12345...102030...


Virtual Reality Is Causing Real Injuries Heres How to Reduce Physical Risk in VR – SciTechDaily

Motion capture and electromyography sensors measure a study participants movement and muscle activity while performing common VR gestures. Credit: Jay Kim

Carpal tunnel, stiff shoulders, eye-strain headaches these are all well-known side effects of prolonged computer use. But what happens when you step away from the desktop and into virtual reality?

A recent study from Oregon State University assessed how some common virtual reality movements contribute to muscle strain and discomfort. Its an effort to ensure future user safety in this fast-growing technology that is used not only for gaming, but also increasingly for education and industrial training.

There are no standards and guidelines for virtual and augmented reality interactions, said researcher Jay Kim of OSUS College of Public Health and Human Sciences. We wanted to evaluate the effects of the target distances, locations, and sizes so we can better design these interfaces to reduce the risk for potential musculoskeletal injuries.

The study was published recently in Applied Ergonomics with Northern Illinois University co-authors Sai Akhil Penumudi, Veera Aneesh Kuppam and Jaejin Hwang.

Virtual reality users wear a headset and engage in full-body, three-dimensional movements unlike conventional computer users, where a desk or the arms of a chair offer some level of support for the hands and arms.

With sensors placed on participants joints and muscles, researchers used motion capture to record their movements and electromyography to measure electrical activity in their muscles while performing common VR gestures. Wearing an Oculus Rift VR headset, participants were tasked with either pointing to specific dots around a circle, or coloring in a certain area with their finger.

Researchers repeated the tests with the visuals placed at eye level, 15 degrees above eye level, 15 degrees below eye level and 30 degrees below eye level.

Regardless of the angle, extending the arm straight out causes shoulder discomfort in as little as three minutes, Kim said. With prolonged use, as VR often requires, this may lead to major health problems like gorilla arm syndrome and rotator cuff injuries.

In addition, the heavy VR headset may increase the burden on the cervical spine, risking greater neck strain.

In computer users, the relationship between awkward postures or repeated movements and musculoskeletal disorders is well known, Kim said. We wanted to see how the VR compares to conventional computer-human interactions.

The goal of the study was to establish a baseline of optimal object placement and angles, so VR developers going forward can design games and programs that minimize user discomfort.

Researchers focused on neck and shoulder movements. They found performance in the coloring task was worst when participants had to tilt their heads down 15 and 30 degrees. The most extreme postures and highest muscle activity were observed with targets at 15 degrees above eye level, as participants were forced to constantly maintain their extended neck and elevated arm position. And discomfort was greatest in the pointing task at 15 degrees above eye level.

Based on this study, we recommend that objects that are being interacted with more often should be closer to the body, Kim said. And objects should be located at eye level, rather than up and down.

The findings could have a massive impact, given VRs growing demand: Tech analysts project that roughly 168 million people worldwide will have some form of VR installed by 2023. A major portion of users are gamers, but VRs practical applications extend to health care, the military, education, and training. In coal mining, for example, trainees use VR to practice new skills that would be dangerous to learn on-site.

Kims main goal is to avoid the mistakes of the past. When personal computing was first emerging in the 80s and 90s, he said, people often didnt think of the risks of overuse until it was too late.

With VR, he said, Wed like to learn now rather than later.

Reference: The effects of target location on musculoskeletal load, task performance, and subjective discomfort during virtual reality interactions by Sai Akhil Penumudi, Veera Aneesh Kuppam, Jeong Ho Kim and Jaejin Hwang, 27 November 2019, Applied Ergonomics.DOI: 10.1016/j.apergo.2019.103010

See the article here:

Virtual Reality Is Causing Real Injuries Heres How to Reduce Physical Risk in VR - SciTechDaily

Virtual reality, real injuries: OSU study aims to ease VR’s aches and pains – KTVZ

CORVALLIS, Ore. (KTVZ) -- Carpal tunnel, stiff shoulders, eye-strain headaches these are all well-known side effects of prolonged computer use. But what happens when you step away from the desktop and into virtual reality?

A recentstudyfrom Oregon State University assessed how some common virtual reality movements contribute to muscle strain and discomfort. Its an effort to ensure future user safety in this fast-growing technology that is used not only for gaming, but also increasingly for education and industrial training.

There are no standards and guidelines for virtual and augmented reality interactions, said researcher Jay Kim of OSUS College of Public Health and Human Sciences. We wanted to evaluate the effects of the target distances, locations and sizes so we can better design these interfaces to reduce the risk for potential musculoskeletal injuries.

The study was published recently in Applied Ergonomics with Northern Illinois University co-authors Sai Akhil Penumudi, Veera Aneesh Kuppam and Jaejin Hwang.

Virtual reality users wear a headset and engage in full-body, three-dimensional movements unlike conventional computer users, where a desk or the arms of a chair offer some level of support for the hands and arms.

With sensors placed on participants joints and muscles, researchers used motion capture to record their movements and electromyography to measure electrical activity in their muscles while performing common VR gestures. Wearing an Oculus Rift VR headset, participants were tasked with either pointing to specific dots around a circle, or coloring in a certain area with their finger.

Researchers repeated the tests with the visuals placed at eye level, 15 degrees above eye level, 15 degrees below eye level and 30 degrees below eye level.

Regardless of the angle, extending the arm straight out causes shoulder discomfort in as little as three minutes, Kim said. With prolonged use, as VR often requires, this may lead to major health problems like gorilla arm syndrome and rotator cuff injuries.

In addition, the heavy VR headset may increase the burden on the cervical spine, risking greater neck strain.

In computer users, the relationship between awkward postures or repeated movements and musculoskeletal disorders is well known, Kim said. We wanted to see how the VR compares to conventional computer-human interactions.

The goal of the study was to establish a baseline of optimal object placement and angles, so VR developers going forward can design games and programs that minimize user discomfort.

Researchers focused on neck and shoulder movements. They found performance in the coloring task was worst when participants had to tilt their heads down 15 and 30 degrees. The most extreme postures and highest muscle activity were observed with targets at 15 degrees above eye level, as participants were forced to constantly maintain their extended neck and elevated arm position. And discomfort was greatest in the pointing task at 15 degrees above eye level.

Based on this study, we recommend that objects that are being interacted with more often should be closer to the body, Kim said. And objects should be located at eye level, rather than up and down.

The findings could have a massive impact, given VRs growing demand: Tech analysts project that roughly168 millionpeople worldwide will have some form of VR installed by 2023. A major portion of users are gamers, but VRs practical applications extend to health care, the military, education and training. Incoal mining, for example, trainees use VR to practice new skills that would be dangerous to learn on-site.

Kims main goal is to avoid the mistakes of the past. When personal computing was first emerging in the 80s and 90s, he said, people often didnt think of the risks of overuse until it was too late.

With VR, he said, Wed like to learn now, rather than later.

View original post here:

Virtual reality, real injuries: OSU study aims to ease VR's aches and pains - KTVZ

You Can Slow Down Time in Virtual Reality: Why This Artist Is Using VR to Recreate Lost Ecosystems in the Era of Climate Change – artnet News

The last Kauai bird died in 1987. After the species went extinct, a user uploaded a recording of the Hawaiian birds unique mating call to YouTube in 2009 and it has since been played by humans more than a half-million times since.

One of them was the Danish-born, New York-based artist Jakob Kudsk Steensen, who usesVirtual Reality as a tool to remix and create a new kind of landscape that is not bound to time or space, and that recalls the irretrievable, lost nature of history.

For his recent installationRE-ANIMATED(2018-19), which was on view in the Future Generation Art Prizes exhibition in Venice during last years biennale, Steensen brings the Kauai bird back to life via an imagined virtual-reality world.

We spoke with Steensen about how he captures an irreconcilable sense of loss in his work and the collective memories that exist between the parallel digital and physical worlds, all through the lens of VR technology.

Your VR workRE-ANIMATED was inspired by the environmental catastrophe that occurred in 1826 when a ship carrying horses to Mexico stopped in Kauai and introduced malaria-carrying mosquitoes into the islands ecosystem, rendering dozens of birds extinct. In a poetic intervention, you virtually recreate one of these extinct birds and Kauais lost ecosystem. What was it about this ecological event that made you want to make this work, and how did you go about doing it?

Four years ago, I came home from a long day of work and was randomly looking at things on the internet, and then I came across this recording of the bird. It was the voice recording of the last Kauai bird that existed on Earth. The birds mating call was uploaded to YouTube and was listened to by people more than a half-million times.

I then read through the comments. There were more than 2,000 very emotional comments to this call. It was as if I had this picture of 2,000 people sitting alone, in front of the computer, responding emotionally to this recording of this extinct bird, and it struck me as something really specific to our time.

Jakob Kudsk Steensen, RE-ANIMATED (2018). Future Generation Art Prize, 2019 Venice Biennale. Courtesy of the artist.

Theres another layer of this story, which is personal, and I dont want to go into details, but its about family and losses. Even though I grew up in a digital time and am used to archiving things with social-media pictures and everything, people still die and vanish and can never come back.

If you think about that, we are living in a time where were trying to bring back extinct species, which is a weird relationship with our past. We have a collective anxiety that everything will vanish, and more and more nature is being destroyed.

I started this project by going to the Museum of Natural History, which collected this bird in the 1800s. So I collected all the materials, the feathers, along with the big archive of plants and trees with all sorts of different species, and I used this archive to recreate the whole landscape. And then I used the satellite images of the island, and then traveled to this island and explored myself. Its a very slow and laborious process, but thats how I usually work on a project.

I like that you describe yourself as a digital gardener. Its very poetic and speaks to your work of recreating lost landscapes to raise awareness about climate change. What is your opinion on VR as a medium for creativity? What is its potential and what are its limits?

VR is a very interesting medium because its corporalyou have to use your body. And my interest is also to bring certain virtual landscapes to people who normally dont use computers. I make works that are very accessibleyou just put on a headset, and thats it. Everyone knows how to move their head and body. So, all of a sudden you can show your art in an intuitive way.

I tried to use minimally complicated controls, I tried to make it very intuitive and playful. And thats something that speaks to the nature of VRyou can take a virtual media and make it a human language. Thats how I look at it. It speaks to you on a human level.

In a way, paintings and projections on screen are one-directional. It is an old way of looking at the world, like the perspective in Western art history. Installation is perhaps a better analogy to VR. Walking into a physical space in an installation is similar to the VR experience; thats also why I built installation around my work sometimes, when the conditions allowed.

Jakob Kudsk Steensen, The Deep Listener (2019), VR visualization. Courtesy of the artist.

What about the limits of VR as a medium?

The limits of VR as medium would be the size of the audience. I have eight headsets now, and after each exhibition they just broke down because the technology is so new. All these complications can play in when dealing with a big audience.

Immersive virtual technologies have enabled us to experience both distant locales and imagined worlds like never before, and your works are great examples of storytelling in VR. However, it seems no one has yet fully cracked the code of creating a truly participatory narrative experience where the viewer has real agency. What do you think needs to happen to get VR to take the leap into the next frontier of storytelling? How do you see this medium evolving over time?

When I show in film festivals, people talk a lot about storytelling, but for me, the way I have been creating my work is almost like moving away from that. A story is a narrative, but I am looking for the experiential part of it, like the senses of the body. Before you understand the mediumfor example, how VR relates to the human bodyregardless of the story you want to tell, its going to fall apart. If youve never played video games or created 3D, it can be quite challenging to use this medium well, because you might make something like when youre looking at 2D on a screen, but you actually need to think about how the body moves in your eyes.

Regarding AR [augmented reality] and VR, the first and foremost challenge is to understand how human bodies are navigating in a space. And I believe before you understand that, its hard to utilize the medium in a compelling way.And you also need to respect your audience. Imagine this: All of a sudden, their body is part of your art; they are no longer just standing, watching, or listening. Youre inviting them to use their bodies to explore the world you created, and I think that really requires a lot of attention and respect.

If you are just violently throwing another human into a 3D world and they dont know how to move themselves, thats when a lot of clashes happen.

You have to think about the human, not the technology. When I design, I think about where the person will be looking and I create a virtual scene. I think about what kind of feeling I want to convey, and then I add the colors, light, and the atmosphere. I think about how I want people to hear, and then I use the technology around to achieve that, instead of trying to force something into the technology. In the past two years, the technology has evolved super fast and the audience now is more used to the medium as well. I am optimistic. I think in the end it just takes time.

Jakob Kudsk Steensen, RE-ANIMATED (2018). Future Generation Art Prize exhibition during the 2019 Venice Biennale. Courtesy of the artist.

The way you incorporate audio, 2D images, and 3D animation into a holistic VR experience is not through a linear narrative. Your work conveys the eerie, unsettling sense of jumping around in time. What is your intention here?

My interest lies in exploring different space and time in natural history. These spatial transformative technologies like VR are a very powerful medium when youre interested in past natural histories because you can literally 3D scan the whole landscape. And I use satellite images, and I digitize plants that I collected in nature and put them on the landscape. I literally go to landscapes and collect organic materials, I collect and photograph them, and transform that into virtual spaces. In other words, I build imaginary landscapes based on the actual materials I collected.

The technologies allowed me to show things to youfor example, how past landscapes can change overtime, how you can look from the scale of a beetle, how you can change your perspective. These things are what this technology is very good at. You can also jump around in time and you can slow down time in virtual realityyou can change your scale in different dimensions.

Your workThe Deep Listener at the Serpentine Galleries last year (commissioned in collaboration withGoogle Arts & Culture and Sir David Adjaye) involved creatingan AR experience of the Kensington Gardens surrounding the gallery. Through extensive research and work with biologists, you focused on one species in each of the five spots you chose and recreated the visual and sonic experiences that users interact with. Where did the inspiration for this work come from?

It takes place in the whole park in London and there are five different locations. You have to go there with your phone. When you arrive at the location, you find these large creatures that are based on the different species in the park that lived at this location, each with different visualized audio recordings. When you physically move around with the phone in your hand, youre also changing the speed of the audio, as if youre changing the speed of time as you walk through the park and interact with the audio.

It basically allows you to hear things you usually dont hear with your phone. Like bats, for example. When you walk around, youre changing how fast the audio is playing, and the pitches, so your ears wouldnt hear these sounds usually. Theres an App you can download and will always be available to use when you visit the park. Everyone can download it.

Where do you find the most inspiration for your work these days?

My inspirations are usually based on the conversations with my friends and biologists, then I go and spend many months in the landscape. I am always out exploring places and talking to people. For example, I spend two months researching the species, and then I find five locations that I want people to go to and explore.

Starting next month, I will be spending nine months in the landscape and collaborating with my wife. We are trying to create a project together. We are going to Sorrel Island; its an island in between Europe and the States where the tectonic plates meet, where three continents meet in one spot, and they formed a mini continent, deep in the sea. We are going to see if we can work with the robots therethe robots that are collecting data for scientistsand then from there we can create a new landscape.

Your works evolve around nature and its histories, and I am curious whether you think we are in the best of times or the end of times? One oddity of our current era is that extreme pessimism about the world coexists with extreme optimism.

There are two answers to that: One is, statistically, we are at a point where we dont have something truly comparable to the past. Its hard to predict what will happen in the future because of that. We have a lot of knowledge and tools available, but at the same time, it could just go the completely opposite direction.

I think were at the middle point between this utopia and dystopia. We are at a point in time when they are clashing together, and barely holding right now, and it could go many different ways.Thats also why Im making works that combine different times. Its more emotional and psychologically challengingthats the kind of ground I have been trying to create. In my works, I tried to create from this old realistic landscape and transform it into something new in the future. All my works exist in the middle of this coexistence of times.

Jakob Kudsk Steensen, RE-ANIMATED (2018) film still. Future Generation Art Prize, 2019 Venice Biennale. Courtesy of the artist.

Secondly, I do believe that much more has to be done, and we need to actually spread the messages, as well as to give resources to people. Consequently, I am thinking more and more about how, as an artist, can my projects help to achieve that? How can they be more specific than in the past, to help share the stories about places that need to have more work be done?

Recently I have been talking to this NGO in Panama that protects the frogs there. And we were talking about how there are 12 different species of frogs that are all extinct in the wild because of a fungus. Because theres a fungus crisis spreading out, and the fungus is making all frogs extinct, all frogs will disappear eventually, from Panama to South America. And people still dont know how to stop it.

This NGO is collecting the frogs that survived the fungus and preserving them, working to see how they can become resistant and then releasing them back to the wild. If they release these frogs back to the wild, all of them will die, unfortunately, because the politics has changed. The NGO doesnt work with the Smithsonian anymore; as a result they are facing financial difficulties to continue the preservation program.

Its pretty obvious if they dont continue to get financed, eventually there will be no frogs in Panama in the future. Its a fact. And these things I find more and more relevant to share with people.I still want to make art thats emotional and powerful, but I am also thinking about how to connect to the stories that are happening right now in our world.

More here:

You Can Slow Down Time in Virtual Reality: Why This Artist Is Using VR to Recreate Lost Ecosystems in the Era of Climate Change - artnet News

Virtual reality reconnects casualties of Partition with ancestral homes – Nikkei Asian Review

NEW DELHI -- Seated on a sofa in her home in London, an elderly Pakistani woman is quietly absorbed in the digital world unfolding inside a cutting-edge virtual reality device placed over her eyes.

More than 70 years after the most dramatic episode of her life -- her flight from India to Pakistan on the eve of the Partition of British India in August 1947 -- Saida Siddiqui is watching a computer-generated simulation of her childhood in an interactive, 3D VR environment.

Siddiqui is one of 75 participants in the events of 1947 who are working with Project Dastaan, an Oxford University-backed VR peace-building initiative that is reconnecting displaced survivors of Partition with their childhoodthrough bespoke 360-degree digital experiences. Dastaan means "tale" or "story" in many Indian and Central Asian languages.

All the survivors involved with Project Dastaan were among the millions of residents of British India displaced by the partition of the colonial state into independent India and Pakistan, whose eastern territories became the separate state of Bangladesh in 1971. Amid intercommunal violence, many Hindus fled east to independent India, while many Muslims fled west to Pakistan -- including Siddiqui, who crossed from Lucknow, now the capital of the Indian state of Uttar Pradesh, to Karachi.

Project Dastaan grew directly out of family memories of Partition. "A year ago, I and [co-founder] Ameena Malak sat down over a coffee and exchanged our grandparents' stories of Partition," said Sparsh Ahuja, an Oxford University student who directs the project. Ahuja's grandfather, Ishar Das Arora, who was 7at the time of Partition, lived in a village called Bela in what is now Pakistan. He eventually moved to Delhi, "after living in many refugee camps and escaping mass-scale communal violence," Ahuja told the Nikkei Asian Review.

Malak's grandfather, Ahmed Rafiq, migrated in the opposite direction, from Hoshiarpur in what is now India to Lahore in Pakistan. Both grandparents yearned to go back home, but never realized their dreams because of advancing age, the traumatic aftermath of their experiences and the impact of subsequent wars between India and Pakistan. Seven decades after Partition it remains difficult to cross the India-Pakistan border. But the two grandchildren realized that, even if their grandparents could not physically return to their homes, they could be brought back via VR.

Other Project Dastaanteam members share these family links to Partition. Saadia Gardezi grew up listening to her mother's stories about refugees she had helped in Lahore, while Sam Dalrymple is a grandchild of the late Sir Hew Fleetwood Hamilton-Dalrymple, a British officer stationed in India during the last years of British rule. Dalrymple, whose father is the British historian William Dalrymple, said his grandfather was so disturbed by the events of Partition that he never wanted to visit family in Delhi.

The team connects to Partition survivors through social media, although witnesses can also submit their stories through the project's website. "One refugee we have shown the VR experience to 'teared up' and told us we had transported him back into his childhood," said Dalrymple. "We are still editing the remaining eight [sessions] that we filmed last month. It's a deeply emotional experience. Sometimes we have even called the refugees from their hometowns, and they get very emotional."

Despite being only just over a year old, Project Dastaan has earned support from Oxford University's Global Area Studies Department, Pakistani activist and Nobel Peace Prize winner Malala Yousafzai, and influential figures in the VR world such as Gabo Arora, a former creative director of the United Nations. The project has also earned funding of $30,000 from the CatchLight Fellowship, a San Francisco-based nongovernmental organization, and the team was invited to speak at the U.K. Parliament.

Besides the 360-degree VRexperiences, Project Dastaan is also at work on "Child of Empire," a documentary that will put viewers in the shoes of a 1947 Partition migrant, and will be presented at film festivals.

Dalrymple said Project Dastaan also aims to map contrasting experiences of Partition in various parts of India and Pakistan. "In Indian Punjab and Calcutta, for example, virtually every Partition witness we have spoken to has lamented leaving their homes, and expressed a wish for the two countries to be friends again," he said. "By contrast, the Rajasthani Partition witnesses that we interviewed were more critical of Pakistan and seemed less interested in returning to their ancestral lands. As a result of this, one of our main aims in the project has become to highlight the geographical variety of Partition experiences."

But the most important aspect of Project Dastaan is probably that it is driven by Indians, Pakistanis and Britons who are trying to make sense of how the history of Partition affects the present. It is hoped that the project will keep inspiring young Indians, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis to reflect on the strife between their countries and to try to change opinions for the benefit of future generations.

"Given how viciously the hatreds unleashed by Partition still divide India and Pakistan today, it's critical that new generations come to grips with what happened and why," said Nisid Hajari, author of "Midnight's Furies: The Deadly Legacy of India's Partition," an award-winning history of Partition and the ensuing violence.

"We've received very positive reactions from millennials," said Ahuja, who thinks that second- or third-generation descendants of the survivors are probably the most committed and enthusiastic supporters of Project Dastaan. "We surprisingly find a lot of our leads through Instagram," he added. "These young people know modern media and use it to help survivors who are not tech-savvy enough to tell their life experiences. They often send in stories of their grandparents for us to track down."

Hajari added: "Any technology that can help Indians and Pakistanis better appreciate the experience of their forefathers, on both sides of the border, is to be welcomed. With luck, these virtual trips will be just the precursor to physical journeys across the border, in both directions, so the two sides can see firsthand how much more unites them than divides them."

View post:

Virtual reality reconnects casualties of Partition with ancestral homes - Nikkei Asian Review

Virtual reality will soon be as common as the smartphone – Human Resources Director

Because employees are more vocal about these expectations, they now strongly influence IT decisions to deploy new technologies sooner.

Sinclair warned that if future workplace technologies, such as AR/VR devices, are not created to suit workers preferences, employees might resist using them, causing further delays in adoption.

Invisible computingThe study also had respondents consider the idea of Invisible Computing, in which future workplace tech are to be made so small or discreet that workers wont even be able to notice them.

This would help employees focus on their tasks or people they are dealing with not on the tech they are using.

Despite the benefits of modern workplace tech, Sinclair believes the devices workers use today can be very distracting. However, he is optimistic future tech will be able to address this issue.

Go here to read the rest:

Virtual reality will soon be as common as the smartphone - Human Resources Director

Virtual Reality’s Role in Detox Featured at CES’ 2020 Digital Health Summit – Business Wire

KYLE, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Harbir Singh, MD, MBA, FACEP explained his hospitals innovative use of virtual reality in detox at CES Digital Health Summit on January 8, 2020. A board certified emergency room physician, Singh is CEO of Kyle ER & Hospital in Kyle, TX, the first hospital to use the tools, and a co-founder of Cynergi Health Partners, which provides the virtual reality programs.

Our community hospital paired a suite of virtual reality experienceswhich can reduce apprehension and panic during withdrawalwith a traditional medication-assisted detox program for patients suffering from substance abuse. We've used the latter for many years, but the VR component adds soothing imagery and sounds and leverages proven psychological techniques to make the process easier, explained Singh.

So far, the combination has been successful in helping our patients, while generating substantial revenue. Our technology can be used alongside medical treatment for many addictive conditions, including alcohol, opioid and benzodiazepine (benzo) addictions.

Digital Health Summit Producer Jill Gilbert commented, "This years Summit spotlighted the exponential tech-assisted transformation underway in healthcare, including the breakthrough benefits offered to patients by adding VR to traditional medication-assisted detoxification programs.

Patients struggling with addiction should know there is additional hope now because of the assistance VR can lend to their medical treatment, said Arshya Vahabzadeh, MD, MRCGP, a co-founder of Cynergi Health and the psychiatrist who developed the virtual reality protocols. And community hospitals now have a better way to help the overwhelming number of people in their areas who are affected by addiction.

About the Digital Health Summit

Featuring more than 175 innovative companies in Health & Wellness Technology, the Summit is produced annually by Living in Digital Times, a series of conferences and events presented in partnership with CES Las Vegas, the worlds largest showcase for innovation in consumer technologies.

About Kyle ER & Hospital

Learn about Kyle ER & Hospital at https://kyleer.com/.

About Cynergi Health Partners

Cynergi Health Partners suite of virtual reality experiences leverages proven psychological techniques and soothing images and sounds to make medication-assisted detox easier and to help patients succeed once their treatment has ended. Its turnkey services help community and rural hospitals bring needed treatment options to their communities while supporting revenues.

See https://www.cynergihealth.com/ for more information.

More:

Virtual Reality's Role in Detox Featured at CES' 2020 Digital Health Summit - Business Wire

SharePoint in VR? Virtual Reality SharePoint Spaces coming this year from Microsoft – OnMSFT

SharePoint Spaces, a tool originally revealed in 2018 at the SharePoint Virtual Summit, is now available in private preview. As noted in a post by Upload, SharePoint Spaces is one step closer to being generally available. SharePoint Spaces will be available for use with the Microsoft HoloLens and Oculus Quest, along with other Windows Mixed Reality headsets sometime in the next few months.

According to Microsoft, SharePoint Spaces will allow anyone to create mixed reality experiences where data, documents, and files can be used empowering everyone to create visually compelling spaces that are available to anyone, on any device. SharePoint Spaces will allow users to create content in these three areas.

Recruiting and onboardingRecruits or new employees can learn about a company in a compelling, 360-degee virtual welcome and orientation, including a 360-degree video message from leadership. They can navigate the campus or building with 3D maps, learn the organizational structure with an interactive organization chart, or explore rich information about coworkers and the organizations products.

LearningWith mixed reality, learning comes to life by captivating your focus and attention. Gain broad perspective with a panoramic view of a topic and learning objectives. Then explore personalized, relevant, and dynamic content. Ignite your curiosity by discovering new insights, and dive deep into topics that matter to you. Learn not just by reading or watching, but by experiencing, with your senses engaged.

Product developmentCreate an inspiring space for your team to spark innovation. Surround yourself with experts to look at data, content, and processes from every angle. Explore a prototype in 3D to identify new opportunities, attach annotations, and visualize improvements.SharePoint Spaces will be integrated within SharePoint offering users a user-friendly experience. SharePoint users will be able to see a preview of their work in a VR space once uploaded. SharePoint Spaces will also support other media content, including 360 photos and videos, and 3D models and objects.

If you are interested in taking part in the SharePoint Spaces private preview, sign-ups are here. Do you think SharePoint Spaces will be a useful VR tool for companies? Let us know in the comments.

See more here:

SharePoint in VR? Virtual Reality SharePoint Spaces coming this year from Microsoft - OnMSFT

BMW to adopt virtual reality windscreen – The Irish Times

BMW has teamed up with Chinese digital display experts Futurus to create the next-generation of heads-up displays. These will no longer be simply about projecting your speed and maybe some sat-nav arrows on to the windscreen, but will instead incorporate complete windscreens with augmented reality displays.

Futurus is showing off its new Mixed Reality (MR) windscreen at the hugely influential Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, and BMW is one of the carmakers lining up for a slice of its tech. MR means that you still view the real world through the windscreen as normal, but the glass can also be used as a gigantic projection screen, with information on road hazards, traffic, and even local information flashing up in front of the drivers eye.

The MR windscreen features independent projection layers, so that from the drivers perspective, the screen is clear aside from hazard warnings (Futuruss systems can detect cyclists and pedestrians at 50m distance) and navigation directions, which can point you directly down the street you need.

From a passengers perspective, the windscreen can be a big TV, showing movies, music, or social media without distracting the driver. The tech is similar to that deployed by Jaguar Land Rover on its infotainment screens, which effectively divides the screen up like a venetian blind, showing one set of angled pixels in one direction.

Chief scientist at Futurus Uber Wu says: Vehicle manufacturers must adopt MR technology if they want to offer a truly safe yet immersive experience in the next generation of vehicles. The in-cabin experience has not changed radically in decades, our windscreen transforms the driver and passenger journey. The technology is the first step towards a smart windscreen that delivers personalised, interactive in-car entertainment, e-commerce and enhanced safety features, thanks to split-screen technology that doesnt distract the driver.

Chief executive of Futurus Technology Alex Xu adds: In-car augmented reality head-up displays (Hud) are installed in relatively few models and offer limited performance, but in the next few years we will produce a smarter hybrid-reality windscreen display that provides the safest ride to mass-market vehicles.

While Futuruss stand at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) will consist mostly of a huge MR windscreen demonstration, across the hall BMW has its own work to show off a two-seat version of the i3 electric car. No, its not what youre thinking. Its not a Smart fortwo rival. Instead, the i3 Urban Suite puts the driver up front as normal, but bins the front passenger seat and one of the rear seats to create a super-luxury perch from which you can be silently chauffeured around.

The idea is that the single rear-seat passenger has their own foot rest, a bigger, comfier seat than usual, personal drop-down video screen and a focused sound zone so their tunes can be listened to without upsetting the driver.

They also get what appears to be a small side cabinet, which BMW says is made from certified wood, while the rest of the cabin gets recycled carpet and leather tanned to eco-friendly principles. Its not a one off either BMW has actually made a whole fleet of these i3 Urban Suites and is offering them, via a special app, to whizz CES attendees around Las Vegas. The idea? To demonstrate that luxury travel in the future will have nothing to do with vehicle size, according to a BMW spokesperson.

Originally posted here:

BMW to adopt virtual reality windscreen - The Irish Times

Addas Popular Virtual Reality Dinners at James Beard House in NYC Have Been Extended – Eater NY

Virtual reality dining from Adda team and James Beard is extended

A virtual reality dining experienced helmed by Chintan Pandya and Roni Mazumdar, the chef and restaurateur team behind hit Indian restaurants Adda and Rahi has been extended through January 26 after quickly selling out tickets for its original run, which was set to end December 29. The duo have teamed up with artist Mattia Casalegno for whats called Aerobanquets RMX, hosted at the James Beard House on West 12th Street.

As diners put on their Oculus headsets, the voice of Top Chefs Gail Simmons guides them through the experience, which includes interacting with virtual representations of food, while also sampling seven actual small plates of food over the course of the 40-minute dinner. Tickets costs $125 and only four people can participate at once. Mazumdar and Pandyas Adda, which is located in Long Island City, and focuses on Indian regional cooking, landed on several best new restaurant lists in the city last year.

Celebrated sommelier Andr Hueston Mack, a French Laundry and Per Se alum, and the first black man to win the best young sommelier in America award from international food society Chane des Rtisseurs, has opened his first restaurant in Prospect Lefferts Garden. And Sons, as the wine bar is known, is a family affair that hes running with his wife and sons. The menu features over 300 selections of wine, and a variety of ham and cheese offerings with options to build a charcuterie board. The restaurant seats 21 and opens January 16, and Mack has plans to open a larder shop next door in the spring, selling ceramics, ham and cheese, and charcuterie boards.

The Post is (rightly) being called out for its viciously written and wildly insensitive coverage of a homeless man who was eating from a Whole Foods hot bar in Midtown.

Mayor Bill de Blasio slammed pizza chain Dominos for selling $30 pies to New Years Eve revelers at Times Square. Twitterati didnt take too kindly to the diss, calling out to the mayor for past pizza faux pas such as eating a slice with a fork and knife on Staten Island in 2014, according to the Post.

Upper East Side restaurant Swiftys, which closed in 2016 much to the disappointment of local residents, has reopened in Palm Beach, Florida.

Well said:

Sign up for our newsletter.

447 Rogers Avenue, Brooklyn, New York 11225

Read more:

Addas Popular Virtual Reality Dinners at James Beard House in NYC Have Been Extended - Eater NY

One Student Entrepreneur’s Virtual Reality Babson Thought & Action – Babson Thought & Action

Innovators must know when to pivot. Market demand, funding, and barriers to entry are all critical factors in determining whether one business may prosper while another may plummet.

Eagle Wu 20 has experienced both sides firsthand.

As founder of virtual reality company Vinci, Wu has pivoted his business model across industriesfrom architecture to military and renewable energy. He has seized the opportunities in front of him, and, in turn, put the business in its best position to succeed.

Vinci was originally focused on virtual reality for architecture and design, but the decision to veer off course was made due to circumstance.

For us, it seemed like the entry into the (architecture) market was way too high, Wu said.

In flew the Air Force.

Last year, Vinci received a $1 million contract with the Air Force to use virtual reality to train aircraft maintainers. The company also is working to create a safety equipment prototype for the wind turbine division of Siemens Gamesa Renewable Energy as part of a research partnership.

With minimal time for physical training situations and a lack of access to instructional aircraft, Vinci has allowed members of the Air Force to train while they ready for their next assignment.

And, even with the significance of the arrangement, Wu still revels in the reach and impact of his company.

The product Im building will be out in the world in these live missions, he said, adding that he recently worked with units that just returned from a stint in the Middle East and Africa. Its intense.

Wus renewable energy work led him to a guest appearance on Bill Nyes podcast, where the two discussed clean energy and new technology approaches, and the advantages of approaching renewable energy from a holistic point of view.

While continuing contract work, the Vinci team also is building an interface that will allow clients to create their own virtual reality simulations, saving money for entities, such as the military, that frequently change their curriculum.

Because of that high turnover, it becomes infeasible for them to service out development, Wu said. Were building a platform that allows them to do it themselves, and also allows us to scale to more clients.

Wu left Babson College for a year and a half to focus on Vinci. He returned this fall with the goal of finishing his coursework while continuing to run the business.

I felt like there were classes at Babson I was missing out on. There are things I do want to learn that I probably wont have the opportunity to learn had I dropped out.

Eagle Wu '20

Taking classes in finance and economics has better positioned himself as an entrepreneur, he said.

At some point, that is something we have to (know.) Its better to have that knowledge, Wu said. When you start scaling up contract sizes, they start to scrutinize every part of your business, including my credentials.

If Im trying to pitch for a $10 million (or) $20 million contact, and I go in and they look at my background and say this guy only has a high school diploma, theyre going to take note of that. Having a degree matters.

Posted in Campus & Community, Entrepreneurs of All Kinds

Tagged Entrepreneurs of All Kinds, Campus, Career, Startups, Student Life, Undergraduate

Follow this link:

One Student Entrepreneur's Virtual Reality Babson Thought & Action - Babson Thought & Action

Edinburgh author Jane Alexander on the futuristic possibilities of virtual reality – The Scotsman

In her thought-provoking new novel, A Users Guide to Make-Believe, Jane Alexander explores the life of a woman who uses virtual reality to revisit the golden days of a relationship. Interview by David Robinson

I dont know anyone who has thought more deeply about virtual reality than the woman sitting across the table from me at a cafe just around the corner from Edinburgh University, where she works though Jane Alexander, BA, MPhil, PhD, isnt a scientist but a lecturer in creative writing.

Her latest novel, A Users Guide to Make-Believe, does a lot more than merely imagine what would happen if we could step into the world of virtual reality as easily as using an asthma inhaler. Thats the simple bit, the quick imaginative fix you might expect from an episode of Black Mirror: the near-future shoved sideways or upside down mainly for the shock of it. What Alexander is trying to do is quite different: to look at how virtual reality would change us.

As she points out, were more than half-way there already, what with all the fictions we put out about ourselves on social media. And like all the most convincing dystopias, the novels seeds are already taking root in the present. Maybe an individually generated virtual reality might take 20 years, she says, but it will probably be there in my lifetime. Youve only got to look at the work Elon Musk is doing with his company Neuralink [on implantable brain-machine interfaces].

She has tried out some of the existing virtual reality technologies. The most successful ones for me have been works of art. The 2016 Bjrk Digital exhibition at Somerset House was very, very convincing. You had to wear goggles and a backpack, and youre very aware that youre weighed down by them, but in terms of your body being in the same space as Bjrk you are completely convinced by that, at least until you look down and see that your feet are missing or that the wind blowing Bjrks hair isnt blowing yours. The Janet Cardiff and George Bures Miller Night Walk for Edinburgh at last years Festival was equally impressive too. But whereas that video walk involved using an iPod and a pair of headphones for its overlay of virtual reality, Alexanders novel imagines something far more immersive a technology called Make-Believe (Whatever your fantasy, live it with Make-Believe the only limit is you) which is also unlinked to anything else. To activate your biomolecules and kickstart your fantasies, all you need is a simple if expensive nasal spray.

Now if you or I had come up with the idea of a virtually undetectable and unmediated VR technology there might be other authors who have, says Alexander, but she hasnt read any my guess is that wed go overboard in describing either how it works or how it changed society. But although Cassie, Alexanders central character, has worked for the manufacturers of Make-Believe, although she describes its business operation and briefly touches on its use in palliative care and in treating mental illness, her novel sets off on an altogether different track.

Thats because, essentially, it is a love story. Not a conventional one, because Alan, the love of Cassies life, is now both physically and mentally the shell of what he once was. Thanks to Make-Believe, though, she can go back, always to the same tender, loving moment, an intimate golden memory. Each time, she can make it more real by remembering in greater detail (just like writing Alexander points out); each time, though, therell also be that crushing ache as she had to leave him behind and carry on with her life.

At the start, though, all we know is that Cassie is attending some sort of addicts meeting, and we dont even know what she is addicted to, no more than we know anything about the hacker she meets there. Theyre both, it seems, addicted to the same thing not drugs or alcohol, but lost love. Hes attractive, and nature looks all set to take its course even if, thanks to VR, Cassie has to work out whether to choose the uncertain present over the idyllic but dead past.

However, before you all shout out Take the uncertain present! the plot lopes off towards even deeper moral dilemmas. Suppose, Alexander imagines, extreme users virtual reality could be affected by other peoples. Suppose, in other words, that people could see straight into each others minds ...

One thing about that, she smiles. It would certainly make interviews pointless.

I suppose it would. Id be able to see at a glance the way Jane Alexander thinks. Id be able to go all the way back to one of her own happiest memories a sunny day in Edinburgh; she was 18 and had come down from her native Aberdeen to visit her friend; theyd walked up Salisbury Crags, and the city and both their futures seemed spread out in front of them. Id catch a flicker of everything shed poured into her mind since: first, learning illustration at Edinburgh College of Art, then the creative writing MPhil in Glasgow, then the PhD at Edinburgh on the sense of the uncanny in Scottish literature. Id see how all that had turned first into this novel, and then into the short story collection she is working on now, which hinges on how new technology is changing our sense of the strange. I wouldnt even need to read it.

Id see, too, some of the people in recovery from substance abuse shes taught creative writing (shed never dream of writing directly about them, though she concedes her fiction is often about damaged, vulnerable characters), and some of the writers she worked with and made her take her own fiction seriously too. Id see what kind of a teacher she is: my own guess is a very good one indeed.

Of course, shed be able to see into my mind too. And shed know for sure that, when I told her Id enjoyed the book, that it had made me think about virtual reality in far greater depth than I can imagine Black Mirror ever doing, and that I hoped it did really well for her, it wasnt a word of a lie.

A Users Guide to Make-Believe is published by Allison & Busby on 23 January, price 14.99

See the article here:

Edinburgh author Jane Alexander on the futuristic possibilities of virtual reality - The Scotsman

BizHawk: Coffee, Restaurants and Virtual Reality on the Rise in Santa Barbara County – Noozhawk

BizHawk is published weekly, and includes items of interest to the business community. Share your business news, including employee announcements and personnel moves, by emailing [emailprotected].

Coffee and food won in 2019.

BizHawk featured 21 restaurants that opened, from the quick and creative Dave's Dog's on Milpas Street to the well-known brand Jeannine's in the Hollister Village Plaza in Goleta. We wrote about the opening of five new coffee shops in 2019, from the venerable, such as the drive-thru Starbucks off Turnpike Road and Krispy Kreme in Santa Maria, to the environmentally cutting edge, Caje.

And despite State Street's much-talked-about woes, the strip was home to several new restaurants:Embermill,The Project Corazon Cocina & Taproom,Oppi'z Italian Restaurant, andApna Indian Cuisine,

Husband and wife team Dominic Shiach and Carmen Deforest opened The Daisy.

Institution Ale, which started in Camarillo, began serving beer in the old Pierre LaFond building. Onus Donutsopened, and Vive was rebrandedto Eleven14 Craft Beer and Sports Bar.

Restaurants were also reborn on Cabrillo Boulevard.

The team behind Los Agaves opened Flor de Maiz, a Oaxacan-styled Mexican food restaurant that specializes in mole. The restaurant took over half of the old El Torito, which lived and died on its Sunday buffet back in the day. The other half of the old El Torito building is also now home to Oku, a California-Asian food restaurant, which is owned by Opal entrepreneur Tina Takaya.

"The goal is to create a locals' place on the water where locals feel like family and visitors feel like locals," Takaya said.

And while many foodies tend to think of Santa Barbara proper as the hot spot for cuisine, Goleta is gaining more prominence as a restaurant destination. With the city's recent development burst, steady rise in tech companies, and the long-awaited, much-anticipated arrival of Target, Goleta is where the people are.

In addition to Jeannine's, Mesa Burger replaced Kahuna Grill in the Camino Real Marketplace. (Mesa Burger, by the way, is planning an opening on Coast Village Road in 2020, to bring the growing burger empire to three spots).

Sp & Js, which sells soup and juice, wasopened in Hollister Villageby the team that owns Kyle's Kitchen. In the Calle Real shopping center, San Francisco chef and Sri Lanka-native Rajesh Selvarathnam opened Masala Spice Indian cuisine. A few doors down,Woody's Boba and Pizza Onlinejumped into the market. Itsells ready-to-go customized pizzas through predominantly online orders.

Old Town continued its slow transition. Indiana-native and chef Owen Hanavan launched Lemon & Coriander.

"Over the past decade, Goleta is slowly coming around, so it's a great location with all the businesses around here," he told Noozhawk in December.

The Public Market in Santa Barbara continues to develop with restaurants Wabi Sabi Sushi and the vegan Middle Eastern Fala Bar opening.

Not everything, however, was about birth. Several businesses spotlighted in Noozhawk came to an end.

Sears, one of Santa Barbara's few shopping destinations for working-class people, closed its doors in La Cumbre Plaza, a victim of the national retail chain's largerproblems. The nearby Auto Center also closed. Along with Macy's, Searswas one of the anchors of La Cumbre Plaza. It's unclear what the future holds for the spot, but the property has proposed building housing in the parking lot area of the site.

Jedlicka's, a Western clothing and supply store that opened in 1932, surrendered in February 2019.

"Lack of volume, lack of sales," owner Josiah Jenkins told Noozhawk. "And a lack of support by suppliers. We just can't compete." The Jedlicka's in Los Olivos remains open.

Restaurants continued to depart from State Street. Santa Barbara clearly wasn't having it Mike's Way.Sandwich shop Jersey Mike's closed its doors quietly in April.

"The concept, their business plan, wasnt working downtown, said Adam Geeb, director of asset management for Sima Corporation, which manages the property.

Goa Taco and Brat Hausalso left town, in June and August, respectively. Another longtime, prominent restaurant closed its doors in Goleta:Ming Dynasty, next to the new Target in Goleta, served lunch and dinner to countless people over the past 40 years.

Coffee continued to grow its footprint. Caje Coffee, makes original coffee drinks, and does not offer disposable cups. You have to drink at the restaurant or buy a to-go cup.Ryan Patronyk, Troy Yamasaki andSean Sepulveda expanded from Isla Vista and opened a new restaurant on Haley Street.

We're trying to offer people an experiment that is not your traditional coffee shop,Yamasaki said. Our passion and desire is to create an other-worldly experience.

Coffee shop Low Pigeon, a name derived from a combination of owners Rich Low, MattPigeon and Dennis Medina, openedacross the street from Caje in the 400 block of East Haley Street. Caffe Luxxeopened in the Montecito Country Mart, and Krispy Kreme and Dunkin' Donuts in Santa Maria.

Perhaps the most interesting of all openings in 2019, however, was not a restaurant or coffee shop, but the unreal Surreal Virtual Reality.

Westmont graduateAlejandro Carvajal opened the unique experiential destination at436 State St. Suite B in November and people haven't stopped flooding his establishment since. Whether it's the John Wick shooting game, Fruit Ninja, Beat Saber, SuperHot, orseveral other game options, the new business has helped silence the criticism that there's nothing for young people to do downtown.

Carvajal actually has games for just about all ages, even the lower-key theBlu, which allows people to explore the ocean and visit sea life and creatures.

"Other than bars and breweries and restaurants, theres not a lot people can do downtown," Carvajal said. "If it can be imagined and coded, it can exist in virtual reality."

Noozhawk staff writer Joshua Molina can be reached at .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address). Follow Noozhawk on Twitter: @noozhawk, @NoozhawkNews and @NoozhawkBiz. Connect with Noozhawk on Facebook.

See original here:

BizHawk: Coffee, Restaurants and Virtual Reality on the Rise in Santa Barbara County - Noozhawk

This study used virtual reality to test the brain’s internal ‘GPS’ – CTV News London

LONDON, ONT. -- A new understanding of a complex part of the brain may hold the key for patients with neurological disorders.

Its called the hippocampus, a part of the brain that in the scientific community is often referred to as our internal GPS.

The hippocampus has cells like a GPS so you have one neuron in the hippocampus and every time youre in one place of the room the neuron lights up and increases the activity and thats how you know where you are, explains Robarts Research Institute scientist Dr. Julio Martinez-Trujillo.

Martinez-Trujillo and his research team wanted to challenge the idea that this area of the brain only served as an internal GPS.

They did so by using a virtual reality type game to study specific activities in the brain.

The virtual reality basically gives you the best of both worlds, says Martinez-Trujillo. You can navigate in a video game and you can at the same time perceive objects and remember the locations that you are or the things you are doing.

By using virtual reality to study the hippocampus, the researchers discovered this important part of the brain is more than a navigation system.

The team concluded the hippocampus also plays a huge roll as a memory maker.

Researchers are going to take these findings and examine how it can help with other neurological conditions such as patients living with epilepsy.

Martinez-Trujillo says they also plan to look at the hippocampus and its role in memory, for possible new targeted treatments for Alzheimers patients.

The next frontier for us is to target memory systems in humans, and we will be able to actually enhance memories, allocate the deficits that patients have, and I think the only way to do that is to understand the brain better.

The full study was published in the journal Nature Neuroscience.

See the original post here:

This study used virtual reality to test the brain's internal 'GPS' - CTV News London

Entertainment, Training, and Free-Roam Immersion: The Real Future of Virtual Reality – Movie TV Tech Geeks News

Virtual Reality (VR) has been around for a while, but it has yet to take off fully.Stephanie Llamas of SuperData Research likens VRs adoption rate to other media: Like color TV, cellphones, and the internet before it, things are bound to start out slowly. Then, an inflection point is hit, resulting in an adoption upswing. Currently, VR is in its infancy, with reported revenues at an estimated $12.1 billion in 2018.

But the VR space continues to scale, driven largely by the world of gaming.A Statista graph shows that VR video gaming sales revenue has been on an uptick, starting at an estimated $3.6 billion in 2016, to $5.8 billion in 2017, $9.6 billion in 2018, and $15.1 billion in 2019. This success can be attributed to the release of acclaimed titles likeBeat SaberandFallout 4 VR, and the distinct possibility of even better games means gaming will continue to be one of the key drivers of VR. It wont be the only one, though.

Miniflixs article on the State of Virtual Reality and Filmrightly notes that technology and artistic achievement have been inseparable. The fact that VR is now being used in cinema is a testament to this connection. The groundbreaking shortFlesh and Sand(2017) by Alejandro Gonzlez Irritu showed just how VR can enhance film and how it may very well be the future of cinema. Since then, major film festivals like Cannes have adopted VR film screenings, and are validating the technology along the way.

Theater companies like Cinemark and AMC are even bringing the VR experience to the masses thanks to location-based VR, giving people immersive experiences unlike any other. The technology is even being used in actual filmmaking, withThe Lion King(2019) directorJon Favreu explaining how VR was used to drive the camera during filming. The result is a technically animated film, but one that feels like a live-action movie.

Virtual reality is also being used for training. In fact, severalF500 companies are now using VR to train the next generation of American workers. Walmart has been the leader in this regard, as it has featured tethered VR devices across its 20 Walmart Academies. But now, thanks to VRs increasing mobility, the company has rolled out its high-tech training program to more than 1 million associates in over 4,600 stores.

Other companies using VR for training include UPS, Boeing, JetBlue, United Rentals, and Fidelity. The fact that these companies have seen increased retention rates and better productivity after adopting VR illustrates how the technology has found its place in the world of training, where it is expanding faster than anyone imagined.

While entertainment is and will continue to be a huge chunk of how VR will change the way we consume information, its also just one aspect of the experience. In fact,the developers of the HP VR G2 backpack suggest using the free-roam system for architectural walkthroughs, art installations, and other immersive experiences that are only possible with this type of technology. These applications, at least for some experts in the industry, represent VRs truest form and are now being leveraged accordingly.

Presently, the free-roam system is mostly being used in immersive gaming experiences (often via VR arenas). But the technology is starting to have an important role in futuristic public installations and state-of-the-art enterprise workflows, too. That role will continue to expand once free-roam systems make greater inroads in industries such as tourism and architecture. And although the system is nascent at best, its untapped potential is why it is regarded as the real future of VR.

Read the rest here:

Entertainment, Training, and Free-Roam Immersion: The Real Future of Virtual Reality - Movie TV Tech Geeks News

Here’s a peek inside the new indoor gaming, entertainment facility headed for Katy – Houston Chronicle

A new gaming facility set to open in the Katy area this year will offer more than 80,000 square feet of fast-paced entertainment such as electric super-karts, arcade games and virtual reality attractions.

Andretti Indoor Karting & Games will open March 3 at 1230 Grand West Boulevard, Katy, according to a release. Established in 2001, the Georgia-based company's newest Texas location is seeking to fill approximately 350 positions before its grand opening.

Attractions include a two-story laser tag battlefield, more than 80 state-of-the-art arcade games, an indoor high adventure ropes course, virtual reality games and high-tech mini-golf.

The Katy location will feature a Food Truck Plaza with American, Italian and Asian food options, sit down dining and a dessert bar. Two bars will offer a selection of craft beer and specialty cocktails and will feature several large HD TVs for watching sports games. The facility will also serve as an event space and offers more than 4,600 square feet of space for corporate events, birthday parties and special occasions.

A job fair for the new location will be held Jan. 15-Feb. 21 at the Best Western Premier Energy Corridor. Job fair hours run 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Monday-Friday and 10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturdays. The facility is looking to hire positions for game and attraction attendants, culinary, janitorial, mechanics and more. Applicants must be at least 18 years old. For more information, click here.

Andretti currently has four locations in Florida, Georgia and Texas.The pay-as-you-go facility has no general admission fee.

PREVIEW: Get our experts picks for concerts, kids stuff, fine arts, movies and more each week in our entertainment newsletter.

Rebecca Hennes covers community news. Read her on our breaking news site, Chron.com, and on our subscriber site, houstonchronicle.com. | rebecca.hennes@chron.com

More:

Here's a peek inside the new indoor gaming, entertainment facility headed for Katy - Houston Chronicle

5 interesting things spotted at the 2020 CES tech summit in Las Vegas – KING5.com

LAS VEGAS Each year, consumer technology influencers from around the globe convene at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) to share innovative products and ideas with the best in the businesses.

This is the 50th year that innovators are coming together at what is branded as the largest and most influential tech event in the world.

CES 2020 will feature more than 4,500 exhibitors who will launch nearly 20,000 new transformative tech products to more than 170,000 attendees, according to their website.

KING 5's Chris Cashman and photojournalist Emily Landeen got to go to CES 2020 in Las Vegas.

Here are five fun things that caught their eye on their first day:

A local company could be seen (and smelled) throughout the venue. Seattles Picnic was featured at the tech summit. Picnic has developed an automated pizza-making machine that can prepare and bake up to 300 pizzas an hour. The Picnic offers a tablet where hungry techies can customize their order and watch as the machine adds sauce and toppings automatically. Clayton Wood of Picnic said this tech can evolve to prepare just about any food thats assembled.

Chris Cashman

Virtual reality has been bubbling at CES for years. The tech is getting better and more immersive. While VR goggles have been in the public eye for some time, a company called Teslasuit is back at CES with some impressive tech. After winning numerous innovation awards last year, Teslasuit returned with a new grip on VR. The suit itself provides users with sensation and a sense of touch in virtual and augmented reality, so you can feel the environment around you. The suit also captures your motion as you maneuver inside that augmented reality. New in 2020 is the world-first Teslasuit-compatible VR glove, bringing us one step closer to being able to see and feel more virtual experiences.

Chris Cashman

There's nothing too innovative about a car stereo, but it does come inside the new Sony electric vehicle. Sony certainly made a splash when they rolled a new concept vehicle on stage. The Vision-S is almost an ironic evolution for CES. Tech companies started getting into the auto industry years ago and now Sony has unveiled a vision of their future in automobiles. It has 33 sensors and many other features that sound like they are from a spaceship. The entire dashboard is made of touch screens where the driver and passenger can access all the car's media controls, like music, Sony movies and other entertainment. Theres no production date and no prices listed, but the Vision-S is a sleek and sophisticated entry.

If you have cats you know they come with a catch. The litter box is like doing your taxes every day: nobody wants to deal with the gross mess, but its a necessity. Smart litter boxes have become a thing here at CES. They have options that use Artificial Intelligence to analyze your cats deposits for health purposes. LavvieBot is back with what they say is the most intelligent IOT cat litter box ever. It cleans the box, replaces the litter and even tracks your cats feces and urine on an app. This may come in helpful for trips to the vet. Best of all it doesnt need your attention for two weeks.

Television has always been a showstopper at CES. Bigger, thinner and higher definition each year. If you got a fancy new 4k TV for the holidays, you might have buyers remorse after seeing products at CES. 8k TVs are the theme at CES 2020. TV maker Skyworth rolled out transparent television screens-- one side is transparent glass and the other side is your TV screen. The practical use for this tech is undeniable. Perhaps youll replace that old TV with a new window thats also a TV!

Chris Cashman

CES 2020 runs until Friday, Jan. 10 in Las Vegas. Learn more about other cool tech presented at the event here.

Excerpt from:

5 interesting things spotted at the 2020 CES tech summit in Las Vegas - KING5.com

5 cutting-edge ways companies are leveraging augmented and virtual reality – AdAge.com

One of the hottest trends in advertising right now is the use of augmented reality (AR) or virtual reality (VR). AR and VR can provide greater creative freedom for advertisers, resulting in a product that can reach customers in a way that traditional ad mediums cant always do.

As leaders in their field, the members of Ad Age Collective keep on top of the latest marketing and advertising trends, as well as how to implement them successfully. Below, five of them tell us the most cutting-edge ways they've seen companies leverage augmented and virtual reality in their campaigns.

Brainlab recently announced a partnership with Magic Leap, which leverages AR to help train brain surgeons via interaction with 3D visualizations. Given Magic Leap raised $2.6 billion off the back of a seriously creative communications strategy, this partnership shows the power of bringing together forward-thinking technology and out-of-the-box communications to make an enormous positive impact. - Patrick Ward, Rootstrap

An effective strategy Ive seen companies leverage with a virtual reality experience is one that teases a new product or launch through hidden passageways or corners to show what is coming before giving away the entire secret prior to the official launch. - Jessica Hawthorne-Castro, Hawthorne Advertising

As we know, many consumers buy wine based on the label, and 19 Crimes has used augmented reality to take the label up a notch. The novelty and short videos became a centerpoint of conversation shared around the bottle. And then, via word of mouth, the experience can be perpetuated to friends who haven't yet experienced the brand -- the most efficient form of promotion. - Reid Carr, Red Door Interactive

Walmart created Walmart Academies, a program using VR to improve the employee experience, deliver training and accurately assess workers' skills. It recreates scenarios associates encounter on the floor but in a safe environment. This program is widely successful as its closely aligned with the business goal of delivering shoppers with the best customer experience possible. - Mason Page, Reflect Systems

Porsche had a problem: How do you keep people excited about a car that theyve put a deposit down for, but have never seen in person? For the Taycan, Porsches electric sports car, they created an augmented reality car app that superimposed a model car wherever you pointed your iPad or mobile phone camera. It was like a virtual RC car and it gave fans something to share with their friends and family. - Rex Briggs, Marketing Evolution

Read this article:

5 cutting-edge ways companies are leveraging augmented and virtual reality - AdAge.com

Global Healthcare Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) Market Set to Reach $10.82 Billion by 2025 – PRNewswire

DUBLIN, Dec. 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ -- The "Global Healthcare Augmented Reality and Virtual Reality Market by Technology, Offering, Device Type, Application, End-user, and Region 2019-2026: Trend Forecast and Growth Opportunity" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

Global augmented reality and virtual reality market in healthcare industry is expected to reach $10.82 billion by 2025, representing a remarkable 2019-2026 CAGR of 36.1%. Augmented Reality (AR) technology accounts for a larger market share and will grow at 38.38% annually over the forecast years, faster than the Virtual Reality (VR) technology in healthcare domain.

The report provides historical market data for 2015-2018, revenue estimates for 2019, and forecasts from 2020 till 2026.

Highlighted with 82 tables and 79 figures, this 184-page report is based on a comprehensive research of the entire global healthcare AR and VR market and all its sub-segments through extensively detailed classifications. Profound analysis and assessment are generated from premium primary and secondary information sources with inputs derived from industry professionals across the value chain.

In-depth qualitative analyses include identification and investigation of the following aspects:

The trend and outlook of global market is forecast in optimistic, balanced, and conservative view. The balanced (most likely) projection is used to quantify global healthcare augmented reality and virtual reality market in every aspect of the classification from perspectives of Technology, Offering, Device Type, Application, End-user, and Region.

Based on technology, the global market is segmented into the following sub-markets with annual revenue for 2015-2026 (historical and forecast) included in each section.

Augmented Reality (AR)

Virtual Reality (VR)

Based on offering, the global market is segmented into the following sub-markets with annual revenue for 2015-2026 (historical and forecast) included in each section.

Hardware

Software

Service

Based on device type, the global market is segmented into the following sub-markets with annual revenue for 2015-2026 (historical and forecast) included in each section.

Augmented Reality Devices

Virtual Reality Devices

Based on application, the global market is segmented into the following sub-markets with annual revenue for 2015-2026 (historical and forecast) included in each section.

Based on end-user, the global market is segmented into the following sub-markets with annual revenue for 2015-2026 (historical and forecast) included in each section.

Geographically, the following regions together with the listed national markets are fully investigated:

For each of the aforementioned regions and countries, detailed analysis and data for annual revenue are available for 2015-2026. The breakdown of all regional markets by country and split of key national markets by Technology, Application, and End-user over the forecast years are also included.

The report also covers current competitive scenario and the predicted trend; and profiles key vendors including market leaders and important emerging players.

Specifically, potential risks associated with investing in global healthcare augmented reality and virtual reality market are assayed quantitatively and qualitatively through a Risk Assessment System. According to the risk analysis and evaluation, Critical Success Factors (CSFs) are generated as a guidance to help investors & stockholders identify emerging opportunities, manage and minimize the risks, develop appropriate business models, and make wise strategies and decisions.

Key Players

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/lz61aj

Research and Markets also offers Custom Research services providing focused, comprehensive and tailored research.

Media Contact:

Research and Markets Laura Wood, Senior Manager press@researchandmarkets.com

For E.S.T Office Hours Call +1-917-300-0470 For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call +1-800-526-8630 For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900

U.S. Fax: 646-607-1907 Fax (outside U.S.): +353-1-481-1716

SOURCE Research and Markets

http://www.researchandmarkets.com

Read more:

Global Healthcare Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR) Market Set to Reach $10.82 Billion by 2025 - PRNewswire

Paramount Inks Multi-Year Pact With Bigscreen For Virtual Reality Distribution – Deadline

Paramount Pictures and San Francisco-based virtual reality startup Bigscreen have set a multi-year agreement that will see select titles from the studio distributed to social VR viewers.

The pact includes the U.S., UK, Canada, Germany, France, Spain, the Netherlands, Sweden, Australia, and Japan.

On Bigscreens platform, users customize personal avatars, hang out in a virtual lobby and voice chat with other movie fans. Films are streamed on screens inside virtual cinemas, providing a social movie watching experience. In addition to 2D screenings, Bigscreen will also show some films in 3D, using rendering technology that it says creates a level of depth and detail not possible with traditional 3D glasses.

Bigscreens virtual reality platform offers a new way for fans to experience films in their homes, said Bob Buchi, President of Worldwide Home Entertainment at Paramount. Were excited to be a part of this experiment using cutting-edge technology to give fans a new entertainment option.

Starting Monday, four new movies per week will premiere in Bigscreen for one-week runs. Titles are delivered to Bigscreen audiences live on a pay-per-view basis, with scheduled showtimes every 30 minutes. Decembers lineup includes Star Trek, Raiders of the Lost Ark and Interstellar.

We are excited to enable fans around the world to hangout, chat, and watch films together in our virtual movie theater, Bigscreen founder and CEO Darshan Shankar said.

Bigscreen can be downloaded for free. Itruns on the Oculus Quest, Oculus Rift, Oculus Go, HTC Vive, Valve Index, all SteamVR headsets, and all Microsoft Windows Mixed Reality headsets.

Founded in 2014, Bigscreen is backed by $14 million in venture funding from lead investors Andreessen Horowitz and True Ventures. It claims to have more than 1 million users of its VR platform, which launched in 2016. The Bigscreen app is often ranked in the top 10 in the app store for Oculus and SteamVR.

Follow this link:

Paramount Inks Multi-Year Pact With Bigscreen For Virtual Reality Distribution - Deadline

Metro VR Studios Poised to Reboot the Virtual Reality Gaming Industry – PRNewswire

BOSTON, Dec. 18, 2019 /PRNewswire/ --Metro VR Studios (MVRS), a Boston-based start-up and independent virtual reality (VR) video game development company, announces it's ready to deliver to avid gamers what they crave: next-generation VR action and adventure games that are fully immersive and told through compelling storylines. Starting with the February 2020 release of the company's first game, Orion13, VR gamers will experience open-world locomotion and realistically-articulated virtual body features that give the player a fluid, fast-paced, first-person, action-filled VR experience, all set to an original sound track.

Scott Matalon, founder and president, MVRS, said, "We've set out to push the user experience by creating an immersive VR game that plays like a movie and feels like you're the main character on a spectacular adventure. What sets our games apart is that we put gamers into a realistically-articulated VR body that moves quickly and fights furiously through an intricate series of levels combined with hands-in-game interactivity and complex puzzling."

Brian Levine, executive vice president, MVRS, "Our games are for gamers. They're for the other ten million Scotts out there who, like Scott, are looking to play a next-generation VR action and adventure game that has a deep story but is also full of Easter eggs and humor. The only difference between Scott and other gamerswhen Scott couldn't find VR games he wanted to play, he designed and programmed one himself."

MVRS is made up of an eclectic group of friends who all share a passion for entrepreneurship, and for making a splash as the small fish in a big pond. In the late 90s, the trio disrupted the online e-commerce industry. In December 2016, they once again banded together to create an independent studio more in-tune with what hard-core VR gamers want.

Aside from gameplay, another critical way MVRS is differentiating itself from AAA publishers and others is by releasing games in quick succession. Gamers won't wait years between titles. Orion13, which is stylized like Bladerunner, set in a futuristic world ruled by robots, where buildings and landscapes are saturated in neon colors, is part of a planned trilogy. Additionally, MVRS has two other games well into development: Quest of the Pirate King and Kid Air Combat.

MVRS is one of a limited number of independent studios selected to participate for each of Sony, Microsoft, and Oculus VR developer programs. MVRS has worked closely with the Oculus Start development team and will initially offer its game on the Steam.com and Oculus Store portals. Orion13 is scheduled for release in Feb. 2020 and will be available for the HTC and Oculus headsets.

Metro VR Studios is an independent VR development company located in Boston, Mass., focused on developing high-quality, character-driven action & adventure games for virtual reality on the Oculus, Vive and PS4 platforms. MVRS is developing multiple VR game titles featuring strong main characters, unique multi-character play-modes, and movie-like plot arcs bringing a unique vision of VR gameplay to a rapidly developing marketplace. For more information, please visit http://www.metrovrstudios.com.

MEDIA CONTACT Lori Sylvia DPR Group, Inc. (240) 686-1000 lori@dprgroup.com

SOURCE Metro VR Studios

Read more:

Metro VR Studios Poised to Reboot the Virtual Reality Gaming Industry - PRNewswire


12345...102030...