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Jitsi – Wikipedia

JitsiOriginal author(s)Emil IvovInitial release2003; 15years ago(2003)Stable release2.10 (build.5550) (February5, 2017; 16 months ago(2017-02-05)) []Preview release2.11 (nightly) []Repository Written inJavaOperating systemLinux, Mac OS X, Windows (all Java supported)Size52.4 MB Windows (bundles its own private JRE)[1] 78.8MB Mac OS X (includes private JRE)[2] 22MB Linux 65MB source code[3]Available inAsturian, English, French, German, Bulgarian, Japanese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek and 25 moreTypeVoice over IP, instant messaging, videoconferencingLicenseApache_License 2.0[4]Websitejitsi.org

Jitsi Desktop (formerly SIP Communicator) is a free and open source multiplatform[5] voice (VoIP), videoconferencing and instant messaging application for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Android. It supports several popular instant-messaging and telephony protocols, including open recognised encryption protocols for chat (OTR) and voice/video/streaming and voice/video conferencing (SIP/RTP/SRTP/ZRTP), as well as built-in IPv6, NAT traversal and DNSSEC. Jitsi and its source code are released under the terms of the Apache Software License.[6]

Jitsi spawned some sister projects such as the Jitsi Video Bridge Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU) and Jitsi Meet, a video and web conferencing application. To prevent confusion with the growing popularity with these other Jitsi projects, the Jitsi client application was rebranded as Jitsi Desktop.

Originally the project was mostly used as an experimentation tool because of its support for IPv6.[7][8] Through the years, as the project gathered members, it also added support for protocols other than SIP.

Jitsi has received support from various institutions such as the NLnet Foundation,[9][10] the University of Strasbourg and the Region of Alsace[11] and it has also had multiple participations in the Google Summer of Code program.[12][13]

Work on Jitsi (then SIP Communicator) started in 2003 in the context of a student project by Emil Ivov at the University of Strasbourg.[14] It was originally released as an example video phone in the JAIN-SIP stack and later spun off as a standalone project.[15]

In 2009, Emil Ivov founded the BlueJimp company which has employed some of Jitsi’s main contributors[16][17] in order to offer professional support and development services[18] related to the project.

In 2011, after successfully adding support for audio/video communication over XMPPs Jingle extensions, the project was renamed to Jitsi since it was no longer “a SIP only Communicator”.[19][20] This name originates from the Bulgarian “” (wires).[21]

On November 4, 2014, “Jitsi + Ostel” scored 6 out of 7 points on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s secure messaging scorecard. They lost a point because there has not been a recent independent code audit.[22]

On February 1, 2015, Hristo Terezov, Ingo Bauersachs and the rest of the team released[23] version 2.6 from their stand at the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting 2015 event in Brussels. This release includes security fixes, removes support of the deprecated MSN protocol, along with SSLv3 in XMPP. Among other notable improvements, the OS X version bundles a Java 8 runtime, enables echo cancelling by default, and uses the CoreAudio subsystem. The Linux build addresses font issues with the GTK+ native LookAndFeel, and fixes some long standing issues about microphone level on call setup when using the PulseAudio sound system. This release also adds the embedded Java database Hyper SQL Database to improve performance for users with huge configuration files, a feature which is disabled by default. A full list of changes is[24] available on the project web site.

Atlassian acquired BlueJimp on April 5, 2015. After the acquisition, the new Jitsi team under Atlassian ceased meaningful new development work on the Jitsi Desktop project and expanded its efforts on projects related to the Jitsi Videbridge and Jitsi Meet. Regular contributions from the open source community have maintained the Jitsi Desktop project.

Jitsi supports multiple operating systems, including Windows as well as Unix-like systems such as Linux, Mac OS X and BSD. “Beta” packages built for Android are available[25] but the project’s roadmap describes the porting to Android as “on hold”.[26] It also includes:[27]

This section needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (December 2017)

The following protocols are currently supported by Jitsi:[5]

Jitsi is mostly written in Java[32] which helps reuse most of the same code over the various operating systems it works on. Its GUI is based upon Swing. The project also uses native code for the implementation of platform specific tasks such as audio/video capture and rendering, IP address selection, and access to native popup notification systems such as Growl.

The project uses the Apache Felix OSGi implementation[33] for modularity.

Among others Jitsi uses the JAIN-SIP protocol stack for SIP support and the Jive Software Smack library[34] for XMPP.[35]

As Jitsi can handle IPv6 it is especially interesting for direct PC-to-PC (peer-to-peer) communication, for instance, if both sides were ‘trapped’ behind NAT routers, but could obtain a reachable IPv6 address via a tunnel-broker.[citation needed]

The Jitsi community has also completed an ICE implementation called ice4j.org, which it uses to provide NAT traversal capabilities, and assist IPv4 to IPv6 transition.[36]

Audio systems supported are PortAudio, PulseAudio and WASAPI (Windows Audio Session API).

Originally posted here:

Jitsi – Wikipedia

Jitsi – Wikipedia

JitsiOriginal author(s)Emil IvovInitial release2003; 15years ago(2003)Stable release2.10 (build.5550) (February5, 2017; 16 months ago(2017-02-05)) []Preview release2.11 (nightly) []RepositoryWritten inJavaOperating systemLinux, Mac OS X, Windows (all Java supported)Size52.4 MB Windows (bundles its own private JRE)[1]78.8MB Mac OS X (includes private JRE)[2]22MB Linux65MB source code[3]Available inAsturian, English, French, German, Bulgarian, Japanese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek and 25 moreTypeVoice over IP, instant messaging, videoconferencingLicenseApache_License 2.0[4]Websitejitsi.org

Jitsi Desktop (formerly SIP Communicator) is a free and open source multiplatform[5] voice (VoIP), videoconferencing and instant messaging application for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Android. It supports several popular instant-messaging and telephony protocols, including open recognised encryption protocols for chat (OTR) and voice/video/streaming and voice/video conferencing (SIP/RTP/SRTP/ZRTP), as well as built-in IPv6, NAT traversal and DNSSEC. Jitsi and its source code are released under the terms of the Apache Software License.[6]

Jitsi spawned some sister projects such as the Jitsi Video Bridge Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU) and Jitsi Meet, a video and web conferencing application. To prevent confusion with the growing popularity with these other Jitsi projects, the Jitsi client application was rebranded as Jitsi Desktop.

Originally the project was mostly used as an experimentation tool because of its support for IPv6.[7][8] Through the years, as the project gathered members, it also added support for protocols other than SIP.

Jitsi has received support from various institutions such as the NLnet Foundation,[9][10] the University of Strasbourg and the Region of Alsace[11] and it has also had multiple participations in the Google Summer of Code program.[12][13]

Work on Jitsi (then SIP Communicator) started in 2003 in the context of a student project by Emil Ivov at the University of Strasbourg.[14] It was originally released as an example video phone in the JAIN-SIP stack and later spun off as a standalone project.[15]

In 2009, Emil Ivov founded the BlueJimp company which has employed some of Jitsi’s main contributors[16][17] in order to offer professional support and development services[18] related to the project.

In 2011, after successfully adding support for audio/video communication over XMPPs Jingle extensions, the project was renamed to Jitsi since it was no longer “a SIP only Communicator”.[19][20] This name originates from the Bulgarian “” (wires).[21]

On November 4, 2014, “Jitsi + Ostel” scored 6 out of 7 points on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s secure messaging scorecard. They lost a point because there has not been a recent independent code audit.[22]

On February 1, 2015, Hristo Terezov, Ingo Bauersachs and the rest of the team released[23] version 2.6 from their stand at the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting 2015 event in Brussels. This release includes security fixes, removes support of the deprecated MSN protocol, along with SSLv3 in XMPP. Among other notable improvements, the OS X version bundles a Java 8 runtime, enables echo cancelling by default, and uses the CoreAudio subsystem. The Linux build addresses font issues with the GTK+ native LookAndFeel, and fixes some long standing issues about microphone level on call setup when using the PulseAudio sound system. This release also adds the embedded Java database Hyper SQL Database to improve performance for users with huge configuration files, a feature which is disabled by default. A full list of changes is[24] available on the project web site.

Atlassian acquired BlueJimp on April 5, 2015. After the acquisition, the new Jitsi team under Atlassian ceased meaningful new development work on the Jitsi Desktop project and expanded its efforts on projects related to the Jitsi Videbridge and Jitsi Meet. Regular contributions from the open source community have maintained the Jitsi Desktop project.

Jitsi supports multiple operating systems, including Windows as well as Unix-like systems such as Linux, Mac OS X and BSD. “Beta” packages built for Android are available[25] but the project’s roadmap describes the porting to Android as “on hold”.[26] It also includes:[27]

This section needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (December 2017)

The following protocols are currently supported by Jitsi:[5]

Jitsi is mostly written in Java[32] which helps reuse most of the same code over the various operating systems it works on. Its GUI is based upon Swing. The project also uses native code for the implementation of platform specific tasks such as audio/video capture and rendering, IP address selection, and access to native popup notification systems such as Growl.

The project uses the Apache Felix OSGi implementation[33] for modularity.

Among others Jitsi uses the JAIN-SIP protocol stack for SIP support and the Jive Software Smack library[34] for XMPP.[35]

As Jitsi can handle IPv6 it is especially interesting for direct PC-to-PC (peer-to-peer) communication, for instance, if both sides were ‘trapped’ behind NAT routers, but could obtain a reachable IPv6 address via a tunnel-broker.[citation needed]

The Jitsi community has also completed an ICE implementation called ice4j.org, which it uses to provide NAT traversal capabilities, and assist IPv4 to IPv6 transition.[36]

Audio systems supported are PortAudio, PulseAudio and WASAPI (Windows Audio Session API).

The rest is here:

Jitsi – Wikipedia

Jitsi – Wikipedia

JitsiOriginal author(s)Emil IvovInitial release2003; 15years ago(2003)Stable release2.10 (build.5550) (February5, 2017; 16 months ago(2017-02-05)) []Preview release2.11 (nightly) []RepositoryWritten inJavaOperating systemLinux, Mac OS X, Windows (all Java supported)Size52.4 MB Windows (bundles its own private JRE)[1]78.8MB Mac OS X (includes private JRE)[2]22MB Linux65MB source code[3]Available inAsturian, English, French, German, Bulgarian, Japanese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek and 25 moreTypeVoice over IP, instant messaging, videoconferencingLicenseApache_License 2.0[4]Websitejitsi.org

Jitsi Desktop (formerly SIP Communicator) is a free and open source multiplatform[5] voice (VoIP), videoconferencing and instant messaging application for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Android. It supports several popular instant-messaging and telephony protocols, including open recognised encryption protocols for chat (OTR) and voice/video/streaming and voice/video conferencing (SIP/RTP/SRTP/ZRTP), as well as built-in IPv6, NAT traversal and DNSSEC. Jitsi and its source code are released under the terms of the Apache Software License.[6]

Jitsi spawned some sister projects such as the Jitsi Video Bridge Selective Forwarding Unit (SFU) and Jitsi Meet, a video and web conferencing application. To prevent confusion with the growing popularity with these other Jitsi projects, the Jitsi client application was rebranded as Jitsi Desktop.

Originally the project was mostly used as an experimentation tool because of its support for IPv6.[7][8] Through the years, as the project gathered members, it also added support for protocols other than SIP.

Jitsi has received support from various institutions such as the NLnet Foundation,[9][10] the University of Strasbourg and the Region of Alsace[11] and it has also had multiple participations in the Google Summer of Code program.[12][13]

Work on Jitsi (then SIP Communicator) started in 2003 in the context of a student project by Emil Ivov at the University of Strasbourg.[14] It was originally released as an example video phone in the JAIN-SIP stack and later spun off as a standalone project.[15]

In 2009, Emil Ivov founded the BlueJimp company which has employed some of Jitsi’s main contributors[16][17] in order to offer professional support and development services[18] related to the project.

In 2011, after successfully adding support for audio/video communication over XMPPs Jingle extensions, the project was renamed to Jitsi since it was no longer “a SIP only Communicator”.[19][20] This name originates from the Bulgarian “” (wires).[21]

On November 4, 2014, “Jitsi + Ostel” scored 6 out of 7 points on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s secure messaging scorecard. They lost a point because there has not been a recent independent code audit.[22]

On February 1, 2015, Hristo Terezov, Ingo Bauersachs and the rest of the team released[23] version 2.6 from their stand at the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting 2015 event in Brussels. This release includes security fixes, removes support of the deprecated MSN protocol, along with SSLv3 in XMPP. Among other notable improvements, the OS X version bundles a Java 8 runtime, enables echo cancelling by default, and uses the CoreAudio subsystem. The Linux build addresses font issues with the GTK+ native LookAndFeel, and fixes some long standing issues about microphone level on call setup when using the PulseAudio sound system. This release also adds the embedded Java database Hyper SQL Database to improve performance for users with huge configuration files, a feature which is disabled by default. A full list of changes is[24] available on the project web site.

Atlassian acquired BlueJimp on April 5, 2015. After the acquisition, the new Jitsi team under Atlassian ceased meaningful new development work on the Jitsi Desktop project and expanded its efforts on projects related to the Jitsi Videbridge and Jitsi Meet. Regular contributions from the open source community have maintained the Jitsi Desktop project.

Jitsi supports multiple operating systems, including Windows as well as Unix-like systems such as Linux, Mac OS X and BSD. “Beta” packages built for Android are available[25] but the project’s roadmap describes the porting to Android as “on hold”.[26] It also includes:[27]

This section needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (December 2017)

The following protocols are currently supported by Jitsi:[5]

Jitsi is mostly written in Java[32] which helps reuse most of the same code over the various operating systems it works on. Its GUI is based upon Swing. The project also uses native code for the implementation of platform specific tasks such as audio/video capture and rendering, IP address selection, and access to native popup notification systems such as Growl.

The project uses the Apache Felix OSGi implementation[33] for modularity.

Among others Jitsi uses the JAIN-SIP protocol stack for SIP support and the Jive Software Smack library[34] for XMPP.[35]

As Jitsi can handle IPv6 it is especially interesting for direct PC-to-PC (peer-to-peer) communication, for instance, if both sides were ‘trapped’ behind NAT routers, but could obtain a reachable IPv6 address via a tunnel-broker.[citation needed]

The Jitsi community has also completed an ICE implementation called ice4j.org, which it uses to provide NAT traversal capabilities, and assist IPv4 to IPv6 transition.[36]

Audio systems supported are PortAudio, PulseAudio and WASAPI (Windows Audio Session API).

Link:

Jitsi – Wikipedia

Jitsi Meet | Jitsi

Jitsi Meet

Jitsi Meet is packed with premium features. Yep, its free and its technologically advanced, too. In fact, Jitsi Meet: Sounds better, thanks to HD audio with Opus Is anonymous No need for an account, ever! Keeps conversations private with encryption by default (and advanced security settings Is developer-friendly Modify and customize it to your []

Read more from the original source:

Jitsi Meet | Jitsi

Jitsi – Wikipedia

JitsiOriginal author(s)Emil IvovInitial release2003; 15years ago(2003)Stable release2.10 (build.5550) (February5, 2017; 16 months ago(2017-02-05)) []Preview release2.11 (nightly) []RepositoryWritten inJavaOperating systemLinux, Mac OS X, Windows (all Java supported)Size52.4 MB Windows (bundles its own private JRE)[1]78.8MB Mac OS X (includes private JRE)[2]22MB Linux65MB source code[3]Available inAsturian, English, French, German, Bulgarian, Japanese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek and 25 moreTypeVoice over IP, instant messaging, videoconferencingLicenseApache_License 2.0[4]Websitejitsi.org

Jitsi (formerly SIP Communicator) is a free and open source multiplatform[5] voice (VoIP), videoconferencing and instant messaging application for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Android. It supports several popular instant-messaging and telephony protocols, including open recognised encryption protocols for chat (OTR) and voice/video/streaming and voice/video conferencing (SIP/RTP/SRTP/ZRTP), as well as built-in IPv6, NAT traversal and DNSSEC. Jitsi and its source code are released under the terms of the Apache Software License.[6]

Work on Jitsi (then SIP Communicator) started in 2003 in the context of a student project by Emil Ivov at the University of Strasbourg.[7] It was originally released as an example video phone in the JAIN-SIP stack and later spun off as a standalone project.[8]

Originally the project was mostly used as an experimentation tool because of its support for IPv6.[9][10] Through the years, as the project gathered members, it also added support for protocols other than SIP.

Jitsi has received support from various institutions such as the NLnet Foundation,[11][12] the University of Strasbourg and the Region of Alsace[13] and it has also had multiple participations in the Google Summer of Code program.[14][15]

In 2009, Emil Ivov founded the BlueJimp company which has employed some of Jitsi’s main contributors[16][17] in order to offer professional support and development services[18] related to the project.

In 2011, after successfully adding support for audio/video communication over XMPPs Jingle extensions, the project was renamed to Jitsi since it was no longer “a SIP only Communicator”.[19][20] This name originates from the Bulgarian “” (wires).[21]

On November 4, 2014, “Jitsi + Ostel” scored 6 out of 7 points on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s secure messaging scorecard. They lost a point because there has not been a recent independent code audit.[22]

On February 1, 2015, Hristo Terezov, Ingo Bauersachs and the rest of the team released[23] version 2.6 from their stand at the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting 2015 event in Brussels. This release includes security fixes, removes support of the deprecated MSN protocol, along with SSLv3 in XMPP. Among other notable improvements, the OS X version bundles a Java 8 runtime, enables echo cancelling by default, and uses the CoreAudio subsystem. The Linux build addresses font issues with the GTK+ native LookAndFeel, and fixes some long standing issues about microphone level on call setup when using the PulseAudio sound system. This release also adds the embedded Java database Hyper SQL Database to improve performance for users with huge configuration files, a feature which is disabled by default. A full list of changes is[24] available on the project web site.

Jitsi supports multiple operating systems, including Windows as well as Unix-like systems such as Linux, Mac OS X and BSD. “Beta” packages built for Android are available[25] but the project’s roadmap describes the porting to Android as “on hold”.[26] It also includes:[27]

This section needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (December 2017)

The following protocols are currently supported by Jitsi:[5]

Jitsi is mostly written in Java[32] which helps reuse most of the same code over the various operating systems it works on. Its GUI is based upon Swing. The project also uses native code for the implementation of platform specific tasks such as audio/video capture and rendering, IP address selection, and access to native popup notification systems such as Growl.

The project uses the Apache Felix OSGi implementation[33] for modularity.

Among others Jitsi uses the JAIN-SIP protocol stack for SIP support and the Jive Software Smack library[34] for XMPP.[35]

As Jitsi can handle IPv6 it is especially interesting for direct PC-to-PC (peer-to-peer) communication, for instance, if both sides were ‘trapped’ behind NAT routers, but could obtain a reachable IPv6 address via a tunnel-broker.[citation needed]

The Jitsi community has also completed an ICE implementation called ice4j.org, which it uses to provide NAT traversal capabilities, and assist IPv4 to IPv6 transition.[36]

Audio systems supported are PortAudio, PulseAudio and WASAPI (Windows Audio Session API).

Read the original:

Jitsi – Wikipedia

Jitsi Meet | Jitsi

Jitsi Meet

Jitsi Meet is packed with premium features. Yep, its free and its technologically advanced, too. In fact, Jitsi Meet: Sounds better, thanks to HD audio with Opus Is anonymous No need for an account, ever! Keeps conversations private with encryption by default (and advanced security settings Is developer-friendly Modify and customize it to your []

Go here to see the original:

Jitsi Meet | Jitsi

Jitsi Meet | Jitsi

Jitsi Meet

Go ahead, video chat with the whole team. In fact, invite everyone you know. Jitsi Meet is a fully encrypted, 100% open source video conferencing solution that you can use all day, every day, for free with no account needed.

Excerpt from:

Jitsi Meet | Jitsi

GitHub – jitsi/ice4j: A Java implementation of the ICE …

The Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) protocol combines various NAT traversal utilities such as the STUN and TURN protocols in order to offer a powerful mechanism that allows Offer/Answer based protocols such as SIP and XMPP to traverse NATs.

This project provides a Java implementation of the ICE protocol that would be usable by both SIP and XMPP applications. The project also provides features such as socket sharing and support for Pseudo TCP.

ice4j is maintained by the Jitsi community. Use Jitsi’s dev mailing list for questions and discussions.

Work on this project was graciously funded by the NLnet Foundation. Thank you!

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GitHub – jitsi/ice4j: A Java implementation of the ICE …

Jitsi – Wikipedia

JitsiOriginal author(s)Emil IvovInitial release2003; 15years ago(2003)Stable release2.10 (build.5550) (February5, 2017; 15 months ago(2017-02-05)) []Preview release2.11 (nightly) []Written inJavaOperating systemLinux, Mac OS X, Windows (all Java supported)Size52.4 MB Windows (bundles its own private JRE)[1]78.8MB Mac OS X (includes private JRE)[2]22MB Linux65MB source code[3]Available inAsturian, English, French, German, Bulgarian, Japanese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek and 25 moreTypeVoice over IP, instant messaging, videoconferencingLicenseApache_License 2.0[4]Websitejitsi.org

Jitsi (formerly SIP Communicator) is a free and open source multiplatform[5] voice (VoIP), videoconferencing and instant messaging application for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Android. It supports several popular instant-messaging and telephony protocols, including open recognised encryption protocols for chat (OTR) and voice/video/streaming and voice/video conferencing (SIP/RTP/SRTP/ZRTP), as well as built-in IPv6, NAT traversal and DNSSEC. Jitsi and its source code are released under the terms of the Apache Software License.[6]

Work on Jitsi (then SIP Communicator) started in 2003 in the context of a student project by Emil Ivov at the University of Strasbourg.[7] It was originally released as an example video phone in the JAIN-SIP stack and later spun off as a standalone project.[8]

Originally the project was mostly used as an experimentation tool because of its support for IPv6.[9][10] Through the years, as the project gathered members, it also added support for protocols other than SIP.

Jitsi has received support from various institutions such as the NLnet Foundation,[11][12] the University of Strasbourg and the Region of Alsace[13] and it has also had multiple participations in the Google Summer of Code program.[14][15]

In 2009, Emil Ivov founded the BlueJimp company which has employed some of Jitsi’s main contributors[16][17] in order to offer professional support and development services[18] related to the project.

In 2011, after successfully adding support for audio/video communication over XMPPs Jingle extensions, the project was renamed to Jitsi since it was no longer “a SIP only Communicator”.[19][20] This name originates from the Bulgarian “” (wires).[21]

On November 4, 2014, “Jitsi + Ostel” scored 6 out of 7 points on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s secure messaging scorecard. They lost a point because there has not been a recent independent code audit.[22]

On February 1, 2015, Hristo Terezov, Ingo Bauersachs and the rest of the team released[23] version 2.6 from their stand at the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting 2015 event in Brussels. This release includes security fixes, removes support of the deprecated MSN protocol, along with SSLv3 in XMPP. Among other notable improvements, the OS X version bundles a Java 8 runtime, enables echo cancelling by default, and uses the CoreAudio subsystem. The Linux build addresses font issues with the GTK+ native LookAndFeel, and fixes some long standing issues about microphone level on call setup when using the PulseAudio sound system. This release also adds the embedded Java database Hyper SQL Database to improve performance for users with huge configuration files, a feature which is disabled by default. A full list of changes is[24] available on the project web site.

Jitsi supports multiple operating systems, including Windows as well as Unix-like systems such as Linux, Mac OS X and BSD. “Beta” packages built for Android are available[25] but the project’s roadmap describes the porting to Android as “on hold”.[26] It also includes:[27]

This section needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (December 2017)

The following protocols are currently supported by Jitsi:[5]

Jitsi is mostly written in Java[32] which helps reuse most of the same code over the various operating systems it works on. Its GUI is based upon Swing. The project also uses native code for the implementation of platform specific tasks such as audio/video capture and rendering, IP address selection, and access to native popup notification systems such as Growl.

The project uses the Apache Felix OSGi implementation[33] for modularity.

Among others Jitsi uses the JAIN-SIP protocol stack for SIP support and the Jive Software Smack library[34] for XMPP.[35]

As Jitsi can handle IPv6 it is especially interesting for direct PC-to-PC (peer-to-peer) communication, for instance, if both sides were ‘trapped’ behind NAT routers, but could obtain a reachable IPv6 address via a tunnel-broker.[citation needed]

The Jitsi community has also completed an ICE implementation called ice4j.org, which it uses to provide NAT traversal capabilities, and assist IPv4 to IPv6 transition.[36]

Audio systems supported are PortAudio, PulseAudio and WASAPI (Windows Audio Session API).

See the original post:

Jitsi – Wikipedia

Jitsi Meet (advanced) Projects

How to join Jitsi Meet video conferences over the Web

If you do not already know what Jitsi Meet is, here is the official homepage. Jitsi Meet allows you to create and join video calls over the Web (even as a simple viewer). Some of its features are: encrypted by default, no account needed, invite by pretty URL https://mysite.com/myroom

Thanks to UV4L it is possible to create or join an existing room and broadcast live video and audio to all the participants or viewers in the room from a camera and a microphone connected to the Raspberry Pi. Its also possible to automatically hear and see other participants if you have speakers and display (HDMI, touchscreen, etc) connected to the Raspberry Pi. Of course, other participants can be other Raspberry Pis. The great news is that you do not need any browser installed on the Raspberry Pi to do this.

Its necessary to install the required packages before proceeding: uv4l, uv4l-server, uv4l-webrtc, uv4l-xmpp-bridge and one video driver (e.g. uv4l-raspicam, uv4l-uvc, etc). Please refer to these installation instructions for more details.

To start and stop streaming to a particular Jitsi Meet server (called videobridge), its enough to invoke the corresponding commands by means of the UV4L Streaming Server installed on the Raspberry Pi. This can be done in two ways.

The first convenient way is through a browser by using the Jitsi Meet control page available at the URL the Streaming Server itself is listening to (e.g. http://myraspberrypi:8080), from which its possible to specify all the mandatory informations (i.e. XMPP and/or BOSH signalling server, chat room, your username and password) required to establish a connection and to click on start/stop buttons in order to join or leave the specified room respectively.

The second way is to invoke the start/stop commands via HTTP/GET requests sent to the Streaming Server from command line. For example, to start streaming to the videobridge which is at the base of the official, free-access Jitsi Meet service at meet.jit.si, type (in one line):

where raspberrypi will have to be replaced with the real hostname of your Raspberry Pi in your network (it can be localhost if you are executing the command from within your Raspberry Pi) and port will have to be replaced with the real port number the Streaming Server is listening to (8080 is the default). The above command will make the Raspberry Pi create or join a conference at http://meet.jit.si/testroom.

If the UV4L Streaming Server is providing HTTPS instead of HTTP, be careful to specify https://[] in the URL. You may also desire to add the insecure option to curl to turn off the verification of the servers certificate (see the curl manual for more details).

Please note the parameters in the URL that you are allowed to specify:

server (XMPP server hostname or ip address) port (port the XMPP server is listening to) muc (multiuser chat domain) room (desired room you want to join or create) room_password (room password, if the room is protected) username (desired username in the chat room) password (password if the server is password protected) reconnect (try to reconnect after disconnection) bosh_enable (1 if you want to use BOSH signalling, 0 otherwise) bosh_server (usually HTTP(S) server hostname for BOSH) bosh_tls (1 for HTTPS, 0 otherwise) bosh_port (typically 443 for HTTPS, 80 for HTTP) bosh_hostname (connection manager hostname, typically the same as bosh_server) action (Start or Stop streaming)

All the above settings can be optionally specified once for all in the UV4L configuration file (except action) (see the uv4l-server manual for more details).

Similarly, to stop streaming:

If you are protecting the UV4L Streaming Server with a password, then the above URL will not work. In this case, you must specify user and password in the URL as in the below example:

Continued here:

Jitsi Meet (advanced) Projects

Jitsi – Wikipedia

JitsiOriginal author(s)Emil IvovInitial release2003; 15years ago(2003)Stable release2.10 (build.5550) (February5, 2017; 15 months ago(2017-02-05)) []Preview release2.11 (nightly) []Written inJavaOperating systemLinux, Mac OS X, Windows (all Java supported)Size52.4 MB Windows (bundles its own private JRE)[1]78.8MB Mac OS X (includes private JRE)[2]22MB Linux65MB source code[3]Available inAsturian, English, French, German, Bulgarian, Japanese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek and 25 moreTypeVoice over IP, instant messaging, videoconferencingLicenseApache_License 2.0[4]Websitejitsi.org

Jitsi (formerly SIP Communicator) is a free and open source multiplatform[5] voice (VoIP), videoconferencing and instant messaging application for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Android. It supports several popular instant-messaging and telephony protocols, including open recognised encryption protocols for chat (OTR) and voice/video/streaming and voice/video conferencing (SIP/RTP/SRTP/ZRTP), as well as built-in IPv6, NAT traversal and DNSSEC. Jitsi and its source code are released under the terms of the Apache Software License.[6]

Work on Jitsi (then SIP Communicator) started in 2003 in the context of a student project by Emil Ivov at the University of Strasbourg.[7] It was originally released as an example video phone in the JAIN-SIP stack and later spun off as a standalone project.[8]

Originally the project was mostly used as an experimentation tool because of its support for IPv6.[9][10] Through the years, as the project gathered members, it also added support for protocols other than SIP.

Jitsi has received support from various institutions such as the NLnet Foundation,[11][12] the University of Strasbourg and the Region of Alsace[13] and it has also had multiple participations in the Google Summer of Code program.[14][15]

In 2009, Emil Ivov founded the BlueJimp company which has employed some of Jitsi’s main contributors[16][17] in order to offer professional support and development services[18] related to the project.

In 2011, after successfully adding support for audio/video communication over XMPPs Jingle extensions, the project was renamed to Jitsi since it was no longer “a SIP only Communicator”.[19][20] This name originates from the Bulgarian “” (wires).[21]

On November 4, 2014, “Jitsi + Ostel” scored 6 out of 7 points on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s secure messaging scorecard. They lost a point because there has not been a recent independent code audit.[22]

On February 1, 2015, Hristo Terezov, Ingo Bauersachs and the rest of the team released[23] version 2.6 from their stand at the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting 2015 event in Brussels. This release includes security fixes, removes support of the deprecated MSN protocol, along with SSLv3 in XMPP. Among other notable improvements, the OS X version bundles a Java 8 runtime, enables echo cancelling by default, and uses the CoreAudio subsystem. The Linux build addresses font issues with the GTK+ native LookAndFeel, and fixes some long standing issues about microphone level on call setup when using the PulseAudio sound system. This release also adds the embedded Java database Hyper SQL Database to improve performance for users with huge configuration files, a feature which is disabled by default. A full list of changes is[24] available on the project web site.

Jitsi supports multiple operating systems, including Windows as well as Unix-like systems such as Linux, Mac OS X and BSD. “Beta” packages built for Android are available[25] but the project’s roadmap describes the porting to Android as “on hold”.[26] It also includes:[27]

This section needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (December 2017)

The following protocols are currently supported by Jitsi:[5]

Jitsi is mostly written in Java[32] which helps reuse most of the same code over the various operating systems it works on. Its GUI is based upon Swing. The project also uses native code for the implementation of platform specific tasks such as audio/video capture and rendering, IP address selection, and access to native popup notification systems such as Growl.

The project uses the Apache Felix OSGi implementation[33] for modularity.

Among others Jitsi uses the JAIN-SIP protocol stack for SIP support and the Jive Software Smack library[34] for XMPP.[35]

As Jitsi can handle IPv6 it is especially interesting for direct PC-to-PC (peer-to-peer) communication, for instance, if both sides were ‘trapped’ behind NAT routers, but could obtain a reachable IPv6 address via a tunnel-broker.[citation needed]

The Jitsi community has also completed an ICE implementation called ice4j.org, which it uses to provide NAT traversal capabilities, and assist IPv4 to IPv6 transition.[36]

Audio systems supported are PortAudio, PulseAudio and WASAPI (Windows Audio Session API).

See original here:

Jitsi – Wikipedia

Jitsi – Wikipedia

JitsiOriginal author(s)Emil IvovInitial release2003; 15years ago(2003)Stable release2.10 (build.5550) (February5, 2017; 15 months ago(2017-02-05)) []Preview release2.11 (nightly) []Written inJavaOperating systemLinux, Mac OS X, Windows (all Java supported)Size52.4 MB Windows (bundles its own private JRE)[1]78.8MB Mac OS X (includes private JRE)[2]22MB Linux65MB source code[3]Available inAsturian, English, French, German, Bulgarian, Japanese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek and 25 moreTypeVoice over IP, instant messaging, videoconferencingLicenseApache_License 2.0[4]Websitejitsi.org

Jitsi (formerly SIP Communicator) is a free and open source multiplatform[5] voice (VoIP), videoconferencing and instant messaging application for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Android. It supports several popular instant-messaging and telephony protocols, including open recognised encryption protocols for chat (OTR) and voice/video/streaming and voice/video conferencing (SIP/RTP/SRTP/ZRTP), as well as built-in IPv6, NAT traversal and DNSSEC. Jitsi and its source code are released under the terms of the Apache Software License.[6]

Work on Jitsi (then SIP Communicator) started in 2003 in the context of a student project by Emil Ivov at the University of Strasbourg.[7] It was originally released as an example video phone in the JAIN-SIP stack and later spun off as a standalone project.[8]

Originally the project was mostly used as an experimentation tool because of its support for IPv6.[9][10] Through the years, as the project gathered members, it also added support for protocols other than SIP.

Jitsi has received support from various institutions such as the NLnet Foundation,[11][12] the University of Strasbourg and the Region of Alsace[13] and it has also had multiple participations in the Google Summer of Code program.[14][15]

In 2009, Emil Ivov founded the BlueJimp company which has employed some of Jitsi’s main contributors[16][17] in order to offer professional support and development services[18] related to the project.

In 2011, after successfully adding support for audio/video communication over XMPPs Jingle extensions, the project was renamed to Jitsi since it was no longer “a SIP only Communicator”.[19][20] This name originates from the Bulgarian “” (wires).[21]

On November 4, 2014, “Jitsi + Ostel” scored 6 out of 7 points on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s secure messaging scorecard. They lost a point because there has not been a recent independent code audit.[22]

On February 1, 2015, Hristo Terezov, Ingo Bauersachs and the rest of the team released[23] version 2.6 from their stand at the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting 2015 event in Brussels. This release includes security fixes, removes support of the deprecated MSN protocol, along with SSLv3 in XMPP. Among other notable improvements, the OS X version bundles a Java 8 runtime, enables echo cancelling by default, and uses the CoreAudio subsystem. The Linux build addresses font issues with the GTK+ native LookAndFeel, and fixes some long standing issues about microphone level on call setup when using the PulseAudio sound system. This release also adds the embedded Java database Hyper SQL Database to improve performance for users with huge configuration files, a feature which is disabled by default. A full list of changes is[24] available on the project web site.

Jitsi supports multiple operating systems, including Windows as well as Unix-like systems such as Linux, Mac OS X and BSD. “Beta” packages built for Android are available[25] but the project’s roadmap describes the porting to Android as “on hold”.[26] It also includes:[27]

This section needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (December 2017)

The following protocols are currently supported by Jitsi:[5]

Jitsi is mostly written in Java[32] which helps reuse most of the same code over the various operating systems it works on. Its GUI is based upon Swing. The project also uses native code for the implementation of platform specific tasks such as audio/video capture and rendering, IP address selection, and access to native popup notification systems such as Growl.

The project uses the Apache Felix OSGi implementation[33] for modularity.

Among others Jitsi uses the JAIN-SIP protocol stack for SIP support and the Jive Software Smack library[34] for XMPP.[35]

As Jitsi can handle IPv6 it is especially interesting for direct PC-to-PC (peer-to-peer) communication, for instance, if both sides were ‘trapped’ behind NAT routers, but could obtain a reachable IPv6 address via a tunnel-broker.[citation needed]

The Jitsi community has also completed an ICE implementation called ice4j.org, which it uses to provide NAT traversal capabilities, and assist IPv4 to IPv6 transition.[36]

Audio systems supported are PortAudio, PulseAudio and WASAPI (Windows Audio Session API).

See the original post:

Jitsi – Wikipedia

Jitsi Meet | Jitsi

Jitsi Meet

Go ahead, video chat with the whole team. In fact, invite everyone you know. Jitsi Meet is a fully encrypted, 100% open source video conferencing solution that you can use all day, every day, for free with no account needed.

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Jitsi Meet | Jitsi

GitHub – jitsi/ice4j: A Java implementation of the ICE …

The Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) protocol combines various NAT traversal utilities such as the STUN and TURN protocols in order to offer a powerful mechanism that allows Offer/Answer based protocols such as SIP and XMPP to traverse NATs.

This project provides a Java implementation of the ICE protocol that would be usable by both SIP and XMPP applications. The project also provides features such as socket sharing and support for Pseudo TCP.

ice4j is maintained by the Jitsi community. Use Jitsi’s dev mailing list for questions and discussions.

Work on this project was graciously funded by the NLnet Foundation. Thank you!

View post:

GitHub – jitsi/ice4j: A Java implementation of the ICE …

Jitsi – Wikipedia

JitsiOriginal author(s)Emil IvovInitial release2003; 15years ago(2003)Stable release2.10 (build.5550) (February5, 2017; 15 months ago(2017-02-05)) []Preview release2.11 (nightly) []Written inJavaOperating systemLinux, Mac OS X, Windows (all Java supported)Size52.4 MB Windows (bundles its own private JRE)[1]78.8MB Mac OS X (includes private JRE)[2]22MB Linux65MB source code[3]Available inAsturian, English, French, German, Bulgarian, Japanese, Spanish, Italian, Romanian, Greek and 25 moreTypeVoice over IP, instant messaging, videoconferencingLicenseApache_License 2.0[4]Websitejitsi.org

Jitsi (formerly SIP Communicator) is a free and open source multiplatform[5] voice (VoIP), videoconferencing and instant messaging application for Windows, Linux, Mac OS X and Android. It supports several popular instant-messaging and telephony protocols, including open recognised encryption protocols for chat (OTR) and voice/video/streaming and voice/video conferencing (SIP/RTP/SRTP/ZRTP), as well as built-in IPv6, NAT traversal and DNSSEC. Jitsi and its source code are released under the terms of the Apache Software License.[6]

Work on Jitsi (then SIP Communicator) started in 2003 in the context of a student project by Emil Ivov at the University of Strasbourg.[7] It was originally released as an example video phone in the JAIN-SIP stack and later spun off as a standalone project.[8]

Originally the project was mostly used as an experimentation tool because of its support for IPv6.[9][10] Through the years, as the project gathered members, it also added support for protocols other than SIP.

Jitsi has received support from various institutions such as the NLnet Foundation,[11][12] the University of Strasbourg and the Region of Alsace[13] and it has also had multiple participations in the Google Summer of Code program.[14][15]

In 2009, Emil Ivov founded the BlueJimp company which has employed some of Jitsi’s main contributors[16][17] in order to offer professional support and development services[18] related to the project.

In 2011, after successfully adding support for audio/video communication over XMPPs Jingle extensions, the project was renamed to Jitsi since it was no longer “a SIP only Communicator”.[19][20] This name originates from the Bulgarian “” (wires).[21]

On November 4, 2014, “Jitsi + Ostel” scored 6 out of 7 points on the Electronic Frontier Foundation’s secure messaging scorecard. They lost a point because there has not been a recent independent code audit.[22]

On February 1, 2015, Hristo Terezov, Ingo Bauersachs and the rest of the team released[23] version 2.6 from their stand at the Free and Open Source Software Developers’ European Meeting 2015 event in Brussels. This release includes security fixes, removes support of the deprecated MSN protocol, along with SSLv3 in XMPP. Among other notable improvements, the OS X version bundles a Java 8 runtime, enables echo cancelling by default, and uses the CoreAudio subsystem. The Linux build addresses font issues with the GTK+ native LookAndFeel, and fixes some long standing issues about microphone level on call setup when using the PulseAudio sound system. This release also adds the embedded Java database Hyper SQL Database to improve performance for users with huge configuration files, a feature which is disabled by default. A full list of changes is[24] available on the project web site.

Jitsi supports multiple operating systems, including Windows as well as Unix-like systems such as Linux, Mac OS X and BSD. “Beta” packages built for Android are available[25] but the project’s roadmap describes the porting to Android as “on hold”.[26] It also includes:[27]

This section needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (December 2017)

The following protocols are currently supported by Jitsi:[5]

Jitsi is mostly written in Java[32] which helps reuse most of the same code over the various operating systems it works on. Its GUI is based upon Swing. The project also uses native code for the implementation of platform specific tasks such as audio/video capture and rendering, IP address selection, and access to native popup notification systems such as Growl.

The project uses the Apache Felix OSGi implementation[33] for modularity.

Among others Jitsi uses the JAIN-SIP protocol stack for SIP support and the Jive Software Smack library[34] for XMPP.[35]

As Jitsi can handle IPv6 it is especially interesting for direct PC-to-PC (peer-to-peer) communication, for instance, if both sides were ‘trapped’ behind NAT routers, but could obtain a reachable IPv6 address via a tunnel-broker.[citation needed]

The Jitsi community has also completed an ICE implementation called ice4j.org, which it uses to provide NAT traversal capabilities, and assist IPv4 to IPv6 transition.[36]

Audio systems supported are PortAudio, PulseAudio and WASAPI (Windows Audio Session API).

Read the original here:

Jitsi – Wikipedia

GitHub – jitsi/ice4j: A Java implementation of the ICE …

The Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) protocol combines various NAT traversal utilities such as the STUN and TURN protocols in order to offer a powerful mechanism that allows Offer/Answer based protocols such as SIP and XMPP to traverse NATs.

This project provides a Java implementation of the ICE protocol that would be usable by both SIP and XMPP applications. The project also provides features such as socket sharing and support for Pseudo TCP.

ice4j is maintained by the Jitsi community. Use Jitsi’s dev mailing list for questions and discussions.

Work on this project was graciously funded by the NLnet Foundation. Thank you!

See the original post here:

GitHub – jitsi/ice4j: A Java implementation of the ICE …

GitHub – jitsi/ice4j: A Java implementation of the ICE …

The Interactive Connectivity Establishment (ICE) protocol combines various NAT traversal utilities such as the STUN and TURN protocols in order to offer a powerful mechanism that allows Offer/Answer based protocols such as SIP and XMPP to traverse NATs.

This project provides a Java implementation of the ICE protocol that would be usable by both SIP and XMPP applications. The project also provides features such as socket sharing and support for Pseudo TCP.

ice4j is maintained by the Jitsi community. Use Jitsi’s dev mailing list for questions and discussions.

Work on this project was graciously funded by the NLnet Foundation. Thank you!

The rest is here:

GitHub – jitsi/ice4j: A Java implementation of the ICE …


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