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Virtual Reality – YouTube

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Virtual Reality – YouTube

VRAC | Virtual Reality Applications Center

Our researches are working on the tools for future precision agriculture. Read more here. Continue reading

Check out why Iowa State has been ranked the best college in Iowa by Time MONEY here. Continue reading

Dr. Jonathan Claussens research group has discovered a way to use inkjet-printed graphene to create wearable/washable electronics. Continue reading

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How Virtual Reality (VR) can Enrich the Hospitality Industry

Virtual reality, or VR for short, is one of the biggest emerging technology trends and the business world is gradually coming to terms with the various opportunities it provides. For those in the hospitality industry, virtual reality has particular appeal, because it can digitally transport potential customers to a hotel or travel destination.

In this article, you learn various ways hotels can leverage virtual reality to boost business results.

Virtual reality is a computer technology, which utilises images, sounds and physical sensations to make users feel as though they are physically present in a virtual world. Virtual reality technology typically makes use of VR headsets and this equipment enables users to look around and immerse themselves in a digital environment.

The concept of virtual reality has actually existed, in some form, since the 1930s, but high-quality virtual reality headsets have only become a mainstream consumer product in more recent times, due in large part to increased investment from the likes of Google, Facebook and Samsung.

While many of the applications of modern virtual reality are entertainment-based, businesses are increasingly getting to grips with VRs potential as a marketing tool, delivering important information to potential customers in a way they can actually experience, and stimulating multiple senses in the process.

Within the hospitality industry, VR has become particularly important, because of the amount of information the average customer needs before they will actually book a hotel room. Rather than reading through descriptions, which may or may not be trustworthy, it offers customers the chance to experience things for themselves.

For example, this potentially allows customers to experience a virtual recreation of a room within a hotel, or take a look at one of the nearby attractions. Essentially, this allows the hotel industry to benefit from the type of try before you buy marketing that has been commonplace within the food industry for decades.

Of course, the practical uses for virtual reality technology do not stop when the customer has booked a hotel room. Indeed, those within the hospitality industry can continue to use VR to deliver information and allow customers to experience nearby attractions once they have arrived, adding to the hotel experience itself.

The full potential of virtual reality within the hotel industry is only recently being recognised. Nevertheless, three of the best current uses of the technology are outlined below:

One of the most common uses of virtual reality in the hospitality industry so far has been the creation of virtual travel experiences, using 360 degree video technology. Through this, users can experience a virtual recreation of different aspects of travel, from the flight, to arrival, to some of the key sights.

Three examples of this can be seen below. The first is a video showing how the basic process works, and showing people who are wearing VR headsets and experiencing a virtual tour. Meanwhile, the second and third examples are 360 degree videos, which can be viewed with VR glasses or a Google Cardboard for a more immersive experience.

Example #1: A Virtual Honeymoon to London and Hawaii

Example #2: Visit Hamilton Island in 360 Virtual Reality with QantasBest viewed with VR glasses or a Google Cardboard

Example #3: Maldives VR 360 4K VideoBest viewed with VR glasses or a Google Cardboard

Another common use of virtual reality technology within the hotel industry is for virtual hotel tours. These tours can be made available on hotel websites, allowing guests or potential guests to take a look at their hotel room, or other parts of the hotel, before they book or before they arrive.

While these tours are best experienced with a VR headset, they can also potentially be made available to those without access to a headset on social media sites like Facebook, using its 360 degree video technology.

Example: Atlantis Dubai Virtual Tour VR 360Best viewed with VR glasses or a Google Cardboard

Finally, one of the more interesting uses of VR technology in recent times has been the creation of virtual reality booking processes. This has recently been put into action by companies like Amadeus, allowing customers to look for flights, compare hotel prices and book rooms through a virtual reality headset.

The potential for this has not yet been fully explored, but it is easy to see how this VR booking process can allow customers to explore virtual hotel rooms, experience local sights and book a room seamlessly.

Virtual Reality travel search and booking experience

Would you like to learn more about other digital technologies which can benefit your business? Have also a look at the articles How Augmented Reality is Transforming the Hospitality Industry and Using Artificial Intelligence in the Hospitality Industry.

With digital technology continuously evolving, it should come as little surprise that its applications within the travel and hospitality industry evolve too. In the following articles you find the most innovating digital trends in the hospitality industry.

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How Virtual Reality (VR) can Enrich the Hospitality Industry

What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

The definition of virtual reality comes, naturally, from the definitions for both virtual and reality. The definition of virtual is near and reality is what we experience as human beings. So the term virtual reality basically means near-reality. This could, of course, mean anything but it usually refers to a specific type of reality emulation.

We know the world through our senses and perception systems. In school we all learned that we have five senses: taste, touch, smell, sight and hearing. These are however only our most obvious sense organs. The truth is that humans have many more senses than this, such as a sense of balance for example. These other sensory inputs, plus some special processing of sensory information by our brains ensures that we have a rich flow of information from the environment to our minds.

Everything that we know about our reality comes by way of our senses. In other words, our entire experience of reality is simply a combination of sensory information and our brains sense-making mechanisms for that information. It stands to reason then, that if you can present your senses with made-up information, your perception of reality would also change in response to it. You would be presented with a version of reality that isnt really there, but from your perspective it would be perceived as real. Something we would refer to as a virtual reality.

So, in summary, virtual reality entails presenting our senses with a computer generated virtual environment that we can explore in some fashion.

Answering what is virtual reality in technical terms is straight-forward. Virtual reality is the term used to describe a three-dimensional, computer generated environment which can be explored and interacted with by a person. That person becomes part of this virtual world or is immersed within this environment and whilst there, is able to manipulate objects or perform a series of actions.

Although we talk about a few historical early forms of virtual reality elsewhere on the site, today virtual reality is usually implemented using computer technology. There are a range of systems that are used for this purpose, such as headsets, omni-directional treadmills and special gloves. These are used to actually stimulate our senses together in order to create the illusion of reality.

This is more difficult than it sounds, since our senses and brains are evolved to provide us with a finely synchronised and mediated experience. If anything is even a little off we can usually tell. This is where youll hear terms such asimmersiveness and realism enter the conversation. These issues that divide convincing or enjoyable virtual reality experiences from jarring or unpleasant ones are partly technical and partly conceptual. Virtual reality technology needs to take our physiology into account. For example, the human visual field does not look like a video frame. We have (more or less) 180 degrees of vision and although you are not always consciously aware of your peripheral vision, if it were gone youd notice. Similarly when what your eyes and the vestibular system in your ears tell you are in conflict it can cause motion sickness. Which is what happens to some people on boats or when they read while in a car.

If an implementation of virtual reality manages to get the combination of hardware, software and sensory synchronicity just right it achieves something known as a sense of presence. Where the subject really feels like they are present in that environment.

This may seems like a lot of effort, and it is! What makes the development of virtual reality worthwhile? The potential entertainment value is clear. Immersive films and video games are good examples. The entertainment industry is after all a multi-billion dollar one and consumers are always keen on novelty. Virtual reality has many other, more serious, applications as well.

There are a wide variety of applications for virtual reality which include:

Virtual reality can lead to new and exciting discoveries in these areas which impact upon our day to day lives.

Wherever it is too dangerous, expensive or impractical to do something in reality, virtual reality is the answer. From trainee fighter pilots to medical applications trainee surgeons, virtual reality allows us to take virtual risks in order to gain real world experience. As the cost of virtual reality goes down and it becomes more mainstream you can expect more serious uses, such as education or productivity applications, to come to the fore. Virtual reality and its cousin augmented reality could substantively change the way we interface with our digital technologies. Continuing the trend of humanising our technology.

There are many different types of virtual reality systems but they all share the same characteristics such as the ability to allow the person to view three-dimensional images. These images appear life-sized to the person.

Plus they change as the person moves around their environment which corresponds with the change in their field of vision. The aim is for a seamless join between the persons head and eye movements and the appropriate response, e.g. change in perception. This ensures that the virtual environment is both realistic and enjoyable.

A virtual environment should provide the appropriate responses in real time- as the person explores their surroundings. The problems arise when there is a delay between the persons actions and system response or latency which then disrupts their experience. The person becomes aware that they are in an artificial environment and adjusts their behaviour accordingly which results in a stilted, mechanical form of interaction.

The aim is for a natural, free-flowing form of interaction which will result in a memorable experience.

Virtual reality is the creation of a virtual environment presented to our senses in such a way that we experience it as if we were really there. It uses a host of technologies to achieve this goal and is a technically complex feat that has to account for our perception and cognition. It has both entertainment and serious uses. The technology is becoming cheaper and more widespread. We can expect to see many more innovative uses for the technology in the future and perhaps a fundamental way in which we communicate and work thanks to the possibilities of virtual reality.

Continue reading here:

What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

The definition of virtual reality comes, naturally, from the definitions for both virtual and reality. The definition of virtual is near and reality is what we experience as human beings. So the term virtual reality basically means near-reality. This could, of course, mean anything but it usually refers to a specific type of reality emulation.

We know the world through our senses and perception systems. In school we all learned that we have five senses: taste, touch, smell, sight and hearing. These are however only our most obvious sense organs. The truth is that humans have many more senses than this, such as a sense of balance for example. These other sensory inputs, plus some special processing of sensory information by our brains ensures that we have a rich flow of information from the environment to our minds.

Everything that we know about our reality comes by way of our senses. In other words, our entire experience of reality is simply a combination of sensory information and our brains sense-making mechanisms for that information. It stands to reason then, that if you can present your senses with made-up information, your perception of reality would also change in response to it. You would be presented with a version of reality that isnt really there, but from your perspective it would be perceived as real. Something we would refer to as a virtual reality.

So, in summary, virtual reality entails presenting our senses with a computer generated virtual environment that we can explore in some fashion.

Answering what is virtual reality in technical terms is straight-forward. Virtual reality is the term used to describe a three-dimensional, computer generated environment which can be explored and interacted with by a person. That person becomes part of this virtual world or is immersed within this environment and whilst there, is able to manipulate objects or perform a series of actions.

Although we talk about a few historical early forms of virtual reality elsewhere on the site, today virtual reality is usually implemented using computer technology. There are a range of systems that are used for this purpose, such as headsets, omni-directional treadmills and special gloves. These are used to actually stimulate our senses together in order to create the illusion of reality.

This is more difficult than it sounds, since our senses and brains are evolved to provide us with a finely synchronised and mediated experience. If anything is even a little off we can usually tell. This is where youll hear terms such asimmersiveness and realism enter the conversation. These issues that divide convincing or enjoyable virtual reality experiences from jarring or unpleasant ones are partly technical and partly conceptual. Virtual reality technology needs to take our physiology into account. For example, the human visual field does not look like a video frame. We have (more or less) 180 degrees of vision and although you are not always consciously aware of your peripheral vision, if it were gone youd notice. Similarly when what your eyes and the vestibular system in your ears tell you are in conflict it can cause motion sickness. Which is what happens to some people on boats or when they read while in a car.

If an implementation of virtual reality manages to get the combination of hardware, software and sensory synchronicity just right it achieves something known as a sense of presence. Where the subject really feels like they are present in that environment.

This may seems like a lot of effort, and it is! What makes the development of virtual reality worthwhile? The potential entertainment value is clear. Immersive films and video games are good examples. The entertainment industry is after all a multi-billion dollar one and consumers are always keen on novelty. Virtual reality has many other, more serious, applications as well.

There are a wide variety of applications for virtual reality which include:

Virtual reality can lead to new and exciting discoveries in these areas which impact upon our day to day lives.

Wherever it is too dangerous, expensive or impractical to do something in reality, virtual reality is the answer. From trainee fighter pilots to medical applications trainee surgeons, virtual reality allows us to take virtual risks in order to gain real world experience. As the cost of virtual reality goes down and it becomes more mainstream you can expect more serious uses, such as education or productivity applications, to come to the fore. Virtual reality and its cousin augmented reality could substantively change the way we interface with our digital technologies. Continuing the trend of humanising our technology.

There are many different types of virtual reality systems but they all share the same characteristics such as the ability to allow the person to view three-dimensional images. These images appear life-sized to the person.

Plus they change as the person moves around their environment which corresponds with the change in their field of vision. The aim is for a seamless join between the persons head and eye movements and the appropriate response, e.g. change in perception. This ensures that the virtual environment is both realistic and enjoyable.

A virtual environment should provide the appropriate responses in real time- as the person explores their surroundings. The problems arise when there is a delay between the persons actions and system response or latency which then disrupts their experience. The person becomes aware that they are in an artificial environment and adjusts their behaviour accordingly which results in a stilted, mechanical form of interaction.

The aim is for a natural, free-flowing form of interaction which will result in a memorable experience.

Virtual reality is the creation of a virtual environment presented to our senses in such a way that we experience it as if we were really there. It uses a host of technologies to achieve this goal and is a technically complex feat that has to account for our perception and cognition. It has both entertainment and serious uses. The technology is becoming cheaper and more widespread. We can expect to see many more innovative uses for the technology in the future and perhaps a fundamental way in which we communicate and work thanks to the possibilities of virtual reality.

Link:

What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

Virtual Reality – YouTube

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Witness those who have conquered the impossible.

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Immerse yourself in a few of today’s most beloved games.

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Instead of merely listening to music: live it.

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Vast landscapes, iconic cities, and other mind-blowing natural places will leave you in awe at the beauty of planet Earth.

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Virtual Reality – YouTube

Virtual Reality – YouTube

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Witness those who have conquered the impossible.

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Immerse yourself in a few of today’s most beloved games.

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Instead of merely listening to music: live it.

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Vast landscapes, iconic cities, and other mind-blowing natural places will leave you in awe at the beauty of planet Earth.

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Watch as these stories unfold all around you.

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The places, people, and events that are shaping our world.

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Climb A Towering Summit in VR

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Virtual Reality – YouTube

What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

The definition of virtual reality comes, naturally, from the definitions for both virtual and reality. The definition of virtual is near and reality is what we experience as human beings. So the term virtual reality basically means near-reality. This could, of course, mean anything but it usually refers to a specific type of reality emulation.

We know the world through our senses and perception systems. In school we all learned that we have five senses: taste, touch, smell, sight and hearing. These are however only our most obvious sense organs. The truth is that humans have many more senses than this, such as a sense of balance for example. These other sensory inputs, plus some special processing of sensory information by our brains ensures that we have a rich flow of information from the environment to our minds.

Everything that we know about our reality comes by way of our senses. In other words, our entire experience of reality is simply a combination of sensory information and our brains sense-making mechanisms for that information. It stands to reason then, that if you can present your senses with made-up information, your perception of reality would also change in response to it. You would be presented with a version of reality that isnt really there, but from your perspective it would be perceived as real. Something we would refer to as a virtual reality.

So, in summary, virtual reality entails presenting our senses with a computer generated virtual environment that we can explore in some fashion.

Answering what is virtual reality in technical terms is straight-forward. Virtual reality is the term used to describe a three-dimensional, computer generated environment which can be explored and interacted with by a person. That person becomes part of this virtual world or is immersed within this environment and whilst there, is able to manipulate objects or perform a series of actions.

Although we talk about a few historical early forms of virtual reality elsewhere on the site, today virtual reality is usually implemented using computer technology. There are a range of systems that are used for this purpose, such as headsets, omni-directional treadmills and special gloves. These are used to actually stimulate our senses together in order to create the illusion of reality.

This is more difficult than it sounds, since our senses and brains are evolved to provide us with a finely synchronised and mediated experience. If anything is even a little off we can usually tell. This is where youll hear terms such asimmersiveness and realism enter the conversation. These issues that divide convincing or enjoyable virtual reality experiences from jarring or unpleasant ones are partly technical and partly conceptual. Virtual reality technology needs to take our physiology into account. For example, the human visual field does not look like a video frame. We have (more or less) 180 degrees of vision and although you are not always consciously aware of your peripheral vision, if it were gone youd notice. Similarly when what your eyes and the vestibular system in your ears tell you are in conflict it can cause motion sickness. Which is what happens to some people on boats or when they read while in a car.

If an implementation of virtual reality manages to get the combination of hardware, software and sensory synchronicity just right it achieves something known as a sense of presence. Where the subject really feels like they are present in that environment.

This may seems like a lot of effort, and it is! What makes the development of virtual reality worthwhile? The potential entertainment value is clear. Immersive films and video games are good examples. The entertainment industry is after all a multi-billion dollar one and consumers are always keen on novelty. Virtual reality has many other, more serious, applications as well.

There are a wide variety of applications for virtual reality which include:

Virtual reality can lead to new and exciting discoveries in these areas which impact upon our day to day lives.

Wherever it is too dangerous, expensive or impractical to do something in reality, virtual reality is the answer. From trainee fighter pilots to medical applications trainee surgeons, virtual reality allows us to take virtual risks in order to gain real world experience. As the cost of virtual reality goes down and it becomes more mainstream you can expect more serious uses, such as education or productivity applications, to come to the fore. Virtual reality and its cousin augmented reality could substantively change the way we interface with our digital technologies. Continuing the trend of humanising our technology.

There are many different types of virtual reality systems but they all share the same characteristics such as the ability to allow the person to view three-dimensional images. These images appear life-sized to the person.

Plus they change as the person moves around their environment which corresponds with the change in their field of vision. The aim is for a seamless join between the persons head and eye movements and the appropriate response, e.g. change in perception. This ensures that the virtual environment is both realistic and enjoyable.

A virtual environment should provide the appropriate responses in real time- as the person explores their surroundings. The problems arise when there is a delay between the persons actions and system response or latency which then disrupts their experience. The person becomes aware that they are in an artificial environment and adjusts their behaviour accordingly which results in a stilted, mechanical form of interaction.

The aim is for a natural, free-flowing form of interaction which will result in a memorable experience.

Virtual reality is the creation of a virtual environment presented to our senses in such a way that we experience it as if we were really there. It uses a host of technologies to achieve this goal and is a technically complex feat that has to account for our perception and cognition. It has both entertainment and serious uses. The technology is becoming cheaper and more widespread. We can expect to see many more innovative uses for the technology in the future and perhaps a fundamental way in which we communicate and work thanks to the possibilities of virtual reality.

Go here to read the rest:

What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

The definition of virtual reality comes, naturally, from the definitions for both virtual and reality. The definition of virtual is near and reality is what we experience as human beings. So the term virtual reality basically means near-reality. This could, of course, mean anything but it usually refers to a specific type of reality emulation.

We know the world through our senses and perception systems. In school we all learned that we have five senses: taste, touch, smell, sight and hearing. These are however only our most obvious sense organs. The truth is that humans have many more senses than this, such as a sense of balance for example. These other sensory inputs, plus some special processing of sensory information by our brains ensures that we have a rich flow of information from the environment to our minds.

Everything that we know about our reality comes by way of our senses. In other words, our entire experience of reality is simply a combination of sensory information and our brains sense-making mechanisms for that information. It stands to reason then, that if you can present your senses with made-up information, your perception of reality would also change in response to it. You would be presented with a version of reality that isnt really there, but from your perspective it would be perceived as real. Something we would refer to as a virtual reality.

So, in summary, virtual reality entails presenting our senses with a computer generated virtual environment that we can explore in some fashion.

Answering what is virtual reality in technical terms is straight-forward. Virtual reality is the term used to describe a three-dimensional, computer generated environment which can be explored and interacted with by a person. That person becomes part of this virtual world or is immersed within this environment and whilst there, is able to manipulate objects or perform a series of actions.

Although we talk about a few historical early forms of virtual reality elsewhere on the site, today virtual reality is usually implemented using computer technology. There are a range of systems that are used for this purpose, such as headsets, omni-directional treadmills and special gloves. These are used to actually stimulate our senses together in order to create the illusion of reality.

This is more difficult than it sounds, since our senses and brains are evolved to provide us with a finely synchronised and mediated experience. If anything is even a little off we can usually tell. This is where youll hear terms such asimmersiveness and realism enter the conversation. These issues that divide convincing or enjoyable virtual reality experiences from jarring or unpleasant ones are partly technical and partly conceptual. Virtual reality technology needs to take our physiology into account. For example, the human visual field does not look like a video frame. We have (more or less) 180 degrees of vision and although you are not always consciously aware of your peripheral vision, if it were gone youd notice. Similarly when what your eyes and the vestibular system in your ears tell you are in conflict it can cause motion sickness. Which is what happens to some people on boats or when they read while in a car.

If an implementation of virtual reality manages to get the combination of hardware, software and sensory synchronicity just right it achieves something known as a sense of presence. Where the subject really feels like they are present in that environment.

This may seems like a lot of effort, and it is! What makes the development of virtual reality worthwhile? The potential entertainment value is clear. Immersive films and video games are good examples. The entertainment industry is after all a multi-billion dollar one and consumers are always keen on novelty. Virtual reality has many other, more serious, applications as well.

There are a wide variety of applications for virtual reality which include:

Virtual reality can lead to new and exciting discoveries in these areas which impact upon our day to day lives.

Wherever it is too dangerous, expensive or impractical to do something in reality, virtual reality is the answer. From trainee fighter pilots to medical applications trainee surgeons, virtual reality allows us to take virtual risks in order to gain real world experience. As the cost of virtual reality goes down and it becomes more mainstream you can expect more serious uses, such as education or productivity applications, to come to the fore. Virtual reality and its cousin augmented reality could substantively change the way we interface with our digital technologies. Continuing the trend of humanising our technology.

There are many different types of virtual reality systems but they all share the same characteristics such as the ability to allow the person to view three-dimensional images. These images appear life-sized to the person.

Plus they change as the person moves around their environment which corresponds with the change in their field of vision. The aim is for a seamless join between the persons head and eye movements and the appropriate response, e.g. change in perception. This ensures that the virtual environment is both realistic and enjoyable.

A virtual environment should provide the appropriate responses in real time- as the person explores their surroundings. The problems arise when there is a delay between the persons actions and system response or latency which then disrupts their experience. The person becomes aware that they are in an artificial environment and adjusts their behaviour accordingly which results in a stilted, mechanical form of interaction.

The aim is for a natural, free-flowing form of interaction which will result in a memorable experience.

Virtual reality is the creation of a virtual environment presented to our senses in such a way that we experience it as if we were really there. It uses a host of technologies to achieve this goal and is a technically complex feat that has to account for our perception and cognition. It has both entertainment and serious uses. The technology is becoming cheaper and more widespread. We can expect to see many more innovative uses for the technology in the future and perhaps a fundamental way in which we communicate and work thanks to the possibilities of virtual reality.

More here:

What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

Virtual Reality – YouTube

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Witness those who have conquered the impossible.

This item has been hidden

Immerse yourself in a few of today’s most beloved games.

This item has been hidden

Instead of merely listening to music: live it.

This item has been hidden

Vast landscapes, iconic cities, and other mind-blowing natural places will leave you in awe at the beauty of planet Earth.

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Watch as these stories unfold all around you.

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The places, people, and events that are shaping our world.

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Virtual Reality – YouTube

VRPorn.com – #1 VR Porn Site in the World

VRPorn.com – #1 VR Porn Site in the World

New free VR porn videos, games and more every day. We love VR. VRPorn.com is ground zero for the virtual reality porn revolution. The VR community keeps this site updated with all the latest XXX VR, including exclusive content. VRPorn.com was established in 2013 before most people had even heard the word “vr porn”. VR sex sells. We understand that VR Porno is a driving force for the widespread adoption of virtual reality. And adult VR helps fuel the significant technological innovations required to make VR a reality. VRPorn.com works with all VR systems, including: Oculus Rift, HTC Vive, GearVR, smartphone, Google cardboard, Playstation VR, Daydream, and Oculus Go.

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VRPorn.com – #1 VR Porn Site in the World

Virtual Reality Solutions | NVIDIA

Virtual Reality (VR) is set to change the way we enjoy entertainment, interact with friends, and get our jobs done. As the leader in visual computing, NVIDIA is at the forefront of this exciting new computing platform. From gaming to product design to cinematic experiences and beyond, NVIDIA delivers groundbreaking solutions for VRincluding industry-leading Pascal GPUs, drivers, and SDKsto meet the needs of professionals, gamers, and developers.

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Virtual Reality Solutions | NVIDIA

What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

The definition of virtual reality comes, naturally, from the definitions for both virtual and reality. The definition of virtual is near and reality is what we experience as human beings. So the term virtual reality basically means near-reality. This could, of course, mean anything but it usually refers to a specific type of reality emulation.

We know the world through our senses and perception systems. In school we all learned that we have five senses: taste, touch, smell, sight and hearing. These are however only our most obvious sense organs. The truth is that humans have many more senses than this, such as a sense of balance for example. These other sensory inputs, plus some special processing of sensory information by our brains ensures that we have a rich flow of information from the environment to our minds.

Everything that we know about our reality comes by way of our senses. In other words, our entire experience of reality is simply a combination of sensory information and our brains sense-making mechanisms for that information. It stands to reason then, that if you can present your senses with made-up information, your perception of reality would also change in response to it. You would be presented with a version of reality that isnt really there, but from your perspective it would be perceived as real. Something we would refer to as a virtual reality.

So, in summary, virtual reality entails presenting our senses with a computer generated virtual environment that we can explore in some fashion.

Answering what is virtual reality in technical terms is straight-forward. Virtual reality is the term used to describe a three-dimensional, computer generated environment which can be explored and interacted with by a person. That person becomes part of this virtual world or is immersed within this environment and whilst there, is able to manipulate objects or perform a series of actions.

Although we talk about a few historical early forms of virtual reality elsewhere on the site, today virtual reality is usually implemented using computer technology. There are a range of systems that are used for this purpose, such as headsets, omni-directional treadmills and special gloves. These are used to actually stimulate our senses together in order to create the illusion of reality.

This is more difficult than it sounds, since our senses and brains are evolved to provide us with a finely synchronised and mediated experience. If anything is even a little off we can usually tell. This is where youll hear terms such asimmersiveness and realism enter the conversation. These issues that divide convincing or enjoyable virtual reality experiences from jarring or unpleasant ones are partly technical and partly conceptual. Virtual reality technology needs to take our physiology into account. For example, the human visual field does not look like a video frame. We have (more or less) 180 degrees of vision and although you are not always consciously aware of your peripheral vision, if it were gone youd notice. Similarly when what your eyes and the vestibular system in your ears tell you are in conflict it can cause motion sickness. Which is what happens to some people on boats or when they read while in a car.

If an implementation of virtual reality manages to get the combination of hardware, software and sensory synchronicity just right it achieves something known as a sense of presence. Where the subject really feels like they are present in that environment.

This may seems like a lot of effort, and it is! What makes the development of virtual reality worthwhile? The potential entertainment value is clear. Immersive films and video games are good examples. The entertainment industry is after all a multi-billion dollar one and consumers are always keen on novelty. Virtual reality has many other, more serious, applications as well.

There are a wide variety of applications for virtual reality which include:

Virtual reality can lead to new and exciting discoveries in these areas which impact upon our day to day lives.

Wherever it is too dangerous, expensive or impractical to do something in reality, virtual reality is the answer. From trainee fighter pilots to medical applications trainee surgeons, virtual reality allows us to take virtual risks in order to gain real world experience. As the cost of virtual reality goes down and it becomes more mainstream you can expect more serious uses, such as education or productivity applications, to come to the fore. Virtual reality and its cousin augmented reality could substantively change the way we interface with our digital technologies. Continuing the trend of humanising our technology.

There are many different types of virtual reality systems but they all share the same characteristics such as the ability to allow the person to view three-dimensional images. These images appear life-sized to the person.

Plus they change as the person moves around their environment which corresponds with the change in their field of vision. The aim is for a seamless join between the persons head and eye movements and the appropriate response, e.g. change in perception. This ensures that the virtual environment is both realistic and enjoyable.

A virtual environment should provide the appropriate responses in real time- as the person explores their surroundings. The problems arise when there is a delay between the persons actions and system response or latency which then disrupts their experience. The person becomes aware that they are in an artificial environment and adjusts their behaviour accordingly which results in a stilted, mechanical form of interaction.

The aim is for a natural, free-flowing form of interaction which will result in a memorable experience.

Virtual reality is the creation of a virtual environment presented to our senses in such a way that we experience it as if we were really there. It uses a host of technologies to achieve this goal and is a technically complex feat that has to account for our perception and cognition. It has both entertainment and serious uses. The technology is becoming cheaper and more widespread. We can expect to see many more innovative uses for the technology in the future and perhaps a fundamental way in which we communicate and work thanks to the possibilities of virtual reality.

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What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

Virtual Reality Solutions | NVIDIA

Virtual Reality (VR) is set to change the way we enjoy entertainment, interact with friends, and get our jobs done. As the leader in visual computing, NVIDIA is at the forefront of this exciting new computing platform. From gaming to product design to cinematic experiences and beyond, NVIDIA delivers groundbreaking solutions for VRincluding industry-leading Pascal GPUs, drivers, and SDKsto meet the needs of professionals, gamers, and developers.

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Virtual Reality Solutions | NVIDIA

What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

The definition of virtual reality comes, naturally, from the definitions for both virtual and reality. The definition of virtual is near and reality is what we experience as human beings. So the term virtual reality basically means near-reality. This could, of course, mean anything but it usually refers to a specific type of reality emulation.

We know the world through our senses and perception systems. In school we all learned that we have five senses: taste, touch, smell, sight and hearing. These are however only our most obvious sense organs. The truth is that humans have many more senses than this, such as a sense of balance for example. These other sensory inputs, plus some special processing of sensory information by our brains ensures that we have a rich flow of information from the environment to our minds.

Everything that we know about our reality comes by way of our senses. In other words, our entire experience of reality is simply a combination of sensory information and our brains sense-making mechanisms for that information. It stands to reason then, that if you can present your senses with made-up information, your perception of reality would also change in response to it. You would be presented with a version of reality that isnt really there, but from your perspective it would be perceived as real. Something we would refer to as a virtual reality.

So, in summary, virtual reality entails presenting our senses with a computer generated virtual environment that we can explore in some fashion.

Answering what is virtual reality in technical terms is straight-forward. Virtual reality is the term used to describe a three-dimensional, computer generated environment which can be explored and interacted with by a person. That person becomes part of this virtual world or is immersed within this environment and whilst there, is able to manipulate objects or perform a series of actions.

Although we talk about a few historical early forms of virtual reality elsewhere on the site, today virtual reality is usually implemented using computer technology. There are a range of systems that are used for this purpose, such as headsets, omni-directional treadmills and special gloves. These are used to actually stimulate our senses together in order to create the illusion of reality.

This is more difficult than it sounds, since our senses and brains are evolved to provide us with a finely synchronised and mediated experience. If anything is even a little off we can usually tell. This is where youll hear terms such asimmersiveness and realism enter the conversation. These issues that divide convincing or enjoyable virtual reality experiences from jarring or unpleasant ones are partly technical and partly conceptual. Virtual reality technology needs to take our physiology into account. For example, the human visual field does not look like a video frame. We have (more or less) 180 degrees of vision and although you are not always consciously aware of your peripheral vision, if it were gone youd notice. Similarly when what your eyes and the vestibular system in your ears tell you are in conflict it can cause motion sickness. Which is what happens to some people on boats or when they read while in a car.

If an implementation of virtual reality manages to get the combination of hardware, software and sensory synchronicity just right it achieves something known as a sense of presence. Where the subject really feels like they are present in that environment.

This may seems like a lot of effort, and it is! What makes the development of virtual reality worthwhile? The potential entertainment value is clear. Immersive films and video games are good examples. The entertainment industry is after all a multi-billion dollar one and consumers are always keen on novelty. Virtual reality has many other, more serious, applications as well.

There are a wide variety of applications for virtual reality which include:

Virtual reality can lead to new and exciting discoveries in these areas which impact upon our day to day lives.

Wherever it is too dangerous, expensive or impractical to do something in reality, virtual reality is the answer. From trainee fighter pilots to medical applications trainee surgeons, virtual reality allows us to take virtual risks in order to gain real world experience. As the cost of virtual reality goes down and it becomes more mainstream you can expect more serious uses, such as education or productivity applications, to come to the fore. Virtual reality and its cousin augmented reality could substantively change the way we interface with our digital technologies. Continuing the trend of humanising our technology.

There are many different types of virtual reality systems but they all share the same characteristics such as the ability to allow the person to view three-dimensional images. These images appear life-sized to the person.

Plus they change as the person moves around their environment which corresponds with the change in their field of vision. The aim is for a seamless join between the persons head and eye movements and the appropriate response, e.g. change in perception. This ensures that the virtual environment is both realistic and enjoyable.

A virtual environment should provide the appropriate responses in real time- as the person explores their surroundings. The problems arise when there is a delay between the persons actions and system response or latency which then disrupts their experience. The person becomes aware that they are in an artificial environment and adjusts their behaviour accordingly which results in a stilted, mechanical form of interaction.

The aim is for a natural, free-flowing form of interaction which will result in a memorable experience.

Virtual reality is the creation of a virtual environment presented to our senses in such a way that we experience it as if we were really there. It uses a host of technologies to achieve this goal and is a technically complex feat that has to account for our perception and cognition. It has both entertainment and serious uses. The technology is becoming cheaper and more widespread. We can expect to see many more innovative uses for the technology in the future and perhaps a fundamental way in which we communicate and work thanks to the possibilities of virtual reality.

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What is Virtual Reality? – Virtual Reality Society

Virtual Reality – YouTube

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Witness those who have conquered the impossible.

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Immerse yourself in a few of today’s most beloved games.

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Instead of merely listening to music: live it.

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Vast landscapes, iconic cities, and other mind-blowing natural places will leave you in awe at the beauty of planet Earth.

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Watch as these stories unfold all around you.

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The places, people, and events that are shaping our world.

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Virtual Reality – YouTube

Glimpse: Virtual Reality For The Masses Might Solve The Problems Social Media Started

Back in December, Facebook admitted something you might have already suspected: too much social media probably isn’t very good for you.

A month prior, Chamath Palihapitiya, a former Facebook VP, put it more bluntly: “The short-term, dopamine-driven feedback loops that we have created are destroying how society works: no civil discourse, no cooperation, misinformation, mistruth,” he said during an interview at Stanford.

That might be a little harsh, but it’s in line with a growing body of research. Excessive social media use has been linked to higher rates of anxiety, depression, increased peer pressure, and negative social comparison. More and more neuroscientists believe it may even be changing the underlying chemistry of our brains.

How will this be treated in the future? Day 180, the sixth episode of Glimpse, a new original sci-fi series from Futurism Studios (a division of Futurism LLC) and DUST explores the effects of these types of addictions. Watch the episode below.

“In a face to face interaction, everything is qualitative,” Lauren Sherman, the author of a 2016 study on the effects of social media on adolescents, told CNN. “You use someone’s gestures or facial expressions, that sort of thing, to see how effective your message is. If you go online, one of the ways you gauge the effectiveness of your message is in the number of likes, favorites or retweets.” In other words, we gauge the success of an online interaction quantitatively, not qualitatively.

Experts now liken this “social quantitative reasoning” to the methods used to make gambling addictive. “The rewards are what psychologists refer to as variable reinforcement schedules and is the key to social media users repeatedly checking their screens,” explained Mark Griffiths, a professor of behavioral addition at Nottingham Trent University, in an interview with The Guardian.

While we don’t yet know if social media can be addictive, it’s clear that sometimes a little break would do us some good. Even some of the companies behind some of these at-times-detrimental tools are making it easier for people to unplug; in May, Google announced its first-ever “Digital Wellbeing” initiative, aimed at developing tools to help users do exactly that.

Clearly, there are things we can do better. But for a lot of people, swearing off social media altogether isn’t exactly an option. A digital presence is increasingly part of the workplace, whether you’re marketing your small business or simply connecting with colleagues in the same field.

Plus, moderate use of digital technologically doesn’t seem to be inherently harmful. Last year, a landmark study of 120,000 adolescents indicated there was a ‘Goldilocks Zone’ for digital screen use. So instead of creating tools to keep us off social media, a better challenge for Silicon Valley, and ideally society as a whole, might be: “How can we reengineer social media to serve people better?”

The answer might just lie in virtual reality.

Getty Images/szfphy/Victor Tangermann

By definition, virtual reality is designed to simulate the real world, immersing us in a digital duplication of it. That, inherently, might protect people from some of the “dopamine-driven feedback loops” they might fall into with social media as we use it now.

And now, the technology is ready to be a part of our everyday lives. The cord-free, phone-free Oculus Go, which Mashable recently called “the iPhone of VR headsets,” may herald in a mass market inflection point.

The Oculus Go’s release is also pushing VR developers toward shared social experiences, instead of individualized play. This is Facebook we’re talking about, after all. Take Oculus Rooms, an app created by Facebook Reality Labs (formerly Oculus Research). Billing itself as your “personalized home base in VR,” Oculus Rooms evokes the customizable chat rooms in Ernest Cline’s Ready Player One to enable close-quarter, face-to-face interaction with a small group of friends joining in from anywhere on Earth.

The emphasis here is on small groups—Oculus Rooms only allows four people to be together at any given time, promoting more meaningful and intimate interactions. The newly expanded Oculus TV offers a similar experience, allowing friends to get together to stream movies and TV together.

Apps that allow small groups of friends to congregate are likely the future of social networking. “What VR does is it takes all the gadgets away, it takes all of the multitasking away and you actually feel like you’re with someone,” Jeremy Bailenson, director of Stanford’s Virtual Human Interaction Lab, explained in an interview with Public Radio International. “We call this social presence — you see their emotions, you see their gestures and it feels just like you’re in the room with them. It takes what is typically seen as something that’s unemotional and distant and makes it feel like somebody is right there with you.”

Bailenson is onto something. Studies have shown that virtual reality is effective in eliciting specific emotions like awe and fear in ways that a smartphone never could. Whether this will ultimately be good or bad for human anthropology remains to be seen, but we’ll find out soon enough.

Ironically — inevitably — it looks like Facebook will be leading the way.

 

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Glimpse: Virtual Reality For The Masses Might Solve The Problems Social Media Started

This Electric Chewing Gum Never Runs out of Flavor

Bad Taste

You’re standing in the checkout lane. You know you want to buy a pack of gum, but just aren’t satisfied with any of the available options. You ask yourself: “Why is it so hard to find a bitter-tasting gum that zaps my tongue with electricity and never runs out of flavor?”

OK, so maybe not.

But on Monday, a team of Japanese researchers demonstrated just such a gum at a technology symposium in Berlin, Germany. And while you might never find this electric chewing gum at your local convenience store, a piece could one day come packaged with your favorite virtual reality (VR) game — and, in the nascent field of virtuality, that’s a big deal.

Sensory Underload

Most of today’s VR systems trick you into thinking you’re in another world by manipulating sight and sound. You don a headset and a pair of headphones, and you’re fighting zombies or whatever.

A few researchers have attempted to bring touch and smell into the virtual experience, but with middling results. Taste has proven particularly tricky to incorporate — according to the Japanese team’s research paper, many attempts include the use of grotesque-sounding “cables around a user’s lips or batteries in their mouth.”

Not exactly the kind of tech that facilitates a seamless transportation to another world.

Tip of the Tongue

The Japanese team’s device, however, looks pretty much like a regular stick of gum. Instead of just chicle and sugar, however, it incorporates a small device — slightly smaller in diameter than a dime, and covered with a saliva-repellent film — that generates a painless current of electricity when chewed. When this electricity hits the chewer’s tongue, it give the sensation of tasting something bitter or salty. As long as the chewer keeps chewing, they’ll keep “tasting” the electric chewing gum.

Why it’s a big deal: The researchers believe they can force the gum to simulate other flavors by adjusting the strength and pattern of the electric current generated while chewing. If they’re successful, we could be moving toward a future in which VR experiences tickle your tastebuds as well as your senses of sight and sound.

READ MORE: Electric Chewing Gum Zaps Your Tongue to Create a Virtual Flavour Hit [New Scientist]

More on VR: You Can “Feel” Virtual Objects Using Microsoft’s New Tech

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This Electric Chewing Gum Never Runs out of Flavor

Facebook Sees a Future in Augmented Reality Glasses

Zuckerglass

The year is 2025. You’re trying to pay attention to your nephew blowing out the candles on his birthday cake, but bright-red Facebook notifications keep flickering in your peripheral vision.

The social media giant really wants its breakout hardware device to be a pair of augmented reality glasses. That’s according to the company’s head of AR, Ficus Kirkpatrick, who blabbed to TechCrunch during an AR event last week in LA.

“We want to see [AR] glasses come into reality,” Kirkpatrick said, “and I think we want to play our part in helping to bring them there.”

Eye Spy

This isn’t the first sign that Facebook wants to dominate the AR space. It bought the breakout VR company Oculus in 2014. Last year, it filed a patent for what look an awful lot like smart spectacles.

If heads-up glasses are the company’s next push, it’ll need to overcome decades of missteps in the space, from Nintendo’s disastrous Virtual Boy to Google’s failed-and-revived Project Glass. And Kirkpatrick cautioned to TechCrunch that the tech likely won’t be here for at least five years.

If the company dreams up a compelling product, though, we’re all going to need to ask ourselves whether we want Facebook notifications clogging up our views as much as they already do our screens.

READ MOREFacebook Confirms It’s Building Augmented Reality Glasses [TechCrunch]

More on augmented reality: These Are The Lightest Augmented Reality Smart Glasses on The Market

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Facebook Sees a Future in Augmented Reality Glasses

Incredible Augmented Reality Demo Conjures Up Ghostly Versions of Your Coworkers

Ghost World

An augmented reality startup called Spatial popped out of stealth mode Wednesday with an incredible AR demo that shows how its service can populate an empty room with ghostly — yet bustling — versions of your coworkers.

“We think the future of work is going to be increasingly distributed,” CEO Anand Agarawala told TechCrunch. “When you put on Spatial, [your coworkers] are in the room with you. It feels like they’re all sitting at the table, and they feel like they’ve been teleported into the space with you.”

Augmented Reality Check

Spatial claims its “collective computing environment” will let remote workers share data with each other in seemingly physical space. All they have to do is don an AR headset, such as Microsoft’s HoloLens. But that could prove to be Spatial’s Achilles’ heel — the current generation of AR headsets are uncomfortable to wear and have narrow fields of view.

Still, the demo is a powerful vision of what virtual work environments could look like in a post-Slack world — even if we need to wait for the hardware to catch up with the concept.

READ MORE: Spatial Debuts ‘Minority Report’-Inspired Augmented Reality Collaboration Tool [Variety]

More on augmented reality: Amazon Has Plans for Headset Free Augmented Reality to Transform Your Home

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Incredible Augmented Reality Demo Conjures Up Ghostly Versions of Your Coworkers


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