stay its decision pending a ruling from the 7th Circuit.

Peterson, a supporter of President Trump, has been a vocal advocate against the execution of her daughter's killer and has even asked that Mr. Trump commute Lee's sentence to life without parole.

Attorney General William Barr announced he had directed the Bureau of Prisons to restart the enforcement of the death penalty last July. "The Justice Department upholds the rule of law and we owe it to the victims and their families to carry forward the sentence imposed by our justice system," Barr said in a statement at the time.

But as one of those families, Peterson said this has never been what she wanted. "Yes, Daniel Lee damaged my life, but I can't believe taking his life is going to change any of that," Peterson said in avideo statement in September. "I can't see how executing Daniel Lee will honor my daughter in any way. In fact, it kinda, like, dirties her name because she wouldn't want it and I don't want it. That's not the way it should be."

Peterson and her family are not alone in their belief that Lee was improperly sentenced. In 2014, the federal judge who oversaw Lee's trial and the lead prosecutor on the case, wrote separately to then-Attorney General Eric Holder arguing the disparity in Lee's sentence compared to that of his co-defendant.

Lee's co-defendant, Chevie Kehoe, was the mastermind behind the crime and evidence at their joint trial showed he was the one who murdered 8-year-old Sarah Powell after Lee had refused to do so. However, Kehoe was not sentenced to death, a dichotomy that advocates attribute to Kehoe appearing more "clean-cut" at trial, while Lee, who lost an eye in a fight and has a triskelion tattooed on his neck, looked more "like an outlaw."

Lee's execution was not the only one set to take place this summer. Three other men on death row are still scheduled to be executed by lethal injection, two of which are still planned for next week.

Wesley Ira Purkey, who was convicted in 2003 for the rape and murder of a 16-year-old girl, and the violent death of an 80-year-old woman, will be executed on Wednesday. His spiritual advisor of 11 years, Reverend Seigen Hartkemeyer, a 68-year-old Buddhist priest, has filed a similar lawsuit to Peterson's, arguing that he would be at risk of COVID-19 if he attends the execution.

"Rev. Hartkemeyer must decide whether to risk his own life in order to exercise his religious obligation to be present for Mr. Purkey's execution," the lawsuit argues. No ruling has been made yet in this case.

In December, the Supreme Court temporarily blocked the Trump administration's initial attempt to resume the death penalty after a lower court found the execution method may have violated the Federal Death Penalty Act. But in June, the court cleared the way for the executions to go forward after they denied hearing a last-ditch petition brought by four inmates who aimed to block the use of a new protocol used in their executions.

Earlier this month, more than a thousand faith leaders signed a statement calling on Mr. Trump and the attorney general to halt the executions. "As our country grapples with the COVID 19 pandemic, an economic crisis, and systemic racism in the criminal legal system, we should be focused on protecting and preserving life, not carrying out executions," their statement said.

According to the Death Penalty Information Center, there are 62 federal prisoners currently awaiting execution on death row.

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Judge blocks first federal execution in 17 years after victims' family raises concerns over virus - CBS News

Robin Yvonne Ingbretson Peterson | Obituaries – Ashland Daily Press

Robin Yvonne Ingbretson Peterson, 61, who resided in Manning, South Carolina, passed away at home with loved ones by her side on June 13, 2020, in Manning.

Robin Peterson was born April 5, 1959, in Shell Lake to Bernard and Barbra Ingbretson. She grew up in Hayward. She was a bartender by trade and worked at several establishments through the years. She enjoyed cooking and loved having her grandkids help. She also enjoyed computers, puzzles and reading.

She is survived by her husband, Gary Peterson, of Manning; children, Bridget (Travis) Wisner of Baraboo, Wisconsin, Nicole (Ben) Boaz of Manning, and Brooke Peterson (Brandon) Petty of Columbia, South Carolina; nine grandchildren; her mother, Barbara Bjorklund of Wisconsin; sisters, Barbara McNemer of Arizona and Peggy Ingbretson of Wisconsin; and brother, Pete Ingbretson of Oregon.

Per Robins wishes she was cremated and there will be no services. A private family

gathering will be held later this summer in Wisconsin.

She will be dearly missed but never forgotten.

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Robin Yvonne Ingbretson Peterson | Obituaries - Ashland Daily Press

Peterson: No matter the obstacles and unknowns, Matt Campbell says his Cyclones will be ready – Des Moines Register

Iowa State Cyclones head coach Matt Campbell runs out with teammates prior to the game against the Notre Dame Fighting Irish at Camping World Stadium.(Photo: Kim Klement/USA TODAY Sports)

Matt Campbell isnt a huge fan of playing a college football season during the spring. His brand of football starts in late August or early the first week of September. It ends in December or January.

Hes a coach, and a darn good one. Campbell willadapt to whatpeople trying to combat the coronavirus mandate because he has to.

But unlike in past years, coaches aren't in charge of college football. The virus is in charge.

If its starting what could be a very good Iowa State season Sept. 5 against South Dakota at Jack Trice Stadium, thats super. If its starting later? Thats all right, too. Conference games only? CommissionerBob Bowlsby simply responded"No," when asked Thursday if an announcement would be coming soon.

No Cy vs. Hawk? No problem. This season, whenever it starts, is about adapting. It's not about tradition.

You just stay ready, Campbell told reporters Thursday. Anywhere, anytime, anyplace has always been our motto, anyways.

Whatever comes our way, well be able to handle it. Whether thats Sept. 5, whether thats in the winter, or whether thats in the spring of 2021 our kids want to play football. Our kids want to have the opportunity to get on the football field and play. I know well be ready for that.

Iowa State quarterback Brock Purdy (15) passes to a teammate during the first half of an NCAA college football game against Kansas State in Manhattan, Kan., Saturday, Nov. 30, 2019. (AP Photo/Orlin Wagner)(Photo: Orlin Wagner, AP)

When, however, is a gigantic question. The Ivy League announced Wednesday that it will not sponsor any fall sports. Many programs have been temporarily shut down because of positive COVID-19 tests.

Coaches, like Campbell, are doing their best to keep players minds on what they can control.Wearing masks. Staying away from social gatherings. Hunkering down in apartments when not at the football facility. Staying away from people you dont know.

Maybe itll pay off with some semblance of a season that starts in around Labor Day. Maybe. Its a topic thats been discussed everywhere the past few months. Now its even in the locker room.

As a player, you question with all this work that were putting in now, is it going to be worth it down the road? quarterback Brock Purdy wondered. Are we going to have a season? Its real. Its a real question, to be honest, that the whole team has.

College teams are working toward a normal start. What happens after thatis one of the great unknowns. Campbell spoke with reporters, by the way, before the news swirled Thursday about the Big Ten playing only conference games, which means no Cy-Hawk game for 2020.

We cant control whats going on outside, Campbell said during his first extensive interview in a while. We cant control what we dont know. What we can control is whats going on in our bubble.

You can get so caught up in everything else thats going on outside of our walls, that you can deviate from where you need to be. Where we all need to be right now is to stay ready, and prepare our young people.

Iowa State freshman running back Breece Hall breaks a tackle in the second quarter against Kansas on Saturday, Nov. 23, 2019, at Jack Trice Stadium in Ames.(Photo: Bryon Houlgrave/The Register)

Just four people associated with the Iowa State football program have tested positive for COVID-19, according to a letter to fans from athletics director Jamie Pollard two weeks ago. Thats far fewer than many other Big 12 programs. All are back with the program, Campbell said.

It started with a great medical plan. It included sacrifice by players.

Those are life choices where the 21 or 22 hours (players) are not in the facility that theyre going to have to make, Campbell said. Its really easy to say that, but its hard to do that.

Were dealing with 18- to 22-year-old young people that are continuing to grow. Were continuing to educate them on what its going to take to be able to train and continue to prepare for our football season. Our kids so far have done a great job investing.

They're giving up a lot of personal sacrifice for the betterment of the whole, but they've done a great job, and I'm really proud of them.

Some players will test positive during the season, regardless of how well programs mitigate risk. Some scheduled games wont be played. Some teams may play 12 regular-season games, and some might play only conference opponents.

Theres no book for this, Campbell said.

He knows that he cant keep star players, like Purdy, in bubble wrap between now and whenever what would be his junior season ends.

We play a sport where injuries do occur, Campbell said. All 105 players are critical to your success, because you never know when your number is going to get called. That's how we built our program. And it's going to be really critical to our success going forward, whether were dealing with a virus that could hold a player out a week or two weeks, or whether you're dealing with an injury.

Purdy summed up best, the great unknowns:

The only thing we can control is whats in front of us. Whatever the calls going to be as far as having the season now, or in the spring or if were not going to have one thatll come.

To be honest, if we freak out about it right now, thats not going to do us any good.

Iowa State columnist Randy Peterson has been writingfor the Des Moines Register for parts of sixdecades. Reach him at rpeterson@dmreg.com, 515-284-8132, and on Twitter at @RandyPete. No one covers the Cyclones like the Register. Subscribe today at DesMoinesRegister.com/Deal to make sure you never miss a moment.

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Peterson: No matter the obstacles and unknowns, Matt Campbell says his Cyclones will be ready - Des Moines Register


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