Removing Dead Exchange 2010 Servers | www.extropy.com

You must remove all of the connectors, mailbox databases and public folder databases from the affected server before deinstall. Also, you must remove the server from the DAG group after removing the mailbox databases. Don’t worry about the physical deletion of the database files warning, it doesn’t matter.

EMS: Exchange Management Shell (a command prompt preloaded with all of the Exchange Powershell extensions)

EMC: Exchange Management Console (Exchange GUI tools – MMC snapins)

Problem #1 need to replicate public folder content to other servers, which can be setup easily enough with the EMC tool for public folders. The hard part is that even when you do this, the removal process tells you that there are still replicas out there and you have to remove them before deleting the public folders, the you can deinstall. The trick is to run this script (MoveAllReplicas.ps1) after you are sure the Public folders have had time to replicate to another server. This script is located in ‘ C:Program FilesMicrosoftExchange ServerV14Scripts’ and should be run from the EMS. It takes ‘-sourceserver [server]’ and ‘-targetserver [server]’ flags and runs quickly. However, I’ve found that it takes awhile to actually complete, and the Public Folder deletion still gives the error and won’t work until it’s done.

Problem #2 when removing routing groups, especially legacy ones connected to 2003 from 2010. This was also an issue for 2007. From EMS you must run the ‘new-routinggroupconnector’ cmdlet, which works fine, but then you must remove the old connectors with the ‘remove-routinggroupconnector’. The problem is that they want the “-identity”, which is described in their “full” help as [administrative grouprouting groupconnector name]. I couldn’t get it right and it wouldn’t take. There is another option to use the GUID of the connector, but even the “full help” doesn’t show how to do this. Online I found that the command ‘get-routinggroupconnector | fl’ dumps the “real full” set of connectors, including their GUIDs. Then you can jsut run the command ‘remove-routinggroupconnector [guid]’ and it removes just fine. Then you can uninstall your Exchange Server (for sysprep, decom or whatever), also the command ‘get-routinggroupconnector’ is used throughout this process.

I’ve also found the Powershell command ‘get-help [cmdlet] -examples’ to be very helpful, e.g., ‘get-help get-routinggroupconnector -examples’; it’s pretty much like a UNIX ‘man’ command, but with more options.

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Removing Dead Exchange 2010 Servers | http://www.extropy.com

Negentropy – Wikipedia

The negentropy has different meanings in information theory and theoretical biology. In a biological context, the negentropy (also negative entropy, syntropy, extropy, ectropy or entaxy[1]) of a living system is the entropy that it exports to keep its own entropy low; it lies at the intersection of entropy and life. In other words, negentropy is reverse entropy. It means things becoming more orderly. By ‘order’ is meant organisation, structure and function: the opposite of randomness or chaos. The concept and phrase “negative entropy” was introduced by Erwin Schrdinger in his 1944 popular-science book What is Life?[2] Later, Lon Brillouin shortened the phrase to negentropy,[3][4] to express it in a more “positive” way: a living system imports negentropy and stores it.[5] In 1974, Albert Szent-Gyrgyi proposed replacing the term negentropy with syntropy. That term may have originated in the 1940s with the Italian mathematician Luigi Fantappi, who tried to construct a unified theory of biology and physics. Buckminster Fuller tried to popularize this usage, but negentropy remains common.

In a note to What is Life? Schrdinger explained his use of this phrase.

In 2009, Mahulikar & Herwig redefined negentropy of a dynamically ordered sub-system as the specific entropy deficit of the ordered sub-system relative to its surrounding chaos.[6] Thus, negentropy has SI units of (J kg1 K1) when defined based on specific entropy per unit mass, and (K1) when defined based on specific entropy per unit energy. This definition enabled: i) scale-invariant thermodynamic representation of dynamic order existence, ii) formulation of physical principles exclusively for dynamic order existence and evolution, and iii) mathematical interpretation of Schrdinger’s negentropy debt.

In information theory and statistics, negentropy is used as a measure of distance to normality.[7][8][9] Out of all distributions with a given mean and variance, the normal or Gaussian distribution is the one with the highest entropy. Negentropy measures the difference in entropy between a given distribution and the Gaussian distribution with the same mean and variance. Thus, negentropy is always nonnegative, is invariant by any linear invertible change of coordinates, and vanishes if and only if the signal is Gaussian.

Negentropy is defined as

where S ( x ) {displaystyle S(varphi _{x})} is the differential entropy of the Gaussian density with the same mean and variance as p x {displaystyle p_{x}} and S ( p x ) {displaystyle S(p_{x})} is the differential entropy of p x {displaystyle p_{x}} :

Negentropy is used in statistics and signal processing. It is related to network entropy, which is used in independent component analysis.[10][11]

There is a physical quantity closely linked to free energy (free enthalpy), with a unit of entropy and isomorphic to negentropy known in statistics and information theory. In 1873, Willard Gibbs created a diagram illustrating the concept of free energy corresponding to free enthalpy. On the diagram one can see the quantity called capacity for entropy. This quantity is the amount of entropy that may be increased without changing an internal energy or increasing its volume.[12] In other words, it is a difference between maximum possible, under assumed conditions, entropy and its actual entropy. It corresponds exactly to the definition of negentropy adopted in statistics and information theory. A similar physical quantity was introduced in 1869 by Massieu for the isothermal process[13][14][15] (both quantities differs just with a figure sign) and then Planck for the isothermal-isobaric process.[16] More recently, the MassieuPlanck thermodynamic potential, known also as free entropy, has been shown to play a great role in the so-called entropic formulation of statistical mechanics,[17] applied among the others in molecular biology[18] and thermodynamic non-equilibrium processes.[19]

In 1953, Lon Brillouin derived a general equation[20] stating that the changing of an information bit value requires at least kT ln(2) energy. This is the same energy as the work Le Szilrd’s engine produces in the idealistic case. In his book,[21] he further explored this problem concluding that any cause of this bit value change (measurement, decision about a yes/no question, erasure, display, etc.) will require the same amount of energy.

Read the original:

Negentropy – Wikipedia

Knights of Unicron (SG) – Transformers Wiki

The Knights of Unicron are a heroic Autobot subgroup from the Shattered Glass continuity family.

The Knights of Unicron were once evil Autobots, but the benevolent god of extropy Unicron reformatted them into his agents of peace. Now, they serve truth and justice across known space. Their members are:

Following their defeat at Decepticon City on Earth, Optimus Prime’s forces retreated aboard Sky Lynx for Cybertron. Memory’s Splinter Midway through, however, Sky Lynx announced that they would have to lighten the load. Rodimus took the opportunity to dump Optimus, Brawn, Prowl, Inferno, and Ratchet out the airlock. The five badly injured Autobots then found themselves in the presence of Unicron. Familiar Reflections Now dominated by good due to the Shroud, the god of extropy offered Optimus and his troopers truth and enlightenment. After Unicron showed Optimus a vision of his greatest victory, Prime accepted, and Unicron healed and reformatted them. The newly-formed Knights were then sent to Cybertron to stop Rodimus’s chaos. Arriving in Rodimus’s throne room, the Autotroopers took on the evil Autobots while Nova went head to head with Rodimus. Nova succeeded, sending Rodimus tumbling down into the depths of Cybertron. Restoration The Knights soon had the Autobots arrested, but Unicron contacted Nova to warn him that a greater threat awaited. Cybertron then seemingly began to fall apart. While the Knights barely maintained their footing, Rodimus reappeared and ordered his Autobots to evacuate. Cybertron then completed its transformation into the physical form of the Cybertronians’ creator-god, Primus. Awakened by Rodimus and dominated by evil due to the Shroud, the dark Primus observed the nearby dimensionally-displaced Earth and tried to destroy it. However, Earth revealed itself as another Transformer god, Primus’s sister Gaea. As the titans clashed, the Knights came to Gaea’s aid, taking out Primus’s eyes. Gaea then destroyed Primus and transformed herself into a new Cybertron as a home to both heroic Autobot and heroic Decepticon. The Knights became the guardians of the new joint society as a new age of peace dawned. The Future Buried…

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Knights of Unicron (SG) – Transformers Wiki

Unicron/Shattered Glass – Transformers Wiki

Unicron. God of extropy. Dedicated to the balance of diversity in the universe.

Thanks to Nexus Prime initiating the Shroud upon the multiverse, Unicron the multiversal singularity was splintered into individual, non-singular incarnations throughout individual universes. Thus, Unicron’s small fragment of good became dominant in his incarnation in Primax -408.24 Epsilon. Out of the One, Many After Optimus Prime and a number of other Autobots were thrown out of Sky Lynx, they found themselves floating before said benevolent side of Unicron, Familiar Reflections who reformatted them into his troops of justice; Nova Prime, Checkpoint and his Autotrooper minions, and X-Brawn. Out of the One, Many These newly-forged heroes traveled to Cybertron and apprehended Rodimus Prime’s evil followers. But Unicron issued a warning to Nova Prime at his moment of triumph: a greater battle awaited them, one that would pit them against Primus! As he awakened, this new foe blocked Unicron’s telepathic transmissions to Nova Prime, disallowing Unicron from dispensing further advice to his creation. Thankfully, even without Unicron’s help, the Autobots were ultimately victorious against the Order-Bringer. The Future Buried…

Acolytes of Unicron arose in the new order, advising the ruling council of New Cybertron that included Nova Prime, Ultra Mammoth, and Galvatron. It was Unicron’s wish that his Acolytes deny Heatwave and his team permission to go on missions, provoking them into defying orders to seek their own destiny regardless. Coalescence

The rest is here:

Unicron/Shattered Glass – Transformers Wiki

Negentropy – Wikipedia

The negentropy has different meanings in information theory and theoretical biology. In a biological context, the negentropy (also negative entropy, syntropy, extropy, ectropy or entaxy[1]) of a living system is the entropy that it exports to keep its own entropy low; it lies at the intersection of entropy and life. In other words, negentropy is reverse entropy. It means things becoming more orderly. By ‘order’ is meant organisation, structure and function: the opposite of randomness or chaos. The concept and phrase “negative entropy” was introduced by Erwin Schrdinger in his 1944 popular-science book What is Life?[2] Later, Lon Brillouin shortened the phrase to negentropy,[3][4] to express it in a more “positive” way: a living system imports negentropy and stores it.[5] In 1974, Albert Szent-Gyrgyi proposed replacing the term negentropy with syntropy. That term may have originated in the 1940s with the Italian mathematician Luigi Fantappi, who tried to construct a unified theory of biology and physics. Buckminster Fuller tried to popularize this usage, but negentropy remains common.

In a note to What is Life? Schrdinger explained his use of this phrase.

In 2009, Mahulikar & Herwig redefined negentropy of a dynamically ordered sub-system as the specific entropy deficit of the ordered sub-system relative to its surrounding chaos.[6] Thus, negentropy has SI units of (J kg1 K1) when defined based on specific entropy per unit mass, and (K1) when defined based on specific entropy per unit energy. This definition enabled: i) scale-invariant thermodynamic representation of dynamic order existence, ii) formulation of physical principles exclusively for dynamic order existence and evolution, and iii) mathematical interpretation of Schrdinger’s negentropy debt.

In information theory and statistics, negentropy is used as a measure of distance to normality.[7][8][9] Out of all distributions with a given mean and variance, the normal or Gaussian distribution is the one with the highest entropy. Negentropy measures the difference in entropy between a given distribution and the Gaussian distribution with the same mean and variance. Thus, negentropy is always nonnegative, is invariant by any linear invertible change of coordinates, and vanishes if and only if the signal is Gaussian.

Negentropy is defined as

where S ( x ) {displaystyle S(varphi _{x})} is the differential entropy of the Gaussian density with the same mean and variance as p x {displaystyle p_{x}} and S ( p x ) {displaystyle S(p_{x})} is the differential entropy of p x {displaystyle p_{x}} :

Negentropy is used in statistics and signal processing. It is related to network entropy, which is used in independent component analysis.[10][11]

There is a physical quantity closely linked to free energy (free enthalpy), with a unit of entropy and isomorphic to negentropy known in statistics and information theory. In 1873, Willard Gibbs created a diagram illustrating the concept of free energy corresponding to free enthalpy. On the diagram one can see the quantity called capacity for entropy. This quantity is the amount of entropy that may be increased without changing an internal energy or increasing its volume.[12] In other words, it is a difference between maximum possible, under assumed conditions, entropy and its actual entropy. It corresponds exactly to the definition of negentropy adopted in statistics and information theory. A similar physical quantity was introduced in 1869 by Massieu for the isothermal process[13][14][15] (both quantities differs just with a figure sign) and then Planck for the isothermal-isobaric process.[16] More recently, the MassieuPlanck thermodynamic potential, known also as free entropy, has been shown to play a great role in the so-called entropic formulation of statistical mechanics,[17] applied among the others in molecular biology[18] and thermodynamic non-equilibrium processes.[19]

In 1953, Lon Brillouin derived a general equation[20] stating that the changing of an information bit value requires at least kT ln(2) energy. This is the same energy as the work Le Szilrd’s engine produces in the idealistic case. In his book,[21] he further explored this problem concluding that any cause of this bit value change (measurement, decision about a yes/no question, erasure, display, etc.) will require the same amount of energy.

See original here:

Negentropy – Wikipedia

extropy – Wiktionary

English[edit]Etymology[edit]

First coined to serve as an antonym of entropy, substituting its en- element (representing the prepositional prefix (en), en, in in its Ancient Greek etymon (entropa), entropia, a turning towards) with ex- (representing the Ancient Greek (ex), ex, out of, from); because (ex) takes the form (ek) when prefixed to an element beginning with (t), the analogical spelling is ectropy (or, alternatively, ektropy), as if after the Ancient Greek * (ektropa, a turning out of).

extropy

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extropy – Wiktionary

Negentropy – Wikipedia

The negentropy has different meanings in information theory and theoretical biology. In a biological context, the negentropy (also negative entropy, syntropy, extropy, ectropy or entaxy[1]) of a living system is the entropy that it exports to keep its own entropy low; it lies at the intersection of entropy and life. In other words, negentropy is reverse entropy. It means things becoming more orderly. By ‘order’ is meant organisation, structure and function: the opposite of randomness or chaos. The concept and phrase “negative entropy” was introduced by Erwin Schrdinger in his 1944 popular-science book What is Life?[2] Later, Lon Brillouin shortened the phrase to negentropy,[3][4] to express it in a more “positive” way: a living system imports negentropy and stores it.[5] In 1974, Albert Szent-Gyrgyi proposed replacing the term negentropy with syntropy. That term may have originated in the 1940s with the Italian mathematician Luigi Fantappi, who tried to construct a unified theory of biology and physics. Buckminster Fuller tried to popularize this usage, but negentropy remains common.

In a note to What is Life? Schrdinger explained his use of this phrase.

In 2009, Mahulikar & Herwig redefined negentropy of a dynamically ordered sub-system as the specific entropy deficit of the ordered sub-system relative to its surrounding chaos.[6] Thus, negentropy has SI units of (J kg1 K1) when defined based on specific entropy per unit mass, and (K1) when defined based on specific entropy per unit energy. This definition enabled: i) scale-invariant thermodynamic representation of dynamic order existence, ii) formulation of physical principles exclusively for dynamic order existence and evolution, and iii) mathematical interpretation of Schrdinger’s negentropy debt.

In information theory and statistics, negentropy is used as a measure of distance to normality.[7][8][9] Out of all distributions with a given mean and variance, the normal or Gaussian distribution is the one with the highest entropy. Negentropy measures the difference in entropy between a given distribution and the Gaussian distribution with the same mean and variance. Thus, negentropy is always nonnegative, is invariant by any linear invertible change of coordinates, and vanishes if and only if the signal is Gaussian.

Negentropy is defined as

where S ( x ) {displaystyle S(varphi _{x})} is the differential entropy of the Gaussian density with the same mean and variance as p x {displaystyle p_{x}} and S ( p x ) {displaystyle S(p_{x})} is the differential entropy of p x {displaystyle p_{x}} :

Negentropy is used in statistics and signal processing. It is related to network entropy, which is used in independent component analysis.[10][11]

There is a physical quantity closely linked to free energy (free enthalpy), with a unit of entropy and isomorphic to negentropy known in statistics and information theory. In 1873, Willard Gibbs created a diagram illustrating the concept of free energy corresponding to free enthalpy. On the diagram one can see the quantity called capacity for entropy. This quantity is the amount of entropy that may be increased without changing an internal energy or increasing its volume.[12] In other words, it is a difference between maximum possible, under assumed conditions, entropy and its actual entropy. It corresponds exactly to the definition of negentropy adopted in statistics and information theory. A similar physical quantity was introduced in 1869 by Massieu for the isothermal process[13][14][15] (both quantities differs just with a figure sign) and then Planck for the isothermal-isobaric process.[16] More recently, the MassieuPlanck thermodynamic potential, known also as free entropy, has been shown to play a great role in the so-called entropic formulation of statistical mechanics,[17] applied among the others in molecular biology[18] and thermodynamic non-equilibrium processes.[19]

In 1953, Lon Brillouin derived a general equation[20] stating that the changing of an information bit value requires at least kT ln(2) energy. This is the same energy as the work Le Szilrd’s engine produces in the idealistic case. In his book,[21] he further explored this problem concluding that any cause of this bit value change (measurement, decision about a yes/no question, erasure, display, etc.) will require the same amount of energy.

View original post here:

Negentropy – Wikipedia

Knights of Unicron (SG) – Transformers Wiki

The Knights of Unicron are a heroic Autobot subgroup from the Shattered Glass continuity family.

The Knights of Unicron were once evil Autobots, but the benevolent god of extropy Unicron reformatted them into his agents of peace. Now, they serve truth and justice across known space. Their members are:

Following their defeat at Decepticon City on Earth, Optimus Prime’s forces retreated aboard Sky Lynx for Cybertron. Memory’s Splinter Midway through, however, Sky Lynx announced that they would have to lighten the load. Rodimus took the opportunity to dump Optimus, Brawn, Prowl, Inferno, and Ratchet out the airlock. The five badly injured Autobots then found themselves in the presence of Unicron. Familiar Reflections Now dominated by good due to the Shroud, the god of extropy offered Optimus and his troopers truth and enlightenment. After Unicron showed Optimus a vision of his greatest victory, Prime accepted, and Unicron healed and reformatted them. The newly-formed Knights were then sent to Cybertron to stop Rodimus’s chaos. Arriving in Rodimus’s throne room, the Autotroopers took on the evil Autobots while Nova went head to head with Rodimus. Nova succeeded, sending Rodimus tumbling down into the depths of Cybertron. Restoration The Knights soon had the Autobots arrested, but Unicron contacted Nova to warn him that a greater threat awaited. Cybertron then seemingly began to fall apart. While the Knights barely maintained their footing, Rodimus reappeared and ordered his Autobots to evacuate. Cybertron then completed its transformation into the physical form of the Cybertronians’ creator-god, Primus. Awakened by Rodimus and dominated by evil due to the Shroud, the dark Primus observed the nearby dimensionally-displaced Earth and tried to destroy it. However, Earth revealed itself as another Transformer god, Primus’s sister Gaea. As the titans clashed, the Knights came to Gaea’s aid, taking out Primus’s eyes. Gaea then destroyed Primus and transformed herself into a new Cybertron as a home to both heroic Autobot and heroic Decepticon. The Knights became the guardians of the new joint society as a new age of peace dawned. The Future Buried…

Continue reading here:

Knights of Unicron (SG) – Transformers Wiki

Negentropy – Wikipedia

The negentropy has different meanings in information theory and theoretical biology. In a biological context, the negentropy (also negative entropy, syntropy, extropy, ectropy or entaxy[1]) of a living system is the entropy that it exports to keep its own entropy low; it lies at the intersection of entropy and life. In other words, negentropy is reverse entropy. It means things becoming more orderly. By ‘order’ is meant organisation, structure and function: the opposite of randomness or chaos. The concept and phrase “negative entropy” was introduced by Erwin Schrdinger in his 1944 popular-science book What is Life?[2] Later, Lon Brillouin shortened the phrase to negentropy,[3][4] to express it in a more “positive” way: a living system imports negentropy and stores it.[5] In 1974, Albert Szent-Gyrgyi proposed replacing the term negentropy with syntropy. That term may have originated in the 1940s with the Italian mathematician Luigi Fantappi, who tried to construct a unified theory of biology and physics. Buckminster Fuller tried to popularize this usage, but negentropy remains common.

In a note to What is Life? Schrdinger explained his use of this phrase.

In 2009, Mahulikar & Herwig redefined negentropy of a dynamically ordered sub-system as the specific entropy deficit of the ordered sub-system relative to its surrounding chaos.[6] Thus, negentropy has SI units of (J kg1 K1) when defined based on specific entropy per unit mass, and (K1) when defined based on specific entropy per unit energy. This definition enabled: i) scale-invariant thermodynamic representation of dynamic order existence, ii) formulation of physical principles exclusively for dynamic order existence and evolution, and iii) mathematical interpretation of Schrdinger’s negentropy debt.

In information theory and statistics, negentropy is used as a measure of distance to normality.[7][8][9] Out of all distributions with a given mean and variance, the normal or Gaussian distribution is the one with the highest entropy. Negentropy measures the difference in entropy between a given distribution and the Gaussian distribution with the same mean and variance. Thus, negentropy is always nonnegative, is invariant by any linear invertible change of coordinates, and vanishes if and only if the signal is Gaussian.

Negentropy is defined as

where S ( x ) {displaystyle S(varphi _{x})} is the differential entropy of the Gaussian density with the same mean and variance as p x {displaystyle p_{x}} and S ( p x ) {displaystyle S(p_{x})} is the differential entropy of p x {displaystyle p_{x}} :

Negentropy is used in statistics and signal processing. It is related to network entropy, which is used in independent component analysis.[10][11]

There is a physical quantity closely linked to free energy (free enthalpy), with a unit of entropy and isomorphic to negentropy known in statistics and information theory. In 1873, Willard Gibbs created a diagram illustrating the concept of free energy corresponding to free enthalpy. On the diagram one can see the quantity called capacity for entropy. This quantity is the amount of entropy that may be increased without changing an internal energy or increasing its volume.[12] In other words, it is a difference between maximum possible, under assumed conditions, entropy and its actual entropy. It corresponds exactly to the definition of negentropy adopted in statistics and information theory. A similar physical quantity was introduced in 1869 by Massieu for the isothermal process[13][14][15] (both quantities differs just with a figure sign) and then Planck for the isothermal-isobaric process.[16] More recently, the MassieuPlanck thermodynamic potential, known also as free entropy, has been shown to play a great role in the so-called entropic formulation of statistical mechanics,[17] applied among the others in molecular biology[18] and thermodynamic non-equilibrium processes.[19]

In 1953, Lon Brillouin derived a general equation[20] stating that the changing of an information bit value requires at least kT ln(2) energy. This is the same energy as the work Le Szilrd’s engine produces in the idealistic case. In his book,[21] he further explored this problem concluding that any cause of this bit value change (measurement, decision about a yes/no question, erasure, display, etc.) will require the same amount of energy.

See the rest here:

Negentropy – Wikipedia

Knights of Unicron (SG) – Transformers Wiki

The Knights of Unicron are a heroic Autobot subgroup from the Shattered Glass continuity family.

The Knights of Unicron were once evil Autobots, but the benevolent god of extropy Unicron reformatted them into his agents of peace. Now, they serve truth and justice across known space. Their members are:

Following their defeat at Decepticon City on Earth, Optimus Prime’s forces retreated aboard Sky Lynx for Cybertron. Memory’s Splinter Midway through, however, Sky Lynx announced that they would have to lighten the load. Rodimus took the opportunity to dump Optimus, Brawn, Prowl, Inferno, and Ratchet out the airlock. The five badly injured Autobots then found themselves in the presence of Unicron. Familiar Reflections Now dominated by good due to the Shroud, the god of extropy offered Optimus and his troopers truth and enlightenment. After Unicron showed Optimus a vision of his greatest victory, Prime accepted, and Unicron healed and reformatted them. The newly-formed Knights were then sent to Cybertron to stop Rodimus’s chaos. Arriving in Rodimus’s throne room, the Autotroopers took on the evil Autobots while Nova went head to head with Rodimus. Nova succeeded, sending Rodimus tumbling down into the depths of Cybertron. Restoration The Knights soon had the Autobots arrested, but Unicron contacted Nova to warn him that a greater threat awaited. Cybertron then seemingly began to fall apart. While the Knights barely maintained their footing, Rodimus reappeared and ordered his Autobots to evacuate. Cybertron then completed its transformation into the physical form of the Cybertronians’ creator-god, Primus. Awakened by Rodimus and dominated by evil due to the Shroud, the dark Primus observed the nearby dimensionally-displaced Earth and tried to destroy it. However, Earth revealed itself as another Transformer god, Primus’s sister Gaea. As the titans clashed, the Knights came to Gaea’s aid, taking out Primus’s eyes. Gaea then destroyed Primus and transformed herself into a new Cybertron as a home to both heroic Autobot and heroic Decepticon. The Knights became the guardians of the new joint society as a new age of peace dawned. The Future Buried…

Read more from the original source:

Knights of Unicron (SG) – Transformers Wiki

Knights of Unicron (SG) – Transformers Wiki – TFWiki.net

The Knights of Unicron are a heroic Autobot subgroup from the Shattered Glass continuity family.

The Knights of Unicron were once evil Autobots, but the benevolent god of extropy Unicron reformatted them into his agents of peace. Now, they serve truth and justice across known space. Their members are:

Following their defeat at Decepticon City on Earth, Optimus Prime’s forces retreated aboard Sky Lynx for Cybertron. Memory’s Splinter Midway through, however, Sky Lynx announced that they would have to lighten the load. Rodimus took the opportunity to dump Optimus, Brawn, Prowl, Inferno, and Ratchet out the airlock. The five badly injured Autobots then found themselves in the presence of Unicron. Familiar Reflections Now dominated by good due to the Shroud, the god of extropy offered Optimus and his troopers truth and enlightenment. After Unicron showed Optimus a vision of his greatest victory, Prime accepted, and Unicron healed and reformatted them. The newly-formed Knights were then sent to Cybertron to stop Rodimus’s chaos. Arriving in Rodimus’s throne room, the Autotroopers took on the evil Autobots while Nova went head to head with Rodimus. Nova succeeded, sending Rodimus tumbling down into the depths of Cybertron. Restoration The Knights soon had the Autobots arrested, but Unicron contacted Nova to warn him that a greater threat awaited. Cybertron then seemingly began to fall apart. While the Knights barely maintained their footing, Rodimus reappeared and ordered his Autobots to evacuate. Cybertron then completed its transformation into the physical form of the Cybertronians’ creator-god, Primus. Awakened by Rodimus and dominated by evil due to the Shroud, the dark Primus observed the nearby dimensionally-displaced Earth and tried to destroy it. However, Earth revealed itself as another Transformer god, Primus’s sister Gaea. As the titans clashed, the Knights came to Gaea’s aid, taking out Primus’s eyes. Gaea then destroyed Primus and transformed herself into a new Cybertron as a home to both heroic Autobot and heroic Decepticon. The Knights became the guardians of the new joint society as a new age of peace dawned. The Future Buried…

View original post here:

Knights of Unicron (SG) – Transformers Wiki – TFWiki.net

Negentropy – Wikipedia

The negentropy has different meanings in information theory and theoretical biology. In a biological context, the negentropy (also negative entropy, syntropy, extropy, ectropy or entaxy[1]) of a living system is the entropy that it exports to keep its own entropy low; it lies at the intersection of entropy and life. In other words, negentropy is reverse entropy. It means things becoming more orderly. By ‘order’ is meant organisation, structure and function: the opposite of randomness or chaos. The concept and phrase “negative entropy” was introduced by Erwin Schrdinger in his 1944 popular-science book What is Life?[2] Later, Lon Brillouin shortened the phrase to negentropy,[3][4] to express it in a more “positive” way: a living system imports negentropy and stores it.[5] In 1974, Albert Szent-Gyrgyi proposed replacing the term negentropy with syntropy. That term may have originated in the 1940s with the Italian mathematician Luigi Fantappi, who tried to construct a unified theory of biology and physics. Buckminster Fuller tried to popularize this usage, but negentropy remains common.

In a note to What is Life? Schrdinger explained his use of this phrase.

In 2009, Mahulikar & Herwig redefined negentropy of a dynamically ordered sub-system as the specific entropy deficit of the ordered sub-system relative to its surrounding chaos.[6] Thus, negentropy has SI units of (J kg1 K1) when defined based on specific entropy per unit mass, and (K1) when defined based on specific entropy per unit energy. This definition enabled: i) scale-invariant thermodynamic representation of dynamic order existence, ii) formulation of physical principles exclusively for dynamic order existence and evolution, and iii) mathematical interpretation of Schrdinger’s negentropy debt.

In information theory and statistics, negentropy is used as a measure of distance to normality.[7][8][9] Out of all distributions with a given mean and variance, the normal or Gaussian distribution is the one with the highest entropy. Negentropy measures the difference in entropy between a given distribution and the Gaussian distribution with the same mean and variance. Thus, negentropy is always nonnegative, is invariant by any linear invertible change of coordinates, and vanishes if and only if the signal is Gaussian.

Negentropy is defined as

where S ( x ) {displaystyle S(varphi _{x})} is the differential entropy of the Gaussian density with the same mean and variance as p x {displaystyle p_{x}} and S ( p x ) {displaystyle S(p_{x})} is the differential entropy of p x {displaystyle p_{x}} :

Negentropy is used in statistics and signal processing. It is related to network entropy, which is used in independent component analysis.[10][11]

There is a physical quantity closely linked to free energy (free enthalpy), with a unit of entropy and isomorphic to negentropy known in statistics and information theory. In 1873, Willard Gibbs created a diagram illustrating the concept of free energy corresponding to free enthalpy. On the diagram one can see the quantity called capacity for entropy. This quantity is the amount of entropy that may be increased without changing an internal energy or increasing its volume.[12] In other words, it is a difference between maximum possible, under assumed conditions, entropy and its actual entropy. It corresponds exactly to the definition of negentropy adopted in statistics and information theory. A similar physical quantity was introduced in 1869 by Massieu for the isothermal process[13][14][15] (both quantities differs just with a figure sign) and then Planck for the isothermal-isobaric process.[16] More recently, the MassieuPlanck thermodynamic potential, known also as free entropy, has been shown to play a great role in the so-called entropic formulation of statistical mechanics,[17] applied among the others in molecular biology[18] and thermodynamic non-equilibrium processes.[19]

In 1953, Lon Brillouin derived a general equation[20] stating that the changing of an information bit value requires at least kT ln(2) energy. This is the same energy as the work Le Szilrd’s engine produces in the idealistic case. In his book,[21] he further explored this problem concluding that any cause of this bit value change (measurement, decision about a yes/no question, erasure, display, etc.) will require the same amount of energy.

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Negentropy – Wikipedia