Lilliputians in Gulliver’s World – The odd world of the mini-state – Geographical

In the third of his series on geopolitical oddities, Vitali Vitaliev looks at our planets smallest independent nations

It is common knowledge that throughout its 300 years of history, Liechtenstein a tiny, 25km-long, sovereign principality, squeezed between Austria and Switzerland was spared foreign invasions. Like many other commonly accepted stereotypes about the worlds smallest sovereign countries, however, this is not entirely true.

Keep an eye on the worldGet Geographicals latest news delivered straight to your inbox every Friday, plus a collection of free eBooks on the subjects that matter to you!

The principality has no army, and its last military engagement was in 1866, when Prussia declared war on Austria. All 80 Liechtenstein soldiers were deployed on the frontier between Tyrol and Italy for one week, during which time they witnessed a blizzard (in August), but never once set eyes on the enemy. They returned to Liechtenstein safe and sound (even making a new recruit on the way back making them one of the few military forces to return from the front lines of a war with more soldiers than when they left), were welcomed by a band, given refreshments at Vaduz castle and then sent home.

And yet, two episodes in the principalitys 20th century history could indeed qualify as invasions, of sorts. The latest happened in October 1992, when a group of Swiss recruits tried by mistake to set up an observation post in the Liechtenstein village of Triesenberg on the Swiss border. A local country woman, who had never seen a soldier before and was obviously unnerved by their rifles and gas-masks, simply shooed them away across the frontier back into Switzerland, which had to apologise officially for the incident.

The first episode, however, warrants a much more detailed description. On the night of 2 May 1945, 500 fully armed Russian soldiers, under the command of Major General Holmston-Smyslovsky, crossed the Austrian frontier into Liechtenstein near the village of Schellenberg. The Russians, remnants of the First Russian Army of the German Wehrmacht, had entered Liechtenstein in search of political asylum. Unlike two and a half million other Russian soldiers and Cossacks, who fought on the German side and were captured by the Allies only to be handed over to Stalin under the Yalta agreement, these 500 were not extradited and were allowed to stay.

The tiny Ruritanian principality was firmly committed to its status of neutrality during WWII. Near the village of Malbun, there is a church, built in 1950 to thank God for sparing Liechtenstein the terrors of the Second World War. In actual fact, it was thanks not to God but to the political prowess of Prince Franz Joseph II (ironically, the nephew of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, whose assassination in Sarajevo precipitated the 1914-1918 war), who bravely paid a surprise visit to Berlin in May 1939. As the Prince himself later recalled, Hitler was visibly ill at ease and didnt make any impression at all during their 90 minute meeting in the Reich Chancellery, but since his visit flattered Hitlers ego, the Nazis decided to leave Liechtenstein alone.

A tourist train running through Liechtenstein

SMALL BUT PROUD

The mini (also called micro) state is a rather confusing and ill-defined concept. Unlike the so-called micronations, mini-states are all fully sovereign and self-governing small entities, recognised as such by the UN and other international organisations. According to the succinct definition by Websters College Dictionary, a mini-state is just a small independent nation. The Free Internet Dictionary defines it as: a very small nation that is an internationally-recognised sovereign state. The obvious question here is: how small is small?

Small is a relative concept when applied to countries. The UK is small compared to, say, China or Russia, but Malta is very small in relation to the UK. Or take Iceland relatively small in population (350,000), yet vast in its area (40,000 square miles). What should we take into account: area, population, both? My favourite definition, quoted by geographer Zbigniew Dumienski in his paper Microstates as Modern Protected States, describes a mini-state as being of a size so small as to invite comment.

If we narrow the bracket even further to a maximum of 100,000 population it leaves us with ten amazingly diverse sovereign countries: Nauru, Tuvalu, Palau and Marshall Islands in Oceania, St Kitts and Nevis, Antigua and Barbuda in the Caribbean and San Marino, Monaco, Liechtenstein and Andorra in Europe. Finally there is also Niue (population 1,600) an island nation in the South Pacific, considered an associated state (ie. minor partner) of New Zealand.

(How about the Vatican, by far the worlds smallest state, with the population of under 900 and the area of just 44 hectares? Well, I consciously chose to leave the Papal State out of the above list, for, to me, it did not quite meet the traditional criteria of a state. And not just to me, it appears: writer Thomas Eccardt in his recent book Secrets of the Seven Smallest States of Europereferred to the Vatican as being more similar to the headquarters of international organisations than to a state in its own right. Hopefully, His Holiness will forgive us both!)

Modern Liechtenstein (area 160 square km, population 39,000), with its per capita GDP of over $140,000 is by some estimates the worlds richest country. And not only due to its tax haven status and its countless letterbox companies (their number is higher than that of the principalitys population), but also because of its proportionally extensive infrastructure, with over 1,800 industrial enterprises specialising in electronics, precision engineering, metal finishing, textile and ceramic industries. It explains why it is often called a mini-industrial giant.

Monaco is the tiny home to more than 37,000 people

We find a very different picture in the all-urban, tax-free Monaco (a principality of 37,000 people, with the worlds highest population density of 25,105 people per square km), effectively owned by the Grimaldi family, whose economy apart from banking heavily relies on the services sector and more recently on Prince Alberts determination to develop environmentally friendly small industries. Meanwhile, San Marino (pop. 34,000), the worlds oldest republic, thrives on exporting its wines, souvenirs and highly collectable postage stamps.

Never miss an issueSubscribe today to Geographicals monthly print and digital magazine and save 30% off the cover price!

The very existence of the prospering small states is a not-so-small miracle in our immensely globalised world. Researchers Iver Neumann and Sieglinde Gstoni certainly had a point when characterising all surviving mini-states as Lilliputians in Gullivers World in their eponymous paper, published by the University of Iceland in May 2004.

Yet, the mini-states most remarkable feature is their frantic, yet entirely peaceful, clinging to their own sovereignty. Despite their minuscule size, modern mini-states are ruled in a plethora of different ways from parliamentary and constitutional monarchies (Monaco and Liechtestein) to unitary parliamentary republics (Palau, Marshall Islands) to San Marinos peculiar diarchy whereby it is governed jointly by two Captains Regent, nominated by the Grand and General Council.

Andorra, a tiny Catalan-speaking co-principality in the Pyrenees that enjoys the worlds highest life expectancy, and has been independent since 1298, retains a parliamentary democracy run by the Council General (Andorras parliament since 1419), but also preserves an element of diarchy by maintaining its two co-Princes, one of whom is traditionally the incumbent President of France, the other the Bishop of Urgel. Unlike in San Marino, however, their role is largely ceremonial.

In St Kitts and Nevis a unique mini-federation of two island states the same minister can hold several different portfolios both in the local island government and at the federal level. The Rt. Hon. Mark Brantley, Neviss Deputy Premier, holds ten!

San Marino is just one of five diarchies countries jointly ruled by two leaders

STANDING STRONG

Liechtensteins head of state, Prince Hans Adam II, is Europes last remaining full-power monarch. He can single-handedly veto laws, call referenda and dissolve the Diet (parliament), as he did in September 1993. Hans Adam II went on to declare general elections and to reject the no-confidence vote against his then prime minister, Markus Buchel, an event normally associated with the 17th century, not the late 20th.

In 2003, he called a referendum on the expansion of his own powers and threatened to leave the country if the people voted against it. They didnt and refused to curtail them once again in 2012 when an anti-monarchists proposal to do so was resolutely voted down.

Not too democratic, you may say. Yet, as the story with the asylum-seeking Russian soldiers goes on to demonstrate, at times it takes a bit of dictatorial toughness to keep the aggressor at bay.

The First Russian Army of the Wehrmacht was made of Russian migrs and freedom-fighters, most of whom were not even Soviet citizens. Its main objective was not to contribute to Russias occupation, but rather to help it to get rid of Bolshevism, which was seen as the greater of two evils. Hitler never fully trusted the Army, and even had Holmston-Smyslovsky, a former Russian count, imprisoned and his unit disbanded for a couple of years. The army didnt commit any atrocities and its involvement in combat action was minimal.

As soon as the news reached Vaduz of the 500 Russians in German uniforms, with all their arms and equipment, crossing the border, the Prince sent his representatives to Schellenberg. Baron Eduard von Falz-Fein, a long-time Liechtenstein resident of Russian/Ukrainian extraction (who passed away at the venerable age of 106 in November 2018), was asked to act as a translator. The negotiations with Holmston-Smyslovsky took place in the Zum Lowen Inn on the border. It was a curious sight for our peaceful Liechtenstein, the Baron once told me many years later during a meeting. Hundreds of heavily armed men, with their horses and vehicles, camping on the lawn behind the inn. Later we built barracks for them in the town of Ruggel.

Franz Josef II as depicted on the countrys official stamps

Asylum was duly granted to all the Russians, but shortly afterwards Prince Franz Josef II found himself under considerable pressure from the Soviets. Unlike his counterparts in Britain, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Finland, Switzerland, Sweden and Norway, all of which had agreed to repatriate the Russian POWs, the ruler of the tiny Liechtenstein firmly resisted all attempts to have the asylum-seekers extradited. Despite strong pressure, and in contrast to the bad example set by other countries, these unfortunate refugees were not handed over to the executioners, the valiant prince wrote in 1980.

The only thing he had to agree to was to allow a Soviet delegation to come to Liechtenstein and interview the asylum-seekers. By stick and carrot, Stalins emissaries managed to dupe 300 into returning to the USSR. Notwithstanding generous guarantees of safety, many of them were executed on arrival and the rest ended up in Gulag.

Most of the remaining 200, including General Holmston-Smyslovsky himself, stayed for two years before moving on, most of them to the safety of Argentina. Thus two hundred human lives were saved by the tiny principalitys faithfulness to its historical and humanitarian principles.

Liechtenstein, Europes only nation, which did not succumb to the Soviets pressure, might be small indeed, but, like many other mini-states, it can teach the modern world an important lesson of true sovereignty and pride. Where some of the worlds greatest democracies effectively capitulated in the face of a gun-brandishing bully, tiny Liechtenstein stayed strong.

The latest edition of Vitali Vitalievs book, Little is the Light: Nostalgic Travels in the Mini-States of Europe, Is published by Thrust Books and is available from: amzn.to/2KZ8wNd

Get the best of Geographical delivered straight to your inbox by signing up to our weekly newsletter and get a free collection of eBooks!

View post:

Lilliputians in Gulliver's World - The odd world of the mini-state - Geographical

Review: In Terra Firma, a Wee Wet Country on the Brink – The New York Times

We are becoming like all the other nations, the queen says in a moment of despair. We have unhappy prisoners, indifferent citizens and the young people refuse to reproduce.

Actually, the nation she rules with her husband, Roy, has just one of each of those things: one prisoner (a recent hostage, good at chess), one citizen (a doofus interested in pyrotechnics) and one young person (the 17-year-old prince, currently away on a mission).

Thats because Terra Firma, as the queen has named it, is a micronation: a self-declared kingdom located on an abandoned 6,000-square-foot antiaircraft platform six miles out to sea. It may not boast much land or populace, but it has a national anthem, a tatty flag, a centralized health service and a constitution if the queen could ever complete it.

Terra Firma, the play by Barbara Hammond about this country, likewise seems in need of more work. Ambitious and smart, it is not yet coherent, at least not in its world premiere, which opened on Thursday at the Baruch Performing Arts Center. Shifting from whimsical comedy to light satire to lumpy allegory, it quickly strips its gears and stops cold.

The whimsy, coming right at the start, proves especially deadly in Shana Coopers staging for a newly founded theater company called the Coop. Mild humor about the micronations pretensions to real statehood seems especially vaporous on the imposing set (by Andrew Boyce) and amid the foreboding ocean roar of Jane Shaws sound design. But at least the absurdity of the premise has a historical precedent: Terra Firma is based on a real place called Sealand, established in the late 1960s off the east coast of England.

The humans seem less precedented. As the citizen (John Keating) and Roy (Gerardo Rodriguez) hoist their hostage (Tom OKeefe) onto the platform and proceed to interrogate him, we might almost be watching a Three Stooges routine, except with less finesse. Clumsily handled as well is the back story: The citizen and Roy, believing that recent nearby explosions are the work of enemies bent on their destruction, are desperate to understand the danger theyre in.

That danger, we quickly understand from the scripts broad hints, is ecological. When the young prince (Daniel Molina) returns from his reconnaissance mission, he brings with him a sliver of a hedge to decorate the homeland; it is apparently the last piece of greenery left in the world. And when a weather-beaten diplomat (T. Ryder Smith) arrives to negotiate the hostage crisis, we learn that the reason he is the first to heed Terra Firmas calls for help delivered in bottles cast out to sea is that there may be no one else left to answer.

The queen, unwilling to credit such dire suspicions, doubles down on her queenliness. Because she is played by Andrus Nichols the marvelously grave Elinor in Kate Hamills Sense & Sensibility a character that could easily turn camp instead comes across as somehow both deluded and brave. Despite her stained blouse and paste tiara, she practices holding her right arm aloft whenever she appears, as if searching for the perfect salute to comfort a grateful people.

This pathos gets at what the play does best: It understands and in some way forgives human limitation. It fares less well when it attempts a critique of rulers who reject reality even if its a reality they helped create. A parallel is suggested between the characters pride and the disaster now engulfing them, as if Terra Firma were the industrialized West in miniature, unable to steer away from the brink of climate change. In an authors note, Hammond writes that she saw in the story of the real Sealand a metaphor for the human predicament.

But that comparison is under-drawn and illogical; a few people stuck on a massive steel life raft for several decades cannot have much to do with rising sea levels and whatever else is eating the rest of the world. The Terra Firmans arent nuclear physicists who built faulty reactors like the characters in Lucy Kirkwoods The Children, a much more sophisticated treatment of the same theme. Theyre refugees.

So, in a way, are the members of the Coop, recently formed as a kind of breakaway republic from another theater company, Bedlam. Terra Firma, the Coops inaugural production, matches its mission to stage plays that resonate with timeless themes and universal truths, but in this case resonance isnt enough.

Thats a problem built into the bloated mash-up of genres: Comedy is based on particularizing human behavior, but allegory is based on generalizing it. In trying to be both, and an ecological tragedy as well, Terra Firma pulls in too many directions. Though the cast especially Nichols, OKeefe and Smith is strong, and Cooper makes lovely stage pictures on the rusty platform, theres something thin and self-defeating about the resulting circular logic. Like most life raft stories, Terra Firma doesnt hold water.

Terra Firma

Tickets Through Nov. 10 at Baruch Performing Arts Center, Manhattan; 212-352-3101, thecoopnyc.org. Running time: 1 hour 45 minutes.

Follow this link:

Review: In Terra Firma, a Wee Wet Country on the Brink - The New York Times

Asteroid warning: When impact hits, nothing but cockroaches will survive, claims expert – Express.co.uk

An asteroid hit 66 million years ago wiped out 75 percent of all life on Earth and plunged the planet into the grips of a nuclear winter. The cataclysm brought about the end of the dinosaurs reign, leaving behind only small mammals, reptiles, birds and amphibians. Should another dinosaur killer strike the Earth today, the dominant species of animal humans would likely disappear from the face of the planet. Because of these risks, space expert Lembit pik believes it is critical to invest in early warning and defence systems.

The dinosaur killer is believed to have been a six-mile-wide (10km) rock that struck near what is todays Chicxulub on the Yucatan Peninsula in Mexico.

Mr pik, who is the Chairman of Parliament for the space-based micronation of Asgardia, believes another Chicxulub asteroid would spell the end of humanity.

He told Express.co.uk: If its a 10km object, the odds are it will miss things in space but if it hits Earth its academic.

The Earth will be covered with a dust cloud made of material thrown into the atmosphere directly and the dust and soot from the fires that would occur for a couple of years.

READ MORE: How often do asteroids hit Earth? What is the danger

It would be long enough to kill photosynthesis and, in other words, those who werent incinerated would starve.

Today, Earths defence measures are coordinated by the likes of NASA and the European Space Agency (ESA).

ESA has in the past stressed there are no rocks currently headed directly at our planet but the list of known asteroid threats is incomplete.

Mr pik said: We have a good register of Earth-crossing objects they are the one that could hit us, they are the objects that cross our orbital lane.

But its not a complete list and therefore we need to be sure we can see them coming.

WATCH HERE: Major asteroid DESTROYS Earth in fiery crash simulation

Oftentimes something will come into the Earths atmosphere like the one over Siberia recently, which injured about 1,000 people, that nobody saw coming.

Now that one was problematic because if it had been a little bit bigger, it would have killed tens of thousands of people.

The ones we are really worried about are maybe ones that are 100m to 200m across.

A one-kilometre object is a continent killer, a 10km object is an Earth killer.

Asteroid defence and protection from space-based dangers is one of the topics Asgardia will address in October at the micronations first Space Science and Investment Conference.

The conference between October 14 and October 16 will address all aspects of moving humanity from Earth and into space.

Asgardia aims to conceive the first child in space in the next 25 years, followed by elevating humanity towards becoming a spacefaring civilisation.

Mr pik has campaigned for more asteroid defence measures since his day as a Member of Parliament for Montgomeryshire in Wales between 1998 and 2010.

Originally posted here:

Asteroid warning: When impact hits, nothing but cockroaches will survive, claims expert - Express.co.uk

Micronation | East Asian Micronations Wiki | FANDOM …

A micronation is an entity intended to replace, resemble, mock, or exist on equal footing with recognised independent state. Some micronations are created with serious intent, while others exist as a hobby or stunt.

Micronations should not be confused with internationally recognised but geographically tiny nations such as Fiji, the Vatican, and San Marino for which the term 'microstate' is used.

The term 'micronation' literally means "small nation". It is a neologism originating in the mid-1990s to describe the many thousands of small unrecognised state-like entities that have mostly arisen since that time. It is generally accepted that the term was invented by Robert Ben Madison.

The term has since also come to be used retrospectively to refer to earlier unrecognised entities, some of which date to as far back as the 19th century. Supporters of micronations use the term "macronation" for any UN-recognized sovereign nation-state.

Micronations generally have a number of common features, although these may vary widely. They may have a structure similar to established sovereign states, including territorial claims, government institutions, official symbols and citizens, albeit on a much smaller scale. Micronations are often quite small, in both their claimed territory and claimed populations although there are some exceptions to this rule, with different micronations having different methods of citizenship. Micronations may also issue formal instruments such as postage stamps, coins, banknotes and passports, and bestow honours and titles of nobility.

A criterion which distinguishes micronations from imaginary countries, eco-villages, campuses, tribes, clans, sects, and residential community associations, is that these entities do not usually seek to be recognised as sovereign.

The Montevideo Convention was one attempt to create a legal definition distinguishing between states and non-states. Some micronations meet this definition, while some do not, and others reject the Convention altogether.

The academic study of micronations and microstates is known as micropatrology, and the hobby of establishing and operating micronations is known as micronationalism.

Micronations have been known to be termed as a 'cybernation', 'fantasy country', 'model country (or nation)', 'new country project', 'pseudonation', 'counternation', 'ephemeral state', 'online nation' and many other variants.

Micronations may also be classified, although many different systems are used across the micronational world. One of the most commonly used systems is the Boodlesmyth-Tallini System of Cclassification.

The Principality of Sealand is one of the more well-known micronations in the world

The 17th century saw the rise to prominence of a world order dominated by the concept of the nation-state, following the Treaty of Westphalia. However, the earliest recognisable micronations can be dated to the 18th century. Most were founded by eccentric adventurers or business speculators, and several were remarkably successful. These include the Cocos (Keeling) Islands, ruled by the Clunies-Ross family, and Sarawak, ruled by the "White Rajas" of the Brooke family. Both were independent personal fiefdoms in all but name, and survived until well into the 20th century.

Less successful were the Kingdom of Araucania and Patagonia (1860-1862) in southern Chile and Argentina, and the Kingdom of Sedang (1888-1890) in French Indochina. The oldest extant micronation to arise in modern times is the Kingdom of Redonda, founded in 1865 in the Caribbean. It failed to establish itself as a sovereign nation-state, but has nonetheless managed to survive into the present day as a unique literary foundation with its own king and aristocracy although it is not without its controversies; there are presently at least four competing claimants to the Redondan throne.

M. C. Harman, owner of the UK island of Lundy in the early decades of the 20th century, issued private coinage and postage stamps for local use. Although the island was ruled as a virtual fiefdom, its owner never claimed to be independent of the United Kingdom. Thus, Lundy can at best be described as a precursor to later territorial micronations.

The 1960s and 1970s saw a 'micronational renaissance', with the foundation of a number of territorial micronations, some of which still persist to this day. The first of these, the Principality of Sealand, was founded in 1967 on an abandoned World War II gun platform in the North Sea, and has endured a military coup, court rulings and rough weather throughout its existence. Others were based on schemes requiring the construction of artificial islands, but only two are known to have risen above sea level.

The Republic of Rose Island was a 400 sq metre platform built in international waters off the Italian town of Rimini, in the Adriatic Sea in 1968. It is reported to have issued stamps, minted currency, and declared Esperanto to be its official language. Shortly after completion, however, it was destroyed by the Italian Navy.

The Republic of Minerva was set up in 1972 as a libertarian new country project by Nevada businessman Michael Oliver. Oliver's group conducted dredging operations at the Minerva Reefs, a shoal located in the Pacific Ocean south of Fiji. They succeeded in creating a small artificial island, but their efforts at securing international recognition met with little success, and near-neighbour Tonga sent a military force to the area and annexed it.

On 1 April 1977, bibliophile Richard Booth, declared the UK town of Hay-on-Wye an "independent republic" with himself as its king. The town has subsequently developed a healthy tourism industry based literary interests, and "King Richard" (whose sceptre consists of a recycled toilet plunger) continues to dole out Hay-on-Wye peerages and honours to anyone prepared to pay for them. The official website for Hay-on-Wye, however, admits that the declaration of independence, along with the later claim to have annexed the USA and renaming it the "US of Hay" were all merely publicity stunts.

Micronationalism has since evolved mainly into hobbies, and with younger participants. Although no all-compassing authority on micronations exists, nor any comprehensive listing, it is known that a number of widely diverse communities and sectors persist throughout the micronational world, often on the internet.

The internet provided micronationalism with a new outlet, and the number of entities able to be termed as micronations skyrocketed the beginning of the twenty-first century as a result. Exact figures may never be known, but it is thought that many thousands of micronations now exist throughout the world. However, with this new outlet of the internet came a large anomaly between micronationalists and micronations. Before the advent of micronationalism on the internet, micronations were few and far between, and were able to coax many hundreds of people in their citizenry. At present, most micronations are 'One-man micronations' or 'Egostans', with only one or two people being citizens of the micronation.

The majority are based in English-speaking countries, but a significant minority arose elsewhere in other countries as well.

In the present day, the following categories are generally accepted as being standard:

Micronations of the first type tend to be fairly serious in outlook, involve sometimes significant numbers of relatively mature participants, and often engage in highly sophisticated, structured activities that emulate the operations of real-world nations. A few examples of these include:

These micronations also tend to be fairly serious, and involve significant numbers of people interested in recreating the past, especially the Roman or Mediaeval past, and living it in a vicarious way. Examples of these include:

With literally thousands in existence, micronations of this type are by far the most common. They are ephemeral, and tend to be Internet-based, rarely surviving more than a few months, although there are notable exceptions. They generally involve a handful of people, and are concerned primarily with arrogating to their founders the outward symbols of statehood. The use of grand-sounding titles, awards, honours, and heraldic symbols derived from European feudal traditions, and the conduct of 'wars' with other micronations, are common manifestations of their activities. Examples include:

Micronations of this type include stand-alone artistic projects, deliberate exercises in creative online and offline fiction, artistic creations, and even popular films. Examples include:

These types of micronations are typically associated with a political or social reform agenda. Some are maintained as media and public relations exercises. Examples of this type include:

A number of micronations have been established for fraudulent purposes, by seeking to link questionable or illegal financial actions with seemingly legitimate nations. Some examples of these are:

A small number of micronations are founded with genuine aspirations to be sovereign states. Many are based on historical anomalies or eccentric interpretations of law, and tend to be easily confused with established states. These types of micronations are usually located in small (usually disputed) territorial enclaves, generate limited economic activity founded on tourism, philatelic and numismatic sales, and are at best tolerated or at worst ignored by other nations. This category includes:

New-country projects are attempts to found completely new nation-states. They typically involve plans to construct artificial islands (few of which are ever realised), and a large percentage have embraced or purported to embrace libertarian or democratic principles. Examples include:

Seasteading is a lifestyle of making the oceans, or at least water-borne craft, one's home. Most seasteads historically have been sailing craft, whether perhaps demonstrated by the Chinese Junk, modified canoes of Oceania, or even the famous Pirates of Libertaria. In modern times in the west the cruising sailboat has begun to be used in the same manner. The term seasteading is of uncertain origin, used at least as early as the turn of the century by Uffa Fox, and others; many feel that catamaran designer and historian James Wharram and his designs represent ideal seasteads. More recently, American sailor and ecological philosopher Jerome FitzGerald has been a leading and effective proponent of seasteading, mostly teaching the concept through the environmental/sailing organization "The Oar Club". The Seasteader's Institute in Hilo, Hawaii offers classes, boat-building opportunities, education in forage foods, diving, and other aspects of a Seasteading lifestyle.

Some theoretical seasteads are floating platforms which could be used to create sovereign micronations, or otherwise serve the ends of ocean colonization. The concept is introduced in a paper by Wayne Gramlich, and later in a book by Gramlich, Patri Friedman and Andy House, which is available for free online. Their research aims at a more practical approach to developing micronations, based on currently available technology and a pragmatic approach to financial aspects.

The authors argue that seasteading has the potential to drastically lower the barrier to entry to the governing industry. This allows for more experimentation and innovation with varying social, political, and economic systems. Potential business opportunities include data havens, offshore aquaculture, and casinos, as well as the gamut of typical business endeavors.

There has been a small but growing amount of attention paid to the micronation phenomenon in recent years. Most interest in academic circles has been concerned with studying the apparently anomalous legal situations affecting such entities as Sealand and the Hutt River Province, in exploring how some micronations represent grassroots political ideas, and in the creation of role-playing entities for instructional purposes.

In 2000, Professor Fabrice O'Driscoll, of the Aix-Marseille University, published a book about micronations: Ils ne sigent pas l'ONU ("They are not in the United Nations"), with more than 300 pages dedicated to the subject.

Several recent publications have dealt with the subject of particular historic micronations, including Republic of Indian Stream (University Press), by Dartmouth College geographer Daniel Doan, The Land that Never Was, about Gregor MacGregor, and the Principality of Poyais, by David Sinclair (ISBN 0-7553-1080-2).

In May 2000, an article in the New York Times entitled "Utopian Rulers, and Spoofs, Stake Out Territory Online" brought the phenomenon to a wider audience for the first time. Similar articles were published by newspapers such as the French Liberation, the Italian La Repubblica, the Greek "Ta Nea", by O Estado de So Paulo in Brazil, and Portugal's Viso at around the same time.

The Democratic Empire of Sunda, which claims to be the Government of the Kingdom of Sunda (an ancient kingdom, in present-day Indonesia) in exile in Switzerland, made media headlines when two so-called princesses, Lamia Roro Wiranatadikusumah Siliwangi Al Misri, 21, and Fathia Reza Wiranatadikusumah Siliwangi Al Misiri, 23, were detained by Malaysian authorities at the border with Brunei, on 13 July 2007, and are charged for entering the country without a valid pass.

In August 2003 a Summit of Micronations took place in Helsinki at Finlandia Hall, the site of the Conference for Security and Co-operation in Europe (CSCE). The summit was attended by delegations such as the Principality of Sealand, Neue Slowenische Kunst|NSK, Ladonia, the Transnational Republic, and by scholars from various academic institutions.

From 7 November through 17 December 2004, the Reg Vardy Gallery at the University of Sunderland hosted an exhibition on the subject of micronational group identity and symbolism. The exhibition focused on numismatic, philatelic and vexillological artefacts, as well as other symbols and instruments created and used by a number of micronations from the 1950s through to the present day. A summit of micronations conducted as part of this exhibition was attended by representatives of Sealand, Elgaland-Vargaland, New Utopia, Atlantium, Frestonia and Fusa. The exhibition was reprised at the Andrew Kreps Gallery in New York City from 24 June29 July of the following year. Another exhibition about micronations opened at Paris' Palais de Tokyo in early 2007.

The Sunderland summit was later featured in a 5-part BBC light entertainment television series called "How to Start Your Own Country" presented by Danny Wallace. The series told the story of Wallace's experience of founding a micronation, Lovely, located in his London flat. It screened in the UK in August 2005. Similar programs have also aired on television networks in other parts of Europe.

On 9 September 2006, The Guardian newspaper reported that the travel guide company Lonely Planet had published the world's first travel guide devoted to micronations, the Lonely Planet Guide to Home-Made Nations (ISBN 1741047307).

Here is the original post:

Micronation | East Asian Micronations Wiki | FANDOM ...

List of micronations – MicroWiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

The list is intended to include entities that claim independence but are not recognized by any major world government, and inclusion (or exclusion) should not be seen as an endorsement of any specific claim to statehood in legal terms.

Entities that are currently inactive or defunct are in italics.

Republic of

Free City of Remus (De Facto)

Mick Enok

Repblica de las Islas y Peones Mediterrneos de Ultramar

aka the Jarian Republic

Frederik Nauem

, Antarctica

Council

President Smith

P.M. Buchanan

(In Facebook)

& Europe

Prince Alban I,

Prince Harland I,

Prince Inigo I

President Jetsoni W.

I

View original post here:

List of micronations - MicroWiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

Possible Locations for the New The Pirate Bay HQ …

The Pirate Bay has made its intentions of purchasing a country quite clear. Apparently, negotiations with Sealand are still under way. But they aren't just looking at Sealand, but a number of other 'micronations' as well.

Youve heard of Sealand, and maybe even Ladonia, but what about Isla Montuosa, Ile de Caille, Geraldo-Pedro & Ronde Island? Those are all candidates for the next Pirate Island. Check out descriptions of a few potential pirate havens below.

SealandThe one country most likely to be bought by The Pirate Bay is Sealand. The micronation is currently owned by the Bates family, who claimed the 5920 sq. ft. platform as their own in 1967. The so-called country is located only 10 kilometres off the coast of Suffolk, England, accessible only by boat and helicopter.

LadoniaThe country second in line is Ladonia, another micronation. Located southwest of Sweden, Ladonia seems to be the most convenient option for the TPB guys, as their current HQ is in Sweden. Ladonia is basically a tiny patch of land on which a few sculptures stand. The story behind it is a long and confusing one. In 1996, Lars Vilks, the artist who owns Ladonia proclaimed it a sovereign nation after a long-drawn court battle to safeguard his supposedly illegally built sculptures.

Isla MontuosaAccording to the BuySealand wiki, Isla Montuosa is a remote island located near Panama in Central America. It is another possible location for The Pirate Bays server farm, and also the largest of the top three. Isla Montuosa spans a whooping 227 acres. Unfortunately, most of the island is covered in trees, and it would be a shame if TPB would have to indulge in mass-deforestation. Also, it seems the island has no infrastructure at all at this point. That would make setting up an server farm extremely difficult. Theyd need electricity and water first!

Other possible countries or islands The Pirate Bay might buy include Chris Pinnacle Island in the Philippines, Ernst-Thlmann Island in Germany, Ronde Island in the Caribbean, the Geraldo and Pedro Islands in Brazil, Great Hans Lollik & Little Hans Lollik, part of the US Virgin Islands and Ile de Caille in Grenada.

What do you think? Which of the various micronations and islands is most suitable for The Pirate Bay to buy? In my opinion, Sealand seems perfect since it already has high-speed Internet access. And what better place for a bunch of pirates than on the high seas?

Excerpt from:

Possible Locations for the New The Pirate Bay HQ ...

Possible Locations for the New The Pirate Bay HQ …

The Pirate Bay has made its intentions of purchasing a country quite clear. Apparently, negotiations with Sealand are still under way. But they aren't just looking at Sealand, but a number of other 'micronations' as well.

Youve heard of Sealand, and maybe even Ladonia, but what about Isla Montuosa, Ile de Caille, Geraldo-Pedro & Ronde Island? Those are all candidates for the next Pirate Island. Check out descriptions of a few potential pirate havens below.

SealandThe one country most likely to be bought by The Pirate Bay is Sealand. The micronation is currently owned by the Bates family, who claimed the 5920 sq. ft. platform as their own in 1967. The so-called country is located only 10 kilometres off the coast of Suffolk, England, accessible only by boat and helicopter.

LadoniaThe country second in line is Ladonia, another micronation. Located southwest of Sweden, Ladonia seems to be the most convenient option for the TPB guys, as their current HQ is in Sweden. Ladonia is basically a tiny patch of land on which a few sculptures stand. The story behind it is a long and confusing one. In 1996, Lars Vilks, the artist who owns Ladonia proclaimed it a sovereign nation after a long-drawn court battle to safeguard his supposedly illegally built sculptures.

Isla MontuosaAccording to the BuySealand wiki, Isla Montuosa is a remote island located near Panama in Central America. It is another possible location for The Pirate Bays server farm, and also the largest of the top three. Isla Montuosa spans a whooping 227 acres. Unfortunately, most of the island is covered in trees, and it would be a shame if TPB would have to indulge in mass-deforestation. Also, it seems the island has no infrastructure at all at this point. That would make setting up an server farm extremely difficult. Theyd need electricity and water first!

Other possible countries or islands The Pirate Bay might buy include Chris Pinnacle Island in the Philippines, Ernst-Thlmann Island in Germany, Ronde Island in the Caribbean, the Geraldo and Pedro Islands in Brazil, Great Hans Lollik & Little Hans Lollik, part of the US Virgin Islands and Ile de Caille in Grenada.

What do you think? Which of the various micronations and islands is most suitable for The Pirate Bay to buy? In my opinion, Sealand seems perfect since it already has high-speed Internet access. And what better place for a bunch of pirates than on the high seas?

Excerpt from:

Possible Locations for the New The Pirate Bay HQ ...

List of micronations – MicroWiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

The list is intended to include entities that claim independence but are not recognized by any major world government, and inclusion (or exclusion) should not be seen as an endorsement of any specific claim to statehood in legal terms.

Entities that are currently inactive or defunct are in italics.

Free City of Remus (De Facto)

Mick Enok

Repblica de las Islas y Peones Mediterrneos de Ultramar

aka the Jarian Republic

Frederik Nauem

, Antarctica

Council

President Smith

P.M. Buchanan

(In Facebook)

& Europe

Prince Alban I,

Prince Harland I,

Prince Inigo I

President Jetsoni W.

I

Go here to see the original:

List of micronations - MicroWiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

List of micronations – MicroWiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

The list is intended to include entities that claim independence but are not recognized by any major world government, and inclusion (or exclusion) should not be seen as an endorsement of any specific claim to statehood in legal terms.

Entities that are currently inactive or defunct are in italics.

Republic of

N/A

Free City of Remus (De Facto)

Repblica de las Islas y Peones Mediterrneos de Ultramar

aka the Jarian Republic

, Antarctica

(In Facebook)

& Europe

(U.S.A)

See the rest here:

List of micronations - MicroWiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

MicroWiki

Introduction; MicroWiki is the largest online encyclopdia about micronations, small and often rather eccentric nations that are unrecognised by the wider international community.The wiki is being continually improved and updated by hundreds of editors, with content being moderated by a small group of staff.Since its creation on 27 May 2005, the site has grown to become one of the largest ...

More here:

MicroWiki

List of micronations – MicroWiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

The list is intended to include entities that claim independence but are not recognized by any major world government, and inclusion (or exclusion) should not be seen as an endorsement of any specific claim to statehood in legal terms.

Entities that are currently inactive or defunct are in italics.

Republic of

N/A

Free City of Remus (De Facto)

Mick Enok

Repblica de las Islas y Peones Mediterrneos de Ultramar

aka the Jarian Republic

Frederik Nauem

, Antarctica

Council

President Smith

P.M. Buchanan

(In Facebook)

& Europe

Prince Alban I,

Prince Harland I,

Prince Inigo I

President Jetsoni W.

I

The rest is here:

List of micronations - MicroWiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

Micronation – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Micronations are countries started by one or a group of people which is not noticed by the United Nations. These countries are mostly used in people's heads, or on the internet.

People make micronations for lots of reasons. Some are to show they do not like their main country (for example the UK), or if they want to make money, or to use it as a place for themselves.

Here is a list of some Micronations;

Republic of Dolmatovka (2014).

Some micronations play in competitions.

The biggest football organisation for micronations is known as the MFA (Micronational Football Association), founded by Joe Foxon in 2009. It has 13 micronations from 7 countries as members. It makes a competition every 4 years called the MFA World Cup for all the micronations in the world to play in. The first World Cup will be in Southern England in 2013.

Every year there is a chess competition for micronations to play in. It is played on the computer and in the first year, 3 micronations took part.

Every year there is a singing competition called the MicroVision Song Contest. Micronations make a song and put it on the internet, and then other micronations vote for the best song. The winner then makes the next one.

Wikipedia of Micronations

View post:

Micronation - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

List of micronations | MicroWiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

The list is intended to include entities that claim independence but are not recognized by any major world government, and inclusion (or exclusion) should not be seen as an endorsement of any specific claim to statehood in legal terms.

Entities that are currently inactive or defunct are in italics.

Free City of Remus (De Facto)

Mick Enok

Repblica de las Islas y Peones Mediterrneos de Ultramar

aka the Jarian Republic

Frederik Nauem

, Antarctica

Council

President Smith

P.M. Buchanan

& Europe

Prince Alban I,

Prince Harland I,

Prince Inigo I

President Jetsoni W.

I

Originally posted here:

List of micronations | MicroWiki | FANDOM powered by Wikia

MicroWiki

Introduction; MicroWiki is the largest online encyclopdia about micronations, small and often rather eccentric nations that are unrecognised by the wider international community.The wiki is being continually improved and updated by hundreds of editors, with content being moderated by a small group of staff.Since its creation on 27 May 2005, the site has grown to become one of the largest ...

See the original post here:

MicroWiki

Inside the world’s strangest micronations – telegraph.co.uk

The world's newest micronation has half a million prospective citizens, runs on crytocurrency donations, and lays claim to a disputed four-mile sandbank on the Danube.

Liberland, founded by Czech economist turned politicianVt Jedlika in 2015, has low-tax, libertarian ideals (its motto is "live and let live") and is a very much a micronation for the 21st century. All business is conducted by email, 100 key representatives in various countries communicate via Skype, it acceptsBitcoin, Bitcoin Cash andEthereum and is about to start distributing its own digital currency.

But efforts to establish itself territorially have not gone down well with local authorities. The strip of land in question, on the border between Croatia and Serbia, is disputed by the two nations. A legal loophole stops Croatia from claiming the area, but that hasn't prevented Croatian officials from arrestingJedlika when he tries to set up a camp.

"The situation on the mainland in Liberland is still difficult as Croatian police illegally persecute all visitors and settlers," he says. "We are waiting for exoneration from the Croatian constitutional court but for now, our settlement has essentially moved to the river, where we host visitors almost on a daily basis."

Many of those visitors are British,he claims, while support for the project has also been offered by the likes ofRoger Ver, an early investor in Bitcoin, andPatrik Schumacher, the chief executive of Zaha Hadid Architects, who has submitted potential designs for Liberland's future cityscape.

Jedlikaadds: "We are constantly looking into options that would entail more Liberlands being created. Right now there are potential candidates in Africa and Central America," he says. "Liberland can be created anywhere, but it all depends on the locals."

Liberland is by no means the first micronation. There have been countless attempts to establish independent states, for a variety of noble and misguided reasons. Here are 10 of the most notable examples.

The self-proclaimed "prince" of this micronation in Western Australia abdicated in 2017 due to poor health, after an impressive 47 years in power. Prince Leonard (real name Leonard George Casley) presided over the Principality of Hutt River for almost half a century after announcing its secession in 1970 in protest at the government's agricultural policy. But the 91-year-old has now handed his position and ceremonial robes over to his son, Graeme.

Located 350 miles north of Perth, the Principality of Hutt River has become a popular tourist attraction, attracting up to 40,000 visitors each year. It is big around 75 square kilometres but has only 30 permanent residents (and a further 13,000+ overseas citizens). It issues its own commemorative coins, and even accepts company registrations (although the Australian Taxation Office has raised doubt as to their legality).

While no nations recognise Hutt River's sovereignty,Prince Leonard and The Queen have exchanged correspondence. In 2016, he wrote to congratulate her on her 90th birthday, after which her senior correspondence officer replied: "I am able to convey Her Majesty's good wishes to you and to all concerned for a most enjoyable and successful celebration... to mark the forty-sixth anniversary of the Principality of Hutt River."

Located between the islands of Nevis and Montserrat, the tiny island of Redonda was - according to legend - claimed by Matthew Dowdy Shiell in 1865, who, with the alleged approval of the British Colonial Office, took with it the title of "King". The title was then given to his son, the author Matthew Phipps Shiell, who claims he was crowned in 1880, at the age of 15, by a bishop from Antigua. There are currently at least four claimants to the throne, while in 2007 the Wellington Arms in Southampton tried to get around the smoking ban by declaring itself an embassy of Redonda.

This Second World War sea fort, seven miles off the Suffolk coast, was seized by pirate radio broadcaster Paddy Roy Bates in 1967. Bates sought to establish the platform as a sovereign state, and in 1968 a British court bolstered his claims by declaring it outside of British jurisdiction (Bates had been summoned by the law after firing warning shots at two workers who were attempting to service a navigational buoy nearby).

The 0.025 km fort has its own constitution, flag, national anthem, coat of arms, currency (the Sealand dollar) and passport, and even survived an audacious attempted German invasion in 1978.Alexander Achenbach hired German and Dutch mercenaries to lead the attack, using speedboats and helicopters, while Bates and his wife were in England. They stormed the offshore platform, taking the couple's son, Michael, hostage. But Michael was able to retake the micronation using stashed weapons andAchenbach spent several weeks under lock and key. A German diplomat eventually secured his release; Achenbach would go on to set up agovernment in exile in Germany.

Bates died in 2012 and was succeeded as Prince of Sealand by Michael, who now lives in Suffolk.

In 1982, in an effort to curb drug smuggling, the US Border Patrol set up an inspection point on the road between the Florida Keys and the mainland, resulting in long traffic jams and a drop in visitors. The mayor of Key West, Dennis Wardlow, concluding that the roadblock was effectively a border station, did the only reasonable thing: he declared full-blown independence. Continuing his protest, Wardlow declared war on the US, surrendered a minute later, and then applied for $1bn in foreign aid. The stunt helped shed light on the city's plight and the inspection point was shifted, but the name of the Conch Republic continues to be used for promotional purposes.

Conceived by Kevin Baugh in 1977, as part of a school project, and established in 1999, Molossia consists solely of Baugh's one-acre home in Nevada. Baugh (the president, naturally) describes it as a "dictatorial banana-republic" where martial law is in place "due to unrest and the ever-present foreign menace from over the border".

Molossia, while itself unrecognised, has numerous treaties with other micronations, and claims it was one of the first countries to recognise Kosovo. It also claims to be at war with East Germany. That East Germany no longer exists doesn't faze Baugh. He points out that Ernst Thlmann Island, off the coast of Cuba and named after a Weimar Germanpolitician and symbolically handed to East Germany is 1972, was never mentioned in the 1990Treaty on the Final Settlement.

All of Baugh's efforts haven't gone unrewarded his home attracts a modest number of tourists, with visits arranged on request.

Rather more inclusive than Kevin Baugh's one-home republic is the micronation found in the bohemian Uupis district of Vilnius, Lithuania. It was declared in 1997 and has its own constitution with articles including "A dog has the right to be a dog" and "People have the right to live by the River Vilnel, while the River Vilnel has the right to flow past people," as well as "Man has the right to individuality". It also has four flags (one for each season), a small "army", and national anthem. Its projects are largely artistic and humorous.

A Telegraph Travel reader, Joanna Griffin, visited in 2016. She wrote: "It is evening and the sand-coloured stone and tumbling geraniums of this Bohemian enclave are set ablaze by the late northern sun of a Baltic midsummer. From my vantage point beneath a yellow canopy, behind a tall glass of Svyturys beer, I watch locals and visitors alike, strolling in the evening warmth and pausing to read the constitution, mounted in 26 languages along a stone wall. Their elaborate scripts from Belarusian to Yiddish are etched into mirrored plaques which reflect the crumbling ochre and terracotta of the tall houses opposite.

"As if in defiance of its oppressive history, the neighbourhood is alive with chatter and good-natured debate. The small courtyard steadily fills and people stand and wait for seats to become free. Waiters rush to erect small tables against the green wooden shutters of the adjoining grocery store and customers jostle their tables and chairs to make room.

"I listen to a group of Canadians discuss recent events in international politics, and I catch the dancing cadence of Italian as it drifts across from a nearby table. The constitution might be tongue-in-cheek but the underlying sentiment of tolerance and inclusion is serious, reflected this evening in this small caf.As dusk falls, candles are lit and strings of tiny lights are illuminated. In the half-light, a fat dun-coloured cat slinks among the tables, searching for scraps and shunning any attempts at affection, fully enjoying his constitutional lack of obligation to love his owner. As for me, I sit back and bask in my own clearly documented rights to idleness and anonymity."

One of the larger examples on our list, Freetown Christiania established in 1971 is a neighbourhood of around 850 people within the Copenhagen district of Christianshavn. It is also among the most successful, and Danish authorities have granted it a unique legal status.

Its residents like that of Uupis are bohemian. Performing arts, yoga and meditation are all popular activities, cannabis is openly traded, and visitors (it is a popular detour for tourists) will spot eye-catching murals and unusual architecture.

Founded by Niels Vermeersch, a Belgian, in 2008, Flandrensis claims five Antarctic islands (Siple Island, Cherry Island, Maher Island, Pranke Island and Carney Island) based on its own interpretation of the Antarctic Treaty of 1959. It has its own ID cards, currency, newspaper, constitution and national anthem, and boasts more than 100 citizens from 21 countries.

While it began life as a hobby of its creator, it has since aimed to raise awareness of environmental issues.

This defunct micronation was founded in 1948 by Russell Arundel, an American businessman and PepsiCo lobbyist, on Outer Bald Tusket Island, the southernmost of Nova Scotia's Tusket Islands. Arundel spotted the island while fishing and bought it for $750. Legend has it that he and his friends conceived the idea of declaring independence during a particularly heavy rum-drinking session. The tongue-in-cheek state was largely nautical themed its currency was called the Tunar, for example, while anyone who caught a bluefin tuna there acquired the title of prince. Arundel sold it to the Nova Scotia Bird Society in 1973.

Created by Danny Wallace for the BBC documentary How to Start Your Own Country, The Kingdom of Lovely was headquartered in his East London flat, had its own flag, coat of arms, and motto ("Die dulci freure" Have a nice day). Thanks to the internet, it managed to attract more than 50,000 "citizens".

See more here:

Inside the world's strangest micronations - telegraph.co.uk

Micronations and Brexit : northernireland – reddit.com

Fucking stupid idea but sure let's see if we can knock it about for fun.

What if in the event of a soft Brexit, communities along the border were to declare themselves micronations and "secede" from both the UK and Ireland. Keep paying tax but call it foreign aid, accept both sterling and Euro and probably some other subversive shit but I'm a couple of beers deep so I dunno but something better than this

Follow this link:

Micronations and Brexit : northernireland - reddit.com

Stattement by the Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs | Talossa

Flip Molinar Talossan since 1-1-2008

Proud Talossan

Posts: 1,562

First of all, let me say what an honor it is to be given this appointment by the Seneschal and the Government of Talossa. I could not be more humbled or proud. Secondly, let me say what a great feeling it is to be back to active involvement in the daily affairs of the nation. I have had a long absence after the death of my mother in 2016 from cancer and subsequent political involvement in the United States fighting for the rights of disabled people and also for the sick and the families of those who care for them. I want to thank everyone for their support over these last two and a half years as I have talked to multiple Talossans sporadically mostly as I came around to vote in the previous few general elections. All of you guys have always been like a second family to me and I appreciate it so much. I'm glad to say that I'm finally at a place in my life where I feel comfortable returning to daily activity here and contributing to the nation in as positive a way as I can.

As the acting Minister of Foreign Affairs, I wish to announce that it will be the policy of the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to explore foreign relations with both nations recognized by the United Nations as well as micronations which have similar interests and goals to those of the Kingdom. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs will be a force for good in the world by promoting peace, understanding, and cooperation among nations throughout the world. The Ministry of Foreign Affairs will not seek any type of recognition by any foreign government including the United States. We will instead seek expressions of friendship between ourselves and other micronations as well as nations recognized by the United Nations. In taking this measured approach, the Government of Talossa will not be in violation of any treaty or policy of any foreign government or any International Organization. We will instead promote ourselves to the world as a nation where everyone is welcome regardless of any defining characteristics other than the content of their character and the goodness of their hearts.

I believe that it is our role to be the greatest nation in the world not because of what we say, but because of what we do. Though we are small in geography, we will continue to be mighty in our compassion and empathy for those in need around the world today. We will speak out loudly against oppression, bigotry, hatred, violence, and injustice anywhere in the world. We will be a nation that continues to have the courage of our convictions and its ability to work effectively with our partners on the world stage. It is time for us to forge ahead with the building of these partnerships in the hopes that we may leave the world a better place than when found it. I asked for the support of the nation as we began to undertake this process of becoming more visible in the community of nations both macro and micro in scale.

I welcome any questions or comments you may have.

Merci,Flip MolinarActing Minister of Foreign Affairs.

See the rest here:

Stattement by the Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs | Talossa

Micronations: The Lonely Planet Guide to Home-Made Nations …

Who We AreAt Lonely Planet, we see our job as inspiring and enabling travellers to connect with the world for their own benefit and for the benefit of the world at large.

What We Do* We offer travellers the world's richest travel advice, informed by the collective wisdom of over 350 Lonely Planet authors living in 37 countries and fluent in 70 languages.* We are relentless in finding the special, the unique and the different for travellers wherever they are.* When we update our guidebooks, we check every listing, in person, every time. * We always offer the trusted filter for those who are curious, open minded and independent.* We challenge our growing community of travellers; leading debate and discussion about travel and the world.* We tell it like it is without fear or favor in service of the travellers; not clouded by any other motive.

What We BelieveWe believe that travel leads to a deeper cultural understanding and compassion and therefore a better world.

Read more from the original source:

Micronations: The Lonely Planet Guide to Home-Made Nations ...

Micronations: The Lonely Planet Guide to Home-Made Nations …

Who We AreAt Lonely Planet, we see our job as inspiring and enabling travellers to connect with the world for their own benefit and for the benefit of the world at large.

What We Do* We offer travellers the world's richest travel advice, informed by the collective wisdom of over 350 Lonely Planet authors living in 37 countries and fluent in 70 languages.* We are relentless in finding the special, the unique and the different for travellers wherever they are.* When we update our guidebooks, we check every listing, in person, every time. * We always offer the trusted filter for those who are curious, open minded and independent.* We challenge our growing community of travellers; leading debate and discussion about travel and the world.* We tell it like it is without fear or favor in service of the travellers; not clouded by any other motive.

What We BelieveWe believe that travel leads to a deeper cultural understanding and compassion and therefore a better world.

The rest is here:

Micronations: The Lonely Planet Guide to Home-Made Nations ...

Micronations: The Lonely Planet Guide to Home-Made Nations …

Who We AreAt Lonely Planet, we see our job as inspiring and enabling travellers to connect with the world for their own benefit and for the benefit of the world at large.

What We Do* We offer travellers the world's richest travel advice, informed by the collective wisdom of over 350 Lonely Planet authors living in 37 countries and fluent in 70 languages.* We are relentless in finding the special, the unique and the different for travellers wherever they are.* When we update our guidebooks, we check every listing, in person, every time. * We always offer the trusted filter for those who are curious, open minded and independent.* We challenge our growing community of travellers; leading debate and discussion about travel and the world.* We tell it like it is without fear or favor in service of the travellers; not clouded by any other motive.

What We BelieveWe believe that travel leads to a deeper cultural understanding and compassion and therefore a better world.

See the original post here:

Micronations: The Lonely Planet Guide to Home-Made Nations ...