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Liberty – IMDb

Production Notes from IMDbPro Status: Pre-production | See complete list of in-production titles Comments: Casting lead. Updated: 26 December 2018 More Info: See moreproduction information about this title onIMDbPro. Learn more More Like This

Action | Drama | Thriller

Selected from an elite military unit post-9/11, Special Agent Mike Cutler carries out a dangerous mission to track and trace Al Qaeda leaders in Afghanistan, only to find himself at the center of a deadly conspiracy.

Director:George Marshall Ruge

Stars:Scott Patterson,Tobin Bell,Bobbie Phillips

Action | Drama | Sport

Three brothers battle through death, decline and war in the baseball-obsessed town of Rupland.

Directors:David Boyd,Michael Dault

Stars:Scott Patterson,Michael Moriarty,Brent Briscoe

Sci-Fi | Thriller

An isolated town in Alaska where a contamination occurs after a minor meteorite explosion.

Director:Eddie Arya

Stars:Tobin Bell,Richard Grieco,Sudeep

Adventure | Fantasy | Horror

A young heir to an ancient medicine bundle, who's falsely accused of murder, escapes the FBI and time jumps to 1862 where he must save 38 ancestors from a hangman's noose and stop a supernatural dark force from destroying the future.

Director:Armand Mastroianni

Stars:Zahn McClarnon,Tara Reid,Tobin Bell

Drama

A young man sets out to find the father he never knew.

Director:Jason Mac

Stars:Tobin Bell,Jason Mac,Rebeca Robles

Crime | Drama

The story of Barry Minkow, a young charismatic business man who becomes a wealthy CEO by lying, cheating and stealing his way to the top.

Director:Bruce Caulk

Stars:Armand Assante,Justin Baldoni,Talia Shire

Director:Adrian Popovici

Stars:James Frain,Michael Ironside,Franco Nero

Western

Mark Miller inherits hell in 1895 Rifle, Colorado.

Stars:Michael Ironside,Elvis Nolasco

Drama | Horror | Romance

A dramatic mystery where a a haunted teen endures a terrifying exorcism in the hopes of unlocking shocking secrets about the church and his family.

Director:Don E. FauntLeRoy

Stars:Randy Shelly,Tobin Bell,John Savage

Sci-Fi

It is a Sci-Fi thriller, the movie of the urban legend; "Black Eyed Kids"

Director:Craig Moss

Stars:Tobin Bell,Sadie Stanley,Makenzie Moss

Drama | Romance

Recently returned combat veteran Matt Benning (Will Brandt) finds himself entangled in a dangerous web of drugs, violence, and toxic love that eventually has him running-and hiding-for his life.

Director:Adrian Bartol

Stars:Will Brandt,Ruby Modine,Michael Ironside

Comedy

A scrawny nerd from the Midwest accidentally lands the head lifeguard job at the hottest country club in LA - and doesn't know how to swim.

Born with telepathic and many other extraordinary skills, a young woman escapes a powerful military program intent on controlling her. Agents hunt her down as she attempts escape.

Budget:$5,000,000 (estimated)

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Liberty - IMDb

Jerry Falwell, Liberty Universitys choice to stay open during coronavirus, explained – Vox.com

On Sunday, Liberty University president Jerry Falwell Jr. announced that unlike virtually all other colleges and universities in the United States, Liberty would soon be reopening and permitting thousands of students and faculty to return to campus even as the coronavirus continues to rage and the city where the school resides discouraged the move.

I think we have a responsibility to our students who paid to be here, who want to be here, who love it here to give them the ability to be with their friends, to continue their studies, enjoy the room and board theyve already paid for and to not interrupt their college life, Falwell, Jr. said in an interview with a Richmond-area newspaper on Sunday.

To be sure, the abrupt closures enacted by thousands of other colleges and universities resulted in major problems for many, with international students and students in need of housing left scrambling as dorms closed and cafeterias shut.

But Liberty faculty have already been on campus during this time, asked to teach to empty rooms while the university and Falwell Jr. give wildly differing stories about the universitys coronavirus strategy to news outlets and to members of the university community. While the university says that students will be taking all classes online, Falwell told ABC Tuesday that about one to two thousand students have returned to campus dorms and cafeterias major gathering places where coronavirus could easily spread. In short, the university will be both open and, according to Falwell Jr., closed, more like an apartment complex than a university during this time. That incoherent strategy has left many at Liberty confused and upset. I reached out to Liberty University for comment and will update if and when I hear back.

As President Trump starts to voice a desire to return to some semblance of economic normalcy by Easter, the president of one of the largest Christian universities in the world (and a major supporter of Trump) is using his campus as a testing ground to prove that the pandemic is no real concern. In a March 23 press release, Falwell Jr. said, Our thinking was, Lets get them back as soon as we can despite a surge of coronavirus cases in the state of Virginia.

Ultimately, its a failure of leadership and communication, a Liberty University professor who wanted to remain anonymous told me.

Liberty University is one of the worlds largest Christian universities, with roughly 15,000 students on campus but more than 95,000 students taking classes online. Founded in 1971 by Falwell Jr.s father, Rev. Jerry Falwell, as Lynchburg Baptist College, the school has become a massive institution of higher learning with hundreds of graduate programs and colleges under its aegis.

But under the leadership of Falwell Jr., who has served as the schools president since 2007, its also become a platform for advancing political evangelism. As I wrote last year:

Its important to remember that despite being often described as a Christian leader, Jerry Falwell Jr. never became a pastor a fact hes not shy about sharing even while leading one of the largest Christian universities in the world. According to the agreement made with his father, upon the Rev. Jerry Falwells death in 2007, Falwell Jr. took the helm of Liberty University while his brother, Jonathan, took over the church their father helped to found in 1956, Thomas Road Baptist Church.

Falwell is also not shy about his fundraising efforts for the university, or his role within the world of what Id call political evangelicalism the effort to combine evangelical Christianity with bare-knuckle politics in order to get evangelical priorities into law and evangelical politicians (or politicians willing to accede to evangelical interests) into office.

Falwell is also a longtime supporter of Donald Trump (because of the presidents purported business acumen). Because of that alliance during the 2016 presidential campaign, Falwell Jr. said that he was offered the role of secretary of education.

And its that fervent support for Trump that some believe may have influenced Falwell Jr.s decision-making regarding coronavirus, a pandemic he told Fox and Friends was both largely an overreaction by mainstream media and potentially a Christmas present from North Korea. In an interview with Fox News radio host Todd Starnes, Falwell Jr. said, Shame on the media for trying to fan [coronavirus] up and destroy the American economy. Theyre willing to destroy the economy just to hurt Trump.

On campus, Falwell Jr. and other leaders downplayed the pandemic during convocation on March 13 (convocation is a mandatory assembly for students held twice a week), referring to coronavirus as a flu and saying that Liberty would be remaining open while eschewing large gatherings. I dont see us doing the same thing other schools have done, Falwell Jr. said, referring to colleges and universities that had already closed in the wake of coronavirus.

You guys paid to be here, you wanted to be on campus, I wanted to give you what you pay for, he continued, while saying that students should be cautious about those with respiratory illnesses and the elderly. While his recent rhetoric toward national outlets has been less dismissive of the virus mirroring Trumps shift on the issue the messaging at Liberty has been incredibly mixed.

But as one faculty member I spoke to told me, students are in fact getting a clear message from the university: [Coronavirus is] not that serious or not as serious as the quote-unquote media makes it out to be.

And for faculty, the situation has been doubly challenging as they have been expected to continue teaching on campus even while students arent present in the classroom. Marybeth Davis Baggett, a professor of English at Liberty, described the confusing situation in an op-ed for Religious News Service:

Faculty and staff are also required to report, despite the fact that telecommuting options are readily available. As a Liberty faculty member, I have been told that my colleagues and I must conduct our classes from our offices, even though that instruction is now being delivered virtually. We are also expected to hold office hours and welcome students for face-to-face interaction.

In response, Falwell Jr. tweeted the page linking to Libertys coronavirus response while referring to her as the Baggett lady.

And the guidance professors and faculty are receiving from the university seemingly changes by the hour, even based on media appearances by Falwell Jr. himself.

For example, in interviews with CNN and ABC News, Falwell Jr. said that all faculty were working from home due to the pandemic, but I reviewed emails sent to faculty that clearly stated they needed to request permission and provide a rationale for why they should work from home rather in their on-campus offices. My source told me that either Falwell Jr. is lying, or he hasnt communicated the new guidance to faculty but has been more than willing to do so to media outlets. Now my colleagues are wondering if we are supposed to go in or now we can stay home.

One faculty member said that this lack of clarity was par for the course at Liberty. To be honest, thats kind of how things go at Liberty. It doesnt work that well when theres not a crisis, [and] it goes especially wrong when there is a crisis, were finding out. Liberty does things on the fly.

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Jerry Falwell, Liberty Universitys choice to stay open during coronavirus, explained - Vox.com

Thousands of Liberty students expected to return to campus amid coronavirus outbreak – Richmond.com

LYNCHBURG As the coronavirus threatens to spread across the Lynchburg region, Liberty University officials are preparing to welcome back up to 5,000 students from spring break this week.

Defying a national trend of campus closures, President Jerry Falwell Jr. has invited students to return to residence halls and has directed faculty members to continue to report to campus even as most classes move online.

In an interview Sunday night, Falwell said somewhere between several hundred to more than 5,000 students are expected to live in campus dorms, where they will continue coursework online rather than in classrooms.

Meanwhile, hundreds of professors and instructors without a valid health exemption will come to campus to hold office hours.

I think we have a responsibility to our students who paid to be here, who want to be here, who love it here to give them the ability to be with their friends, to continue their studies, enjoy the room and board theyve already paid for and to not interrupt their college life, Falwell said.

Falwells decision leaves Liberty as an outlier among the scores of colleges and universities across the country that have shut down to help limit the spread of the disease known as COVID-19.

The threat of the coronavirus became more immediate for the Lynchburg region this weekend when the Virginia Department of Health announced cases in Amherst and Bedford counties. Statewide, as of Monday evening, more than 250 people have contracted the disease and seven have died.

In response to the widening pandemic, several nearby institutions have instructed faculty to work remotely and have limited dorms to students unable to return home. At the University of Lynchburg, 19 students continue to live in dorms while at Randolph College just five remain on campus.

In contrast with other schools, Libertys dorms, academic buildings, library and fitness center remain open to students.

The university has taken some steps to help slow the spread of the virus. Gatherings in campus buildings, including a handful of classes still holding in-person meetings, are capped at 10 people in accordance with an order by Gov. Ralph Northam.

Similarly, dining halls are only providing take-out service and campus visits have been suspended.

On Monday, Northam directed all non-essential businesses to close by the start of Wednesday. Non-essential services were identified as all places of indoor public amusement as well as fitness centers, and salons that cannot comply with social distancing guidelines. It is unclear how that order will impact Liberty.

Falwell, who has publicly downplayed the threat of the virus in recent weeks, said he is confident the school has taken the proper steps to prepare for a campus outbreak. He said Liberty officials have identified an old hotel owned by the university as a place to quarantine students who fall ill.

I think we, in a way, are protecting the students by having them on campus together, he said. Ninety-nine percent of them are not at the age to be at risk and they dont have conditions that put them at risk.

Some Liberty faculty members have questioned whether Falwells actions have gone far enough.

In a blunt opinion piece published by Religion News Service on Sunday, longtime English Professor Marybeth Davis Baggett called on Libertys board of trustees to overrule Falwells decision to keep campus open.

Many students, faculty, and staff have health conditions that would make COVID-19 difficult to fight, Baggett wrote. And of course, Liberty is not a bubble where the virus would be contained. Instead, its population comes into regular contact with those in the Lynchburg community, putting their health and lives at risk as well.

In an interview with The News & Advance, Baggett said she has refused to return to campus during the course of the pandemic.

Lives are at stake, Baggett, who plans to join the Houston Baptist University faculty this fall after 17 years at Liberty, said. I think this decision is a recipe for disaster and I have been trying to push that as much as I have been able to internally.

For some students life on campus has already resumed, albeit under unusual circumstances.

Senior Christian Griffith returned to his east campus dorm Thursday. He said of the about 70 students who normally live in the building, only around 20 have since moved back in.

It's a pretty empty campus, he said. The number of students staying seems to be low.

Other students returned only briefly to meet a Tuesday night deadline to complete the move out process. According to an announcement sent to students Saturday, the university is now considering offering refunds or credits to students who choose to move off campus.

Though Griffith is concerned about the swiftly spreading virus, the Charlottesville native said he is happy to have a place to stay in Lynchburg. Both of his parents work at the University of Virginia Medical Center and living at home, he said, could pose a greater health risk than living in a dorm.

To protect himself, Griffith has stocked up on food and plans to spend most of his day indoors binging television shows, studying for classes and reading the Bible.

I'm not going to leave unless I need to, he said.

Photos: The scene in Washington D.C. as cherry blossoms reach full bloom, streets close

A visitor take a picture as she walks by cherry blossom trees in full bloom at the tidal basin in Washington, Sunday, March 22, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

A 17-year-old who asked not to be named wears a yellow hazmat suit, gas mask, boots, and gloves as he walks with his family, from Gaithersburg, Md., under cherry blossom trees in full bloom along the tidal basin, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. "I'm not worried for me since I'm young," says the 17-year-old, "I'm wearing this in case I come into contact with anyone who is older so that I won't be a threat to them." He plans to wear his protective outfit for coronavirus each time he leaves the house. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin areas have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw a large crowd. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

At sunrise people walk by cherry blossom trees in full bloom on the National Mall, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A family from Washington, who asked not to be named, are reflected in a puddle as they take photographs for the daughter's quinceaera, or fifteenth birthday celebration, under cherry blossom trees in full bloom along the tidal basin, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw a large crowd. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A visitor take pictures of cherry blossom trees in full bloom at the tidal basin in Washington, Saturday, March 21, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors using masks walk by cherry blossom trees in full bloom at the tidal basin in Washington, Saturday, March 21, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

A visitor walks by cherry blossom trees in full bloom on the National Mall, in Washington, Sunday, March 22, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds..(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors walk by cherry blossom trees in full bloom at the tidal basin in Washington, Sunday, March 22, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds..(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

A couple take a picture as they walk by cherry blossom trees in full bloom on the National Mall, in Washington, Sunday, March 22, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds..(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors walk by cherry blossom trees in full bloom at the tidal basin in Washington, Sunday, March 22, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds..(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

A musician play as visitors walk by cherry blossom trees in full bloom at the tidal basin in Washington, Sunday, March 22, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds..(AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Officer Green, with the Traffic Control Office, directs traffic around street closures as the city makes an an effort to keep large crowds away while the cherry blossom trees are in full bloom, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin areas have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw a large crowd. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Summer Thomas, 16, left, and Emily Treacy, 18, both of McLean, Va., run past cherry blossom trees in bloom at the tidal basin, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. "We run track together and we are trying to keep our workouts going," says Treacy, "running is the one thing that makes it feel normal." The girls recently dyed their hair pink together via video chat with friends who are staying home due to coronavirus worries. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A car is towed from a parking space on 14th St NW shortly after sunrise as sections of the National Mall and tidal basin were closed to vehicular traffic in an effort to prevent crowds from visiting the cherry blossom trees in full bloom along the tidal basin, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. Traffic was modified to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw a large crowd. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

People visit the cherry blossom trees in full bloom at the tidal basin, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A woman wearing a mask walks along an almost empty Tidal Basin lined with cherry blossoms that are about to peak, Wednesday, March 18, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A small amount of cherry blossoms have begun to bloom along the Tidal Basin at East Potomac Park, Friday, March 13, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

The Lincoln Memorial is visible as Cherry Blossoms begin to bloom near the base of the Washington Monument on the National Mall, Tuesday, March 17, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

Visitors walk by cherry blossom trees in full bloom with the Washington Monument in the background on the National Mall in Washington, Sunday, March 22, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

A 17-year-old who asked not to be named wears a yellow hazmat suit, gas mask, boots, and gloves as he walks past a couple in an embrace, as he and his family from Gaithersburg, Md. walk under cherry blossom trees in full bloom on their way to the tidal basin, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. "I'm not worried for me since I'm young," says the 17-year-old, "I'm wearing this in case I come into contact with anyone who is older so that I won't be a threat to them." He plans to wear his protective outfit for coronavirus each time he leaves the house. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin areas have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw a large crowd. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Milla Tang, center, and Aaron Chen, right, wait as Junjie Dong, left, takes a photograph as the college students visited cherry trees in full bloom, Sunday, March 22, 2020, along the tidal basin in Washington. "I've heard people saying it's hilarious to wear masks," say Tang, who came early to avoid crowds, "it makes me feel sad, masks aren't a joke, they can keep people safe. We want to be treated like everyone else, not like dangerous Asian people." Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Two people stand in front of the Washington Monument at sunrise as cherry blossom trees are seen in full bloom, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin area have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw a large crowd. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A District of Columbia Police Car blocks the road near the Washington Monument in an effort to discourage crowds from visiting the cherry blossom trees in full bloom, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin areas have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw a large crowd. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Charlotte Petersen, 1, toddles to her father, Billy Petersen, of Falls Church, Va., next to her mother Heather, as the family visits the cherry blossom trees in full bloom along the tidal basin, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. "We wanted to get some fresh air and a change of scenery," says Heather Petersen, "we figured if we came early and it wasn't crowded then we wouldn't be too on top of other people." Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin areas have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw a large crowd. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

A family plays under cherry blossom trees in bloom at the tidal basin, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Visitors walk by cherry blossom trees in full bloom at the tidal basin in Washington, Sunday, March 22, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors take pictures of cherry blossom trees in full bloom at the tidal basin in Washington, Saturday, March 21, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

Visitors walk by cherry blossom trees in full bloom at the tidal basin in Washington, Sunday, March 22, 2020. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)

A lone man skateboards under cherry blossom trees in bloom at the tidal basin, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. Sections of the National Mall and tidal basin have been closed to vehicular traffic to encourage people to practice social distancing and not visit Washington's iconic cherry blossoms this year due to coronavirus concerns. The trees are in full bloom this week and would traditionally draw large crowds. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

Dave Anderson, left, and Panadda Harrington, both of Reston, Va., walk hand-in-gloved-hand while wearing cloth face masks as they visit the tidal basin to see the cherry blossom trees in full bloom, Sunday, March 22, 2020, in Washington. "We walk everyday," says Harrington, "and cabin fever pushed us out to see the blossoms. We didn't think it would be as crowded as usual and it's not. We would only have been concerned about coronavirus if it had been very crowded." (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

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Thousands of Liberty students expected to return to campus amid coronavirus outbreak - Richmond.com

Central Virginia Health District performs surprise inspection at Liberty University as students return to campus – WFXRtv.com

LYNCHBURG, Va. (WFXR) Officials with the Central Virginia Health District (CVHD) showed up Tuesday on the campus of Liberty University to perform an unannounced inspection as students return to campus.

The CVHD staff visited common areas and food establishments across campus, including Montview, the buffet at Reber Thomas, the Tilley Student Center and the Tinney Caf.

According to the CVHD, they did not find any violations of the State of Virginias Executive Order 53, placing temporary restrictions on certain businesses and organizations.

All operations appeared to be in compliance with the governors emergency order, which becomes effective at midnight. We observed that all operations were carry-out only, no seating was provided, and onsite security guards present at each location were limiting the number of customers in line to 10.

The department also found that all food, including on the buffet line, was being dispensed by food service workers which included items that are usually self-serve. They also found that public items like soda machines and utensil dispensers were being sanitized every fifteen minutes.

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Central Virginia Health District performs surprise inspection at Liberty University as students return to campus - WFXRtv.com

Eyes that Gleam with Liberty Green – The Georgetown Voice

I announced this morning that I am suspending my campaign for president, Elizabeth Warren said on March 5 with a tone that was, for her supporters, strangely hopeful. In fact, as she spoke those words, I felt a lot of conflicting emotions: sadness, pride, confusion, but most significantly, nostalgia. My mind started to paint a thousand images of the past year. As I watched her announce the end of her campaign, the image that endured was the night she announced the beginning.

The news that Elizabeth Warren intended to run for president set off smiles, laughs, and ecstatic jumps in my dorm room. My roommate, best friend, and I all radiated a happiness and vigor that was insatiable. Warrens iconic campaign color, Liberty Green, reflected in our eyes while we watched the announcement video. Rife with passion, my plans for the night started to change. I dropped all intent to be productive, and instead put on a face mask, steeped some tea, took her book This Fight is Our Fight off my shelf, and read through the night the words of possibly Americas first female president.

Warrens campaign immediately struck an emotional and passionate tone. Always a planner, she outlined exactly what kind of America she fights for: One where our democracy and economy work for all of us, no matter where we live or where we come from. One where we can strive for what we all truly want: to work hard, play by the same set of rules, and take care of the people we love. Her vision for American ideals was present in every aspect of her campaignher intricate plans, her pinky-promises, all the way down to her iconic Liberty Green.

When I was 12, I wrote an essay about one of my favorite fellow Okies, who went by Betsy in our shared hometown of Norman. And now she was running for president. It would make sense that I had such a strong reaction to the candidacy of one of my long-term role models, but I didnt realize that people without that connection would feel the same. I didnt expect the same excited shrieks from my roommate and best friend that day. Nor did I expect an equal amount of passion from hundreds of people who I can now call friends when we set up Hoyas for Warren.

For seven months, we worked hard. We phonebanked to early primary states. We canvassed in Virginia. We designed buttons. We wrote pamphlets. We planned events. We fundraised. We tabled. We organized. We led. We knocked on those doors with the same fists that Elizabeth used to fight Wall Street, big business, and deep-pocketed billionaires. We talked to friends, family, and voters with the same persistent words of her inspiring campaign. And in everything we did, our eyes gleamed with Elizabeths vision, a vision of progression, compassion, accountability, and equal opportunity. We all so deeply believed in that vision.

So, Super Tuesday was hard. I was confused when the immense passion and dedication I saw around me for Elizabeth Warrens campaign did not translate into delegates. When she dropped out two days later, it was even harder. I cant tell you how many people who once came to my dorm to jump for joy now came to cry. But the following days were the hardest. People were outraged for all sorts of reasons. Some were rightfully saddened because all those little girls that she pinky-promised would have to wait four more years. Some were angry because they felt that Warren was the most competent and well-prepared presidential hopeful. And some were angry at her, heavily criticizing every move short of an endorsement as a betrayal of her lifes work. For a brief moment, all that grassroots organizing for seven exhausting months felt futile. We didnt know what to think. Her supporters scrambled to find the candidate they so loved in Bernie and Joe, but she just wasnt there.

Shortly after the news that she was suspending her campaign, I went to Mexico to visit my sister for spring break. Women there were outraged there for a plethora of reasons, but especially the increased femicide and violence against women. So, they decided to disappear from society and organize a national strike called A Day Without Us. These women wanted to give their nation a taste of an economy, culture, and life without themand, for a day, the nation became malnourished with a bland and empty flavor. Because of her traditionally marginalized status, a womans profession is not entitled to her by society, but her work is somehow assumed. Many times, she may feel that she has to prove her occupation to society, which motivates her to work relentlessly and reinforce a position she has already won, or gain one she hasnt. Of course, some men try to shake this institution, but it is difficult when it inherently benefits them. Oppression of minorities is a stain of different hues, but often the same base color throughout, which allows women to empathize with other marginalized groups on some level. These phenomena, paired with the fact that womens issues are best characterized by women themselves, produce an interrelated feminine insight. Therefore, a world without women loses productivity, empathy, and understanding. There is a list much longer than this of undeniably vital contributions of women to society, and a presidential race is no different.

Not to undermine the women that work in the Sanders or Biden engine, but a woman at the forefront of a campaign carries unique visibility and direction. Elizabeth Warren was a once-in-a-lifetime candidate that struck a chord in millions of people strong enough to uproot their lives and pour their heart into the movement. Her empowering run deserves reflection and recognition in itself, but her legacy ripples outward.

In that hopeful announcement of her intent to run, Elizabeth assured us, if we organize together, if we fight together, if we persist together, we can win. Fast-forward a few months of dedicated campaigning, she thanks her staffers and supporters for leaving plenty of blood and teeth on the floor in a righteous fight. Maybe we didnt win like we wanted tobut we did win. Just this past week, both Biden and Sanders have adopted some of her most significant plans and ideas, from portions of the wealth tax, to her plans for combatting Coronavirus, to her ideas involving education costs and bankruptcy. Katie Porter, a co-campaign manager, expertly pressed the director of the CDC to commit to free coronavirus testing. Marie Newman of Illinois, whom Elizabeth and her team leaned heavily into even before her official suspension, dethroned an eight-term congressman who actively worked against the progressive cause. I can imagine the big smile on Warrens face as she witnesses the strong coalition of fighters she has put together.

As for Warren herself, she is doing what she has spent a lifetime doing. She warns of the economic recession caused by COVID-19, of course, accompanied with thoughtful plans that protect consumers and the most vulnerable during this outbreak. She is holding the wealthy and well-connected accountable, and making certain they play by the same rules we all do. She is fighting. She is persisting, just like all of us. Elizabeth Warren persists with heart and grit and determination and selflessness and passion. She taught me an invaluable lesson: there are selfless fights worth fighting in this world that either end with victory, or plenty of blood and teeth and legacy left on the floor. Thats why Ill forever be a Warren democrat. Her vision will emanate from my actions no matter what fight Im devoted to in my future. Thanks to such an empowering campaign and inspiring candidate, the United States of America is now full of eyes rife with that same gleam of liberty green.

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Eyes that Gleam with Liberty Green - The Georgetown Voice

AP all-state: Libertys Maisie Burnham named girls 2B player of the year – The Spokesman-Review

The Associated Press announced its 2019-20 all-state boys and girls basketball teams for all classifications on Wednesday, and 22 regional athletes were named to the lists.

Libertys Maisie Burnham, who signed with Eastern Washington, was selected as girls 2B state player of the year one of four players of the year within the region.

Joining Burnham as AP POY are Clarkston senior Tru Allen (boys 2A), Odessa senior Ryan Moffet (boys 1B) and Curlew senior Korin Baker (girls 1B).

Burnham and Moffet the state career scoring record-holder helped their teams to state titles. Allen guided Clarkston to a state runner-up finish and Bakers Cougars finished sixth at state.

All four players were scheduled to participate in The Spokesman-Review High School Basketball Showcase.

Its pretty exciting, Burnham said. Its quite an honor, but Im more excited about our team accomplishment, you know.

Burnham is the latest in the extended Soliday family to receive the honors.

Her grandfather, Ron, is one of four brothers who helped put Eastern Washington basketball on the map.

Theres some pretty high expectations in the family, for sure, Burnham said.

Her mother, Cheri (Soliday) Burnham, won a title at Reardan in 1988, an achievement that eluded her father Blaze and brothers Match and Chase.

I wanted it for so long, Maisie Burnham said of the state title. I know me personally, my dad and my brothers we have had troubles reaching that goal. My mom did it and so I was the last chance to follow my moms footsteps.

It definitely feels good to bring that home, not only for us, but for Liberty.

Burnham praised teammates Aleena Cook (honorable mention), Kendyl Fletcher and Delaney Goodwin, among others, as instrumental in the title chase.

I think it really showed you cant win with just a few players. Youve got to have the whole team, and I think that we really honed in on that and I think thats what made us pretty successful throughout the season, and it helped us in final game for sure.

Several Greater Spokane League players received honors.

Gonzaga Prep senior Liam Lloyd was named to the boys 4A first team. GSL Player of the Year, junior Tyson Degenhart, was selected to the boys 3A first team.

This is Degenharts second consecutive all-state selection.

I think it just shows the amount of work someone has to put in the offseason, he said. I think it just motivates me to keep putting in more work and getting better each day.

Degenhart was selected to the State 3A all-tournament team, despite Mt. Spokane being eliminated in a first-round game.

I thought that was super cool, he said. I was totally surprised when those all-tournament teams came out.

Degenhart said he was honored by the all-tourney and all-state selections.

Its nice to have some respect over on the West Side, because most of the time on the East Side of the state you dont get as much respect from the West Side. It just seems like thats just how its been.

He was also impressed at the volume of Eastern Washington players on the all-state teams.

Thats a lot of players, he said. I think, as time goes on, the East Side just keeps getting better and better and I think that number will continue to rise.

Junior MJ Bruno, from girls State 4A champion Central Valley, was named as honorable mention. GSL Player of the Year, senior Jayda Noble of Mt. Spokane, who signed with the University of Washington, was a 3A first-team pick.

Other area players honored:

Boys first team: 1A: Jobi Gelder, sr., Deer Park. 2B: AJ Floyd, sr., Davenport.

Boys honorable mention: 2B: Tyshawn Colvin, soph., Liberty; Matthew Thompson, sr., Kettle Falls. 1B: Chase Gerard, sr., Almira/Coulee-Hartline; Reece Isaak, soph., ACH.

Girls first team: 2A: Ashlyn Wallace, jr., Clarkston. 1B: Mia Pakootas, sr., Inchelium; Rylee Desautel, sr., Inchelium.

Girls honorable mention: 2A: Hailey Marlow, sr., West Valley. 2B: Lydia Bergquist, sr., St. Georges; Aleena Cook, sr., Liberty. 1B: Lizzy Perry, sr., Oakesdale.

Complete Associated Press all-state teams:

All-class POY: Jabe Mullins, sr., Mount Si.

4A: POY: Mullins. First team: Mullins; Liam Lloyd, sr., Gonzaga Prep; Tanner Toolson, sr., Union; Kaden Perry, jr., Battle Ground; Jackson Grant, jr., Olympia. Hon. mention: Tyler Patterson, sr., Mount Si; Cooper DeWitt, sr., Chiawana.

3A: POY: Tari Eason, sr., Garfield. First team: Eason; Tyson Degenhart, jr., Mount Spokane; Paolo Banchero, jr., ODea; Ayoni Benavidez, sr., Kennewick; Nolan Hickman, jr., Eastside Catholic. Hon. mention: Cameron Stordahl, sr., Marysville Pilchuck; Malakhi Knight, jr., Marsyville Getchell; Kyson Rose, sr., Kamiakin.

2A: POY: Tru Allen, sr., Clarkson. First team: Allen; Noah Pepper, jr., Selah; Kobe McMillian, sr., North Kitsap; Jonas La Tour, soph., North Kitsap; Nate Snook, sr. Columbia River; Issac Perez, sr., Toppenish. Hon. mention: Alex Jensen, sr., Lakewood; Shea Humphrey, sr., North Kitsap; Tyler Speck, sr., W.F. West; Jackson Reisner, sr., Burlington-Edison; Wyatt Walker, sr., Burlington-Edison.

1A: POY: Tyler Lindhart, soph., Kings. First team: Lindhart; Hunger Ecklund, sr., La Center; Jaden DeBoer, jr., Lynden Christian; Mason Landdeck, jr., Zillah; Jobi Gelder, sr., Deer Park. Hon. mention: Malachy Caffrey, sr., La Salle; Andrew DeVries, sr., Lynden Christian; William Bailey III, sr., River View.

2B POY: Omari Maulana, jr., Life Christian. First team: Maulana; Bryce Cline, sr., Winlock; AJ Floyd, sr., Davenport; Tre Seydel, soph., Raymond; Cade Gebbers, jr., Brewster. Hon. mention: Devin Sampson-Craig, jr., White Swan; Justin Hudson, sr., Kittitas; Tayshawn Colvin, soph., Liberty; Logan Walker, jr., Willapa Valley; Cole Hatton, sr., Ocosta; Braden Thomas, sr., Adna; Matthew Thompson, sr., Kettle Falls; Broc Keeton, sr., Toutle Lake.

1B POY: Ryan Moffet, sr., Odessa. First team: Moffet; Ethan Lindstrom, sr., Naselle; Levi Rivera, sr., Riverside Christian; Bryce Strom, sr., Yakama Tribal; Izaiah Mowitch, jr., Taholah. Hon. mention: Chase Gerard, sr., Almira/Coulee-Hartline; Reece Isaak, soph., Almira/Coulee-Hartline; Caleb Revey, sr., Lummi Nation; Darius Nichols, sr., Muckleshoot.

All-class POY: Hailey Van Lith, sr., Cashmere.

4A POY: Mia Hughes, jr., Woodinville. First team: Hughes; Talia Von Oelhoffen, jr., Chiawana; Aaliyah Alexander, sr., Todd Beamer; Keeli Burton-Oliver, sr., Eastlake; Raigan Reed, sr., Lake Stevens. Hon. mention: MJ Bruno, jr., Central Valley; Mason Oberg, sr., Union.

3A POY: Meghan Fiso, sr., Garfield. First team: Fiso; Jayda Noble, sr., Mt. Spokane; Malia Samuels, fr., Eastside Catholic; Tiarra Brown, sr., Bethel; Dalayah Daniels, sr., Garfield. Hon. mention: Nakia Boston, sr., Lynnwood; MeiLani McBee, sr., Kennewick; Olivia Wikstrom, sr., Bainbridge.

2A POY: Keylie Hershey, sr., Lynden. First team: Hershey; Ashlyn Wallace, jr., Clarkston; Dylan Philip, soph., Ellensburg; Megan River, sr., Black Hills; Kylie Sherman, fr., Selah. Hon. mention: Ashlynn Sylve, jr., East Valley (Yakima); Emilia Long, jr., Port Angeles; Drea Brumfield, soph., W.F. West; Hailey Marlow, sr., West Valley (Spokane); Julia Lucas, sr., Archbishop Murphy; Paige Winter, sr. Rochester.

1A POY: Van Lith. First team: Van Lith; Juianna Walker, jr., Annie Wright; Riley Dykstra, sr., Lynden Christian; Trista Hull, jr., La Salle; Jalyn Sackrider, sr., Elma. Hon. mention: Brynn Widner, soph., Zillah; Kali Rambo, sr., Elma; Zoe Hutchings, sr., Montesano; McKynnlie Dalan, fr., Montesano; Irena Korolenko, sr., Cedar Park Christian; Madison Smith, jr., Connell.

2B POY: Burnham. First team: Burnham; Kyra Gardner, soph., Raymond; Erika Glenn, jr., Ilwaco; Kal Schaplow, sr., Toledo; Justine Benson, sr., La Conner. Hon. mention: Addison Hall, soph., Winlock; McKenna Martinez, jr., Tri-Cities Prep; Jadyn Johnson, sr., Columbia (Burbank); Lydia Bergquist, sr., St. Georges; Aleena Cook, sr., Liberty; Jansie Merz, jr., Wahkiakum; Kaeley Schultz, soph., Rainier.

1B POY: Baker. First team: Baker; Maddy Dixon, sr., Pomeroy; Mia Pakootas, sr., Inchelium; Rylee Desautel, sr., Inchelium; Jada Liulamaga, jr., Yakama Tribal. Hon. mention: Lizzy Perry, sr., Oakesdale; Nakeah McCrory, soph., Taholah; Lalia Green, jr., Neah Bay.

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What is the cost of freedom and liberty in the era of coronavirus? | TheHill – The Hill

To reassure concerned Americans about the coronavirus, President Trump held a press conference with the heads of some of the largest companies in the country. One of the messages he was clearly hoping to convey was that, however feckless the federal response had been to that point, he is now harnessing the skills and innovative approaches of business leaders. Any enthusiasm that might have been generated for relying on the forces of capitalism to protect us, however, quickly disappeared as the national struggle to address the spreading pandemic has now been more urgent.

Since the 1980s, we have lost sight of the notion that our country must have a mix of government and markets to keep us safe and prosperous. Americans rightly value individualism, but that is not enough to protect our liberty. The history of the United States is one that has relied on both government and markets to ensure that liberty. It is certainly easy to see how markets promote liberty, since individuals are free to make whatever choices they deem appropriate. But the government is also necessary to promote liberty. This is because the market system, when left to its own devices, creates risks for individuals that push far beyond their control. When this happens, the government can and must act to keep us safer.

Americans should of course welcome help from the largest companies in the country. It is not the market system and individualism, however, that will save the day. To get through this, we need a collective and organized response, led by competent and prepared government leaders with the foresight to plan before the problem turns from a crisis to a catastrophe.

The focus right now is on the lack of coronavirus testing kits, emergency planning, and so on, but the lack of federal government preparation runs much deeper. With our emphasis on individualism rather than smart and effective governance, we have created a level of economic inequality that will harm all of us by leading to a wider outbreak and even more financial dislocation. The inequities hardwired into our economy, such as jobs that do not pay a living wage and the lack of health insurance for millions of workers, leave many of our fellow men and women at far greater risks.

Even if testing kits are available, people without health insurance would avoid them because of the cost of supportive care following a diagnosis. People will go to work even if they think they might be sick because they need to earn the money to feed and shelter themselves and their families. Any time that we are not able to heed the public guidance to stay at home and avoid personal interaction, we increase the danger that our hospitals will become overwhelmed, unable to care for the elderly and vulnerable who are seriously ill, or anyone else suffering from a medical emergency.

The United States has greatly benefited from a robust market system, but sensible public policy can ensure that its prosperity reaches everyone and that we work together to protect each other from harm. In the short term, we should make emergency aid available for those millions of Americans who will be staying home without pay. We cannot let people starve, suffer from malnutrition, or be thrown out of their homes when they lose work.

The government must do all this and much more to reduce the severity of the incoming recession. In the long term, our elected leaders should pass and effectively implement health care and economic measures to ensure that there is no next time of facing a pandemic unprepared. A new mix of government and markets is necessary both today and into the future.

Sidney Shapiro is the Fletcher Chair in Administrative Law at Wake Forest University and is a board member with the Center for Progressive Reform.

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What is the cost of freedom and liberty in the era of coronavirus? | TheHill - The Hill

The Passing of a Great Advocate of Liberty and Peace: Jon Basil Utley, RIP | Doug Bandow – Foundation for Economic Education

The conservative movement lost a giant last week with the passing of Jon Basil Utley. Largely unknown to the public, he understood the horror of tyranny and devoted his life to promoting liberty. He was 86 and suffered from lymphoma. He beat cancer once and returned to the political battlefield as active as ever. But this time he ventured into a new realm.

A gentle, friendly soul, Jon was activist and donor, colleague and adviser, and most fundamentally a friend. An antiwar activist within a movement that was captured by neoconservatives two decades ago, he was always cheerful even when a seemingly forlorn figure at right-leaning gatherings. Yet his background gave him a unique authority absent to most conservatives today.

Jon was born in the Soviet Union in 1934. His mother was Freda Utley, a British intellectual who visited the USSR after World War I and, like many others, fell for the seeming promise of communism. She met his father, Soviet economist Arcadi Berdichevsky, when he served in the Soviet trade mission in London. They returned to the Soviet Union, where her illusions were soon shattered with Berdichevskys arrest in 1936. As a British citizen, she was able to get out with Jon. In Britain, she received two postcards from her husband, then nothing; she initiated a public campaign to release her husband, enlisting the aid of leading left-wing intellectuals and even writing to Stalin. Two decades later, she found out that he was executed in 1938.

Berdichevsky was arrested for allegedly being a Trotskyite; Stalin feared fellow Bolshevik Leon Trotsky until the latters assassination in 1940. Imprisoned at Vorkuta Corrective Labor Camp, or Vorkutlag for short, Jons father was executed at the Brick Quarry, a notorious site mentioned in Alexander Solzhenitsyns Gulag Archipelago. Berdichevsky was one of three leaders of a hunger strike in his prison camp and was found guilty of provoking massive discontent among the prisoners, Utley explained. Berdichevsky was formally rehabilitated in 1961, only a quarter century late.

In 2004, Utley traveled to Russia, visiting the Federal Security Service (formerly KGB) archives and Perm gulag museum. He reviewed his fathers file, which included three photos of Berdichevsky, his mothers letter, and the execution order signed by Joseph Stalin. Utley made a fascinating half-hour film of his quest.

The experience helped turn his mother, who emigrated with Jon to America, into a fervent anti-Communist. In 1940, she penned The Dream We Lost. Explained Utley: It had a very profound effect on intellectuals who later built the anticommunist movement in America after 1945.

She wrote a number of books in succeeding years, including Odyssey of a Liberal, a biography covering her early years and political journey. Perhaps most important for Jons intellectual development, his mother turned their home into a salon of sorts, with leading conservative intellectuals in regular attendance. Jon could not escape being involved in the conservative movement.

Nevertheless, though journalism and activism were in his blood, he began his career with American International Group Insurance in Colombia, Cuba, and Venezuela, all destined to become international hotspots. He later worked in the oil and real estate industries.

Still, his calling remained clear. He was a foreign correspondent for Knight-Ridder, involved in Latin American publications, and entered the Voice of America during the Reagan administration. Ultimately, his career became his work on behalf of freedom.

He was involved with and supported many movement organizations. For instance, he backed Reason foundation and magazine and Future of Freedom Foundation, as well as the Cato Institute, with which I am affiliated. However, his special passion was hating communism. So he naturally celebrated its demise. After the collapse of the Soviet Union, he worked and traveled with the Atlas Economic Research Foundation, now the Atlas Network, to promote the newly free states transition to capitalism and democracy. Years later he supported the Victims of Communism Memorial to ensure that people remembered the legacy of mankinds most destructive modern ideology.

He was no narrow ideologue, however. After the demise of the Evil Empire in Ronald Reagans famous description, Jon took on another cause: peace. He was never attracted by the superficial cant delivered by hardened revolutionaries and their fellow travelers. He had no sympathy for the ideological posturing of authoritarians in sheeps clothing. His personal experience demonstrated the big lie that undergirded systems like the USSR.

However, he truly believed in limited government and individual liberty. And understood how war undermined both. His views were a bit like that of James Madison, who warned: Of all the enemies of true liberty, war is, perhaps, the most to be dreaded, because it comprises and develops the germ of every other. War is the parent of armies; from these proceed debts and taxes; and armies, and debts, and taxes are the known instrument for bringing the many under the domination of the few. But there was something more. Jon was appalled by the human cost to Americans and other peoples. His moral concern and human compassion did not end at the countrys border. Patriotism never blinded him to the harm done to other societies by Washingtons promiscuous war-making.

In 1991, Jon organized against the first Gulf War. He backed creation of antiwar.com, for which I wrote a column in the late 2000s, becoming the first major donor in 1999, according to co-founder Eric Garris. Years later he became publisher and financial benefactor of The American Conservative, an iconoclastic right-leaning publication, for which I write a weekly column, helping it financially as well.

These were his passions, though he did not stop there. He was never satisfied with just a financial role. Not one to sit in the grandstands reviewing others work, he also wrote regularly for numerous publications. He loved the intellectual contest, shaping the argument, convincing others, and especially addressing philosophical friends who needed to be saved from their wayward ways. He was a political evangelist, thriving on personal contact and going where the people were. For him, as Jesus said, the fields, political in Jons case, are ripe for harvest (John 4:35). Observed Kelley Vlahos at The American Conservative:

So many people called Utley friend because that is what he was. He zeroed in on interesting, authentic people at every station in life and cultivated new bonds with unusual fervor. He was known to use the standing room at conferences, empty spaces between tables at dinners, and hallways outside of events to introduce his new and old compatriots to one another, hoping to spark meaningful collaborations. Business cards were passed, years-long friendships formed.

Perhaps his most yeoman, and certainly courageous, service was going to a seemingly endless succession of conservative meetings evangelizing against war. This wasnt easy, especially during the Bush years, with many conservatives doubling down on the Iraq debacle. I saw him regularly at the Wednesday Group meetings hosted by Grover Norquist and Americans for Tax Reform.

Week in and week out, Jon would make announcements, distribute articles, and question speakers. Other regular attendees knew what was coming. Many, probably with little knowledge of his background, clearly wished Jon would just go away. But he never did. And he was never discouraged, or at least never showed it, no matter how cold the rebuff from the majority of listeners. Like an Old Testament prophet, he felt compelled to call sinners to account. They had to choose to repent. But if they did not, he would be back the following week to chastise them again.

Conservative stalwart Lee Edwards noted Jons willingness to speak his mind irrespective of the views of others. Edwards cited the typical result: an embarrassed silence after Jon spoke. But afterwards, reported Edwards, people would come up to him and say, Jon, keep saying that. Keep asking those questions.

Jon had the courage others admitted that they lacked.

In fact, despite the criticism received from hawkish Republican regulars, he could point to two Republican presidents who seemed uncomfortable with war. Ronald Reagan turned to missile defense in horrified reaction to the doctrine of Mutual Assured Destruction, which prescribed retaliation for any Soviet attack, which would incinerate Moscow and other major cities. Despite constant bluster and inconsistency, Donald Trump has angered hawks by balking at their many proposals for military action.

In 2014, the Committee for the Republic made a video to honor Jon on his 80th birthday. Last year he received a lifetime achievement award from The American Conservative. The presentation was a heartfelt affair. The nine-minute tribute video captured his life and appropriately was entitled Jon Utley: A Lifetime of Courage. His friends and colleagues offered many compliments. But the most obvious and emblematic was brave. With the same consistency that he opposed communism, he opposed war.

Yet his political activities should not take away from Jon the person. He was warm, friendly, and encouraging. He exhibited a basic decency and civility in making his case. Prolific iconoclastic writer Jim Bovard offered the ultimate compliment: Jon was almost a novelty in Washington: when he asked how you were doing, he actually gave a damn about the answer. Jon did.

Jon Basil Utley was unique. Good, decent, dedicated, and principled. And a good friend. The conservative movement needs more activists like him. He will be missed.

"Vorkuta to Perm: Russias Concentration Camp Museums and My Fathers Story" - Originally published in The Freeman.

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The Passing of a Great Advocate of Liberty and Peace: Jon Basil Utley, RIP | Doug Bandow - Foundation for Economic Education

Liberty Twp. leaders, churches step up to help with grocery delivery – WKBN.com

They're coming together with a team of volunteers to help people who may need food or other deliveries while practicing social distancing

by: Nadine Grimley

WKBN

LIBERTY TWP., Ohio (WKBN) Liberty Township trustees are teaming up with area churches and the police department to help residents during the COVID-19 outbreak.

Theyre coming together with a team of volunteers to help people who may need food or other deliveries while practicing social distancing.

If you need help, you can call one of their volunteers to pick up a curbside grocery order placed at a store in the township and theyll deliver it right to your door.

A volunteer from one of our chaplain units will go out, pick it up, a trustee will pick it up, Ill pick it up, said Police Chief Toby Meloro. We have people that want to just help our residents in any way we can.

We dont know how long this pandemic is going to happen, trustee Devon Stanley said. We know that theres going to be a shut-in, essentially, tonight effectively and were still getting paid as Liberty Township officials. Were a government, were open for business. We want to make sure were providing a service to them and helping them in any way we can.

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Liberty Twp. leaders, churches step up to help with grocery delivery - WKBN.com

Learjets Speedy New Business Jet Comes With Its Own Mini Executive Suite – Robb Report

One of the original developers of private business aircraft, William Powell Lear founded what is now Learjet in 1962, with its first production plane delivered two years later. Canada-based Bombardier acquired the company in 1990 and continued adding to the fleet, including the Learjet 75 in 2013.

But since then, the brand has been in a holding pattern when it comes to new models, at least until recently. Scheduled to enter service this year, the nascent Learjet 75 Liberty has already had two examples sold as medevac aircraft for duty in Poland. The business-jet version, however, offers up a six-seat configuration, allowing its passengers the opportunity to spread out a bit in what is one of the longest cabins in the light-jet class. Measuring 19 feet, 10 inches, the length beats comparable aircraft from Embraer, Cessna and Beechcraft (which range from 15 to 17 feet)and it has a flat floor, no less.

The cabins luxurious, spacious interior.Courtesy of Chad Slattery

The 75 Liberty is touted as the first to offer a spacious, two-seat Executive Suite in this size jet. The setup, located at the front, delivers 35 inches of legroom, a couple of fold-out tables and a private space perfect for talking shop, finishing up projects or getting some much-needed sleep. The latter is made easier by a pocket door between the galley and the Club Suite (main cabin) that reduces cabin noise by up to eight decibels. The Club Suites four-seat configuration makes for another comfortable zone thats conducive to relaxation or multitasking, especially given the aircrafts Gogo ATG 4G connectivity.

With a top speed of Mach 0.81among the fastest in categoryand a range of 2,080 nautical miles, Liberty bests the Embraer Phenom 300 and Cessna Citation CJ3+ on both counts. Those specs mean that it can fly nonstop from, say, Las Vegas to New York or Mexico City to San Francisco, and all with assistance from its Bombardier Vision flight deck and Garmin G5000 avionics upgrade. Base price for the latest Learjet is $9.9 million.

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Learjets Speedy New Business Jet Comes With Its Own Mini Executive Suite - Robb Report

Life, liberty … and the fundamental right to birdie 17 at Shenny – theday.com

Full disclosure: My musings on life in the past few weeks haven't always been accurate. Tuesday's diatribe became Wednesday's mea culpa. I suspect many of us have experienced disturbing confrontations with humility, given the perpetually changing circumstances the coronavirus thrusts upon us.

Still, my unenlightened fancies notwithstanding, I'm pretty sure our framers, after the "life, liberty and pursuit of happiness" part, didn't include "and the fundamental right to birdie 17 at Shenny."

So can someone explain why Shennecossett, Norwich Golf Course and Stonington Country Club (for its members) are still open? I mean, how many times do Dr. Fauci, Gov. Cuomo and Surgeon General Jerome Adams have to beg for social distancing before we all yes, all adhere to the information?

Some golf groupies believe courses have the right to remain open, citing semantics connected to Gov. Lamont's recent executive order closing all non-essential businesses. Except that the governor's order is irrelevant to the argument. The decision to keep a golf course open thumbs its nose at a greater societal responsibility.

And this virus will continue to run faster than Jesse Owens if we fail to take societal responsibility more seriously. Sure, that antagonizes the YOU CAN'T TELL ME WHAT TO DO crowd. Lest we forget, though, that crazy little thing called humility. Sure beats hubris during a global pandemic.

A month ago, few of us ever heard of social distancing. Now it's at the epicenter of life's changing circumstances. We must adhere to it. Leaving a golf course open, while so many other businesses tethered to recreation have closed, sends the wrong message. It suggests that members of society not allowed to play golf translates into a higher form of suffering than everybody else's. This just in: It's not. We all miss our friends and the things we like to do.

I've never been a fan of slippery slope arguments, mostly because it's illogical to accept a succession of events as inevitable without direct evidence that the course of events would happen. But after watching human behavior in recent weeks and how there's a direct line connecting human weakness with selfishness I cannot say with assurance that others in society wouldn't think like this: If it's permissible for golfers to congregate, why can't we get together with our friends, too?

And then there goes the virus like Jesse Owens again.

In the abstract, sure, one can theoretically participate in golf and stay six feet away from the next person. How many of you honestly think golfers especially if they've partaken of the euphoric nectar would follow that in any sensible way?

The restrictions some courses have in place are laudable: removal of ball washers and rakes, not allowing use of carts, limiting patrons in the pro shop and extending starting tee time intervals to lessen the likelihood of congregating. They'll prove useful later when life resumes with some sense of normalcy.

But now is not the time.

I get that most golfers are going to read this and hate it. Good. Because let me reiterate: Your brand of suffering isn't worse than mine. Or the person next door. Or the medical personnel at hospitals throughout the country who don't have enough masks right now to keep themselves safe. What, your inability to trot out your new Titleist Hybrid is somehow worse than a nurse whose life is in peril every day?

I got an email Tuesday from a Waterford attorney and presumably avid golfer, who offered this:"Emergency orders issued pursuant to the state's police power, which are in derogation of our rights, are to be narrowly construed. Playing golf has not been prohibited by Gov. Lamont pursuant to his emergency powers."

Of course. We must narrowly construe everything here in a global crisis. Because the constitutional right for you to play golf is more sacrosanct than the Sermon on the Mount. Such an inspiring attitude: ME ME ME. Yup. Your individual rights supersede the greater good. Always and forever.

Except that it's about WE WE WE.

This is the opinion of Day sports columnist Mike DiMauro

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Life, liberty ... and the fundamental right to birdie 17 at Shenny - theday.com

A look at the top paid athletic employees at Liberty – A Sea of Red

Since Liberty is a private entity, the school does not have to publicly release information and is not subject to FOIA laws as other schools are. Because of this, salary information of coaches is never released, and we can only go off public tax documents.

Libertys tax documents for the tax year beginning July 1, 2017 and ending June 30, 2018, were just recently published. Included within these tax documents is compensation information for several key university employees as well as a handful of athletic employees.

Liberty Athletic Director Ian McCaw had base compensation of $458,279 with other reportable compensation of $17,797, retirement and other deferred compensation of $22,500, and nontaxable benefits of $27,197 for a total of $525,773.

Former Liberty head football coach Turner Gill had base compensation of $739,126 with bonus & incentive compensation of $16,000, retirement and other deferred compensation of $24,000, and nontaxable benefits of $29,946 for a total of $809,072.

Liberty head basketball coach Ritchie McKay had base compensation of $564,194 with bonus & incentive compensation of $25,000, retirement and other deferred compensation of $22,137, and nontaxable benefits of $29,102 for a total of $640,433.

Liberty womens head basketball coach Carey Green had base compensation of $243,906 with bonus & incentive compensation of $15,000, retirement and other deferred compensation of $11,844, and nontaxable benefits of $21,392 for a total of $292,142.

Former Liberty Athletic Director Jeff Barber had base compensation of $321,350 with retirement and other deferred compensation of $15,583 and nontaxable benefits of $22,711 for a total of $359,644.

McCaw was hired in late November 2016 shortly after Barber had resigned.

McKay and Liberty agreed to a multi-year contract extension through the 2024-25 season in April 2019 after he led the team to a program record 29 wins and the first ever NCAA Tournament win a year ago, and again had a contract extension signed following the 2020 season.

Gill retired in December 2018 and Hugh Freeze was hired shortly thereafter. Following his first season at Liberty, when he guided the Flames to an 8-5 record and the programs first ever bowl game appearance and win, Freeze was awarded with a five year contract extension that reportedly makes him among the highest paid coaches in the Group of Five at an average of $2 million per year.

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A look at the top paid athletic employees at Liberty - A Sea of Red

‘Extremely high’ North Liberty man arrested after reporting captive in his basement – The Gazette

NORTH LIBERTY A man high on meth was arrested Saturday after he reported a captive in his basement, but police found only an illegally possessed gun.

Police said Kyle L. Wagner, 39, was extremely high on meth around 4 p.m. at his home on Swan Lake Road SW. Wagner was very paranoid that someone was being held captive in his basement, according to a police criminal complaint.

Police responded to the residence but did not find anyone held captive in Wagners basement bedroom. But they did find a shotgun and ammunition in a closet.

As a felon, Wagner is barred from possessing firearms.

He was arrested and faces one count of control of dominion/control of a firearm by a felon, a Class D felony punishable by up to five years in prison.

Comments: (319) 339-3155; lee.hermiston@thegazette.com

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'Extremely high' North Liberty man arrested after reporting captive in his basement - The Gazette

Pressure on Liberty Media to protect UK F1 teams – Planet F1

Date published: March 25 2020

David Richards, chairman of Motorsport UK, has called on Liberty Media to stand by Britains F1 teams to ensure they dont go bust during the coronavirus pandemic.

The bedrock of the sport is located in England with six of the grids 10 teams Mercedes, Red Bull, McLaren, Renault, Racing Point and Williams based here.

But after the new season was put on hold with eight of the opening 22 races either postponed or cancelled Richards believes the financial hit from those scrapped races could place a number of the smaller teams at risk.

He urged the sports American owners to emulate former supremo Bernie Ecclestone by dipping into their own pockets if required.

A lot will depend on the way Formula One behaves throughout this, Richards told the PA news agency.

F1 cannot afford to lose teams at the back of the grid because that would be a disaster for them.

Bernie made sure that when there were tough times the smaller teams were looked after and I hope that Liberty see the common sense in that, too.

The big manufacturers such as Mercedes and Renault will be okay, but if you look at Williams and Racing Point, for example, it is not going to be easy for them. There is a distinct danger of operations going out of business.

There will be motorsport companies who do not have the resources to get through this period. It is going to be a real challenge.

Liberty remain hopeful of staging as many as 18 races this year and believe the campaign could get still get under way in the summer.

The season had been due to start in Melbourne, but the grand prix was cancelled just 90 minutes before opening practice following McLarens withdrawal from the event after a team member contracted coronavirus.

Liberty were very late in their decision about Australia, added Richards, a former team principal for BAR and Benetton.

It is very difficult and I am not for one minute suggesting it was an easy decision, but given the amount of people who travelled to Australia from various countries across Europe, it was an inappropriate thing to do. A week beforehand they could have come to the decision to cancel.

As you approach a new season there is big impetus and expectation. It is easy to say this all in hindsight, but nobody is denying that it could have been done better.

Lewis Hamilton talked for most when he spoke out on the matter. He has really matured and come of age and represents a very positive side of F1 and the consciousness of the sport. He is not afraid to speak his mind and I applaud him for that.

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Pressure on Liberty Media to protect UK F1 teams - Planet F1

How West Chester, Liberty townships are reacting to coronavirus – Hamilton Journal News

WEST CHESTER

The two largest townships in Butler County have locked their doors to the public but officials say business is still being conducted albeit not necessarily as usual.

Liberty Twp. locked its doors on Monday and about half the staff are working remotely, the rest are in the office on a weekly rotation. The administration center in West Chester Twp. was open on Tuesday because it was a polling place, but the doors were shut after the primary election was cancelled. All employees were still working, but officials said accommodations are being made for employees with special circumstances, like lack of daycare for their children.

West Chester Police Chief Joel Herzog said his officers are still patrolling the streets but are now all equipped with special suits to protect them. He said they are prepared for the worst.

RELATED: Butler County commissioners approve funds to help in coronavirus fight

If for some reason the illness starts hitting us we have a platoon deployment system we would implement, Herzog said. That will redirect employees from other areas of the department like detectives, traffic safety, community affairs and they would move out to uniform patrol, so even if we lost half our workforce we still would be able to maintain staffing.

He said they continue to take police reports from people but are doing more of that via phone versus face-to-face, when it is not urgent.

Residents and businesses can reach West Chester staff via phone and through the website. Spokeswoman Barb Wilson said public safety departments will postpone non-essential public appearances, community outreach, facility tours and the like. The township parks are open, restrooms at Beckett Park are available and Keehner Park restrooms will be opened mid-April as usual.

Liberty Twp. Trustee Board President Christine Matacic said the township made the decision to isolate its staff late last week but all of their decisions are ongoing because the crisis keeps changing so rapidly.

Once reality hit last week with having the virus here in Butler County it made it even more urgent for us to start taking action, Matacic said.

The Parks Committee and Zoning Commission meetings that were scheduled for March 16 were cancelled. The trustees limited attendance at their meeting Tuesday to the elected officials and Administrator Kristen Bitonte, all the other key staffers who usually attend were kept away. All other meetings for township staff are being held via phone or postponed. The parks are open but restrooms locked.

Matacic said the fire department and sheriffs deputies were operating as close to normal as possible.

They have to respond but they also have to take precautions in their responses, Matacic said. They are on the front line with our residents and with our businesses, I dont think any of us are operating normally right now.

Matacic said as far as protective supplies for first responders go the township is well equipped for the short term. However, she cautioned that everyone should heed the governors and health officials warning to stay home and stop the spread.

We have to take this very, very seriously. Its going to be day by day, hour by hour, things will change in how we approach things, she said. We have to be on top of it all and be sure we are doing everything we can to protect our residents.

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How West Chester, Liberty townships are reacting to coronavirus - Hamilton Journal News

Selection of Sarah Makin-Acciani shows the commitment to religious liberty | TheHill – The Hill

Just a few weeks ago, President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe pandemic is bad, we need the capability to measure just how bad Florida governor wants federal disaster area declaration Amash calls stimulus package 'a raw deal' for 'those who need the most help' MORE put Vice President Mike PenceMichael (Mike) Richard PenceWhite House press secretary to return to work after negative virus test Trump officials advise people leaving New York to self-quarantine for 14 days Intercept editor: Dems want Pence to take wheel on coronavirus response MORE in charge of handling the COVID-19 situation. Thus far, the vice president has done a remarkable job leading the charge: Millions of Americans are taking the call to stay home quite seriously and doing all they can to keep themselves, their families, and their neighbors safe.

But this isnt the only area where the vice president has demonstrated a remarkable ability to preserve safety and freedom. News recently broke that one of his aides, Sarah Makin-Acciani, has been tapped to serve on the National Security Council (NSC) as the presidents adviser on international religious freedom. The position is an important one; some sources say that the U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom has urged the White House to fill this position for nearly 20 years.

And Makin-Acciani is a perfect fit for the job. Shes served for many years in our nations capital, fighting to promote the biblical values of life and freedom across the country. Sarah served as senior advisor to Randy ForbesJames (Randy) Randy ForbesSelection of Sarah Makin-Acciani shows the commitment to religious liberty Too much can do, not enough candor Trump makes little headway filling out Pentagon jobs MORE, the Republican representative for Virginias fourth congressional district from 2001 to 2017.

Forbes was well-known for his pro-life stance, having been given a 100 percent rating from the National Right to Life Committee (NRLC) and, more recently, voting in favor of the Pain-Capable Unborn Child Act, which bans abortions after 20 weeks when an unborn child is capable of experiencing pain.

After working for Rep. Forbes, Makin-Acciani served on the vice presidents staff as director of public engagement and intergovernmental affairs. Her leadership during this time made her an obvious choice for the role, as does her outspoken faith. Makin-Acciani is a practicing evangelical Christian who places Christ at the center of her life and aims to use the remarkable position shes been placed in for his glory.

he opportunity couldnt come at a better time. Momentum on the international religious freedom front has continued to grow since President Trump took office. The evening before the National Prayer Breakfast in February, the International Religious Freedom Alliance a group of 27 nations committed to protecting the rights of individuals to practice their religious faith met for the first time in Washington. The Alliance aims to stem the tide of violence against religious communities and promote other human rights intimately linked to freedom of religion, such as freedom of expression and assembly.

The world desperately needs firm and decisive leadership on this issue. The World Economic Forum (WEF) reported a significant spike in religious violence over the last decade. Some of the violence is infighting among sects within one religious faith, such as Sunni and Shia Muslims; some of the violence is when individuals from one religious faith (or none) attack those from another, such as the increase in anti-Semitic violence in Europe and, sadly, here in the United States. Christians are not exempt from such violence: Open Doors USA, an organization that helps persecuted Christians around the world, reports that 260 million Christians experience persecution in 2020.

The more quickly we can coordinate effective international action and the more passionately we advocate for such action here at home the more we can keep believers of all faiths safe and free. Much of the worlds energy in the coming days will be dedicated to stopping the coronavirus, and that is as it should be.

But once we recover from this pandemic and begin to turn the corner, we must redouble our commitment to ending religious violence and ensuring that everyone, around the globe, can pray free from fear and safe from harm. I am confident that Makin-Acciani will be an invaluable resource in these efforts, and I look forward to seeing how she will help this administration continue its important work to promote the first and most precious of human rights in the years to come.

Timothy Head is executive director of the Faith and Freedom Coalition, a national grassroots movement of over two million conservatives and people of faith in support of time-honored values, stronger families, and individual freedom.

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Selection of Sarah Makin-Acciani shows the commitment to religious liberty | TheHill - The Hill

Liberty coaches, athletes stunned and in disbelief following ASUN’s cancellation of spring sports – Lynchburg News and Advance

Kelly Nangle, in her seventh season as the Liberty womens lacrosse coach, has had to address dejected locker rooms throughout the years. Those normally come in the familiar confines of a locker room following crushing defeats when the outcome of the game was decided on the field.

How could she tell a room full of players their season was over with more than a month to go in the regular season? There would be no more games. The road trips that build team chemistry had to be canceled.

That was one of probably the hardest things Ive ever had to do as a head coach and probably will ever have to do because I dont really have a lot of answers, Nangle said.

The ASUN Conference announced Friday evening the cancellation of its spring sports season, roughly 26 hours after it suspended play through at least April 5 because of concerns over the novel coronavirus, COVID-19.

The decision to suspend play came 90 minutes after the NCAA canceled its winter and spring sports championships.

At this point right now, I think everybodys just stunned, LU baseball coach Scott Jackson said. I think its more disbelief and just kind of stunned, like wow, I cant believe that this is a possibility let alone a reality. Its pretty much the sentiment from our players, pretty much the sentiment from other coaches that Ive talked to, and just kind of hard to believe.

The ASUN is one of 20 Division I conferences to cancel all spring sports competition. That list includes the America East, Atlantic 10, Big 12, Big East, Big Ten, Big West, Colonial Athletic Association, Ivy League, MAAC, Missouri Valley, Mid-American, Mountain West, Northeast, Patriot League, Pac-12, Southland, SWAC, Summit League and West Coast.

The other 12 conferences are suspended to varying degrees.

The MEAC announced its spring sports competitions are suspended through the end of the semester, but did not say if the suspension will be evaluated at a later date.

The ACC, American, Big Sky, Conference USA and Western Athletic conferences are suspended until further notice. The Sun Belt is suspended indefinitely.

The Horizon League suspended competition through Friday and has not released a statement whether play will resume Monday.

The Big South and Southern conferences both suspended competition through March 30, the Ohio Valley Conference suspended play until April 3, and the SEC suspended spring sports until April 15.

This is unprecedented, Liberty softball coach Dot Richardson said. I think that its a situation with the virus that people dont know how its going to respond, and being how quickly and infectious it is in other countries, the caution makes sense.

The sports at Liberty affected by the ASUNs decision to cancel the spring sports season are baseball, softball, mens golf, womens lacrosse, mens and womens tennis, and mens and womens outdoor track & field.

The track & field programs had not competed in an outdoor event this season. The first meet the CSU Spring Break Invitational was scheduled for next weekend in North Charleston, South Carolina.

I hate it for all the teams and those seniors that dont get to finish their careers, football coach Hugh Freeze said during Fridays fifth spring practice.

There are 39 seniors on those eight rosters who are in their final season of eligibility.

The NCAA on Friday said its council leadership agreed eligibility relief is appropriate for all Division I student-athletes who participated in spring sports.

Additional issues with NCAA rules must be addressed first, such as how the return of seniors will impact roster space with incoming freshmen and how the additional scholarships will be funded.

Jackson said three of his seniors had plans lined up following the conclusion of the upcoming season right-handed pitcher Garret Price is getting married, shortstop Cam Locklear has a job lined up with the Air Force, and third baseman Ben Highfill has been accepted to grad school at Duke.

He is hopeful those three, along with utility infielder Trey McDyre, elect to return for the 2021 season.

Its going to be interesting because for the programs that get their seniors back, its the best recruiting day ever, Jackson said.

Richardson added three of her five seniors Emily Sweat, Addison Baele and Kayla Harris are either planning to take or already are taking graduate classes and would welcome the extra year of eligibility. Her other two seniors, twins Amber and Autumn Bishop, are both getting married, and Richardson was unsure if they wanted to return for another season.

When [the NCAA] made the decision, it wasnt our place to dispute it, Richardson said. I quickly, in talking with [the players], said that the NCAA in the past has always tried to do the right thing for the student-athlete. I said to them, I would not be surprised if they try and give each of you another year. When they heard that, they were a little more in tuned a little bit of some promise and hope.

The other spring sport coaches were unsure what their seniors had planned following the conclusion of the semester.

I think its something theyll all sit down and look at and take some time to decide. I think its a lot for them to really try to grasp right now and to try to really think through, Nangle said. It does help. I know for them, its hard because theyre so focused on this year with this season with this team that the idea of anything besides this season [and] this group is just something they cant really wrap their heads around. But its helpful. I told them its helpful to know that they have that, but they dont need to rush to make any decision this second. I definitely think its something theyre going to look into and think about and kind of try to digest.

Nangle and womens tennis coach Jeff Maren said they are taking advantage of the ASUNs decision to grant member schools the discretion to resume practice activities under their own campus policies related to face-to-face activity.

Liberty University President Jerry Falwell Jr. announced early Friday that academic instruction at LU is planning to resume as normal, with in-person classes, after this weeks spring break.

We actually are going to practice, even next week. Even though its our spring break, we had planned to be there because we were going to have matches to prepare for, Maren said. We decided as a team that we would still continue to practice. The girls wanted that sense of normalcy, they wanted to be able to still train, which I was very proud of hearing them say that if our season is over, we want to continue to get ready for the next season. I was really proud to hear that.

Maren and his team learned the season was being put on hold Thursday while they were in the hotel lobby in Honolulu, Hawaii, following a two-match stay in the Aloha State.

They had an opportunity to visit national landmarks and scored a victory over North Texas. The second match, against Hawaii, was rained out with the Flames leading.

It was absolute extremes. We just had the absolute extremes, Maren said. We felt great about ourselves tennis-wise; we felt great about being in Hawaii and seeing all the sights. Then to have that news broken to us, we went all the way to the bottom in terms of our emotions and how we felt. It went from smiles to frowns real quickly. Yeah, it was very tough.

Jackson and his team were on a bus from Morgantown, West Virginia, to Columbus, Ohio, to begin a three-game weekend series against Ohio State.

Jackson had the bus driver pull into a nearby truck stop about an hour outside of Columbus so he could communicate with Ohio State coach Greg Beals about the transpiring events.

Dan Brown, Libertys director of baseball operations, delivered the news about the College World Series being canceled, and Jackson heard from Beals that the Buckeyes season was also canceled.

The ever-changing landscape of college athletics was felt in the six-hour bus ride back to Lynchburg on Thursday.

I think they were just stunned, Jackson said of how his players reacted to the news. I mean, it wasnt a lot of emotion. It was just a lot of silence and some pretty long faces and just sadness. I think thats the best way to describe it. They were pretty sad kids.

Damien Sordelett covers Liberty University athletics and local golf for The News & Advance. Reach him at (434) 385-5550.

Damien Sordelett covers Liberty University athletics and local golf for The News & Advance. Reach him at (434) 385-5550.

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Liberty coaches, athletes stunned and in disbelief following ASUN's cancellation of spring sports - Lynchburg News and Advance

Falwell: Liberty University will resume in-person classes after spring break – Lynchburg News and Advance

Liberty University will continue to hold in-person classes when students return from spring break March 23, even as a wave of other colleges across Virginia and the nation have closed their campuses due to the growing coronavirus threat, President Jerry Falwell Jr. announced Friday

I dont see us doing the same thing that other schools have done, Falwell said in a taped interview streamed online with campus pastor David Nasser.

Falwell said the university has canceled almost all gatherings of large crowds on campus and will livestream convocation from a studio for the next several weeks instead of hosting the twice-weekly assembly in the 10,000-seat Vines Center.

Despite the moratorium on large gatherings, Falwell also said the university still plans to hold an outdoor graduation ceremony May 9. The university previously announced U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo will deliver the commencement address.

Graduation is something were not going to deny our graduates whove worked so hard to reach that milestone, he said.

Falwell said he has been flooded with messages from students in recent days who have pleaded with him not to cancel classes.

You guys paid to be here, you wanted to be on campus and I want to give you what you paid for, Falwell said of the nearly 15,000 students who attend classes on campus.

No cases of COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus, have been confirmed locally. But on Friday, the Virginia Department of Health announced the number of confirmed and presumptive cases had risen to 30. The majority of the cases are in Northern Virginia, though one case has been identified in nearby Prince Edward County.

The rising number of cases in the state prompted Gov. Ralph Northam on Thursday to declare a state of emergency and led several Virginia colleges to cancel in- person classes, including the University of Lynchburg, the University of Virginia and Virginia Tech.

Falwells announcement immediately drew criticism on social media from some segments of the student body.

Nathan Creekmore, a Liberty University sophomore studying nursing, was one of more than 1,700 people by Friday evening to affix their name to an online petition calling on the school to extend spring break and move to online classes.

Creekmore said Falwells announcement left him concerned students returning from break could help spread the disease when they return to Lynchburg later this month.

I think its super embarrassing for the school and super embarrassing for the students, Creekmore said. It tarnishes my future degree and its frustrating.

In his interview Friday, Falwell suggested the hype in the press surrounding the coronavirus pandemic could be a politically motivated attack against President Donald Trump.

Were hopeful that thats the case, that its overhyped, that its not as bad as everybody wants to think it is, Falwell, who has at times acted as a political surrogate for Trump, said. Were praying that thats the case.

Earlier this week, Liberty announced it had canceled all university-sponsored international travel in the spring and summer semester after a recommendation from the Centers for Disease Control that institutions of higher learning reconsider study abroad programs.

Richard Chumney covers Liberty University for The News & Advance. Reach him at (434) 385-5547.

Richard Chumney covers Liberty University for The News & Advance. Reach him at (434) 385-5547.

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Falwell: Liberty University will resume in-person classes after spring break - Lynchburg News and Advance

Liberty London gives Crocs a luxury make-over: Shop the collaboration – Yahoo Lifestyle

For many, Crocs are very much like marmite: you either love them or hate them.

Crocs may have become known for their comfort and quirky charms back in 2007, but in recent years theyve been elevated to a whole new sartorial standing through numerous fashion collaborations.

In fact, getting your hands on any Crocs collaboration is quite a challenge as they continue sell out in record time: from Balenciagas 600 platform Crocs, to a collection with American rapper Post Malone.

Today Crocs announced its latest collaboration with iconic British brand Liberty London - and even if youve never been a fan of Crocs before, that could all be about the change.

Fusing comfort with undeniable style, the Liberty London x Crocs collection features an assortments of heritage archive printsfrom the London-based stores iconic collection.

The range is made up of two silhouettes: the Classic Crocs Clogs and Classic Crocs Sliders - both feature Libertys iconic floral Art Nouveau Liberty print Ianthe, which dates back to 1902.

Each style, available in sizes 4 to 8, also comes customised with one of Libertys signature silk scarves that is expertly tied around each shoe.

The scarves are available in three historic Liberty prints: Tanjore Gardens, Chesham and Ianthe, which have been reworked into exclusive new colourways for the collaboration.

The slides come in classic black or white hues for those who prefer a subtler silhouette, whereas Crocs recognisable clogs are offered in a bold fuschia pink and black.

And the Liberty x Crocs offering does not stop there.

Liberty have also given Croc charms a stylish revamp with a selection of whimsical limited-edition metal charms, from a a purple Liberty logo to a double-decker bus, that will be available to buy separately.

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Liberty London gives Crocs a luxury make-over: Shop the collaboration - Yahoo Lifestyle

Several gunshots reported on west side of North Liberty – KCRG

NORTH LIBERTY, Iowa (KCRG) - Police received reports of shots being fired near a commercial building on the west side of North Liberty, according to law enforcement officials.

At around 2:20 a.m. on Saturday, March 14, 2020, the North Liberty Police Department was sent to the area of the 500 block of Penn Court after multiple people reported hearing several shots fired in the area. The reports included a person running in the area with a gun, along with cars leaving the area from behind the building located at 580 North Madison Avenue.

Officers conducted an investigation in the area and located shell casings in the parking lot behind the building, along with bullet holes in the back of it.

Nobody was reported injured in the incident. Police did not describe any suspects.

The Johnson County Sheriff's Office, Iowa State Patrol, Coralville Police Department, Iowa City Police Department, and the Johnson County Joint Emergency Communication Center assisted in the emergency response.

An investigation into the matter is ongoing. If anyone has information about the incident, they are encouraged to call the Iowa City Area Crimestoppers at (319) 358-TIPS. All tips may remain anonymous.

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Several gunshots reported on west side of North Liberty - KCRG


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