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Moore’s law | computer science | Britannica

Moores law, prediction made by American engineer Gordon Moore in 1965 that the number of transistors per silicon chip doubles every year.

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For a special issue of the journal Electronics, Moore was asked to predict developments over the next decade. Observing that the total number of components in these circuits had roughly doubled each year, he blithely extrapolated this annual doubling to the next decade, estimating that microcircuits of 1975 would contain an astounding 65,000 components per chip. In 1975, as the rate of growth began to slow, Moore revised his time frame to two years. His revised law was a bit pessimistic; over roughly 50 years from 1961, the number of transistors doubled approximately every 18 months. Subsequently, magazines regularly referred to Moores law as though it were inexorablea technological law with the assurance of Newtons laws of motion.

What made this dramatic explosion in circuit complexity possible was the steadily shrinking size of transistors over the decades. Measured in millimetres in the late 1940s, the dimensions of a typical transistor in the early 2010s were more commonly expressed in tens of nanometres (a nanometre being one-billionth of a metre)a reduction factor of over 100,000. Transistor features measuring less than a micron (a micrometre, or one-millionth of a metre) were attained during the 1980s, when dynamic random-access memory (DRAM) chips began offering megabyte storage capacities. At the dawn of the 21st century, these features approached 0.1 micron across, which allowed the manufacture of gigabyte memory chips and microprocessors that operate at gigahertz frequencies. Moores law continued into the second decade of the 21st century with the introduction of three-dimensional transistors that were tens of nanometres in size.

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Were not prepared for the end of Moores Law | MIT …

Moores argument was an economic one. Integrated circuits, with multiple transistors and other electronic devices interconnected with aluminum metal lines on a tiny square of silicon wafer, had been invented a few years earlier by Robert Noyce at Fairchild Semiconductor. Moore, the companys R&D director, realized, as he wrote in 1965, that with these new integrated circuits, the cost per component is nearly inversely proportional to the number of components. It was a beautiful bargainin theory, the more transistors you added, the cheaper each one got. Moore also saw that there was plenty of room for engineering advances to increase the number of transistors you could affordably and reliably put on a chip.

Soon these cheaper, more powerful chips would become what economists like to call a general purpose technologyone so fundamental that it spawns all sorts of other innovations and advances in multiple industries. A few years ago, leading economists credited the information technology made possible by integrated circuits with a third of US productivity growth since 1974. Almost every technology we care about, from smartphones to cheap laptops to GPS, is a direct reflection of Moores prediction. It has also fueled todays breakthroughs in artificial intelligence and genetic medicine, by giving machine-learning techniques the ability to chew through massive amounts of data to find answers.

But how did a simple prediction, based on extrapolating from a graph of the number of transistors by yeara graph that at the time had only a few data pointscome to define a half-century of progress? In part, at least, because the semiconductor industry decided it would.

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Moore wrote that cramming more components onto integrated circuits, the title of his 1965 article, would lead to such wonders as home computersor at least terminals connected to a central computerautomatic controls for automobiles, and personal portable communications equipment. In other words, stick to his road map of squeezing ever more transistors onto chips and it would lead you to the promised land. And for the following decades, a booming industry, the government, and armies of academic and industrial researchers poured money and time into upholding Moores Law, creating a self-fulfilling prophecy that kept progress on track with uncanny accuracy. Though the pace of progress has slipped in recent years, the most advanced chips today have nearly 50 billion transistors.

Every year since 2001, MIT Technology Review has chosen the 10 most important breakthrough technologies of the year. Its a list of technologies that, almost without exception, are possible only because of the computation advances described by Moores Law.

For some of the items on this years list the connection is obvious: consumer devices, including watches and phones, infused with AI; climate-change attribution made possible by improved computer modeling and data gathered from worldwide atmospheric monitoring systems; and cheap, pint-size satellites. Others on the list, including quantum supremacy, molecules discovered using AI, and even anti-aging treatments and hyper-personalized drugs, are due largely to the computational power available to researchers.

But what happens when Moores Law inevitably ends? Or what if, as some suspect, it has already died, and we are already running on the fumes of the greatest technology engine of our time?

Its over. This year that became really clear, says Charles Leiserson, a computer scientist at MIT and a pioneer of parallel computing, in which multiple calculations are performed simultaneously. The newest Intel fabrication plant, meant to build chips with minimum feature sizes of 10 nanometers, was much delayed, delivering chips in 2019, five years after the previous generation of chips with 14-nanometer features. Moores Law, Leiserson says, was always about the rate of progress, and were no longer on that rate. Numerous other prominent computer scientists have also declared Moores Law dead in recent years. In early 2019, the CEO of the large chipmaker Nvidia agreed.

In truth, its been more a gradual decline than a sudden death. Over the decades, some, including Moore himself at times, fretted that they could see the end in sight, as it got harder to make smaller and smaller transistors. In 1999, an Intel researcher worried that the industrys goal of making transistors smaller than 100 nanometers by 2005 faced fundamental physical problems with no known solutions, like the quantum effects of electrons wandering where they shouldnt be.

For years the chip industry managed to evade these physical roadblocks. New transistor designs were introduced to better corral the electrons. New lithography methods using extreme ultraviolet radiation were invented when the wavelengths of visible light were too thick to precisely carve out silicon features of only a few tens of nanometers. But progress grew ever more expensive. Economists at Stanford and MIT have calculated that the research effort going into upholding Moores Law has risen by a factor of 18 since 1971.

Likewise, the fabs that make the most advanced chips are becoming prohibitively pricey. The cost of a fab is rising at around 13% a year, and is expected to reach $16 billion or more by 2022. Not coincidentally, the number of companies with plans to make the next generation of chips has now shrunk to only three, down from eight in 2010 and 25 in 2002.

Finding successors to todays silicon chips will take years of research.If youre worried about what will replace moores Law, its time to panic.

Nonetheless, Intelone of those three chipmakersisnt expecting a funeral for Moores Law anytime soon. Jim Keller, who took over as Intels head of silicon engineering in 2018, is the man with the job of keeping it alive. He leads a team of some 8,000 hardware engineers and chip designers at Intel. When he joined the company, he says, many were anticipating the end of Moores Law. If they were right, he recalls thinking, thats a drag and maybe he had made a really bad career move.

But Keller found ample technical opportunities for advances. He points out that there are probably more than a hundred variables involved in keeping Moores Law going, each of which provides different benefits and faces its own limits. It means there are many ways to keep doubling the number of devices on a chipinnovations such as 3D architectures and new transistor designs.

These days Keller sounds optimistic. He says he has been hearing about the end of Moores Law for his entire career. After a while, he decided not to worry about it. He says Intel is on pace for the next 10 years, and he will happily do the math for you: 65 billion (number of transistors) times 32 (if chip density doubles every two years) is 2 trillion transistors. Thats a 30 times improvement in performance, he says, adding that if software developers are clever, we could get chips that are a hundred times faster in 10 years.

Still, even if Intel and the other remaining chipmakers can squeeze out a few more generations of even more advanced microchips, the days when you could reliably count on faster, cheaper chips every couple of years are clearly over. That doesnt, however, mean the end of computational progress.

Neil Thompson is an economist, but his office is at CSAIL, MITs sprawling AI and computer center, surrounded by roboticists and computer scientists, including his collaborator Leiserson. In a new paper, the two document ample room for improving computational performance through better software, algorithms, and specialized chip architecture.

One opportunity is in slimming down so-called software bloat to wring the most out of existing chips. When chips could always be counted on to get faster and more powerful, programmers didnt need to worry much about writing more efficient code. And they often failed to take full advantage of changes in hardware architecture, such as the multiple cores, or processors, seen in chips used today.

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Were not prepared for the end of Moores Law | MIT ...

Tuesday briefing: Britons flee Brexit by the thousands – The Guardian

Top story: Exodus akin to economic or political crisis

Good morning, Warren Murray bringing you the headlines this Tuesday morning.

The number of British nationals emigrating to other EU countries has risen by 30% since the Brexit referendum, to a level akin to a country experiencing economic or political crisis, experts have found. Analysis of data from the OECD and Eurostat shows the number leaving was 73,642 a year in 2016-18, with a 500% increase in those who then took up citizenship in an EU state. In Germanys case 31,600 Britons have naturalised since the referendum a 2,000% rise. The biggest jump in migration has been to Spain, followed by France.

The withdrawal agreement signed in January enshrines residency, work and social rights of EU citizens in the UK and Britons in the bloc, but failed to guarantee the free movement rights of British migrants restricting future employment and residency prospects in other member states. Unless British nationals take out citizenship in their host country, they can no longer work in or offer a service to another EU member state, impacting professions including accounting, law, architecture, translation and health.

Carlos gone Spains former king, Juan Carlos, has exiled himself to an as-yet-unnamed country after allegations about his finances damaged the monarchy and embarrassed his son, King Felipe.

Juan Carlos played a pivotal role in restoring democracy to Spain after the death of General Francisco Franco in 1975. He abdicated six years ago after a series of scandals including taking an elephant-hunting trip to Botswana while Spain was in the grip of financial crisis. Juan Carlos said in a letter to Felipe that he was leaving to help his son exercise his responsibilities as king.

Coronavirus latest The government has one month to significantly boost its test-and-trace systems or risk a second wave of coronavirus after schools in England reopen, researchers have warned. Dozens of leading virus experts have complained that UK testing contracts have gone on ideological grounds to private sector companies rather than being based on expertise. The government has announced new 90-minute tests but the experts from the UK Clinical Virology Network say such tests were already available, whereas the types chosen by the government are not well known.

Advertising spending across the UK media fell by more than 1bn year on year during the coronavirus lockdown, according to figures that reveal the government as the biggest advertiser during the pandemic. Activists are calling on the pharmaceutical firm Gilead Sciences to develop a drug called GS-441524 that showed promise in curing cats of a coronavirus. Donald Trump has again lashed out at his own health experts while repeating his opposition to lockdowns. Keep up on coronavirus developments at our live blog in our latest global wrap, the UN has warned of a generational catastrophe as more than a billion children miss out on school, while Latin America has surpassed five million Covid-19 cases to account for nearly 30% of global infections

Health experts painkiller warning Painkillers such as paracetamol, ibuprofen, aspirin and opioids can do more harm than good and should not be prescribed for chronic primary pain, the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (Nice) says. It cites little or no evidence that the commonly used drugs make any difference to quality of life, pain or psychological distress in people with long-term pain. Draft guidance, which is open to public consultation until 14 August, says people should instead be offered supervised group exercise programmes, psychological therapy or acupuncture. Antidepressants might also be considered for some people with chronic primary pain, Nice says.

Striker pose Marcus Rashfords policy-changing campaign against child poverty has helped propel the footballer on to the front cover of British Vogues September issue.

The Manchester United striker, who forced a government U-turn on the granting of free food vouchers for the poorest families over the summer, headlines a special edition dedicated to activism posing alongside Adwoa Aboah, the supermodel turned mental health activist, for the Activism Now issue.

With NHS services consumed by the fight against Covid-19 in recent months, cancer care has been dealt a blow, with diagnoses and treatment delayed.

Sorry your browser does not support audio - but you can download here and listen https://audio.guim.co.uk/2020/08/03-69879-200804TIFcancer.mp3

In its first year of existence, Extinction Rebellion transformed the global conversation around the climate crisis. But then it was gripped by internal conflicts about its next steps. Can XR reinvent itself for the post-pandemic world?

English hockey has an endemic race issue from the national team down to the club game and junior levels, and is not doing enough to attract players from more deprived areas, the sports governing body has been told in a hard-hitting letter signed by nine clubs. Pakistans head coach, Misbah-ul-Haq, believes the 17-year-old Naseem Shah is a complete bowler and is pleased with his teams preparations for the Test series, which starts at Old Trafford on Wednesday. England defender Danny Rose has said he is regularly stopped by police in his car and questioned in various scenarios that would not happen if he were a white man as he detailed his anger and exasperation at racism in the UK. Manchester United are in advanced negotiations with Borussia Dortmund to sign Jadon Sancho for an initial 100m (90m) a fee that would set a transfer record for an English player. Odell Beckham Jr, one of the NFLs biggest stars, says the season should not go ahead as the Covid-19 pandemic continues its spread across the United States. And Sky Brown, Great Britains 12-year-old world skateboarding bronze medallist, is recuperating after a horrific accident but has told the Guardian she is already thinking of next years Olympic Games.

Asian shares have risen after strong US manufacturing data and gains in tech stocks helped investors look past broader worries about the coronavirus and global economy. Oil futures gave up overnight gains to fall in Asia due to nagging worries about an increase in the supply of crude. US stock futures were 0.02% higher in Asia. The pound is worth $1.307 and 1.111 while the FTSE is pitched to open 12 points lower.

Several of todays front pages memorialise John Hume and his role in Northern Ireland peacemaking. The Guardian remembers Hume as A titan and a visionary. Our print editions top story is the theft by Russians of secret UK-US trade documents from Liam Foxs private email account. The Telegraph leads with that one too.

Differing treatments of Eat out to help out. The Metro has Rishi two-snacks noting that instead of just snagging a 50% discount, some people went two-for-one, which the paper warns will fuel the obesity crisis. The Mail confects Weve had our lunch, now lets get back to work the paper finds a striking contrast in restaurants being packed while offices are largely deserted.

Test & trace fiasco is timebomb the Mirror really ought to have chosen one derogative or the other. Having virus may earn right to roam the i is reviving the immunity passport idea (maybe well call it the travel bug). The Express says Painkillers do more harm than good and the Times has Dont give paracetamol to patients, doctors told thats about treatment of chronic pain, and the warning also covers ibuprofen, aspirin and opioids. The Timess picture slot goes to Spains runaway king-emeritus. The FT has HSBC profits plummet 96% amid pandemic crisis and US-China spat heres Larry Elliott on that one.

The Guardian Morning Briefing is delivered to thousands of inboxes bright and early every weekday. If you are not already receiving it by email, you can sign up here.

For more news: http://www.theguardian.com

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Tuesday briefing: Britons flee Brexit by the thousands - The Guardian

Arthur (Artie) Satkowski | Obituaries | thedailynewsonline.com – The Daily News Online

Arthur (Artie) Satkowski, 69, of Medina, N.Y., passed away peacefully at his home on Wednesday, July 29, 2020, with his loving wife at his side.

Born on March 10, 1951, in Medina, N.Y., he was the son of the late Ben and Anna (Will) Satkowski.

Arthur worked for the NYS Department of Corrections & Community Supervision and retired with 25 years of dedicated service. He retired to Las Vegas for six years and returned home to be with his family and friends. In his younger years, he as an avid bowler and managed the Medina Bowling Alley. He enjoyed fishing with his father, brother, Tom and many friends. Arthur was a strong-minded individual who always spoke his mind in a tone for all to hear. This confidence carried over into his love of poker and his willingness to call you for the hand. Arthur possessed a green thumb, always producing one of the best vegetable gardens in the area. He would frequently be found selling the sweetest strawberries in front of his home. He had a great affection for dogs; leading him to his most recent endeavor of dog care and loved his two dogs, Luna and Bella. He truly treasured his family and friends.

He is survived by his wife, Pamela Jones Satkowski, a son, John Satkowski, two daughters, Melinda (Jason) Cogovan, Elizabeth Satkowski, all of Medina, N.Y.; a daughter-in-law, Sara (David) Bouche of Kendall, N.Y.; three stepsons, Jamie (Alisha) Duffina of Medina, N.Y., Kevin Jones of Oakfield, N.Y., Jason Duffina of Theodore, Ala. Also surviving are two brothers, Thomas Satkowski of Medina, N.Y., Jim (Barb) Satkowski of South Carolina; and a sister, Clara (John) Lockwood and a brother-in-law, Larry (Linda) Barnaby of Moores Fork, N.Y. Also surviving are numerous brothers- and sisters-in-law, nieces, nephews and grandchildren.

Besides his parents, Arthur is predeceased by his first wife, Nancy (Pries) Satkowski; maternal parents, Harold and Grace (Higgins) Pries; maternal parents, Clearance and Grace (Hawksby) Barnaby; stepson, Bobby Jones; grandson, Devante Boston; nephew, Justin Pries; and brothers-in-law, Jamie Winters and Gary Barnaby.

Relatives and friends may call on Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020, from 11 a.m.-1 p.m. at the Oak Orchard Assembly of God Church, 12111 Ridge Rd, Medina, NY 14103, where a memorial service will be held at 1 p.m. with the Pastor Rev. Daniel A. Thurber officiating. Burial will be held at the convenience of the family.

Memorials may be made in Arthurs name to: PAWS, 3371 Gaines Basin Rd. Albion, NY 14411, or to: Strong Hospital, 601 Elmwood Ave, Rochester, NY 14642.

Arrangements were entrusted to the Bogan & Tuttle Funeral Home, 226 Pearl St., Medina, NY 14103.

Please light a candle or share a memory of Arthur at: http://www.bogantuttlefunerals.com

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Arthur (Artie) Satkowski | Obituaries | thedailynewsonline.com - The Daily News Online

Intel Makes Changes to Technology Organization – Global Banking And Finance Review

Today, Intel CEO Bob Swan announced changes to the companys technology organization and executive team to accelerate product leadership and improve focus and accountability in process technology execution. Effective immediately, the Technology, Systems Architecture and Client Group (TSCG) will be separated into the following teams, whose leaders will report directly to the CEO:

As a result of these changes, Murthy Renduchintala will leave Intel on Aug. 3, 2020.

I look forward to working directly with these talented and experienced technology leaders, each of whom is committed to driving Intel forward during this period of critical execution, said Swan. I also want to thank Murthy for his leadership in helping Intel transform our technology platform. We have the most diverse portfolio of leadership products in our history and, as a result of our six pillars of innovation and disaggregation strategy, much more flexibility in how we build, package and deliver those products for our customers.

About Intel

Intel (Nasdaq: INTC) is an industry leader, creating world-changing technology that enables global progress and enriches lives. Inspired by Moores Law, we continuously work to advance the design and manufacturing of semiconductors to help address our customers greatest challenges. By embedding intelligence in the cloud, network, edge and every kind of computing device, we unleash the potential of data to transform business and society for the better. To learn more about Intels innovations, go to newsroom.intel.com and intel.com.

Intel Corporation. Intel, the Intel logo and other Intel marks are trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries. Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

Will Moss

(650) 521-1754

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Intel Makes Changes to Technology Organization - Global Banking And Finance Review

7/28 Impact Wrestling TV Results: Moore’s review of Eddie Edwards vs. Trey Miguel for the Impact World Championship, The Good Brothers vs. Reno Scum,…

By John Moore, ProWrestling.net Staffer (@liljohnm)

Impact Wrestling TVTaped July 19-20 in Nashville, Tennessee at Skyway StudiosAired July 28, 2020 on AXS TV

Impact started off with a Previously on recap of last weeks show

Josh Mathews and Madison Rayne were on commentary

1. Eddie Edwards vs. Trey Miguel for the Impact World Heavyweight Championship. The commentators are calling Trey Trey Miguel now, but are also talking about how hes acting like a more serious wrestler now. Eddie and Trey started off with a collar and elbow lockup. Trey kept Eddie under control for the opening minutes. Trey then hit Eddie with a bulldog on Treys knee. Trey did a cool looking handstand into a headscissors into a dropkick leading to a one count. Eddie regained control with an atomic drop and Belly to Belly.

Eddie went for several quick pins on Trey for one counts. Trey and Eddie ended up knocking each other out heading into commercial.[c]

Trey and Eddie traded strong style punches in the center of the ring (I kinda miss Michael Elgins strong style exchanges where the punches look a bit more snug). Eddie blocked a Come Up Stunner, but Trey reversed the reversal and then nailed Eddie with the Come Up Stunner for the two count. Eddie reversed Treys dive into a flapjack. Trey reversed a Tiger Driver into a huracanrana. Eddie recovered and hit Trey with a Tiger Driver for a two count. After an exchange, Eddie nailed Trey with the Boston Knee Party for the victory.

Eddie Edwards defeated Trey Miguel via pinfall in 10:22.

Quickly after Eddies victory, World Class Maniac Eric Young made his entrance to confront Eddie. Young teased entering the ring, but he backtracked telling Eddie to sleep well and that hell do things on my time

Johns Thoughts: A really good opening match. Trey looked good and putting in good performances like this will do him well in the future when Impact decides to get behind him. He seems to be on that AJ Styles/Christopher Daniels path of being a future star (where in the past Jeff Jarrett was pushing Dezmond Xavier of the Rascalz as the future main eventer). Im willing to see how the reboot of Eddie Edwards goes. The guy has to be rebuilt after two years of acting like Perry Saturns Moppy phase. So far, so good. Eddies been playing it straight for the last few weeks. The next step, the guy should probably shave and trim his hair. There wasnt a problem visually with American Wolf Eddie right? His problem back then was his confidence and body language and hes conquered that.

Josh Mathews and Madison Rayne checked in from their commentary set where they ran through upcoming segments. Josh Mathews advertised Katie Forbes giving a free preview of her websites photos later on this show. He also said Wrestle House was premiering

They cut to the Wrestle House show. There was cheesy sitcom music in the background. Rosemary and Taya were chatting. Taya said she had enough and was going to leave. Taya tried to leave but she walked into a wall of fire where stock footage of WWE Producer Abyss was trying to hand her a bag of tacks. After more bantering between the wrestlers they cut to a TV Sitcom Intro for the show.

Alisha Edwards was shocked to find out that they were in a reality show. Tommy Dreamer introduced himself as the voice of Wrestle House. Dreamer revealed that it was his house. Larry D wondered if it was the House of Hardcore. Dreamer said it wasnt because he used his ECW checks before they bounced to buy it. More banter ensued[c]

Johns Thoughts: Im afraid that the creative team will get a bit too cute, especially with the Rosemary magic, but so far Im liking what Im seeing. I always like me some Reality-TV Dreamer. Which has me wondering, Dreamers backstage comedy skits are usually good ones. I hope hes the one creatively running this because he brings over the humor that he would do on the Edge and Christian Show of Awesomeness. Ultimately, I hope this is close to the Edge and Christian Show because while it had a rough start, that show ended up being pretty entertaining.

An ad aired for Talking Shop A Mania, which is The Luke Gallows and Karl Anderson wrestling special on Fite TV. The headline match is supposedly the Boner Yard Match. They showed Luke Gallows, Karl Anderson, and Maria Kanellis recreating their famous New Japan scene where they all stopped their match against the Kingdom to dance with Maria (this was back when New Japan had the Maria Kanellis ass cam and the overly horny Japanese color commentator)

The show cut back to Wrestle House. Team XXXL and The Deaners were arguing. Susie Yung got in between them and told them that arguments are bad and they should call a truce. Cousin Jake said no way jose to that. Dreamer cut in and said we didnt sign him (theres that E&C kayfabe humor). Kylie Rae recommended that they air high five to make the truce with social distancing. Johnny Swinger said that he learned you can bow like Mr. Fuji to shake hands with social distance. Everyone but Cousin Jake agreed to the truce. Susie told Jake to agree for me. Jake reluctantly gave in.

They cut back to Taya and Rosemary. Taya wondered the reason why everyone was here. Dreamer cut in and said that everyone is here for the opportunity to win a Million Dollars. Everyone celebrated with Dreamer doing a DX crotch chop. Rosemary yelled and telled everyone that it wasnt true. Dreamer insisted that it was true. Dreamer said he makes the rules and he usually makes income off this six bedroom house off AirBNB. The bedroom revelation caused the wrestlers to all sprint to claim their beds. Kylie and Susie were being too polite with their bed, which caused Johnny Swinger to take his bed.

Johnny Swinger offered Crazzy Steve to be his bed mate and young boy (as in the Japanese wrestling term). Steve disagreed and said he wasnt desperate. Swinger called Steve a Mizzark. More comedy antics ensued with the wrestlers claiming beds. Steve and Acey tried to claim the ring as a bed. Dreamer called for a Match time when both men entered the ring in the back yard. Suddenly through the power of magic, Acey and Steve were in their ring gear. Kylie agreed to be the referee.

2. Acey Romero vs. Crazzy Steve where the winner gets to claim the ring as a bed. Im recapping this match because they cut away from cinematic camera to a regular handheld. Steve tried to agree to split the ring in half. Romero then chased Steve around the ring as Steve struck sleeping poses. Romero then tossed Steve across the ring. Steve then fooled Ace into gassing himself out. Steve tried to agree to a truce again, but Ace hit Steve with a Atomic Drop into a Sleeper for the tapout win.

Acey Romero defeated Crazzy Steve via submission.

Johnny Swinger said he was proud of his young boy doing good work. The show cut away from the Wrestle House

Johns Thoughts: Mixed thoughts, but ultimately I thought it was fun. I kinda like that they took the Lucha Underground approach of doing cinematics during cutscenes, and traditional in-ring. Sadly the in-ring here was a comedy indie match. No fault of the producers, but not quite what I was hoping for. As for the comedy, I thought it was solid and Dreamer is definitly bringing over some of his Edge and Christian Show influence to this cinematic production.

Rohit Raju ran into TJ Perkins and Fallah Bahh backstage. Bahh handed Raju a surgical mask. Raju was a bit disgusted because it came from Bahhs hand, but he put the mask on. Perkins forced Raju to wear a neck gaiter. Bahh forced Raju to stand six feet away. Raju tried to tempt TJ Perkins to join the X Division again for some reason. Perkins said he would consider it.

TJs answer caused Chris Bey to run off and find Chris Bey. Raju tried to convince Bey that TJ Perkins was coming after Chris Beys title and that Bey might need backup to counter Fallah Bahh in the other corner. Bey agreed to let Raju be in his corner when he faces Perkins. The show then cut to an Ozzy Osbourne Travel Show commercial (which tells you Im not watching via screener this week)[c]

Gia Miller interviewed Ace Austin and Madman Fulton (I think Gia and Ace are a real life couple?). Ace cut off Gia during her question. Ace talked about two new guys showing up in his ring and cheap shotting him. Ace said the Good Brothers are trying to get their attention and Ace and Fulton are about to look very closely at the Good Brothers vs. Reno Scum match

A highlight package aired which showcased the TNA career of Chris Sabin and Alex Shelley, the Motor City Machine Guns

Ethan Page and Josh Alexander were trying to cut a promo backstage. Alexander yelled at Page a bit for being silent. Alexander talked about how the reason is because theyre missing their championship belts. Alexander said The North are as smart as they are talented. Alexander brought up the rematch clause they have as former champions. Page took off his glasses and was about to speak, but instead he pouted a bit and walked off

This weeks Impact Plus Flashback Match of the week was The Motor City Machine Guns vs. Beer Money Inc. for the TNA Tag Titles from TNA Victory Road 2010. There were multiple referees in the ring for some reason (because its TNA?). Somehow, this match ended with both referees counting three counts against the other team. The Hebners agreed to restart the match. They aired about 5 minutes and the Guns won

Johns Thoughts: I mean, therea a lot of great Guns finishes in TNA history. And the one they decide to show is the overbooked Only in TNA one? They have a lot of returning viewers. I dont think this is too harmful, but why would you remind returning viewers of some of the reasons they left (this being the illogical overbooked finishes).

Katie Forbes was hanging onto Rob Van Dam, running through some of the photos shes going to show viewers[c]

Johns Thoughts: I mean, I get that sex does sell if sold right; but this is just straight up trash and trashy. Didnt they learn from when they both didnt increase their popularity many times in the past, even so much as to getting their show banned on Twitch.

The show cut back to EC3 cutting a promo in front of his usual brick wall. He talked about having the longest undefeated streak in TNA history. He then bragged about beating TNA hall of famers in the past. His old theme played for a few seconds and cut off. EC3 said he doesnt care about any of that. He said hes destroying all of his history. EC3 talked about how he hates his past and when he looks in the mirror he sees failure.

He said he didnt fail in his career, but to get to his past successes he had to give up his soul. He said he doesnt fear his past, because his past is his biggest foe. EC3 said hes here for the distruction of his past. EC3 said in order to take back his power he must control the narrative

Johns Thoughts: Another good EC3 promo, but I still have my fears. The production and the delivery is strong. What I fear is the content. Its borderline pretentious without crossing the line into pretentious (a little bit of street-preacher in there). There is a level of being mopey and self hating. Im willing to wait on this though, because I have confidence that he pulls it all together. Im guessing well have to wait and see how this unfolds.

Gia Miller interviewed Moose backstage. Moose bragged about beating the Panda boy Fallah Bahh. Moose claimed to beat Bahh in 30 seconds and Gia Miller tried to correct him. Moose said he was throwing out another invitational for the TNA Championship. Miller asked Moose for his thoughts on EC3. Moose said EC3 wasnt getting an invitation because Moose doesnt want to conquer EC3s narrative yet. Heath [Slater] interrupted the interview saying he has an invitation. Slater claimed to have a TNA contract.

Moose said there is no committee. Heath pointed out that because theres no committee, then theres no TNA, and no TNA championship. An angry Moose agreed to give Heath a title shot next week. Moose left. Scott DAmore walked up to Heath and said Heaths contract in hand is as legitamate as something written by Heyman & Heyman law offices. DAmore said since Heath conned Moose into a match, that if Heath beats Moose he can get a roster spot

Johns Thoughts: Now a part of me likes the hook, but a part of me is really wondering why they are recreating the Heath Slater and Shane McMahon free agent storyline with DAmore playing the role of Shane McMahon? He might even be using the same lines that Shane used in 2016? Are we going to get Rhino eating Cheese Whiz and Crackers in two weeks? This is kinda making me want to see Heath go back to WWE and continue his program with Drew McIntyre, just for some fresh Heath.

3. Impact Knockouts Champion Deonna Purrazzo vs. Kimber Lee in a non-title match. Lee pummeled Purrazzo early on with forearms. Lee then hit Purrazzo with a huracanrana. Purrazzo rolled to ringside for a moment of respite. Lee caught Deonna in the ring with a pump kick for a two count. Lee used her legs to lock Purrazzo in a Full Nelson. Lee then locked Purrazzo in a body scissors submission. Deonna recovered and then stompped a mudhole at Deonna in the corner.

Josh Mathews said that Kylie Rae cant challenge for the title because shes stuck at wrestle house. Both women traded strikes with Deonna getting the upper hand. Lee avoided Purrazzos Fujiwara armbar. Lee gave Purrazzo a German Suplex for a two count. Purrazzo dragged Lee off the top rope and hit Lee with the Sacrifice Arm Breaker. Deonna locked in the Fujiwara armbar for the submission win.

Deonna Purrazzo defeated Kimber Lee via submission in 5:28.

Deonnas entrance theme was interrupted by Jordynne Graces generic entrance theme. Jordynne Grace made her entrance with an arm in a sling. Grace entered the ring and then beat up Deonna after revealing her arm wasnt injured

Johns Thoughts: Solid showcase match for the new champion and it looks like Kimber Lee will probably be designated as the gatekeeper wrestler moving forward, given the deep depth chart of Impacts womens division now. Simple and effective stuff with Purrazzo and Grace afterwards. Given how Grace vs. Purrazzo was arguably the match of the night at Slammiversary, I wouldnt mind a Grace vs. Purrazzo rematch at Bound for Glory? Maybe sooner (but they had Josh go out of his way to say that Kylie Rae is stuck in Wrestle House to explain why Kylie isnt challenging for the title).

Katie Forbes ran into Sami Callihan backstage. Callihan said he is a former world champ. Forbes walked away, joking that Callihan looked like a fan[c]

A Talking Shop A Mania ad aired, featuring characters from Southpaw Regional wrestling

A Brian Myers re-debut vignette aired

They cut back to Wrestle House. Swinger joked that he stunk up the bathroom and then reoffered Crazzy Steve a chance to share a bed and be his young boy. Steve did a creepy laugh and said it would be a great idea. They cut to The Deaners in a room. Jake was on the bed while Cody slept on the floor. They bantered over snooring. Tommy Dreamer emerged from Jakes comforter and proposed another match time. Jake wondered if its today, Dreamer asked for them to do it in the morning.

Cut to the morning

4. Cousin Jake vs. Cody Deaner in a Wrestle House match. Alisha Edwards was referee. Both Deaners continued to argue over the snoring. Cody bowed to try to call for a truce. Jake agreed and Cody tried to roll up Jake for a two count. Cody then beat up Jake around the ring. Jake countered Cody with an Irish Whip into a leaping front hip attack. Jake put on Codys hat and turned it. Jake hit Cody with a lariat for a two count. Cody hit Jake with a series of punches. Jake hit Cody with a sitout sidewalk slam for the victory.

Cousin Jake defeated Cody Deaner via pinfall in about 3:00.

Alisha Edwards claimed she didnt know which Deaner so she called Jake A Deaner. Jake and Cody then agreed on a truce.They cut back into cinematic mode where Cody was happy when he walked in front of a production RV trailer (or Private Bus?)[c]

Johns Thoughts: We didnt need two wrestle house segments this week. Someone in Impacts editing team needs to learn restraint, and lack of restraint usually leads to some sharks jumping. And can somebody give Cousin Jake another gimmick. The guy has a good look and exhibits great ability, but hes saddled with the country stereotype gimmick. I dont want a big man version of Rohit Raju running around too (lots of talent, but pegged as a comedy jobber)!

Sami Callihan ran into Ken Shamrock backstage. Callihan wanted Shamrocks explanation for losing their Slammiversary match. Shamrock acted biwildered and said he has to go and doesnt know when hell be back. Shamrock left. Katie Forbes then pointed at Sami to RVD saying that Sami was creeping on her. RVD told Sami to hip his distance away from Katie. Katie and Rob left after Sami blew them off

Rob Van Dam and Katie Forbes made their entrance. Forbes had her stripper money guns. Josh kept hyping up Katies Free.99 preview. Katie then plugged her website and said shes showing off things tonight for free.99. Katies photos then flashed on the screen, except with Sami Callihans face and voiceover over it. After the slideshow, Katie threw a fit. Josh Mathews hyped Good Brothers vs. Reno Scum for after the break[c]

Johns Thoughts: Uhm? Did somebody let Vince McMahon book some segments for Impact? Either that or Scott DAmore and Vince have the same sense of humor. I get that feeling sometimes. Anyway, what was that? Why? Im a fan of good ol fan service just like any red blooded American male, but this is just trash at several levels. Didnt they get banned from Twitch for this trash? And I didnt need the image of Sami Callihan with a stripper body. So this is how were kicking off Samis babyface run? The guy was the MVP of Impact for the last two years and now in 2020 hes a magic hacker and a stripper. Damn 2020.

An Impact Plus Ad aired

Dezmond Xavier and Zachary Wentz are back to the 70s show segments. Dez said he invited a power ranger, in suicide. Wentz said Suicide is not a power ranger (I agree). Suicide joined the smoke circle. They did a weed smoking montage

Josh Mathews and Madison Rayne checked in from their commentary set. They advertised Rohit Raju and Chris Bey vs. Bahh and Perkins, Moose vs. Heath for the TNA belt, a MCMG interview, and Eddie Edwards vs. a mystery opponent for the TNA title

Josh Mathews then interviewed Rich Swann via skype. Rich Swann said hes disappointed after being on the couch for 7 months, making his return challenging for the world championship only to get put back on the shelf. Swann said Young took away Swanns opportunity and may have changed Swanns life. Rayne asked Swann for a medical update. Swann said the doctors are telling him too many things, so much that hes in a dark place now. Swann said hell be by next week with an update for the fans. Swann said he cant handle it anymore and asked if Josh can end the interview now. Josh agreed

Entrances for the main event match took place. But before then they cut to commercials featuring the the Ozzyborne travel show[c]

Johns Thoughts: Hey, last time I was reviewing via AXS it was all Eddie Money commercials, now its Ozzy. Anyway, I think Rich Swann has the chance to cut one hell of a promo next week. Key with that is hopefully he drops the Lionel Richie tribute act, at least for one week. Swann showed in his feud with Sami Callihan that the guy can be a main event badass. Swann, despite being a lot smaller, reminds me of babyface Dean Ambrose in WWE (not necessarily the more edgy John Moxley), and thats not a bad thing. That man was world champ.

The show cut back with 9 minutes left at the top of the hour

5. The Good Brothers Luke Gallows and Karl Anderson vs. Reno Scum Adam Thornstowe and Luster the Legend. Karl Anderson and Adam Fn Thornstowe started off the match. Anderson ended up taking donw Thornstowe with a shoulder tackle. Thornstowe tried to run the ropes, but he was taken down by another tackle. Gallows tagged in and threw Kane like boxing punches in the corner. Gallows hit Thornstowe with a series of elbows. The Good Brothers traded tags to work on and keep Adam under control.

Ace Austin showed up at the top of the ramp where he took a seet. That allowed Luster to tag in and body slam Adam onto Anderson. Reno Scum traded tags and worked on Anderson for a bit. Anderson got a window of opportunity after hitting Thornstowe with a spinebuster. Gallows cleaned house off the hot tag. Anderson tagged back in. The Brothers hit Thornstowe with a Magic Killer for the victory.

The Good Brothers defeated Reno Scum via pinfall in 6:29.

Ace Austin distracted the Brothers which allowed Reno Scum to blindside Gallows and Anderson. Gallows and Anderson quickly dispatched Reno Scum (how ineffective are these guys?). Ace distracted Gallows and Anderson again to allow Madman Fulton to blindside them. Fulton actually cleared Gallows and Anderson from the ring. Ace and Fulton brawled with Gallows and Anderson to the back. Josh said they need to send a camera to follow the brawl.

They cut to the back where the two teams were still brawling. Gallows dumped Ace into a pile of cardboard boxes. Ace recovered and both teams brawled to the parking lot. The show cut away right before Gallows went for a big boot on Fulton

Johns Thoughts: Im happy that local California Bay Area Team Reno Scum got to make the main event on AXS, but I also understand that these guys are best utilized as enhancement guys for the stars (I do hope that Thornstowe in particular gets a singles run one day though. I got to see that guy have great feuds with people like Jeff Cobb, Brian Cage, Rich Swann, Drake Younger, Jacob Fatu, and other cali standouts. His only weakness is his cartoony promos). Anyway good showcase for the former Bullet Club members. Gallows and Anderson look way more of a big deal in three Impact weeks than theyve had in their entire WWE run. The only thing Im not a huge fan of is Ace Austin seemingly being setup as the sacrificial lamb for the debut of the Good Brothers.

Whenever they head to the next set of tapings, I really hope they right ship and do something similar to what Jason Powell proposed last week several times, that they push Ace Austin as the new Fergal Devitt. Anderson and Gallows have been in teams with Devitt and Devitts successors (AJ Styles, Kenny Omega, and Cody Rhodes). That sets up Ace as a future main eventer if they go that route. I can also see Ace add a level of menacing to him similar to what they did in New Japan with white meat happy-go-lucky Fergal Devitt to the edgy and quirky leader of Bullet Club.

This weeks show was solid, but I thought that the editing wasnt too great. It seemed like there were less matches and too much Wrestle House which made way for a comedy Rascalz smoke circle and a dud Katie Forbes segment? Wrestle House wasnt bad, but it looked like they squeezed two weeks of Wrestle House into one week of show to the point of immediate oversaturation. Everything else pretty much set up a few new programs and new characters. The best part of this show was definitely Eddie Edwards vs. Trey Miguel and it was a good first step in Eddie rehabbing his character.

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7/28 Impact Wrestling TV Results: Moore's review of Eddie Edwards vs. Trey Miguel for the Impact World Championship, The Good Brothers vs. Reno Scum,...

Intel Editorial: The Pandemic Drives New Era of Tech Collaboration – Global Banking And Finance Review

The following is an opinion editorial by Rick Echevarria of Intel Corporation.

One hundred days ago, our CEO, Bob Swan, announced the Intel Pandemic Response Technology Initiative. Intel would invest $50 million to combat COVID-19 in ways we knew best: using technology to study and help with the diagnosis of the coronavirus, helping disrupted educators and students, and supporting innovative new ideas and projects.

Ive had the privilege of leading this initiative and seeing an extraordinarily committed group of Intel employees, customers and partners mobilize. In just over three months they have made possible new and creative uses for our technology to address a range of challenges. Weve come a long way, learned a lot and still have much to do. On behalf of this team at 100 days in I wanted to share some of that journey.

More: Intel Response to COVID-19 Crisis (Press Kit) | Intels PRTI at 100 Days: In Los Angeles, Online Classes that Inspire

So far, Intel has partnered with over 100 organizations on close to 200 projects totaling more than $30 million in contributions from the original pandemic response to first early steps toward recovery. In those early days, we provided ventilator manufacturers with vital parts. We assisted with the creation of virtual intensive care units.

Today, were providing technology and educational content for students who might otherwise be left behind. Were aiding businesses as they take the first steps to re-open safely. And were exploring ways Intel technology and our financial support can be used in the search for diagnoses, treatments and vaccines.

Our role through the pandemic points out undeniable lessons: Technology used to its potential can save lives and change lives. No one can solve these problems alone. And we will never thrive as we once did if we dont work with our customers and our communities to make our world better after we recover.

Three examples show how far weve come.

As weve moved through the lifecycle of pandemic response, its obvious the coronavirus has changed society, industry and Intel. Historic calls for change (the end to acts of racism, inequity and social injustice) in COVID-19s shadow illustrate how important the coming few months will be for all of us in the U.S. and around the world. Collectively, its led us at Intel to recognize several vital lessons.

Technology and its creative use are needed more than ever: Four months ago, Intel CEO Bob Swan wrote to our customers: You provide vital services, tools and infrastructure to millions of people who are directly struggling with this virus Day in and day out, it has proven true. Inside Intel and with our customers, weve broken down silos to move more quickly than ever. Newly discovered sources of technology value, like Providences care at a distance, prove to be life-changing as patients and care providers grow comfortable with them. Weve thought creatively and pulled together customers to provide services that are saving lives, educating students and keeping our community infrastructure solid.

Data collaboration and sharing have never been more important: Solving the challenges brought to the world by the coronavirus requires researchers worldwide to work together. The whole world has become a peer community. There is much we dont know about the coronavirus, but with the help of federated learning, researchers are able to privately share patient data as they collaborate to create a vaccine or treatment program. They can access a rich world of data to make better decisions and follow groundbreaking clues, all without breaching privacy laws. Our technology to effectively manage, share and collaborate using important data sets has never been as significant as when researchers are chasing a deadly virus.

Better health will go hand in hand with recovering economies: Peoples health will be critical to the worlds economic recovery, just as the economic recovery will be key to everyones health. Going back to doing things the way we did them before wont carry over after the coronavirus is solved. I keep going back to it, but telehealth is a great example. To best realize its benefits, we need to recognize its success and acceptance among people seeking physician guidance. Only that will allow it to thrive.

As a company, we have learned to operate with more empathy, agility and velocity. We look at our products not for what we know they can do, but for what they might be able to do in a changed world. Outside of our walls, we have come together in new ways with customers, partners and the community and weve seen what a difference working together can make when we all think and act creatively.

We wont forget these lessons. They will shape our approach, as we press forward with our goals for the next decade.

Life will be different for everyone around the world after the coronavirus is history. Doctors and patients will communicate from a greater distance. Educators will find lessons in distance learning to make online classes more effective and meaningful. Cures for many more diseases will come from the private, safe and efficient sharing of data.

Our Pandemic Response Technology Initiative cant solve all of the challenges were facing, but what we learn and what we teach others after this event will create a strong foundation for the future. Its inspiring to see how our technology and that of the broader high-tech industry will make enriching lives (even in a world as challenged as it is today) possible.

Rick Echevarria is vice president in the Sales, Marketing and Communications Group and general manager of the Intel Olympic Program at Intel Corporation. He leads Intels Pandemic Response Technology Initiative.

About Intel

Intel (Nasdaq: INTC) is an industry leader, creating world-changing technology that enables global progress and enriches lives. Inspired by Moores Law, we continuously work to advance the design and manufacturing of semiconductors to help address our customers greatest challenges. By embedding intelligence in the cloud, network, edge and every kind of computing device, we unleash the potential of data to transform business and society for the better. To learn more about Intels innovations, go to newsroom.intel.com and intel.com.

Intel Corporation. Intel, the Intel logo and other Intel marks are trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries. Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

Laurie Smith DeJong

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Intel Editorial: The Pandemic Drives New Era of Tech Collaboration - Global Banking And Finance Review

Singapore Researchers Look to Intel Neuromorphic Computing to Help Enable Robots That Feel – Global Banking And Finance Review

Whats New: Today, two researchers from the National University of Singapore (NUS), who are members of the Intel Neuromorphic Research Community (INRC), presented new findings demonstrating the promise of event-based vision and touch sensing in combination with Intels neuromorphic processing for robotics. The work highlights how bringing a sense of touch to robotics can significantly improve capabilities and functionality compared to todays visual-only systems and how neuromorphic processors can outperform traditional architectures in processing such sensory data.

This research from National University of Singapore provides a compelling glimpse to the future of robotics where information is both sensed and processed in an event-driven manner combining multiple modalities. The work adds to a growing body of results showing that neuromorphic computing can deliver significant gains in latency and power consumption once the entire system is re-engineered in an event-based paradigm spanning sensors, data formats, algorithms, and hardware architecture. Mike Davies, director of Intels Neuromorphic Computing Lab

Why It Matters: The human sense of touch is sensitive enough to feel the difference between surfaces that differ by just a single layer of molecules, yet most of todays robots operate solely on visual processing. Researchers at NUS hope to change this using their recently developed artificial skin, which according to their research can detect touch more than 1,000 times faster than the human sensory nervous system and identify the shape, texture and hardness of objects 10 times faster than the blink of an eye.

Enabling a human-like sense of touch in robotics could significantly improve current functionality and even lead to new use cases. For example, robotic arms fitted with artificial skin could easily adapt to changes in goods manufactured in a factory, using tactile sensing to identify and grip unfamiliar objects with the right amount of pressure to prevent slipping. The ability to feel and better perceive surroundings could also allow for closer and safer human-robotic interaction, such as in caregiving professions, or bring us closer to automating surgical tasks by giving surgical robots the sense of touch that they lack today.

While the creation of artificial skin is one step in bringing this vision to life, it also requires a chip that can draw accurate conclusions based on the skins sensory data in real time, while operating at a power level efficient enough to be deployed directly inside the robot. Making an ultra-fast artificial skin sensor solves about half the puzzle of making robots smarter, said assistant professor Benjamin Tee from the NUS Department of Materials Science and Engineering and NUS Institute for Health Innovation & Technology. They also need an artificial brain that can ultimately achieve perception and learning as another critical piece in the puzzle. Our unique demonstration of an AI skin system with neuromorphic chips such as the Intel Loihi provides a major step forward towards power-efficiency and scalability.

About the Research: To break new ground in robotic perception, the NUS team began exploring the potential of neuromorphic technology to process sensory data from the artificial skin using Intels Loihi neuromorphic research chip. In their initial experiment, the researchers used a robotic hand fitted with the artificial skin to read Braille, passing the tactile data to Loihi through the cloud to convert the micro bumps felt by the hand into a semantic meaning. Loihi achieved over 92 percent accuracy in classifying the Braille letters, while using 20 times less power than a standard Von Neumann processor.

Building on this work, the NUS team further improved robotic perception capabilities by combining both vision and touch data in a spiking neural network. To do so, they tasked a robot to classify various opaque containers holding differing amounts of liquid using sensory inputs from the artificial skin and an event-based camera. Researchers used the same tactile and vision sensors to test the ability of the perception system to identify rotational slip, which is important for stable grasping.

Once this sensory data was captured, the team sent it to both a GPU and Intels Loihi neuromorphic research chip to compare processing capabilities. The results, which were presented at Robotics: Science and Systems this week, show that combining event-based vision and touch using a spiking neural network enabled 10 percent greater accuracy in object classification compared to a vision-only system. Moreover, they demonstrated the promise for neuromorphic technology to power such robotic devices, with Loihi processing the sensory data 21 percent faster than a top-performing GPU, while using 45 times less power.

Were excited by these results. They show that a neuromorphic system is a promising piece of the puzzle for combining multiple sensors to improve robot perception. Its a step toward building power-efficient and trustworthy robots that can respond quickly and appropriately in unexpected situations, said assistant professor Harold Soh from the Department of Computer Science at the NUS School of Computing.

About the Intel Neuromorphic Research Community: The Intel Neuromorphic Research Community is an ecosystem of academic groups, government labs, research institutions, and companies around the world working with Intel to further neuromorphic computing and develop innovative AI applications. Researchers interested in participating in the INRC and developing for Loihi can visit the Intel Neuromorphic Research Community website. A list of current members can also be found at the site.

More Context: Neuromorphic Computing (Press Kit) | Intel Labs (Press Kit) | How Neuromorphic Computing Uses the Human Brain as a Model (Video) | Exceptional sense of touch for robots and prosthetics (National University of Singapore) | New breakthrough by NUS researchers gives robots intelligent sensing abilities to carry out complex tasks (National University of Singapore)

About Intel

Intel (Nasdaq: INTC) is an industry leader, creating world-changing technology that enables global progress and enriches lives. Inspired by Moores Law, we continuously work to advance the design and manufacturing of semiconductors to help address our customers greatest challenges. By embedding intelligence in the cloud, network, edge and every kind of computing device, we unleash the potential of data to transform business and society for the better. To learn more about Intels innovations, go to newsroom.intel.com and intel.com.

Intel Corporation. Intel, the Intel logo and other Intel marks are trademarks of Intel Corporation or its subsidiaries. Other names and brands may be claimed as the property of others.

Alexa Korkos

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Singapore Researchers Look to Intel Neuromorphic Computing to Help Enable Robots That Feel - Global Banking And Finance Review

Police may serve search warrants out of their jurisdiction, Alabama AG says – alreporter.com

The United States Supreme Court on Wednesday handed down two decisions strengthening religious liberty and expanding freedom of religion.

In the first case, the Court ruled in favor of the Little Sisters of the Poor, saying that the Catholic nuns do not have to pay for medical procedures that they object to including abortion.

The decision was written by pro-life Justice Clarence Thomas. The 7 to 2 decision majority opinion is the biggest pro-life decision of the Trump presidency. This overturns a lower court ruling saying employees are entitled to abortion and birth control services.

The Montgomery-based Foundation for Moral Law praised the Supreme Courts decision in Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania. The Foundation had filed an amicus brief with the Court arguing in favor of the Little Sisters of the Poors case.

This case arose from Obamacares contraception mandate. The Little Sisters objected to complying with the Obamacare mandate of contraception and abortion services based on their religious convictions. The Trump administration issued new rules that exempted employers with religious and moral objections to complying with the mandate. The States of Pennsylvania and New Jersey sued, and the United States Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit ruled against the Trump administration and the Little Sisters.

The Supreme Court reversed the judgment of the Third Circuit. The Court held that the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 allowed the Trump administration to craft these regulations and that the Trump administration had complied with the Administrative Procedures Act in enacting the rules.

Consequently, it did not reach the religious freedom claim, but it held that it was proper for the Trump administration to consider the effect of federal religious freedom law when it passed the rules.

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GREAT win at the Supreme Court today on the Obamacare abortion drug mandate, said Republican Senate candidate Jeff Sessions. For the first time in nearly a DECADE, the Little Sisters of the Poor & other religious groups can do their good work without fear of being forced to violate their beliefs.

As Attorney General, I reversed the Obama administrations position in the Little Sisters of the Poor litigation, and said NO MORE to government persecution of religion, Sessions said. I have a lifelong record of fighting to protect religious freedom. This is one of many issues on which President Donald J. Trump and I worked on together to take a strong stand for religious liberty. I also started the Religious Liberty Task Force at the Department of Justice to protect religious freedom across the entire government.

Sessions is running for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senate in the Republican primary on July 14. His opponent is former Auburn head football Coach Tommy Tuberville.

Although the majority opinion focused more on administrative law than on religious liberty, the Courts decision was a win for religious freedom because it upheld important rules that protect Americans with religious and moral objections to Obamacares contraceptive mandate, said Matt Clark, the attorney who wrote the Foundations amicus brief in this case.

Justice Alitos concurring opinion importantly emphasized that the courts must defer to a persons interpretation of his religious obligations when he raises a religious objection, Clark continued. As James Madison wrote in 1785, The Religion then of every man must be left to the conviction and conscience of every man; and it is the right of every man to exercise it as these may dictate.

Kayla Moore is the President of the Foundation for Moral Law.

The main opinion said that Congress considers religious liberty to be an unalienable right, Moore said. We commend Congress and the Court for recognizing it as such, and we hope that the Court will take that principle to its logical conclusion in every religious freedom case that it considers.

Bible scholar and cultural commentator Dr. Michael Brown said, This is a tremendous victory for freedom of religion and conscience in America. Under Obamacare, employers were forced to provide birth control coverage as part of their health plans, which for many Catholics in particular would be in violation of their faith. The court has overwhelmingly ruled for religious freedom, honoring moral objections of employers who now may opt out of providing abortion or birth control services.

The Supreme Court also released a ruling Wednesday saying religious institutions have the right to pick their own employees and are exempt from secular anti-discrimination laws.

Trump and moral conservatives won two big ones, Brown said.

In Our Lady of Guadalupe School v. Morrissey-Berru the Court ruled that the First Amendment prevents courts from intervening in employment disputes between religious schools and the teachers at those schools who are entrusted with the responsibility of instructing their students in the faith.

Chief Justice John Roberts wrote, The religious education and formation of students is the very reason for the existence of most private religious schools, and therefore the selection and supervision of the teachers upon whom the schools rely to do this work lie at the core of their mission. Judicial review of the way in which religious schools discharge those responsibilities would undermine the independence of religious institutions in a way that the First Amendment does not tolerate.

Brown is the author of the new book, Evangelicals at the Crossroads: Will We Pass the Trump Test? He has written 35 books and hosts a nationally syndicated daily talk radio show The Line of Fire, as well as the host of shows on GOD TV, NRBTV, and METV.

Barbara Ann Luttrell is the Vice President of External Affairs for Planned Parenthood Southeast.

Planned Parenthood SE was upset with both rulings.

Today, the Supreme Court of the United States upheld two Trump administration rules that allow employers and universities to push their religious or moral beliefs on employees and students by denying them access to insurance that covers birth control, Luttrelll said in a statement. Bosses and universities will be able to decide based on their own objections if their health insurance plans cover birth control.

Staci Fox is the President and CEO of Planned Parenthood Southeast.

Todays ruling deals yet another devastating blow to health care access in this country, Fox said. As is so often the case, it will hit people of color and low-income people hardest, and in the middle of a global pandemic that is already ravaging those communities. It is more proof that reproductive rights are under attack at all levels not just abortion access.

Both decisions were victories for Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall. The State of Alabama, under Marshalls leadership, had previously joined multistate amicus briefs to the Supreme Court in both cases, supporting the Little Sisters of the Poor and Our Lady of Guadalupe School: Little Sisters of the Poor v. Pennsylvania; and Our Lady of Guadalupe School v. Morrissey-Berru.

The First Amendment rightly recognizes that one of the unalienable rights all men and women possess is the right to exercise their faith, Marshall wrote in a statement. And today the Supreme Court has reaffirmed that fundamental truth in two important decisions. Thankfully, the Court recognized that the federal government need not force nuns to violate their sincerely held beliefs by providing contraceptive coverage to employees who help them care for the sick. And the Court likewise reaffirmed that the government has no authority to tell religious schools who they must hire or retain to teach their faith.

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Police may serve search warrants out of their jurisdiction, Alabama AG says - alreporter.com

What the end of Moores Law will mean for the tech world and consumers – MyNorthwest.com

Are we ready for the end of Moores Law? Its something that could have huge ramifications in the tech world, and yet we dont seem to be doing much about it at the moment. So says David Rotman, editor of MIT Technology Review, who joined Seattles Morning News to explain what it is and why it matters.

It was in 1965 that Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors you could squeeze into a computer chip would double every year. And then later it became every two years. So its a prediction that you would get more powerful, faster computer chips every two years, he said.

When he predicted it, there were about 50 transistors on a chip. By 1975 it was 65,000 and now its 50 billion transistors on a chip, and thats why we have such powerful devices, Rotman explained. When you think about the progress, almost everything we use, our devices from smartphones to cloud computing to artificial intelligence all depends on the progress. The iPhone is 100,000 times more powerful in computing power than the computer on the Apollo spacecraft that went to the moon.

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So what does it mean if this pace of progress doesnt continue? Weve come to expect the level of ease of use and immediacy that you get from an iPhone with its billions of transistors. Is there a change around the corner?

We know Moores Law will end sooner or later, and no one knows quite when, but it will end (likely within the next 10 years). So what happens next? No one really knows what comes next. And maybe more importantly, no one is really working on whats the next big technology, he said.

SCOTUS decision on scholarships to religious schools not applicable to WA

Thats what I found a bit troubling at the end of the article is that were not spending the money and the resources to find the next great technology that will drive progress through the next 50 years.

One of the possibilities is the advent of quantum computing because there youre using particles that presumably are as small as nature permits.

Quantum computing is, for now, very specialized. Its amazing what it may be able to do, but its not a generalized computing technology, he said.

Why do we not appear to be investing in the next big technology? Partially because it might require tossing out the way we do things now.

It would take you to completely throw out the rule book, rethink everything. And thats why Im thinking about what comes after Moores Law, it will end over the next 10 to 20 years, and finding a different approach will mean rethinking everything. And thats going to take a long time its going to take a lot of smart people thinking hard about it, he said.

Many of the things that we really are interested in these days, for example artificial intelligence the idea of self-driving cars or all these things, robotics that think for themselves these amazing technologies are really computational intensive, Rotman said. They require really powerful computers and so we just have an endless appetite for computational power.

Listen to Seattles Morning News weekday mornings from 5 9 a.m. on KIRO Radio, 97.3 FM. Subscribe to thepodcast here.

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What the end of Moores Law will mean for the tech world and consumers - MyNorthwest.com

If transistors can’t get smaller, then coders have to get smarter – MIT News

In 1965, Intel co-founder Gordon Moore predicted that the number of transistors that could fit on a computer chip would grow exponentially and they did, doubling about every two years. For half a century, Moores Law has endured: Computers have gotten smaller, faster, cheaper, and more efficient, enabling the rapid worldwide adoption of PCs, smartphones, high-speed internet, and more.

This miniaturization trend has led to silicon chips today that have almost unimaginably small circuitry. Transistors, the tiny switches that implement computer microprocessors, are so small that 1,000 of them laid end-to-end are no wider than a human hair. And for a long time, the smaller the transistors were, the faster they could switch. But today, were approaching the limit of how small transistors can get. As a result, over the past decade researchers have been scratching their heads to find other ways to improve performance so that the computer industry can continue to innovate.

While we wait for the maturation of new computing technologies like quantum, carbon nanotubes, or photonics (which may take a while), other approaches will be needed to get performance as Moores Law comes to an end. In a recent journal article published in Science, a team from MITs Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory (CSAIL) identifies three key areas to prioritize to continue to deliver computing speed-ups: better software, new algorithms, and more streamlined hardware.

Senior author Charles E. Leiserson says that the performance benefits from miniaturization have been so great that, for decades, programmers have been able to prioritize making code-writing easier rather than making the code itself run faster. The inefficiency that this tendency introduces has been acceptable, because faster computer chips have always been able to pick up the slack.

But nowadays, being able to make further advances in fields like machine learning, robotics, and virtual reality will require huge amounts of computational power that miniaturization can no longer provide, says Leiserson, the Edwin Sibley Webster Professor in MIT's Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. If we want to harness the full potential of these technologies, we must change our approach to computing.

Leiserson co-wrote the paper, published this week, with Research Scientist Neil Thompson, Professor Daniel Sanchez, Adjunct Professor Butler Lampson, and research scientists Joel Emer, Bradley Kuszmaul, and Tao Schardl.

No more Moore

The authors make recommendations about three areas of computing: software, algorithms, and hardware architecture.

With software, they say that programmers previous prioritization of productivity over performance has led to problematic strategies like reduction: taking code that worked on problem A and using it to solve problem B. For example, if someone has to create a system to recognize yes-or-no voice commands, but doesnt want to code a whole new custom program, they could take an existing program that recognizes a wide range of words and tweak it to respond only to yes-or-no answers.

While this approach reduces coding time, the inefficiencies it creates quickly compound: if a single reduction is 80 percent as efficient as a custom solution, and you then add 20 layers of reduction, the code will ultimately be 100 times less efficient than it could be.

These are the kinds of strategies that programmers have to rethink as hardware improvements slow down, says Thompson. We cant keep doing business as usual if we want to continue to get the speed-ups weve grown accustomed to.

Instead, the researchers recommend techniques like parallelizing code. Much existing software has been designed using ancient assumptions that processors can only do only one operation at a time. But in recent years multicore technology has enabled complex tasks to be completed thousands of times faster and in a much more energy-efficient way.

Since Moore's Law will not be handing us improved performance on a silver platter, we will have to deliver performance the hard way, says Moshe Vardi, a professor in computational engineering at Rice University. This is a great opportunity for computing research, and the [MIT CSAIL] report provides a road map for such research.

As for algorithms, the team suggests a three-pronged approach that includes exploring new problem areas, addressing concerns about how algorithms scale, and tailoring them to better take advantage of modern hardware.

Lastly, in terms of hardware architecture, the team advocates that hardware be streamlined so that problems can be solved with fewer transistors and less silicon. Streamlining includes using simpler processors and creating hardware tailored to specific applications, like the graphics-processing unit is tailored for computer graphics.

Hardware customized for particular domains can be much more efficient and use far fewer transistors, enabling applications to run tens to hundreds of times faster, says Schardl. More generally, hardware streamlining would further encourage parallel programming, creating additional chip area to be used for more circuitry that can operate in parallel.

While these approaches may be the best path forward, the researchers say that it wont always be an easy one. Organizations that use such techniques may not know the benefits of their efforts until after theyve invested a lot of engineering time. Plus, the speed-ups wont be as consistent as they were with Moores Law: they may be dramatic at first, and then require large amounts of effort for smaller improvements.

Certain companies have already gotten the memo.

For tech giants like Google and Amazon, the huge scale of their data centers means that even small improvements in software performance can result in large financial returns, says Thompson. But while these firms may be leading the charge, many others will need to take these issues seriously if they want to stay competitive.

Getting improvements in the areas identified by the team will also require building up the infrastructure and workforce that make them possible.

Performance growth will require new tools, programming languages, and hardware to facilitate more and better performance engineering, says Leiserson. It also means computer scientists being better educated about how we can make software, algorithms, and hardware work together, instead of putting them in different silos.

This work was supported, in part, by the National Science Foundation.

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If transistors can't get smaller, then coders have to get smarter - MIT News

Major online conference on COVID-19 and economy featuring eminent speakers this Friday – Scottish Legal News

Published 8 June 2020

A number of eminent figures are set to speak at a conferenceon the current crisis and the global economy.

The full-day webinar hosted by the Corporate and Financial Law Research Group of the University of Glasgow and Edinburgh Law School will explore the impact of COVID-19 on the global economy.

The global pandemic has prompted a series of unprecedented interventions by governments and regulatory agencies around the world. In the medium term COVID-19 might prove the watershed moment of this decade and beyond in a number of contexts.

These include a re-orientation of economic and monetary policy, the future shape of financial markets, debt sustainability and preservation of financial stability, and the development of corporate governance norms to serve social growth and the green economy.

This full-day webinar will examine what these changes might bring. It will specifically focus on the COVID-19 response in Europe (encompassing the eurozone, rest of the EU, and the UK). Eminent speakers and leading experts will consider the economic and legal aspects of the pandemic response, how these challenge todays dominant paradigms in law and the economy, and their implications for the future.

Does the global pandemic signal a paradigm shift in law and the economy? will feature a roster of top speakers including:

For speaker bios and short summaries of the presentations see here.

Register for the event here.

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Major online conference on COVID-19 and economy featuring eminent speakers this Friday - Scottish Legal News

This Week’s Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through June 6) – Singularity Hub

IMPACT

Cant Go Out and Protest? Heres How to Help From HomeDemetria Mosley | WiredWhether youre trying to maintain your social distance or just looking for other ways to speak up, here are some ideas on how to contribute. Not everyone is a front-liner, and thats OK because we need all types of people, says Andra Hudson, an activist and prison reformist based in North Carolina. There are many ways people can help out from their homes, and we need people to do it. We need everyone to show up.'

How to Protest Safely in the Age of SurveillanceAndy Greenberg and Lily Hay Newman | WiredIf youre going out to protestas is your right under the First Amendmentand bringing your smartphone with you, there are some basic steps you should take tosafeguard your privacy. Thesurveillance toolsthat state and federal law enforcement groups have used at protests for years put it at risk right along withyour physical wellbeing.

ARK Invest: AI Training Costs Dropped 100-Fold Between 2017 and 2019Kyle Wiggers | VentureBeatMachine learning systems are cheaper to train now than ever before. Thats the assertion of ARK Invest, which today published ameta-analysisindicating the cost of training is improving at 50 times the pace of Moores law, the principle that computer hardware performance doubles every two years.

All This Chaos Might Be Giving You Crisis FatigueMatt Simon | WiredYou might at this point feel lost or numb, and thats perfectly natural. Psychologists call it crisis fatigue: Your body is well adapted to handle temporary stresses, but it can get overwhelmed by the constant, unrelenting pressures of this horrible year.

Salto Jumping Robot Masters Pinpoint LandingsEvan Ackerman | IEEE SpectrumAs far as we know, the best way of getting Salto to stop jumping without destroying itself has been for someone with exceptional timing to try and snatch it directly out of the air mid-bounce. While amazing at jumping, Salto hasnt been particularly good at not-jumping. That is, at landing. Until now!

Lidar Helps Uncover an Ancient, Kilometer-Long Mayan StructureDevin Coldewey | TechCrunchLidaris fast becoming one of the most influential tools in archaeology, revealing things in a few hours what might have taken months of machete wielding and manual measurements otherwise. The latest such discovery is an enormous Mayan structure, more than a kilometer long, 3,000 years old, and seemingly used for astronomical observations.

The Facebook Groups Where People Pretend the Pandemic Isnt HappeningKaitlyn Tiffany | The AtlanticLosing track of a friend in a packed bar or screaming to be heard over a live band is not something thats happening much in the real world at the moment, but it happens all the time in the 2,100-person Facebook group a group where we all pretend were in the same venue. So does losing shoes and Juul pods, and shouting matches over which bands are the saddest, and therefore the greatest.

Image credit:Lucas Benjamin /Unsplash

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This Week's Awesome Tech Stories From Around the Web (Through June 6) - Singularity Hub

‘The problem of gendered language is universal’ how AI reveals media bias – The Guardian

If, during an election campaign, you heard one candidate described as brave and another candidate described as strong, which of the two would you be more likely to vote for? If the answer to this question seems obvious to you, thats because logically it is. But it also demonstrates the power of language to shape our thinking and influence our behaviour.

Gendered language is understood as language that has a bias towards a particular gender [and] reflects and maintains pre-existing social distinctions, explains Roxana Lupu, an expert in applied linguistics. It shows us two things not only does it signal the presence of sexism in the society, but it also reinforces those beliefs and perceptions. To put it simply: gendered language is that which promotes bias towards one gender, while simultaneously entrenching such bias further.

For a relatively new field of study in sociolinguistics (gendered language only rose to academic prominence in the 1970s), it has had no shortage of attention emerging alongside second-wave feminism, it deepened the collective understanding of how gender discrimination is proliferated, both directly and indirectly.

Lupu believes the media plays a fundamental role in disseminating gendered language among the population. We need to raise awareness to drive change, she says.

But raising awareness is hindered by a lack of information on just how big the problem is. Thats where artificial intelligence (AI) comes in.

Never before have we had the capability to analyse language in such a meaningful way at such massive scale, says Rich Wilson, owner of Deviance (a technology company that focuses on language analytics). This represents a huge opportunity for broad areas such as cultural or gender research, he continues, which means that evidence is now indisputable and quantifiable rather than just anecdotal.

It was precisely this thinking that inspired a recent media coverage study conducted by a female-led marketing agency, Mac+Moore, with the support of Deviance. As marketeers, the brands founders, Jess MacIntyre and Natalie Moores, spend a large portion of their time discussing the power of language and messaging with their clients. We work closely with companies to craft and shape the way they communicate with their audience, Moores says, so we know better than most how language can be a very powerful and persuasive tool and has the ability to shape peoples perception.

The difference in the medias treatment of men and women is a topic that has been growing in coverage over the past decade. Savvy brands such as Gillette have been using their marketing campaigns to highlight and challenge gender discrimination and how it damages women. But Mac+Moore wanted to take this one step further. We wanted to produce a data set that irrefutably demonstrated how gendered language is used in the media, says Moores, so that we had hard evidence that couldnt just be dismissed as an opinion.

Using a technique known as comparative linguistics (where two data sets are analysed in relation to one another), Deviances software would enable them to analyse in a detailed way any linguistic differences in the way men and women are described in the source material. Not only this, but it would enable the analysis of articles by publications from all across the UKs media landscape at a volume higher than humans alone have ever been able to process and in only a matter of hours. AI is perfect because it allows the analysis to be completely removed from any bias that we may have it allows for complete neutrality, says MacIntyre.

We chose the Labour leadership race as source material because its so topical and, whats more, theres never been a female leader of the party, but the odds of one being elected in this contest were four to one, says Moores. Statistically, it is more likely than ever that a woman will be elected, which would enable us to see with more clarity how gendered language is affecting the candidates chances for better or for worse.

And so they fed 145,000 words through the software, sourced from recent coverage of all five candidates from a broad cross-section of the medias online content amounting to 250 articles in total.

The results were startling: articles covering the only man in the race, Keir Starmer, were 4.4 times more likely to describe him using words meaning preferred and favoured, whereas the female candidates were 1.9 times more likely to be described using words such as brave (arguably patronising in this context), sad, violent/angry, and dislike.

Moreover, the results show that there is a huge focus on gender through the use of titles such as Ms or Mrs, which they were three times more likely to use for female candidates, whereas Starmer was referred to mostly by just his surname or the honorific Sir, which holds a positive connotation. Finally, Starmer was 1.6 times more likely to be discussed in terms of professional employment, politics, law and order, and belonging to a group, whereas the female candidates were much more likely to be discussed in relation to their families and, particularly, their fathers.

Not just this, but the web scraper tool used on the first analysis picked up the content of digital advertising on each website. This revealed that whenever a female candidate was discussed, ads were served against the content for clothing, fashion and beauty, says MacIntyre. This never happened for Keir Starmer the adverts served in articles for him were much more gender neutral. This, they believe, indicates an entrenched data bias in the software used by digital ad services that could potentially influence who consumes the content, the implication being that articles written about female candidates are only relevant for female readers, says MacIntyre.

There is strong evidence to support the theory that women are being portrayed and represented within the media in an overly negative and gendered way, which could be impacting the outcome of election campaigns, says Moores, and the implications of this are potentially huge both in politics but also wider society.

The two women are energised by the research and plan to use the results to push for companies to think more carefully about how content is presented. Although these results tell the story of one leadership election, the problem of gendered language is universal, says MacIntyre.

More than anything, the study demonstrates how AI can drive forward our awareness of the scale of the problem of gendered language: the first step to addressing the issue. The media has a responsibility to contribute to an equal society, says Lupu. For Wilson, if AI can help to highlight a path to progress, then we should grasp that opportunity with both hands. MacIntyre agrees: After all, if the world is changing, why shouldnt our language change too?

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'The problem of gendered language is universal' how AI reveals media bias - The Guardian

Were not prepared for the end of Moores Law – MIT Technology Review

Gordon Moores 1965 forecast that the number of components on an integrated circuit would double every year until it reached an astonishing 65,000 by 1975 is the greatest technological prediction of the last half-century. When it proved correct in 1975, he revised what has become known as Moores Law to a doubling of transistors on a chip every two years.

Since then, his prediction has defined the trajectory of technology and, in many ways, of progress itself.

Moores argument was an economic one. Integrated circuits, with multiple transistors and other electronic devices interconnected with aluminum metal lines on a tiny square of silicon wafer, had been invented a few years earlier by Robert Noyce at Fairchild Semiconductor. Moore, the companys R&D director, realized, as he wrote in 1965, that with these new integrated circuits, the cost per component is nearly inversely proportional to the number of components. It was a beautiful bargainin theory, the more transistors you added, the cheaper each one got. Moore also saw that there was plenty of room for engineering advances to increase the number of transistors you could affordably and reliably put on a chip.

Soon these cheaper, more powerful chips would become what economists like to call a general purpose technologyone so fundamental that it spawns all sorts of other innovations and advances in multiple industries. A few years ago, leading economists credited the information technology made possible by integrated circuits with a third of US productivity growth since 1974. Almost every technology we care about, from smartphones to cheap laptops to GPS, is a direct reflection of Moores prediction. It has also fueled todays breakthroughs in artificial intelligence and genetic medicine, by giving machine-learning techniques the ability to chew through massive amounts of data to find answers.

But how did a simple prediction, based on extrapolating from a graph of the number of transistors by yeara graph that at the time had only a few data pointscome to define a half-century of progress? In part, at least, because the semiconductor industry decided it would.

Wikimedia

Moore wrote that cramming more components onto integrated circuits, the title of his 1965 article, would lead to such wonders as home computersor at least terminals connected to a central computerautomatic controls for automobiles, and personal portable communications equipment. In other words, stick to his road map of squeezing ever more transistors onto chips and it would lead you to the promised land. And for the following decades, a booming industry, the government, and armies of academic and industrial researchers poured money and time into upholding Moores Law, creating a self-fulfilling prophecy that kept progress on track with uncanny accuracy. Though the pace of progress has slipped in recent years, the most advanced chips today have nearly 50 billion transistors.

Every year since 2001, MIT Technology Review has chosen the 10 most important breakthrough technologies of the year. Its a list of technologies that, almost without exception, are possible only because of the computation advances described by Moores Law.

For some of the items on this years list the connection is obvious: consumer devices, including watches and phones, infused with AI; climate-change attribution made possible by improved computer modeling and data gathered from worldwide atmospheric monitoring systems; and cheap, pint-size satellites. Others on the list, including quantum supremacy, molecules discovered using AI, and even anti-aging treatments and hyper-personalized drugs, are due largely to the computational power available to researchers.

But what happens when Moores Law inevitably ends? Or what if, as some suspect, it has already died, and we are already running on the fumes of the greatest technology engine of our time?

RIP

Its over. This year that became really clear, says Charles Leiserson, a computer scientist at MIT and a pioneer of parallel computing, in which multiple calculations are performed simultaneously. The newest Intel fabrication plant, meant to build chips with minimum feature sizes of 10 nanometers, was much delayed, delivering chips in 2019, five years after the previous generation of chips with 14-nanometer features. Moores Law, Leiserson says, was always about the rate of progress, and were no longer on that rate. Numerous other prominent computer scientists have also declared Moores Law dead in recent years. In early 2019, the CEO of the large chipmaker Nvidia agreed.

In truth, its been more a gradual decline than a sudden death. Over the decades, some, including Moore himself at times, fretted that they could see the end in sight, as it got harder to make smaller and smaller transistors. In 1999, an Intel researcher worried that the industrys goal of making transistors smaller than 100 nanometers by 2005 faced fundamental physical problems with no known solutions, like the quantum effects of electrons wandering where they shouldnt be.

For years the chip industry managed to evade these physical roadblocks. New transistor designs were introduced to better corral the electrons. New lithography methods using extreme ultraviolet radiation were invented when the wavelengths of visible light were too thick to precisely carve out silicon features of only a few tens of nanometers. But progress grew ever more expensive. Economists at Stanford and MIT have calculated that the research effort going into upholding Moores Law has risen by a factor of 18 since 1971.

Likewise, the fabs that make the most advanced chips are becoming prohibitively pricey. The cost of a fab is rising at around 13% a year, and is expected to reach $16 billion or more by 2022. Not coincidentally, the number of companies with plans to make the next generation of chips has now shrunk to only three, down from eight in 2010 and 25 in 2002.

Finding successors to todays silicon chips will take years of research.If youre worried about what will replace moores Law, its time to panic.

Nonetheless, Intelone of those three chipmakersisnt expecting a funeral for Moores Law anytime soon. Jim Keller, who took over as Intels head of silicon engineering in 2018, is the man with the job of keeping it alive. He leads a team of some 8,000 hardware engineers and chip designers at Intel. When he joined the company, he says, many were anticipating the end of Moores Law. If they were right, he recalls thinking, thats a drag and maybe he had made a really bad career move.

But Keller found ample technical opportunities for advances. He points out that there are probably more than a hundred variables involved in keeping Moores Law going, each of which provides different benefits and faces its own limits. It means there are many ways to keep doubling the number of devices on a chipinnovations such as 3D architectures and new transistor designs.

These days Keller sounds optimistic. He says he has been hearing about the end of Moores Law for his entire career. After a while, he decided not to worry about it. He says Intel is on pace for the next 10 years, and he will happily do the math for you: 65 billion (number of transistors) times 32 (if chip density doubles every two years) is 2 trillion transistors. Thats a 30 times improvement in performance, he says, adding that if software developers are clever, we could get chips that are a hundred times faster in 10 years.

Still, even if Intel and the other remaining chipmakers can squeeze out a few more generations of even more advanced microchips, the days when you could reliably count on faster, cheaper chips every couple of years are clearly over. That doesnt, however, mean the end of computational progress.

Time to panic

Neil Thompson is an economist, but his office is at CSAIL, MITs sprawling AI and computer center, surrounded by roboticists and computer scientists, including his collaborator Leiserson. In a new paper, the two document ample room for improving computational performance through better software, algorithms, and specialized chip architecture.

One opportunity is in slimming down so-called software bloat to wring the most out of existing chips. When chips could always be counted on to get faster and more powerful, programmers didnt need to worry much about writing more efficient code. And they often failed to take full advantage of changes in hardware architecture, such as the multiple cores, or processors, seen in chips used today.

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Thompson and his colleagues showed that they could get a computationally intensive calculation to run some 47 times faster just by switching from Python, a popular general-purpose programming language, to the more efficient C. Thats because C, while it requires more work from the programmer, greatly reduces the required number of operations, making a program run much faster. Further tailoring the code to take full advantage of a chip with 18 processing cores sped things up even more. In just 0.41 seconds, the researchers got a result that took seven hours with Python code.

That sounds like good news for continuing progress, but Thompson worries it also signals the decline of computers as a general purpose technology. Rather than lifting all boats, as Moores Law has, by offering ever faster and cheaper chips that were universally available, advances in software and specialized architecture will now start to selectively target specific problems and business opportunities, favoring those with sufficient money and resources.

Indeed, the move to chips designed for specific applications, particularly in AI, is well under way. Deep learning and other AI applications increasingly rely on graphics processing units (GPUs) adapted from gaming, which can handle parallel operations, while companies like Google, Microsoft, and Baidu are designing AI chips for their own particular needs. AI, particularly deep learning, has a huge appetite for computer power, and specialized chips can greatly speed up its performance, says Thompson.

But the trade-off is that specialized chips are less versatile than traditional CPUs. Thompson is concerned that chips for more general computing are becoming a backwater, slowing the overall pace of computer improvement, as he writes in an upcoming paper, The Decline of Computers as a General Purpose Technology.

At some point, says Erica Fuchs, a professor of engineering and public policy at Carnegie Mellon, those developing AI and other applications will miss the decreases in cost and increases in performance delivered by Moores Law. Maybe in 10 years or 30 yearsno one really knows whenyoure going to need a device with that additional computation power, she says.

The problem, says Fuchs, is that the successors to todays general purpose chips are unknown and will take years of basic research and development to create. If youre worried about what will replace Moores Law, she suggests, the moment to panic is now. There are, she says, really smart people in AI who arent aware of the hardware constraints facing long-term advances in computing. Whats more, she says, because application--specific chips are proving hugely profitable, there are few incentives to invest in new logic devices and ways of doing computing.

Wanted: A Marshall Plan for chips

In 2018, Fuchs and her CMU colleagues Hassan Khan and David Hounshell wrote a paper tracing the history of Moores Law and identifying the changes behind todays lack of the industry and government collaboration that fostered so much progress in earlier decades. They argued that the splintering of the technology trajectories and the short-term private profitability of many of these new splinters means we need to greatly boost public investment in finding the next great computer technologies.

If economists are right, and much of the growth in the 1990s and early 2000s was a result of microchipsand if, as some suggest, the sluggish productivity growth that began in the mid-2000s reflects the slowdown in computational progressthen, says Thompson, it follows you should invest enormous amounts of money to find the successor technology. Were not doing it. And its a public policy failure.

Theres no guarantee that such investments will pay off. Quantum computing, carbon nanotube transistors, even spintronics, are enticing possibilitiesbut none are obvious replacements for the promise that Gordon Moore first saw in a simple integrated circuit. We need the research investments now to find out, though. Because one prediction is pretty much certain to come true: were always going to want more computing power.

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Were not prepared for the end of Moores Law - MIT Technology Review

Helix of an Elusive Rare Earth Metal Could Help Push Moore’s Law to The Next Level – ScienceAlert

To cram ever more computing power into your pocket, engineers need to come up with increasingly ingenious ways to add transistors to an already crowded space.

Unfortunately there's a limit to how small you can make a wire. But a twisted form of rare earth metal just might have what it takes to push the boundaries a little further.

A team of researchers funded by the US Army have discovered a way to turn twisted nanowires of one of the rarest of rare earth metals,tellurium, into a material with just the right properties that make it an ideal transistor at just a couple of nanometres across.

"This tellurium material is really unique," says Peide Ye, an electrical engineer from Purdue University.

"It builds a functional transistor with the potential to be the smallest in the world."

Transistors are the work horse of anything that computes information, using tiny changes in charge to prevent or allow larger currents to flow.

Typically made of semiconducting materials, they can be thought of as traffic intersections for electrons. A small voltage change in one place opens the gate for current to flow, serving as both a switch and an amplifier.

Combinations of open and closed switches are the physical units representing the binary language underpinning logic in computer operations. As such, the more you have in one spot, the more operations you can run.

Ever since the first chunky transistor was prototyped a little more than 70 years ago, a variety of methods and novel materials have led to regular downsizing of the transistor.

In fact the shrinking was so regular that co-founder of the computer giant Intel, George Moore, famouslynoted in 1965 that it would follow a trend of transistors doubling in density every two years.

Today, that trend has slowed considerably. For one thing, more transistors in one spot means more heat building up.

But there are also only so many ways you can shave atoms from a material and still have it function as a transistor. Which is where tellurium comes in.

Though not exactly a common element in Earth's crust, it's a semi-metal in high demand, finding a place in a variety of alloys to improve hardness and help it resist corrosion.

It also has properties of a semiconductor; carrying a current under some circumstances and acting as a resistor under others.

Curious about its characteristics on a nanoscale, engineers grew single-dimensional chains of the element and took a close look at them under an electron microscope. Surprisingly, the super-thin 'wire' wasn't exactly a neat line of atoms.

"Silicon atoms look straight, but these tellurium atoms are like a snake. This is a very original kind of structure," says Ye.

On closer inspection they worked out that the chain was made of pairs of tellurium atoms bonded strongly together, and then stacking into a crystal form pulled into a helix by weaker van der Waal forces.

Building any kind of electronics from a crinkly nanowire is just asking for trouble, so to give the material some structure the researchers went on the hunt for something to encapsulate it in.

The solution, they found, was a nanotube of boron nitride. Not only did the tellurium helix slip neatly inside, the tube acted as an insulator, ticking all the boxes that would make it suit life as a transistor.

Most importantly, the whole semiconducting wire was a mere 2 nanometres across, putting it in the same league as the 1 nanometre record set a few years ago.

Time will tell if the team can squeeze it down further with fewer chains, or even if it will function as expected in a circuit.

If it works as hoped, it could contribute to the next generation of miniaturised electronics, potentially halving the size of current cutting edge microchips.

"Next, the researchers will optimise the device to further improve its performance, and demonstrate a highly efficient functional electronic circuit using these tiny transistors, potentially through collaboration with ARL researchers," says Joe Qiu, program manager for the Army Research Office.

Even if the concept pans out, there's a variety of other challenges for shrinking technology to overcome before we'll find it in our pockets.

While tellurium isn't currently considered to be a scarce resource, in spite of its relative rarity, it could be in high demand in future electronics such as solar cells.

This research was published in Nature Electronics.

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Helix of an Elusive Rare Earth Metal Could Help Push Moore's Law to The Next Level - ScienceAlert

The Unsolved Murder of Civil Rights Activist Harry Moore – Smithsonian.com

It was late on Christmas night, 1951, but Harry and Harriette Moore had yet to open any gifts. Instead they had delayed the festivities in anticipation of the arrival of their younger daughter, Evangeline, who was taking a train home from Washington, D.C. to celebrate along with her sister and grandmother. The Moores had another cause for celebration: the day marked their 25th wedding anniversary, a testament to their unshakeable partnership. But that night in their quiet home on a citrus grove in rural Mims, Florida, the African American couple were fatal victims of a horrific terrorist attack at the hands of those who wanted to silence the Moores.

At 10:20 p.m., a blast ripped apart their bedroom, splintering the floorboards, ceiling and front porch. The explosion was so powerful that witness reported hearing it several miles away. Pamphlets pushing for voters rights floated out of the house and onto the street, remnants of a long fight for justice. Harry Moore had spent much of the last two decades earning the enmity of Floridas white supremacists as he organized for equal pay, voter registration, and justice for murdered African Americans. And yet despite his immense sacrifice and the nations initial shock at his assassination, Moores name soon faded from the pantheon of Civil Rights martyrs.

After the attack, Moores mother and daughter knew they would be unable to get an ambulance willing to transport a black victim, so nearby relatives drove the wounded Harry and Harriette to the town of Sanford, which was more than 30 miles away on a dark, two-lane road bracketed by dense foliage. Harry died shortly after arriving in the hospital, Harriette would die a little more than a week later. When Evangeline arrived at the train station the next day, She didnt see her mother and father, but she saw her aunts and uncles and family members. She knew something was wrong, says Sonya Mallard, coordinator for the Harry T. and Harriette V. Moore Cultural Complex, who knew Evangeline before her death in 2015. Her uncle broke the news on the drive to the hospital, and her world was never the same again. Never.

In the years before his death, Harry Moore was increasingly a marked manand he knew it. But he had begun charting this course in the 1930s, when he worked tirelessly to register black voters. He later expanded his efforts into fighting injustice in lynching cases (Florida had more lynchings per capita than any other state at the time), putting him in the crosshairs of Floridas most violent and virulent racists.

Harry T. Moore understood that we had to make a better way, we had to change what was going on here in the state of Florida, says Mallard. Traveling around the state on roads where it was too dangerous to even use a public restroom, Moores mother, Rosa, worried hed be killed, but he kept on going because he knew it was bigger than him, says Mallard.

Moore was born in 1905 in the panhandle town of Houston, Florida. His father, Johnny, owned a small shop and worked for the railroad, and died when Harry was just 9 years old. After trying to support her son as a single parent, Rosa sent Harry to live with his aunts in Jacksonville, a hub for African American business and culture that would prove to be influential on the young Moore. After graduating from Florida Memorial College, as todays university was then known, Moore likely could have made a relatively comfortable life in Jacksonville.

However, the climate in Florida as a whole as hostile to African Americans. His formative years were ones of pervasive racial violence often unchecked by officials. Before the 1920 election, displaying the impunity enjoyed by white supremacists, the Ku Klux Klan marched in downtown Orlando specifically to intimidate black voters, says Ben Brotemarkle, executive director of the Florida Historical Society. When a man named July Perry came to Orlando from nearby Ocoee to vote, he was beaten, shot and hung from a light post and then the primarily African American town was burned in a mob rampage that killed dozens. For decades after, Ocoee had no black residents and was known as a sundown town; today the city of 46,000 is 21 percent African American.

In 1925, Moore began teaching at a school for black students in Cocoa, Florida, a few miles south of Mims and later assumed the role of principal at the Titusville Colored School. His first year in Cocoa, Harry met Harriette Simms, three years his senior, at a party. She later became a teacher after the birth of their first daughter, Annie Rosalea, known as Peaches. Evangeline was born in 1930.)

His civic activism flowed from his educational activism. He would bring his own materials and educate students about black history, but what he also did was bring in ballots and he taught his students how to vote. He taught his students the importance of the candidates and making a decision to vote for people who took your interests seriously, says Brotemarkle.

In 1934, Moore joined the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), an indication of his growing interest in civic matters. In 1937, Moore pushed for a lawsuit challenging the chasm between black and white teachers salaries in his local Brevard County, with fellow educator John Gilbert as the plaintiff. Moore enlisted the support of NAACP lawyer (and later Supreme Court Justice) Thurgood Marshall, the start of their professional collaboration. The lawsuit was defeated in both the Circuit Court and the Florida Supreme Court. For his efforts, the Moores later lost their teachings jobsas did Gilbert.

In the early 1940s, Moore organized the Florida State conference of the NAACP and significantly increased membership (he would later become its first paid executive secretary). He also formed the Progressive Voters League in Florida in 1944. He understood the significance of the power of the vote. He understood the significance of the power of the pen. And he wrote letters and typed letters to anyone and everyone that would listen. And he knew that [African Americans] had to have a voice and we had to have it by voting, says Mallard. In 1947, building on the U.S. Supreme Court case in which Marshall successfully argued against Texas white primary that excluded minority voters, Moore organized a letter writing campaign to help rebuff bills proposed in the Florida legislature that would effectively perpetuate white primaries. (As the Tampa Bay Times notes, Florida was a leading innovator of discriminatory barriers to voting.)

Before his death, Moores efforts in the state helped increase the number of black voters by more than 100,000, according to the Moore Cultural Complex, a figure sure to catch the attention of influential politicians.

But success was a risky proposition. Moore was coming into a situation in Central Florida where there was a lot of Klan activity, there were a lot of Klansman who had positions in government, and it was a very tenuous time for civil rights, says Brotemarkle. People were openly being intimidated and kept away from the polls, and Moore worked diligently to fight that.

Moore was willing to risk much more than his job. He first became involved in anti-lynching efforts after three white men kidnapped 15-year-old Willie James Howard, bound him with ropes and drowned him in a river for the crime of passing a note to a white girl in 1944. The perpetual inaction in cases like Howards, in which no one was arrested, tried, or convicted, spurred Moore to effect change. In a 1947 letter to Floridas congressional delegation, Moore wrote We cannot afford to wait until the several states get trained or educated to the point where they can take effective action in such cases. Human life is too valuable for more experimenting of this kind. The Federal Government must be empowered to take the necessary action for the protection of its citizens.

Moore letters show a polite, but persistent, push for change. His scholarly nature obscured the profound courage it took to stand up to the hostile forces around him in Florida. Those who knew him recall a quiet, soft-spoken man. The fiery from the pulpit speech? That was not Harry T. Moore. He was much more behind the scenes, but no less aggressive. You can see it from his letters that he was every bit as brave, says Brotemarkle.

Two years before his death, Moore placed himself in harms way in the most prominent manner yet with his involvement in the Groveland Four incident. The men had been accused of raping a white woman; a mob went to drag them from jail and not finding them there, burned and shot into nearby black residents homes. After their arrest, conviction by an all-white jury was practically a foregone conclusion, despite attorneys assertions that the defendants confessions were physically coerced. The case also pitted Moore against Sherriff Willis McCall, who was investigated numerous times in his career for misconduct related to race.

While transporting two of the suspects, McCall shot them, killing one. McCall claimed he had been attacked, but the shootings elicited furious protest. All this took place against the backdrop of the ongoing legal battleeventually, the U.S. Supreme Court ordered a re-trial, which again ended in the conviction of the surviving suspect, who was represented by Thurgood Marshall. (In recent years, Florida has posthumously pardoned and apologized to all four of the accused).

Moore wrote repeatedly to Governor Fuller Warren, methodically dismantling McCalls claims. He admonished Warren that Florida is on trial before the rest of the world, calling on him to remove the officers involved in the shooting. He closed with a reminder that Florida Negro citizens are still mindful of the fact that our votes proved to be your margin of victory in the [runoff election in] 1948. We seek no special favors; but certainly we have a right to expect justice and equal protection of the laws even for the humblest Negro. Shall we be disappointed again?

Compounding Moores woes, just weeks after the shooting of the Groveland suspects and weeks before his own death, he lost his job at the NAACP. Moore had clashed with the organizations national leadership for his forward political involvement and disagreements over fundraising. It was a severe blow, but he continued his commitment to the workalbeit now on an unpaid basis.

During the fall of 1951, Florida saw a rash of religious and racial violence. Over a three-month period, multiple bombs had hit Carver Village, a housing complex in Miami leasing to black tenants, in what was likely the work of the KKK; a synagogue and Catholic church were also menaced. As dark shadow of violence has drifted across sunny Floridacast by terrorist who blast and kill in the night, the Associated Press reported days after the Christmas bombing. If lesser known black residents were targeted, then Moores prominence meant his situation was especially perilous.

Moore ruffled a lot of feathers, and there was a large population of Florida that didnt want to see the type of change that he was part of, says Brotemarkle.

I tried to get him to quit the N.A.A.C.P., thinking something might happen to him some day, Rosa Moore told a reporter after the bombing. But he told me, Im trying to do what I can to elevate the Negro race. Every advancement comes by the way of sacrifice, and if I sacrifice my life or health I still think it is my duty for my race.

News of Moores Christmas night death made headlines across the country. Former First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt expressed her sadness. Governor Warren called for a full investigation but clashed with NAACP executive secretary Walter White, who accused the governor of not doing enough. Warren said White has come to Florida to try to stir up strife and called him a hired Harlem hatemonger.

While Moore may have been out of favor with the NAACPs national leadership shortly before his death, he was venerated soon after. In March of 1952, the NAACP held a fundraising gala in New York City, featuring the Ballad of Harry T. Moore, written by poet Langston Hughes. His name was a rallying cry at numerous events.

The Moore bombings set off the most intense civil rights uproar in a decade, writes Ben Green in Before His Time: The Untold Story of Harry T. Moore, Americas First Civil Rights Martyr. There had been more violent racial incidentsbut the Moore bombing was so personal, so singular a man and his wife blown up in their home on Christmas Day that it became a magnifying glass to focus the nations revulsion.

While the publicity helped galvanize awareness for civil rights on a national level, the assassination soon had a chilling effect on voter registration in Florida. People were petrified, they were scared, says Mallard. The KKK terrorized you, they killed you, they lynched you, they scared you. They did all that to shut you up.

Meanwhile Harriette Moore remained hospitalized for nine days, dying from her injuries one day after her husbands funeral. There isn't much left to fight for. My home is wrecked. My children are grown up. They don't need me. Others can carry on," she had told a reporter in a bedside interview. Harriettes discouragement was palpable, after years of facing the same threats side by side with Harry. She adored her husband, says Mallard.

The crime has never been definitively solved, despite commitments from notorious FBI chief J. Edgar Hoover in the bombings aftermath and from Florida Governor Charlie Crist in the mid-2000s. After almost 70 years, the identity of the killer or killers may never be pinpointed, but those who have studied Moores life and the multiple investigations of the case are confident it was the work of the KKK.

As the movements ranks swelled and the battle was carried to Birmingham, Nashville, Tallahassee, Little Rock, Greensboro and beyond, the unsolved murders of Harry and Harriette Moore, still hanging in limbo, were forgotten, Green writes. For Evangeline and Peaches Moore, the pain and heartache never ceased. The murderers of their parents still walked the streets, and no one seemed to care.

Moores life and death underscore that not all heroes become legends. Today cities like Selma, Montgomery and Memphisnot Mimsevoke images of the Civil Rights struggle. Moore worked for almost two decades without the weight of national outrage behind him. No television cameras documented the brutal violence or produced the images needed to appall Americans in other states. The Maya Lin-designed Civil Rights Memorial situated across the street from the Southern Poverty Law Centers office in Montgomery, Alabama, recognizes martyrs from 1955 until Martin Luther King Jr.s death in 1968. That was 17 years after the Moores were killed.

When you talk about the contemporary civil rights movement, [people] look at the Brown v. Board of Education decision in 1954 as kind of the starting place for the timeline, and while that can be seen as true in a lot of ways, it overlooks a lot of activity that led up to that, says Brotemarkle.

Nonetheless Moores work and legacy helped lay the groundwork for the expansion of civil rights onto the national platform, and Moore has received some belated recognition in recent decades. The Moore Cultural Complex in Mims welcomes visitors to a replica of their home, rebuilt on the original property. Several of their personal effects are on display at the Smithsonians National Museum of African American History & Culture in Washington, D.C.

In looking back at Moores life and work, it is abundantly clear he was never motivated by name recognition in the first place. Moores goal was singular - his daughter would later remember him saying before his death that I have endeavored to help the Negro race and laid my life on the altar.

The rest is here:

The Unsolved Murder of Civil Rights Activist Harry Moore - Smithsonian.com

Stanford University finds that AI is outpacing Moores Law – ComputerWeekly.com

Stanford Universitys AI Index 2019 annual report has found that the speed of artificial intelligence (AI) is outpacing Moores Law.

Moores Law maps out how processor speeds double every 18 months to two years, which means application developers can expect a doubling in application performance for the same hardware cost.

But the Stanford report, produced in partnership with McKinsey & Company, Google, PwC, OpenAI, Genpact and AI21Labs, found that AI computational power is accelerating faster than traditional processor development. Prior to 2012, AI results closely tracked Moores Law, with compute doubling every two years., the report said. Post-2012, compute has been doubling every 3.4 months.

The study looked at how AI algorithms have improved over time, by tracking the progress of the ImageNet image identification program. Given that image classification methods are largely based on supervised machine learning techniques, the reports authors looked at how long it takes to train an AI model and associated costs, which they said represents a measurement of the maturity of AI development infrastructure, reflecting advances in software and hardware.

Their research found that over 18 months, the time required to train a network on cloud infrastructure for supervised image recognition fell from about three hours in October 2017 to about 88 seconds in July 2019. The report noted that data on ImageNet training time on private cloud instances was in line with the public cloud AI training time improvements.

The reports authors used the ResNet image classification model to assess how long it takes algorithms to achieve a high level of accuracy. In October 2017, 13 days of training time were required to reach just above 93% accuracy. The report found that training an AI-based image classification over 13 days to achieve 93% accuracy would have cost about $2,323 in 2017.

The study reported that the latest benchmark available on Stanford DAWNBench , using a cloud TPU on GCP to run the ResNet model to attain image classification accuracy slightly above 93% accuracy, cost just over $12 in September 2018.

The report also explored how far computer vision had progressed, looking at innovative algorithms that push the limits of automatic activity understanding, which can recognise human actions and activities from videos using the ActivityNet Challenge.

One of the tasks in this challenge, called Temporal Activity Localisation, uses a long video sequences that depict more than one activity, and the algorithm is asked to find a given activity. Today, algorithms can accurately recognise hundreds of complex human activities in real time, but the report found that much more work is needed.

After organising the International Activity Recognition Challenge (ActivityNet) for the last four years, we observe that more research is needed to develop methods that can reliably discriminate activities, which involve fine-grained motions and/or subtle patterns in motion cues, objects and human-object interactions, said Bernard Ghanem, associate professor of electrical engineering at King Abdullah University of Science and Technology, in the report.

Looking forward, we foresee the next generation of algorithms to be one that accentuates learning without the need for excessively large manually curated data. In this scenario, benchmarks and competitions will remain a cornerstone to track progress in this self-learning domain.

See the rest here:

Stanford University finds that AI is outpacing Moores Law - ComputerWeekly.com

ASML version of Intel roadmap shows 1.4nm CPUs arrive in 2029 – CPU – News – HEXUS

Intel semiconductor machinery partner ASML presented at the IEEE International Electron Devices Meeting earlier this week and raised eyebrows with an edited version of an Intel processor scaling roadmap. Intel originally showed off this roadmap back in September. However, ASML made it rather more interesting by clearing the fog and overlaying the nanometer node sizes alongside corresponding years, spanning 2019 through to 2029.

Above you can see the original Intel roadmap slide from September. Below is the ASML edited version superimposing numerals indicating node sizes. As AnandTech notes, people could have extrapolated these from 2019 10nm+, ++ and so on, themselves - but it is good to see it in 'ink'.

Overall the slides represent the intended return to a two year cadence for Intel manufacturing process node upgrades. It shows we are now at 10nm, as far as Intel is concerned, and we will see 7nm EUV in 2021, 5nm and new features in 2023, 3nm in 2025, 2nm in 2027, and the first time we have seen charted or mentioned with respect to Intel: 1.4nm in 2029. This 1.4nm scale means a processor feature could be as small as the length of 12 silicon atoms in a row.

Between each node will be a yearly iterative + version - a 'tock' following the process 'tick', if you like. Furthermore, every node shows an opportunity to back port new process features to the previous node, shown as ++ versions. This can help maintain a smooth flow of product if there are any production issues going forward.

Overall it looks like Intel and ASML are aiming to keep step with Moore's Law for the next decade but this might be more of an optimistic schedule than a cold hard realistic plan. Indeed, beyond 2023 Intel is still in the path-finding and 'research' mode, notes AnandTech. Meaning that it is still looking at and assessing new materials, new transistor designs, and so on. To get to 5nm and beyond Intel is considering introducing stacked nanowires and 3D wafer stacking, as highlighted in a presentation by Jim Keller this summer, marking the 50th anniversary of Moore's Law. See the slide above, which seems to chronographically correspond to the slides atop of this article.

Read the original here:

ASML version of Intel roadmap shows 1.4nm CPUs arrive in 2029 - CPU - News - HEXUS

These are the unis to study law at if you want to be minted – The Tab

Sorry to break it to you, but if you're studying English or Philosophy or whatever, there's no pot of gold.

Law, on the other hand. Well, for the low low price of one human soul, you will be rewarded handsomely. In fact, you could be raking in up to 60k just five years after graduating.

Law nerds Legal Cheek have ranked the UK's best and brightest law schools by the median earnings of law grads five years after graduating.

Pretend to be shocked: Oxford and Cambridge top the table, with their grads getting over 50k on average.

In a Champions League-places upset, west country minnows Bristol beat Durham, UCL, York, and Warwick into fourth place.

1: Oxford 67,000

2: Cambridge 58,500

3: LSE 44,700

4: Bristol 42,900

5: Durham 42,100

6: Nottingham 41,800

7: Warwick 41,500

8: KCL 39,300

9: UCL 37,500

10: York 36,400

11: Glasgow 35,100

12: Edinburgh 35,000

13: Exeter 34,700

14: Reading 34,200

15: Aberdeen 33,500

16: Leeds 33,200

17: Manchester 32,800

18: Southampton 32,400

19: Birkbeck 32,100

20: Newcastle 31,900

21: East Anglia 31,700

22: SOAS 31,100

23: Strathclyde 31,000

24: Buckingham 30,800

25: Sussex 30,100

26: Queen Mary 29,800

27: Robert Gordon 29,800

28: City 29,400

29: Leicester 29,400

30Brunel 29,100

31: Dundee 29,100

32: Roehampton 28,900

33: Surrey 28,800

34: Oxford Brookes 28,300

35: Birmingham 28,300

36: Cardiff 27,700

37: Kingston 27,400

38: Open University 27,200

39: Bournemouth 27,100

40: Kent 27,000

41: Sheffield 26,700

42: Brighton 26,500

43: Westminster 26,200

44: Canterbury Christ Church 26,100

45: Glasgow Caledonian 26,000

46: Portsmouth 25,600

47: Edinburgh Napier 25,200

48: Essex 25,100

49: Lancaster 24,900

50: Cumbria 24,900

51: Liverpool 24,800

52: Stirling 24,800

53: Buckinghamshire New 24,700

54: Nottingham Trent 24,700

55: Greenwich 24,300

56: Northumbria 24,000

57: West of England 24,000

58: St Marys 23,800

59: Chester 23,400

60: Staffordshire 23,100

61: Hertfordshire 23,100

62: Hull 23,100

63: Anglia Ruskin 23,000

64: Gloucestershire 23,000

65: Plymouth 23,000

66: London South Bank 22,900

67:Southampton Solent 22,900

68: Salford 22,900

69: Keele 22,800

70: Abertay Dundee 22,800

71: Winchester 22,700

72: Coventry 22,500

73: Sheffield Hallam 22,500

74: West of Scotland 22,500

75: Bangor 22,400

76: Croydon College 22,300

77: Leeds Beckett 22,200

78: Liverpool John Moores 22,200

79: West London 22,100

80: De Montfort 22,000

81: Manchester Metropolitan 21,900

82: Aberystwyth 21,900

83: Middlesex 21,500

84: Swansea 21,500

85: South Wales 21,500

86: Sunderland 21,400

87: Northampton 21,300

88: Birmingham City 21,300

89: Lincoln 21,200

90: Derby 21,100

91: East London 20,800

92:Bedfordshire 20,600

93: Teesside 20,500

94: London Metropolitan 20,300

95: Edge Hill 20,100

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These are the unis to study law at if you want to be minted - The Tab


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