12345...102030...


Moore’s Law | Definition of Moore’s Law by Merriam-Webster

In 1965, Gordon E. Moore, the co-founder of Intel published a paper predicting that the integrated circuit could be expanded exponentially at a reasonable cost approximately every two years. At the time, the integrated circuit, a key component in the central processing unit of computers had only been around for seven years. Indeed, the trend has continued for over fifty years with no sign of abating.

For the consumer, Moore’s law is demonstrated by a $1500 computer today being worth half that amount next year and being almost obsolete in two years.

While Moore’s law is a really just an observation of a trend, it has also become a goal of the electronics industry. The innovation of electronic design and manufacturing costs, including the objective of placing whole “systems” on a chip, miniaturization of electronic devices, and the seamless integration of electronics into social fabric of daily life are outcomes from these industry goals.

Original post:

Moore’s Law | Definition of Moore’s Law by Merriam-Webster

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Main TERM M

By Vangie Beal

(n.) Moore’s Law is the observation made in 1965 by Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, that the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits had doubled every year since the integrated circuit was invented. Moore predicted that this trend would continue for the foreseeable future. In subsequent years, the pace slowed down a bit, but data density has doubled approximately every 18 months, and this is the current definition of Moore’s Law, which Moore himself has blessed. Most experts, including Moore himself, expect Moore’s Law to hold true until 2020-2025.

Stay up to date on the latest developments in Internet terminology with a free weekly newsletter from Webopedia. Join to subscribe now.

Link:

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Moore’s Law | Definition of Moore’s Law by Merriam-Webster

In 1965, Gordon E. Moore, the co-founder of Intel published a paper predicting that the integrated circuit could be expanded exponentially at a reasonable cost approximately every two years. At the time, the integrated circuit, a key component in the central processing unit of computers had only been around for seven years. Indeed, the trend has continued for over fifty years with no sign of abating.

For the consumer, Moore’s law is demonstrated by a $1500 computer today being worth half that amount next year and being almost obsolete in two years.

While Moore’s law is a really just an observation of a trend, it has also become a goal of the electronics industry. The innovation of electronic design and manufacturing costs, including the objective of placing whole “systems” on a chip, miniaturization of electronic devices, and the seamless integration of electronics into social fabric of daily life are outcomes from these industry goals.

Continued here:

Moore’s Law | Definition of Moore’s Law by Merriam-Webster

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Main TERM M

By Vangie Beal

(n.) Moore’s Law is the observation made in 1965 by Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, that the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits had doubled every year since the integrated circuit was invented. Moore predicted that this trend would continue for the foreseeable future. In subsequent years, the pace slowed down a bit, but data density has doubled approximately every 18 months, and this is the current definition of Moore’s Law, which Moore himself has blessed. Most experts, including Moore himself, expect Moore’s Law to hold true until 2020-2025.

Stay up to date on the latest developments in Internet terminology with a free weekly newsletter from Webopedia. Join to subscribe now.

See the original post here:

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Moore’s Law | Definition of Moore’s Law by Merriam-Webster

In 1965, Gordon E. Moore, the co-founder of Intel published a paper predicting that the integrated circuit could be expanded exponentially at a reasonable cost approximately every two years. At the time, the integrated circuit, a key component in the central processing unit of computers had only been around for seven years. Indeed, the trend has continued for over fifty years with no sign of abating.

For the consumer, Moore’s law is demonstrated by a $1500 computer today being worth half that amount next year and being almost obsolete in two years.

While Moore’s law is a really just an observation of a trend, it has also become a goal of the electronics industry. The innovation of electronic design and manufacturing costs, including the objective of placing whole “systems” on a chip, miniaturization of electronic devices, and the seamless integration of electronics into social fabric of daily life are outcomes from these industry goals.

Link:

Moore’s Law | Definition of Moore’s Law by Merriam-Webster

Moore’s law | computer science | Britannica.com

We welcome suggested improvements to any of our articles. You can make it easier for us to review and, hopefully, publish your contribution by keeping a few points in mind.

Your contribution may be further edited by our staff, and its publication is subject to our final approval. Unfortunately, our editorial approach may not be able to accommodate all contributions.

Go here to read the rest:

Moore’s law | computer science | Britannica.com

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Main TERM M

By Vangie Beal

(n.) Moore’s Law is the observation made in 1965 by Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, that the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits had doubled every year since the integrated circuit was invented. Moore predicted that this trend would continue for the foreseeable future. In subsequent years, the pace slowed down a bit, but data density has doubled approximately every 18 months, and this is the current definition of Moore’s Law, which Moore himself has blessed. Most experts, including Moore himself, expect Moore’s Law to hold true until 2020-2025.

Stay up to date on the latest developments in Internet terminology with a free weekly newsletter from Webopedia. Join to subscribe now.

Read the original here:

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Moore’s law | computer science | Britannica.com

We welcome suggested improvements to any of our articles. You can make it easier for us to review and, hopefully, publish your contribution by keeping a few points in mind.

Your contribution may be further edited by our staff, and its publication is subject to our final approval. Unfortunately, our editorial approach may not be able to accommodate all contributions.

Read the original post:

Moore’s law | computer science | Britannica.com

Moore’s law | computer science | Britannica.com

We welcome suggested improvements to any of our articles. You can make it easier for us to review and, hopefully, publish your contribution by keeping a few points in mind.

Your contribution may be further edited by our staff, and its publication is subject to our final approval. Unfortunately, our editorial approach may not be able to accommodate all contributions.

See the original post:

Moore’s law | computer science | Britannica.com

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Main TERM M

By Vangie Beal

(n.) Moore’s Law is the observation made in 1965 by Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, that the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits had doubled every year since the integrated circuit was invented. Moore predicted that this trend would continue for the foreseeable future. In subsequent years, the pace slowed down a bit, but data density has doubled approximately every 18 months, and this is the current definition of Moore’s Law, which Moore himself has blessed. Most experts, including Moore himself, expect Moore’s Law to hold true until 2020-2025.

Stay up to date on the latest developments in Internet terminology with a free weekly newsletter from Webopedia. Join to subscribe now.

Go here to see the original:

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Moore’s law | computer science | Britannica.com

We welcome suggested improvements to any of our articles. You can make it easier for us to review and, hopefully, publish your contribution by keeping a few points in mind.

Your contribution may be further edited by our staff, and its publication is subject to our final approval. Unfortunately, our editorial approach may not be able to accommodate all contributions.

Originally posted here:

Moore’s law | computer science | Britannica.com

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Main TERM M

By Vangie Beal

(n.) Moore’s Law is the observation made in 1965 by Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, that the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits had doubled every year since the integrated circuit was invented. Moore predicted that this trend would continue for the foreseeable future. In subsequent years, the pace slowed down a bit, but data density has doubled approximately every 18 months, and this is the current definition of Moore’s Law, which Moore himself has blessed. Most experts, including Moore himself, expect Moore’s Law to hold true until 2020-2025.

Stay up to date on the latest developments in Internet terminology with a free weekly newsletter from Webopedia. Join to subscribe now.

Visit link:

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Moore’s law | computer science | Britannica.com

We welcome suggested improvements to any of our articles. You can make it easier for us to review and, hopefully, publish your contribution by keeping a few points in mind.

Your contribution may be further edited by our staff, and its publication is subject to our final approval. Unfortunately, our editorial approach may not be able to accommodate all contributions.

See the rest here:

Moore’s law | computer science | Britannica.com

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Main TERM M

By Vangie Beal

(n.) Moore’s Law is the observation made in 1965 by Gordon Moore, co-founder of Intel, that the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits had doubled every year since the integrated circuit was invented. Moore predicted that this trend would continue for the foreseeable future. In subsequent years, the pace slowed down a bit, but data density has doubled approximately every 18 months, and this is the current definition of Moore’s Law, which Moore himself has blessed. Most experts, including Moore himself, expect Moore’s Law to hold true until 2020-2025.

Stay up to date on the latest developments in Internet terminology with a free weekly newsletter from Webopedia. Join to subscribe now.

Read the original:

What is Moore’s Law? Webopedia Definition

Moore’s Law | Definition of Moore’s Law by Merriam-Webster

In 1965, Gordon E. Moore, the co-founder of Intel published a paper predicting that the integrated circuit could be expanded exponentially at a reasonable cost approximately every two years. At the time, the integrated circuit, a key component in the central processing unit of computers had only been around for seven years. Indeed, the trend has continued for over fifty years with no sign of abating.

For the consumer, Moore’s law is demonstrated by a $1500 computer today being worth half that amount next year and being almost obsolete in two years.

While Moore’s law is a really just an observation of a trend, it has also become a goal of the electronics industry. The innovation of electronic design and manufacturing costs, including the objective of placing whole “systems” on a chip, miniaturization of electronic devices, and the seamless integration of electronics into social fabric of daily life are outcomes from these industry goals.

Read the original:

Moore’s Law | Definition of Moore’s Law by Merriam-Webster

Moore’s Law – investopedia.com

What is ‘Moore’s Law’

Moore’s law refers to an observation made by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore in 1965. He noticed that the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits had doubled every year since their invention.

Moore’s law predicts that this trend will continue into the foreseeable future. Although the pace has slowed, the number of transistors per square inch has since doubled approximately every 18 months. This is used as the current definition of Moore’s law.

Because Moore’s law suggests exponential growth, it is unlikely to continue indefinitely. Most experts expect Moore’s law to hold for another two decades. Some studies have shown physical limitations could be reached by 2017.

The extension of Moore’s law is that computers, machines that run on computers, and computing power all become smaller and faster with time, as transistors on integrated circuits become more efficient. Transistors are simple electronic on/off switches embedded in microchips, processors and tiny electrical circuits. The faster microchips process electrical signals, the more efficient a computer becomes.

Costs of these higher-powered computers eventually came down as well, usually about 30 percent per year. When designers increased the performance of computers with better integrated circuits, manufacturers were able to create better machines that could automate certain processes. This automation created lower-priced products for consumers, as the hardware created lower labor costs.

Fifty years after Moore’s law, contemporary society sees dozens of benefits from his vision. Mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablet computers, would not work without very small processors. Smaller and faster computers improve transportation, health care, education and energy production. Just about every facet of a high-tech society benefits from the concept of Moore’s law put into practice.

Thanks to nanotechnology, some transistors are smaller than a virus. These microscopic structures contain carbon and silicon molecules aligned in perfect fashion that help move electricity along the circuit faster. Eventually, the temperature of the transistors make it impossible to create smaller circuits, because cooling the transistors takes more energy than what passes through the transistors. Experts show that computers should reach physical limits of Moore’s law sometime in the 2020s. When that happens, computer scientists can examine entirely new ways of creating computers.

Applications and software can improve the speed and efficiency of computers in the future, rather than physical processes. Cloud computing, wireless communication, the Internet of Things and quantum physics may all play a role in innovating computer technology. Many designers, engineers and computer scientists agreed in early 2016 that Moore’s law may run its course within 10 years. Progress achieving the doubling of the number of circuits has slowed, and integrated circuits cannot get much smaller as transistors approach the size of an atom.

Some time in the future, software or hardware breakthroughs may keep the dream of Moore’s law alive. However, the computer industry seems ready to veer to another course moving forward from 2016.

Go here to see the original:

Moore’s Law – investopedia.com

Moore’s Law – investopedia.com

What is ‘Moore’s Law’

Moore’s law refers to an observation made by Intel co-founder Gordon Moore in 1965. He noticed that the number of transistors per square inch on integrated circuits had doubled every year since their invention.

Moore’s law predicts that this trend will continue into the foreseeable future. Although the pace has slowed, the number of transistors per square inch has since doubled approximately every 18 months. This is used as the current definition of Moore’s law.

Because Moore’s law suggests exponential growth, it is unlikely to continue indefinitely. Most experts expect Moore’s law to hold for another two decades. Some studies have shown physical limitations could be reached by 2017.

The extension of Moore’s law is that computers, machines that run on computers, and computing power all become smaller and faster with time, as transistors on integrated circuits become more efficient. Transistors are simple electronic on/off switches embedded in microchips, processors and tiny electrical circuits. The faster microchips process electrical signals, the more efficient a computer becomes.

Costs of these higher-powered computers eventually came down as well, usually about 30 percent per year. When designers increased the performance of computers with better integrated circuits, manufacturers were able to create better machines that could automate certain processes. This automation created lower-priced products for consumers, as the hardware created lower labor costs.

Fifty years after Moore’s law, contemporary society sees dozens of benefits from his vision. Mobile devices, such as smartphones and tablet computers, would not work without very small processors. Smaller and faster computers improve transportation, health care, education and energy production. Just about every facet of a high-tech society benefits from the concept of Moore’s law put into practice.

Thanks to nanotechnology, some transistors are smaller than a virus. These microscopic structures contain carbon and silicon molecules aligned in perfect fashion that help move electricity along the circuit faster. Eventually, the temperature of the transistors make it impossible to create smaller circuits, because cooling the transistors takes more energy than what passes through the transistors. Experts show that computers should reach physical limits of Moore’s law sometime in the 2020s. When that happens, computer scientists can examine entirely new ways of creating computers.

Applications and software can improve the speed and efficiency of computers in the future, rather than physical processes. Cloud computing, wireless communication, the Internet of Things and quantum physics may all play a role in innovating computer technology. Many designers, engineers and computer scientists agreed in early 2016 that Moore’s law may run its course within 10 years. Progress achieving the doubling of the number of circuits has slowed, and integrated circuits cannot get much smaller as transistors approach the size of an atom.

Some time in the future, software or hardware breakthroughs may keep the dream of Moore’s law alive. However, the computer industry seems ready to veer to another course moving forward from 2016.

Read more:

Moore’s Law – investopedia.com

Ripple Price Forecast: Korbit, IMF & Other Causes of XRP Price Crash

Ripple News Update
At the end of last week, it looked like cryptocurrencies would outrun the storm of government regulations bearing down on them. But that analysis was all wrong—it’s now clear that we were sitting in the eye of the storm.

However, the momentary calm wasn’t so bad. It led to a short-lived rally in Ripple prices, which in turn revived some enthusiasm on Reddit and other discussion boards.

Then a barrage of bad news broke over the weekend. Not only did this snap the optimism, but it reminded us that governments are getting.

The post Ripple Price Forecast: Korbit, IMF & Other Causes of XRP Price Crash appeared first on Profit Confidential.

Link:

Ripple Price Forecast: Korbit, IMF & Other Causes of XRP Price Crash

Kraken Exchange Review: Facts to Know Before Buying Any Cryptocurrency

Kraken Exchange Review
Kraken is one of the most popular exchanges where users can buy and sell cryptocurrencies. It is arguably the largest Bitcoin exchange, based on liquidity. Kraken was also the first Bitcoin exchange to have its trading price and volume displayed in the “Bloomberg Terminal”.

Having established its reputation in the cryptocurrency world, Kraken is the first choice of many international cryptocurrency traders.

The following table is a Kraken exchange review with all the basic info you need.
Kraken.

The post Kraken Exchange Review: Facts to Know Before Buying Any Cryptocurrency appeared first on Profit Confidential.

Continued here:

Kraken Exchange Review: Facts to Know Before Buying Any Cryptocurrency

Litecoin Price Prediction: Upcoming Litecoin Upgrade To Make it Even Cheaper Than Bitcoin

Daily Litecoin News Update
It’s a quiet day in the cryptocurrency world. The storm has settled and the sun is out. Investors are finally out of choppy waters and trading with more peace of mind. Top cryptos, including Litecoin are trading in the green. At this point another piece of good news may serve as the icing on the cake that Litecoin investors may have been longing to taste.

Litecoin founder Charlie Lee updates from the headquarters that Litecoin’s next upgrade is on its way. As promised, the developers will be cutting down transaction fees to further make LTC transactions cheaper for users.

Later, he also updates that Litecoin, like Bitcoin, would be integrating.

The post Litecoin Price Prediction: Upcoming Litecoin Upgrade To Make it Even Cheaper Than Bitcoin appeared first on Profit Confidential.

Excerpt from:

Litecoin Price Prediction: Upcoming Litecoin Upgrade To Make it Even Cheaper Than Bitcoin


12345...102030...