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FreedomWorks | Lower Taxes, Less Government, More Freedom

Yesterday, twelve Senators from the radical left, including Senators Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), wrote a letter to Federal Communications Commission (FCC) Chairman Ajit Pai demanding he open an investigation into a news company based entirely on the content aired and viewpoints of that company. What is immediately obvious to just about everyone besides these twelve Senators, including Chairman Pai, is that such action would constitute an egregious violation of the First Amendment. Today, Chairman Pai sent a letter back to the Senators making clear just as much.

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FreedomWorks | Lower Taxes, Less Government, More Freedom

| Freedom to Marry

Winning in Court

Many people presume that judges issue rulings in court based simply on the facts at hand, without public opinion playing any role at all. However, history tells us that how judges

For many years into our campaign, pundits (and even some movement colleagues) declared that a state legislature would never vote in favor of the freedom to marry the politics

Through hard work and many ups and downs, we learned how to win marriage in the courts, in the legislatures, in the heartland as well as the coasts, and with Republicans as well as

Freedom to Marrys goal was to win marriage for same-sex couples nationwide, no more and no less. Freedom to Marry was created as the eyes-on-the-prize campaign to drive the

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| Freedom to Marry

| Freedom to Marry

Winning in Court

Many people presume that judges issue rulings in court based simply on the facts at hand, without public opinion playing any role at all. However, history tells us that how judges

For many years into our campaign, pundits (and even some movement colleagues) declared that a state legislature would never vote in favor of the freedom to marry the politics

Through hard work and many ups and downs, we learned how to win marriage in the courts, in the legislatures, in the heartland as well as the coasts, and with Republicans as well as

Freedom to Marrys goal was to win marriage for same-sex couples nationwide, no more and no less. Freedom to Marry was created as the eyes-on-the-prize campaign to drive the

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| Freedom to Marry

FreedomWorks | Lower Taxes, Less Government, More Freedom

FreedomWorks Foundation continues to support the leadership of Administrator Scott Pruitt at the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). During Pruitts tenure, EPA has led the way in terms of administration-wide regulatory reform efforts, accounting for roughly a third of total Trump administration deregulatory actions, implementing critical checks on agency rulemaking processes, and relieving Americans of more than $1 billion in regulatory costs.

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FreedomWorks | Lower Taxes, Less Government, More Freedom

Freedom | Define Freedom at Dictionary.com

1. Freedom, independence, liberty refer to an absence of undue restrictions and an opportunity to exercise one’s rights and powers. Freedom emphasizes the opportunity given for the exercise of one’s rights, powers, desires, or the like: freedom of speech or conscience; freedom of movement. Independence implies not only lack of restrictions but also the ability to stand alone, unsustained by anything else: Independence of thought promotes invention and discovery. Liberty, though most often interchanged with freedom, is also used to imply undue exercise of freedom: He took liberties with the text. 9. openness, ingenuousness. 12. license. 16. run.

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Freedom | Define Freedom at Dictionary.com

Freedom – Wikipedia

This article serves as an overview of the topic. For more specific articles and other uses, see Freedom (disambiguation).

Freedom, generally, is having an ability to act or change without constraint. A thing is “free” if it can change its state easily and is not constrained in its present state. In philosophy and religion, it is associated with having free will and being without undue or unjust constraints, or enslavement, and is an idea closely related to the concept of liberty. A person has the freedom to do things that will not, in theory or in practice, be prevented by other forces. Outside of the human realm, freedom generally does not have this political or psychological dimension. A rusty lock might be oiled so that the key has freedom to turn, undergrowth may be hacked away to give a newly planted sapling freedom to grow, or a mathematician may study an equation having many degrees of freedom. In mechanical engineering, “freedom” describes the number of independent motions that are allowed to a body or system, which is generally referred to as degrees of freedom.”

In philosophical discourse, freedom is discussed in the context of free will and self-determination, balanced by moral responsibility.

Advocates of free will regard freedom of thought as innate to the human mind, while opponents regard the mind as thinking only the thoughts that a purely deterministic brain happens to be engaged in at the time.

In political discourse, political freedom is often associated with liberty and autonomy in the sense of “giving oneself one’s own laws”, and with having rights and the civil liberties with which to exercise them without undue interference by the state. Frequently discussed kinds of political freedom include freedom of assembly, freedom of association, freedom of choice, and freedom of speech.

In some circumstances, particularly when discussion is limited to political freedoms, the terms “freedom” and “liberty” tend to be used interchangeably.[1][2] Elsewhere, however, subtle distinctions between freedom and liberty have been noted.[3] JohnStuartMill, differentiated liberty from freedom in that freedom is primarily, if not exclusively, the ability to do as one wills and what one has the power to do; whereas liberty concerns the absence of arbitrary restraints and takes into account the rights of all involved. As such, the exercise of liberty is subject to capability and limited by the rights of others.[4]

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun explains the differences in terms of their relation to institutions:

Liberty is linked to human subjectivity; freedom is not. The Declaration of Independence, for example, describes men as having liberty and the nation as being free. Free willthe quality of being free from the control of fate or necessitymay first have been attributed to human will, but Newtonian physics attributes freedomdegrees of freedom, free bodiesto objects.[5]

Freedom differs from liberty as control differs from discipline. Liberty, like discipline, is linked to institutions and political parties, whether liberal or libertarian; freedom is not. Although freedom can work for or against institutions, it is not bound to themit travels through unofficial networks. To have liberty is to be liberated from something; to be free is to be self-determining, autonomous. Freedom can or cannot exist within a state of liberty: one can be liberated yet unfree, or free yet enslaved (Orlando Patterson has argued in Freedom: Freedom in the Making of Western Culture that freedom arose from the yearnings of slaves).[5]

Another distinction that some political theorists have deemed important is that people may aspire to have freedom from limiting forces (such as freedom from fear, freedom from want, and freedom from discrimination), but descriptions of freedom and liberty generally do not invoke having liberty from anything.[2] To the contrary, the concept of negative liberty refers to the liberty one person may have to restrict the rights of others.[2]

Other important fields in which freedom is an issue include economic freedom, academic freedom, intellectual freedom, and scientific freedom.

In purely physical terms, freedom is used much more broadly to describe the limits to which physical movement or other physical processes are possible. This relates to the philosophical concept to the extent that people may be considered to have as much freedom as they are physically able to exercise. The number of independent variables or parameters for a system is described as its number of degrees of freedom. For example the movement of a vehicle along a road has two degrees of freedom; to go fast or slow, or to change direction by turning left or right. The movement of a ship sailing on the waves has four degrees of freedom, since it can also pitch nose-to-tail and roll side-to-side. An aeroplane can also climb and sideslip, giving it six degrees of freedom.

Degrees of freedom in mechanics describes the number of independent motions that are allowed to a body, or, in case of a mechanism made of several bodies, the number of possible independent relative motions between the pieces of the mechanism. In the study of complex motor control, there may be so many degrees of freedom that a given action can be achieved in different ways by combining movements with different degrees of freedom. This issue is sometimes called the degrees of freedom problem.

In mathematics freedom is the ability of a variable to change in value.

Some equations have many such variables. This notion is formalized as the dimension of a manifold or an algebraic variety. When degrees of freedom is used instead of dimension, this usually means that the manifold or variety that models the system is only implicitly defined. Such degrees of freedom appear in many mathematical and related disciplines, including degrees of freedom as used in physics and chemistry to explain dependence on parameters, or the dimensions of a phase space; and degrees of freedom in statistics, the number of values in the final calculation of a statistic that are free to vary.

Read the rest here:

Freedom – Wikipedia

Freedom – Wikipedia

This article serves as an overview of the topic. For more specific articles and other uses, see Freedom (disambiguation).

Freedom, generally, is having an ability to act or change without constraint. A thing is “free” if it can change its state easily and is not constrained in its present state. In philosophy and religion, it is associated with having free will and being without undue or unjust constraints, or enslavement, and is an idea closely related to the concept of liberty. A person has the freedom to do things that will not, in theory or in practice, be prevented by other forces. Outside of the human realm, freedom generally does not have this political or psychological dimension. A rusty lock might be oiled so that the key has freedom to turn, undergrowth may be hacked away to give a newly planted sapling freedom to grow, or a mathematician may study an equation having many degrees of freedom. In mechanical engineering, “freedom” describes the number of independent motions that are allowed to a body or system, which is generally referred to as degrees of freedom.”

In philosophical discourse, freedom is discussed in the context of free will and self-determination, balanced by moral responsibility.

Advocates of free will regard freedom of thought as innate to the human mind, while opponents regard the mind as thinking only the thoughts that a purely deterministic brain happens to be engaged in at the time.

In political discourse, political freedom is often associated with liberty and autonomy in the sense of “giving oneself one’s own laws”, and with having rights and the civil liberties with which to exercise them without undue interference by the state. Frequently discussed kinds of political freedom include freedom of assembly, freedom of association, freedom of choice, and freedom of speech.

In some circumstances, particularly when discussion is limited to political freedoms, the terms “freedom” and “liberty” tend to be used interchangeably.[1][2] Elsewhere, however, subtle distinctions between freedom and liberty have been noted.[3] JohnStuartMill, differentiated liberty from freedom in that freedom is primarily, if not exclusively, the ability to do as one wills and what one has the power to do; whereas liberty concerns the absence of arbitrary restraints and takes into account the rights of all involved. As such, the exercise of liberty is subject to capability and limited by the rights of others.[4]

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun explains the differences in terms of their relation to institutions:

Liberty is linked to human subjectivity; freedom is not. The Declaration of Independence, for example, describes men as having liberty and the nation as being free. Free willthe quality of being free from the control of fate or necessitymay first have been attributed to human will, but Newtonian physics attributes freedomdegrees of freedom, free bodiesto objects.[5]

Freedom differs from liberty as control differs from discipline. Liberty, like discipline, is linked to institutions and political parties, whether liberal or libertarian; freedom is not. Although freedom can work for or against institutions, it is not bound to themit travels through unofficial networks. To have liberty is to be liberated from something; to be free is to be self-determining, autonomous. Freedom can or cannot exist within a state of liberty: one can be liberated yet unfree, or free yet enslaved (Orlando Patterson has argued in Freedom: Freedom in the Making of Western Culture that freedom arose from the yearnings of slaves).[5]

Another distinction that some political theorists have deemed important is that people may aspire to have freedom from limiting forces (such as freedom from fear, freedom from want, and freedom from discrimination), but descriptions of freedom and liberty generally do not invoke having liberty from anything.[2] To the contrary, the concept of negative liberty refers to the liberty one person may have to restrict the rights of others.[2]

Other important fields in which freedom is an issue include economic freedom, academic freedom, intellectual freedom, and scientific freedom.

In purely physical terms, freedom is used much more broadly to describe the limits to which physical movement or other physical processes are possible. This relates to the philosophical concept to the extent that people may be considered to have as much freedom as they are physically able to exercise. The number of independent variables or parameters for a system is described as its number of degrees of freedom. For example the movement of a vehicle along a road has two degrees of freedom; to go fast or slow, or to change direction by turning left or right. The movement of a ship sailing on the waves has four degrees of freedom, since it can also pitch nose-to-tail and roll side-to-side. An aeroplane can also climb and sideslip, giving it six degrees of freedom.

Degrees of freedom in mechanics describes the number of independent motions that are allowed to a body, or, in case of a mechanism made of several bodies, the number of possible independent relative motions between the pieces of the mechanism. In the study of complex motor control, there may be so many degrees of freedom that a given action can be achieved in different ways by combining movements with different degrees of freedom. This issue is sometimes called the degrees of freedom problem.

In mathematics freedom is the ability of a variable to change in value.

Some equations have many such variables. This notion is formalized as the dimension of a manifold or an algebraic variety. When degrees of freedom is used instead of dimension, this usually means that the manifold or variety that models the system is only implicitly defined. Such degrees of freedom appear in many mathematical and related disciplines, including degrees of freedom as used in physics and chemistry to explain dependence on parameters, or the dimensions of a phase space; and degrees of freedom in statistics, the number of values in the final calculation of a statistic that are free to vary.

View original post here:

Freedom – Wikipedia

Freedom | Credit Cards | Chase.com

CHASE DOES NOT ENDORSE/GUARANTEE THE ACCURACY OF, AND DISCLAIMS ALL LIABILITY FOR, ALL SUBMISSIONS INCLUDING POSTS MADE BY EMPLOYEES/SUPPLIERS WHO ARE NOT AUTHORIZED ADMINISTRATORS OF THIS SITE. SUBMISSIONS ARE NOT EDITED BY CHASE NOR DO THEY NECESSARILY REPRESENT/REFLECT THE VIEWS/OPINIONS OF CHASE. PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS MENTIONED IN REVIEWS MAY CHANGE OVER TIME.

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Freedom | Credit Cards | Chase.com

Freedom Health – Tampa, FL – Inc.com

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Freedom Health administers Medicare and Medicaid benefits in numerous counties in Florida. A health insurance company owned and operated by physicians, Freedom Health focuses on providing cost-effective health insurance that both improves quality of care and reduces total out-of-pocket costs for its members.

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Freedom Health – Tampa, FL – Inc.com

Freedom | Credit Cards | Chase.com

CHASE DOES NOT ENDORSE/GUARANTEE THE ACCURACY OF, AND DISCLAIMS ALL LIABILITY FOR, ALL SUBMISSIONS INCLUDING POSTS MADE BY EMPLOYEES/SUPPLIERS WHO ARE NOT AUTHORIZED ADMINISTRATORS OF THIS SITE. SUBMISSIONS ARE NOT EDITED BY CHASE NOR DO THEY NECESSARILY REPRESENT/REFLECT THE VIEWS/OPINIONS OF CHASE. PRODUCTS AND BENEFITS MENTIONED IN REVIEWS MAY CHANGE OVER TIME.

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Freedom | Credit Cards | Chase.com

Freedom – Wikipedia

This article serves as an overview of the topic. For more specific articles and other uses, see Freedom (disambiguation).

Freedom, generally, is having an ability to act or change without constraint. A thing is “free” if it can change its state easily and is not constrained in its present state. In philosophy and religion, it is associated with having free will and being without undue or unjust constraints, or enslavement, and is an idea closely related to the concept of liberty. A person has the freedom to do things that will not, in theory or in practice, be prevented by other forces. Outside of the human realm, freedom generally does not have this political or psychological dimension. A rusty lock might be oiled so that the key has freedom to turn, undergrowth may be hacked away to give a newly planted sapling freedom to grow, or a mathematician may study an equation having many degrees of freedom. In mechanical engineering, “freedom” describes the number of independent motions that are allowed to a body or system, which is generally referred to as degrees of freedom.”

In philosophical discourse, freedom is discussed in the context of free will and self-determination, balanced by moral responsibility.

Advocates of free will regard freedom of thought as innate to the human mind, while opponents regard the mind as thinking only the thoughts that a purely deterministic brain happens to be engaged in at the time.

In political discourse, political freedom is often associated with liberty and autonomy in the sense of “giving oneself one’s own laws”, and with having rights and the civil liberties with which to exercise them without undue interference by the state. Frequently discussed kinds of political freedom include freedom of assembly, freedom of association, freedom of choice, and freedom of speech.

In some circumstances, particularly when discussion is limited to political freedoms, the terms “freedom” and “liberty” tend to be used interchangeably.[1][2] Elsewhere, however, subtle distinctions between freedom and liberty have been noted.[3] JohnStuartMill, differentiated liberty from freedom in that freedom is primarily, if not exclusively, the ability to do as one wills and what one has the power to do; whereas liberty concerns the absence of arbitrary restraints and takes into account the rights of all involved. As such, the exercise of liberty is subject to capability and limited by the rights of others.[4]

Wendy Hui Kyong Chun explains the differences in terms of their relation to institutions:

Liberty is linked to human subjectivity; freedom is not. The Declaration of Independence, for example, describes men as having liberty and the nation as being free. Free willthe quality of being free from the control of fate or necessitymay first have been attributed to human will, but Newtonian physics attributes freedomdegrees of freedom, free bodiesto objects.[5]

Freedom differs from liberty as control differs from discipline. Liberty, like discipline, is linked to institutions and political parties, whether liberal or libertarian; freedom is not. Although freedom can work for or against institutions, it is not bound to themit travels through unofficial networks. To have liberty is to be liberated from something; to be free is to be self-determining, autonomous. Freedom can or cannot exist within a state of liberty: one can be liberated yet unfree, or free yet enslaved (Orlando Patterson has argued in Freedom: Freedom in the Making of Western Culture that freedom arose from the yearnings of slaves).[5]

Another distinction that some political theorists have deemed important is that people may aspire to have freedom from limiting forces (such as freedom from fear, freedom from want, and freedom from discrimination), but descriptions of freedom and liberty generally do not invoke having liberty from anything.[2] To the contrary, the concept of negative liberty refers to the liberty one person may have to restrict the rights of others.[2]

Other important fields in which freedom is an issue include economic freedom, academic freedom, intellectual freedom, and scientific freedom.

In purely physical terms, freedom is used much more broadly to describe the limits to which physical movement or other physical processes are possible. This relates to the philosophical concept to the extent that people may be considered to have as much freedom as they are physically able to exercise. The number of independent variables or parameters for a system is described as its number of degrees of freedom. For example the movement of a vehicle along a road has two degrees of freedom; to go fast or slow, or to change direction by turning left or right. The movement of a ship sailing on the waves has four degrees of freedom, since it can also pitch nose-to-tail and roll side-to-side. An aeroplane can also climb and sideslip, giving it six degrees of freedom.

Degrees of freedom in mechanics describes the number of independent motions that are allowed to a body, or, in case of a mechanism made of several bodies, the number of possible independent relative motions between the pieces of the mechanism. In the study of complex motor control, there may be so many degrees of freedom that a given action can be achieved in different ways by combining movements with different degrees of freedom. This issue is sometimes called the degrees of freedom problem.

In mathematics freedom is the ability of a variable to change in value.

Some equations have many such variables. This notion is formalized as the dimension of a manifold or an algebraic variety. When degrees of freedom is used instead of dimension, this usually means that the manifold or variety that models the system is only implicitly defined. Such degrees of freedom appear in many mathematical and related disciplines, including degrees of freedom as used in physics and chemistry to explain dependence on parameters, or the dimensions of a phase space; and degrees of freedom in statistics, the number of values in the final calculation of a statistic that are free to vary.

See the rest here:

Freedom – Wikipedia

Freedom Synonyms, Freedom Antonyms | Thesaurus.com

The spirit and the gifts of freedom ill assort with the condition of a slave.

It seems to me that life is no life, but living death, without that freedom!

The cause of freedom owes her much; the country owes her much.

Under the eternal urge of freedom we became an independent Nation.

Because we are free we can never be indifferent to the fate of freedom elsewhere.

They add up to only a tiny fraction of the price that has been paid for our freedom.

It is not profane if I now say, ‘with a great price obtained I this freedom.’

There are those in the world who scorn our vision of human dignity and freedom.

Freedom is one of the deepest and noblest aspirations of the human spirit.

We believe that all men have the right to freedom of thought and expression.

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Freedom Synonyms, Freedom Antonyms | Thesaurus.com

Chase Freedom: Cash Back Credit Card | Chase.com

Siempre acumula un 1% de reembolso en efectivo ILIMITADO en todas las dems compras5

1 Para obtener ms informacin, consulte Chase Freedom opens new windowPreguntas Frecuentes.

2 Incluye las transacciones realizadas usando su tarjeta Chase Freedom con PayPal para compras o envo de dinero. Solo las transacciones elegibles califican para un total del 5% de recompensas de reembolso en efectivo. Las compras realizadas usando PayPal en otras categoras trimestrales actuales del 5% recibirn un total del 5% de recompensas de reembolso en efectivo hasta un mximo de $1,500 en compras combinadas. Cuando enva dinero a amigos y familia a travs de PayPal utilizando su tarjeta Chase Freedom, se aplican los cargos estndar de transaccin. Consulte opens overlaylos cargos de PayPal. Las pginas de Internet y otra informacin proporcionada por PayPal no estn bajo el control de Chase y es posible que no estn disponibles en espaol. Debe abrir o tener abierta una cuenta de PayPal para enviar y recibir dinero.

3 No incluye compras realizadas en Walmart o Target, tiendas de descuento o clubes de almacn, excepto por las compras realizadas con estos comercios utilizando Chase Pay o PayPal (una categora del 5%). Si no utiliza Chase Pay o PayPal, seguir acumulando el 1% de reembolso en efectivo ilimitado en estas compras.

4 Incluye las compras realizadas usando su tarjeta Freedom con su billetera mvil Chase Pay al finalizar la compra. Solo las compras elegibles califican para un total del 5% de recompensas de reembolso en efectivo. Las compras realizadas usando Chase Pay en otras categoras trimestrales actuales del 5% recibirn un total del 5% de recompensas de reembolso en efectivo hasta un mximo de $1,500 en compras combinadas.

5 Consulte el Contrato del Programa de Recompensas para ms detalles.

Los comercios indicados no estn de ninguna manera afiliados con Chase, ni los comercios indicados se consideran patrocinadores o copatrocinadores de este programa. Todas las marcas comerciales son propiedad de sus respectivos dueos.

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Chase Freedom: Cash Back Credit Card | Chase.com

Freedom Mortgage – FHA Loan | VA Loan | Conventional Mortgage

By clicking submit, you are providing Freedom Mortgage with your express consent to be contacted through automated means such as autodialing, text SMS/MMS (charges may apply), and prerecorded messaging, even if your telephone number or cellular phone number is on a corporate, state, or the National Do Not Call Registry. Providing your consent for contact does not require you to select Freedom Mortgage Corporation for your mortgage. By communicating with us by phone, you consent to calls being recorded and monitored.

You may also receive marketing/promotional emails from us.

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Freedom Mortgage – FHA Loan | VA Loan | Conventional Mortgage

Freedom | Define Freedom at Dictionary.com

1. Freedom, independence, liberty refer to an absence of undue restrictions and an opportunity to exercise one’s rights and powers. Freedom emphasizes the opportunity given for the exercise of one’s rights, powers, desires, or the like: freedom of speech or conscience; freedom of movement. Independence implies not only lack of restrictions but also the ability to stand alone, unsustained by anything else: Independence of thought promotes invention and discovery. Liberty, though most often interchanged with freedom, is also used to imply undue exercise of freedom: He took liberties with the text. 9. openness, ingenuousness. 12. license. 16. run.

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Freedom | Define Freedom at Dictionary.com


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