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Golden Rule – Wikipedia

The Golden Rule is the principle of treating others as one’s self would wish to be treated. It is a maxim that is found in many religions and cultures.[1][2]

The Golden Rule can be considered an ethic of reciprocity in some religions, although other religions treat it differently. The maxim may appear as either a positive or negative injunction governing conduct:

The idea dates at least to the early Confucian times (551479 BC) according to Rushworth Kidder, who identifies that this concept appears prominently in Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Judaism, Taoism, Zoroastrianism, and “the rest of the world’s major religions”.[3] The concept of the Rule is codified in the Code of Hammurabi stele and tablets, 1754-1790 BC. 143 leaders encompassing the world’s major faiths endorsed the Golden Rule as part of the 1993 “Declaration Toward a Global Ethic”, including the Baha’i Faith, Brahmanism, Brahma Kumaris, Buddhism, Christianity, Hinduism, Indigenous, Interfaith, Islam, Jainism, Judaism, Native American, Neo-Pagan, Sikhism, Taoism, Theosophist, Unitarian Universalist and Zoroastrian.[4][5] According to Greg M. Epstein, “‘do unto others’… is a concept that essentially no religion misses entirely,” but belief in God is not necessary to endorse it.[6] Simon Blackburn also states that the Golden Rule can be “found in some form in almost every ethical tradition”.[7]

Yet, as with any historically prominent maxim, the Golden Rule is not without its controversy (as seen in the Criticism section below).

The term “Golden Rule”, or “Golden law”, began to be used widely in the early 17th century in Britain by Anglican theologians and preachers;[8] the earliest known usage is that of Anglicans Charles Gibbon and Thomas Jackson in 1604.[1][9]

Possibly the earliest affirmation of the maxim of reciprocity, reflecting the ancient Egyptian goddess Ma’at, appears in the story of The Eloquent Peasant, which dates to the Middle Kingdom (c. 20401650 BC): “Now this is the command: Do to the doer to make him do.”[10][11] This proverb embodies the do ut des principle.[12] A Late Period (c. 664323 BC) papyrus contains an early negative affirmation of the Golden Rule: “That which you hate to be done to you, do not do to another.”[13]

In Mahbhrata, the ancient epic of India, there is a discourse in which the wise minister Vidura advises the King Yuddhihhira

Listening to wise scriptures, austerity, sacrifice, respectful faith, social welfare, forgiveness, purity of intent, compassion, truth and self-controlare the ten wealth of character (self). O king aim for these, may you be steadfast in these qualities. These are the basis of prosperity and rightful living. These are highest attainable things. All worlds are balanced on dharma, dharma encompasses ways to prosperity as well. O King, dharma is the best quality to have, wealth the medium and desire (kma) the lowest. Hence, (keeping these in mind), by self-control and by making dharma (right conduct) your main focus, treat others as you treat yourself.

Mahbhrata Shnti-Parva 167:9

In Chapter 32 in the Part on Virtue of the Tirukkua (c. 200 BC c. 500 AD), Tiruvalluvar says: “Do not do to others what you know has hurt yourself” (K. 316.); “Why does one hurt others knowing what it is to be hurt?” (K. 318). He furthermore opined that it is the determination of the spotless (virtuous) not to do evil, even in return, to those who have cherished enmity and done them evil. (K. 312) The (proper) punishment to those who have done evil (to you), is to put them to shame by showing them kindness, in return and to forget both the evil and the good done on both sides (K. 314)

The Golden Rule in its prohibitive (negative) form was a common principle in ancient Greek philosophy. Examples of the general concept include:

The Pahlavi Texts of Zoroastrianism (c. 300 BC1000 AD) were an early source for the Golden Rule: “That nature alone is good which refrains from doing to another whatsoever is not good for itself.” Dadisten-I-dinik, 94,5, and “Whatever is disagreeable to yourself do not do unto others.” Shayast-na-Shayast 13:29[18]

Seneca the Younger (c. 4 BC65 AD), a practitioner of Stoicism (c. 300 BC200 AD) expressed the Golden Rule in his essay regarding the treatment of slaves: “Treat your inferior as you would wish your superior to treat you.”[19]

According to Simon Blackburn, the Golden Rule “can be found in some form in almost every ethical tradition”.[20]

A rule of altruistic reciprocity was first stated positively in a well-known Torah verse (Hebrew: ):

You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against your kinsfolk. Love your neighbor as yourself: I am the LORD.

Hillel the Elder (c. 110 BC 10 AD),[21] used this verse as a most important message of the Torah for his teachings. Once, he was challenged by a gentile who asked to be converted under the condition that the Torah be explained to him while he stood on one foot. Hillel accepted him as a candidate for conversion to Judaism but, drawing on Leviticus 19:18, briefed the man:

What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow: this is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation; go and learn.

Hillel recognized brotherly love as the fundamental principle of Jewish ethics. Rabbi Akiva agreed and suggested that the principle of love must have its foundation in Genesis chapter 1, which teaches that all men are the offspring of Adam, who was made in the image of God (Sifra, edoshim, iv.; Yer. Ned. ix. 41c; Genesis Rabba 24).[22] According to Jewish rabbinic literature, the first man Adam represents the unity of mankind. This is echoed in the modern preamble of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.[23][24] And it is also taught, that Adam is last in order according to the evolutionary character of God’s creation:[22]

Why was only a single specimen of man created first? To teach us that he who destroys a single soul destroys a whole world and that he who saves a single soul saves a whole world; furthermore, so no race or class may claim a nobler ancestry, saying, ‘Our father was born first’; and, finally, to give testimony to the greatness of the Lord, who caused the wonderful diversity of mankind to emanate from one type. And why was Adam created last of all beings? To teach him humility; for if he be overbearing, let him remember that the little fly preceded him in the order of creation.[22]

The Jewish Publication Society’s edition of Leviticus states:

Thou shalt not hate thy brother. in thy heart; thou shalt surely rebuke thy neighbour, and not bear sin because of him. 18 Thou shalt not take vengeance, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the LORD.[25]

This Torah verse represents one of several versions of the Golden Rule, which itself appears in various forms, positive and negative. It is the earliest written version of that concept in a positive form.[26]

At the turn of the eras, the Jewish rabbis were discussing the scope of the meaning of Leviticus 19:18 and 19:34 extensively:

The stranger who resides with you shall be to you as one of your citizens; you shall love him as yourself, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt: I the LORD am your God.

Commentators summed up foreigners (= Samaritans), proselytes (= ‘strangers who resides with you’) (Rabbi Akiva, bQuid 75b) or Jews (Rabbi Gamaliel, yKet 3, 1; 27a) to the scope of the meaning.

On the verse, “Love your fellow as yourself,” the classic commentator Rashi quotes from Torat Kohanim, an early Midrashic text regarding the famous dictum of Rabbi Akiva: “Love your fellow as yourself Rabbi Akiva says this is a great principle of the Torah.”[27]

Israel’s postal service quoted from the previous Leviticus verse when it commemorated the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on a 1958 postage stamp.[28]

The “Golden Rule” was given by Jesus of Nazareth (Matthew 7:12 NCV, see also Luke 6:31). The common English phrasing is “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”. A similar form of the phrase appeared in a Catholic catechism around 1567 (certainly in the reprint of 1583).[29]The Golden Rule is stated positively numerous times in the Old Testament: Leviticus 19:18 (“Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the LORD.”; see also Great Commandment) and Leviticus 19:34 (“But treat them just as you treat your own citizens. Love foreigners as you love yourselves, because you were foreigners one time in Egypt. I am the Lord your God.”).

The Old Testament Deuterocanonical books of Tobit and Sirach, accepted as part of the Scriptural canon by Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodoxy, and the Non-Chalcedonian Churches, express a negative form of the golden rule:

“Do to no one what you yourself dislike.”

Tobit 4:15

“Recognize that your neighbor feels as you do, and keep in mind your own dislikes.”

Sirach 31:15

Two passages in the New Testament quote Jesus of Nazareth espousing the positive form of the Golden rule:

Matthew 7:12

Do to others what you want them to do to you. This is the meaning of the law of Moses and the teaching of the prophets.

Luke 6:31

Do to others what you would want them to do to you.

A similar passage, a parallel to the Great Commandment, is Luke 10:25-28

25And one day an authority on the law stood up to put Jesus to the test. “Teacher,” he asked, “what must I do to receive eternal life?”

26What is written in the Law?” Jesus replied. “How do you understand it?”27He answered, ” Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul. Love him with all your strength and with all your mind.(Deuteronomy 6:5) And, Love your neighbor as you love yourself. “28”You have answered correctly,” Jesus replied. “Do that, and you will live.”.

The passage in the book of Luke then continues with Jesus answering the question, “Who is my neighbor?”, by telling the parable of the Good Samaritan, indicating that “your neighbor” is anyone in need.[30] This extends to all, including those who are generally considered hostile.

Jesus’ teaching goes beyond the negative formulation of not doing what one would not like done to themselves, to the positive formulation of actively doing good to another that, if the situations were reversed, one would desire that the other would do for them. This formulation, as indicated in the parable of the Good Samaritan, emphasizes the needs for positive action that brings benefit to another, not simply restraining oneself from negative activities that hurt another.[31]

In one passage of the New Testament, Paul the Apostle refers to the golden rule:

Galatians 5:14

14For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.

The Arabian peninsula was known to not practice the golden rule prior to the advent of Islam. “Pre-Islamic Arabs regarded the survival of the tribe, as most essential and to be ensured by the ancient rite of blood vengeance”[according to whom?][32]

However, this all changed when Muhammad came on the scene:

Fakir al-Din al-Razi and several other Qur’anic commentators have pointed out that Qur’an 83:1-6 is an implicit statement of the Golden Rule, which is explicitly stated in the tradition, “Pay, Oh Children of Adam, as you would love to be paid, and be just as you would love to have justice!” [33]

Similar examples of the golden rule are found in the hadith of the prophet Muhammad. The hadith recount what the prophet is believed to have said and done, and traditionally Muslims regard the hadith as second to only the Qur’an as a guide to correct belief and action.”[according to whom?][34]

From the hadith, the collected oral and written accounts of Muhammad and his teachings during his lifetime:

A Bedouin came to the prophet, grabbed the stirrup of his camel and said: O the messenger of God! Teach me something to go to heaven with it. Prophet said: “As you would have people do to you, do to them; and what you dislike to be done to you, don’t do to them. Now let the stirrup go!” [This maxim is enough for you; go and act in accordance with it!]”

None of you [truly] believes until he wishes for his brother what he wishes for himself.

Seek for mankind that of which you are desirous for yourself, that you may be a believer.

That which you want for yourself, seek for mankind.[36]

The most righteous person is the one who consents for other people what he consents for himself, and who dislikes for them what he dislikes for himself.[36]

Ali ibn Abi Talib (4th Caliph in Sunni Islam, and first Imam in Shia Islam) says:

O’ my child, make yourself the measure (for dealings) between you and others. Thus, you should desire for others what you desire for yourself and hate for others what you hate for yourself. Do not oppress as you do not like to be oppressed. Do good to others as you would like good to be done to you. Regard bad for yourself whatever you regard bad for others. Accept that (treatment) from others which you would like others to accept from you… Do not say to others what you do not like to be said to you.

The writings of the Bah’ Faith encourages everyone to treat others as they would treat themselves and even prefer others over oneself:

O SON OF MAN! Deny not My servant should he ask anything from thee, for his face is My face; be then abashed before Me.

Blessed is he who preferreth his brother before himself.

And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy neighbour that which thou choosest for thyself.

Ascribe not to any soul that which thou wouldst not have ascribed to thee, and say not that which thou doest not.

Those acts that you consider good when done to you, do those to others, none else.

One should never do that to another which one regards as injurious to ones own self. This, in brief, is the rule of dharma. Other behavior is due to selfish desires.

By making dharma your main focus, treat others as you treat yourself[48]

Also,

If the entire Dharma can be said in a few words, then it isthat which is unfavorable to us, do not do that to others.

Buddha (Siddhartha Gautama, c. 623543 BC)[49][50] made this principle one of the cornerstones of his ethics in the 6th century BC. It occurs in many places and in many forms throughout the Tripitaka.

Comparing oneself to others in such terms as “Just as I am so are they, just as they are so am I,” he should neither kill nor cause others to kill.

One who, while himself seeking happiness, oppresses with violence other beings who also desire happiness, will not attain happiness hereafter.

Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.

Putting oneself in the place of another, one should not kill nor cause another to kill.[51]

The Golden Rule is paramount in the Jainist philosophy and can be seen in the doctrines of Ahimsa and Karma. As part of the prohibition of causing any living beings to suffer, Jainism forbids inflicting upon others what is harmful to oneself.

The following quotation from the Acaranga Sutra sums up the philosophy of Jainism:

Nothing which breathes, which exists, which lives, or which has essence or potential of life, should be destroyed or ruled over, or subjugated, or harmed, or denied of its essence or potential.

In support of this Truth, I ask you a question “Is sorrow or pain desirable to you?” If you say “yes it is”, it would be a lie. If you say, “No, It is not” you will be expressing the truth. Just as sorrow or pain is not desirable to you, so it is to all which breathe, exist, live or have any essence of life. To you and all, it is undesirable, and painful, and repugnant.[52]

A man should wander about treating all creatures as he himself would be treated.

In happiness and suffering, in joy and grief, we should regard all creatures as we regard our own self.

Lord Mahavira, 24th Tirthankara

Saman Suttam of Jinendra Varni[53] gives further insight into this precept:-

Just as pain is not agreeable to you, it is so with others. Knowing this principle of equality treat other with respect and compassion.

Suman Suttam, verse 150

Killing a living being is killing one’s own self; showing compassion to a living being is showing compassion to oneself. He who desires his own good, should avoid causing any harm to a living being.

Suman Suttam, verse 151

Precious like jewels are the minds of all. To hurt them is not at all good. If thou desirest thy Beloved, then hurt thou not anyone’s heart.

Guru Arjan Dev Ji 259, Guru Granth Sahib

The same idea is also presented in V.12 and VI.30 of the Analects (c. 500 BC), which can be found in the online Chinese Text Project. The phraseology differs from the Christian version of the Golden Rule. It does not presume to do anything unto others, but merely to avoid doing what would be harmful. It does not preclude doing good deeds and taking moral positions.

The sage has no interest of his own, but takes the interests of the people as his own. He is kind to the kind; he is also kind to the unkind: for Virtue is kind. He is faithful to the faithful; he is also faithful to the unfaithful: for Virtue is faithful.

Regard your neighbor’s gain as your own gain, and your neighbor’s loss as your own loss.

If people regarded other peoples states in the same way that they regard their own, who then would incite their own state to attack that of another? For one would do for others as one would do for oneself. If people regarded other peoples cities in the same way that they regard their own, who then would incite their own city to attack that of another? For one would do for others as one would do for oneself. If people regarded other peoples families in the same way that they regard their own, who then would incite their own family to attack that of another? For one would do for others as one would do for oneself. And so if states and cities do not attack one another and families do not wreak havoc upon and steal from one another, would this be a harm to the world or a benefit? Of course one must say it is a benefit to the world.

Mozi regarded the golden rule as a corollary to the cardinal virtue of impartiality, and encouraged egalitarianism and selflessness in relationships.

Do not do unto others whatever is injurious to yourself.– Shayast-na-Shayast 13.29

Here ye these words and heed them well, the words of Dea, thy Mother Goddess, “I command thee thus, O children of the Earth, that that which ye deem harmful unto thyself, the very same shall ye be forbidden from doing unto another, for violence and hatred give rise to the same. My command is thus, that ye shall return all violence and hatred with peacefulness and love, for my Law is love unto all things. Only through love shall ye have peace; yea and verily, only peace and love will cure the world, and subdue all evil.”

The Way to Happiness expresses the Golden Rule both in its negative/prohibitive form and in its positive form. The negative/prohibitive form is expressed in Precept 19 as:

19. Try not to do things to others that you would not like them to do to you.

The positive form is expressed in Precept 20 as:

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Golden Rule – Wikipedia

Marriott | Golden Rule

I traveled “home” to Lake Charles, LA for a family funeral, and when my housekeeper discovered this, she shared with her team. The next evening, returning to my room after a long and especially difficult day, there was a lovely sympathy card from the hotel staff on my bed.

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Marriott | Golden Rule

Golden rule (law) – Wikipedia

The golden rule in English law is one of the rules of statutory construction traditionally applied by the English courts. The rule can be used to avoid the consequences of a literal interpretation of the wording of a statute when such an interpretation would lead to a manifest absurdity or to a result that is obnoxious to principles of public policy. The rule can be applied in two different ways, named respectively the narrower approach and the wider approach.

In Becke v Smith (1836) Justice Parke (later Lord Wensleydale) stated:

It is a very useful rule in the construction of a statute to adhere to the ordinary meaning of the words used, and to the grammatical construction, unless that is at variance with the intention of the legislature to be collected from the statute itself, or leads to any manifest absurdity or repugnance, in which case the language may be varied or modified so as to avoid such inconvenience but no further.

Twenty years later, Lord Wensleydale restated the rule in different words in Grey v. Pearson (1857):

[I]n construing statutes, and all written instruments, the grammatical and ordinary sense of the words is to be adhered to, unless that would lead to some absurdity or inconsistency with the rest of the instrument, in which case the grammatical and ordinary sense of the words may be modified, so as to avoid that absurdity or inconsistency, but not farther.

The rule may be applied in the narrower sense where there is some ambiguity or absurdity in the words themselves.[1]

In the leading case of R v Allen (1872) the defendant was charged with bigamy under Section 57 of the Offences against the Person Act 1861 which made it an offence to marry while one’s spouse is still alive and not divorced. The court held that the word ‘marry’ could not in that context mean ‘become legally married’ since that could never apply to someone who is already married to someone else. To make sense of the provision, the word should be interpreted as meaning to ‘go through a second ceremony of marriage’.[1]

In its wider sense the rule may be used to avoid a result that is obnoxious to principles of public policy, even where words may prima facie carry only one meaning.

The rule was applied in this sense in In re Sigsworth[2] (1935) in the context of the Administration of Estates Act 1925. A man had murdered his mother and then committed suicide. Under the plain terms of section 46, as the woman had died intestate her murderer stood to inherit substantially her entire estate, which would then have passed to his descendants. This was challenged by other members of the woman’s family. The court used the golden rule to find in favour of the family, preventing the son’s descendants as a matter of public policy from profiting from his crime.[3][4] The rule as applied in that particular case has subsequently been put onto a statutory footing in the Forfeiture Act 1982 and the Estates of Deceased Persons (Forfeiture Rule and Law of Succession) Act 2011.

The leading case on the wider approach is Adler v George (1964) in which the defendant was charged with obstructing a military guard in the execution of his duty. In order to succeed, the prosecution had to show that the act took place in the vicinity of a military establishment. The defendant argued that in the vicinity meant ‘outside or in the proximity or area’ of the establishment, whereas he was in fact inside. The court decided that such an interpretation would lead to an absurd result, and interpreted in the vicinity of to cover a person already on the premises.[1]

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Golden rule (law) – Wikipedia

Golden Rule | ethical precept | Britannica.com

Golden Rule, precept in the Gospel of Matthew (7:12): In everything, do to others what you would have them do to you. . . . This rule of conduct is a summary of the Christians duty to his neighbour and states a fundamental ethical principle. In its negative form, Do not do to others what you would not like done to yourselves, it occurs in the 2nd-century documents Didach and the Apology of Aristides and may well have formed part of an early catechism. It recalls the command to love the stranger (sojourner) as found in Deuteronomy. It is not, however, peculiar to Christianity. Its negative form is to be found in Tob. 4:15, in the writings of the two great Jewish scholars Hillel (1st century bc) and Philo of Alexandria (1st centuries bc and ad), and in the Analects of Confucius (6th and 5th centuries bc). It also appears in one form or another in the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Isocrates, and Seneca.

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Golden rule – definition of golden rule by The Free Dictionary

Natasha did not follow the golden rule advocated by clever folk, especially by the French, which says that a girl should not let herself go when she marries, should not neglect her accomplishments, should be even more careful of her appearance than when she was unmarried, and should fascinate her husband as much as she did before he became her husband.Here is your benevolent Patriarch of a Casby, and there is his golden rule.The merits of a broken speculation, or a bankruptcy, or of a successful scoundrel, are not gauged by its or his observance of the golden rule, ‘Do as you would be done by,’ but are considered with reference to their smartness.It is all-important to remember that naturalists have no golden rule by which to distinguish species and varieties; they grant some little variability to each species, but when they meet with a somewhat greater amount of difference between any two forms, they rank both as species, unless they are enabled to connect them together by close intermediate gradations.Grant, is the language used by our Divine Master himself, and it should be the golden rule with us, his humble followers.Vholes, “to be honest with you (honesty being my golden rule, whether I gain by it or lose, and I find that I generally lose), money is the word.I have been happy in meriting the confidence of parents; and I have been strict in observing the golden rules of economy.Never to put one hand to anything, on which I could throw my whole self; and never to affect depreciation of my work, whatever it was; I find, now, to have been my golden rules.Most of us learned the golden rule from our mothers: Do unto others, as you would have them do unto you.The Golden Rule reorients our moral thinking by putting ourselves in someone else’s shoes.What they discover is amazing and life changing, in fact the Golden Rule, as they uncovered its essence, is a way of opening your life to all that it can be.The Golden Rule of treating others as you would like to be treated yourself has never been more true than it is in the contact center.

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Plumber & HVAC Des Moines IA | Golden Rule Plumbing, Heating …

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We offer a full range of residential plumbing services in Des Moines, IA. This includes everything from a simple drain unclogging to a large wholehouse repiping. Your household plumbing is vital for everyday convenience and comfort, and youll only want to trust plumbers with the experience necessary to ensure an excellent job each time. We have the plumbing professionals who can deliver!

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We take pride that one of our specialties is work with geothermal systems. You might think using geothermal heating and cooling is out of reach for your house, but our experienced professionals would love to show you otherwise! We want to help more homes enjoy the energysaving and environmentallyfriendly benefits of using geothermal power. Our team installs, replaces, maintains, and repairs geothermal heat pumps in the area. Call to find out more.

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Our motto is”We Obey the Rules to Live By!”.

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Versions of the Golden Rule in dozens of religions and other …

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A photoshopped “Golden Rule Bus”

This bus image was altered to display “The Golden Rule” on its front.The side of the bus was photoshopped to contain the upper part of Scarboro Missions’ Golden Rule poster, which is shown below

Linking the Golden Rule to the “Sheep and Goats” passage, Matthew 25:32-46

A statement by Gautama Buddha:He was the founder of Buddhism, which is the fifth largest religion after Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Chinese traditional religion:

“Resolve to be tender with the young,compassionate with the aged,sympatheitic with the striving.and tolerant with the weak and wrong.Sometime in your life, you will have been all of these.” 2

Statement by the Dalai Lama:

The core beliefs of every religion

3

Sponsored link

The Ethic of Reciprocity — often called the Golden Rule — simply states that all of us are to treat other people as we would wish other people to treat us in return.

On April 5 each year, the International Golden Rule Day will be observed as a global virtual celebration. Before 2018’s celebration the web site https:www.goldenruleday.org announced:

“Join us on Thursday, April 5, for a 24-hour global virtual celebration of the Golden Rule; a universal principle shared by nearly all cultural, spiritual, religious, and secular traditions on Earth.

Over the course of 24 hours, people from many corners of the world will address Why the Golden Rule Matters Now as they share how people, organizations and governments can use this Common Principle to create a better world for everyone.

Join us and experience conversations, music, stories, and art inspired by the Golden Rule. Learn new ways to apply the Golden Rule in your life and community.”4

Almost all organized religions, philosophical systems, and secular systems of morality include such an ethic. It is normally intended to apply to the entire human race. Unfortunately, it is too often applied by some people only to believers in the same religion or even to others in the same denomination, of the same gender, the same sexual orientation, etc.

Marriott International, Inc. is a leading global lodging company with more than 6,500 properties across 127 countries and territories. They promote the Golden Rule on their website, saying:

“We live by the #GoldenRule: Treating others like wed like to be treated. It has always been our guiding principle.”

Their web site includes stories of “GoldenRule moments.”5 They are well worth reading. One example is below.

6

Excerpt from:

Versions of the Golden Rule in dozens of religions and other …

Golden Rule – Wikipedia

According to Simon Blackburn, the Golden Rule “can be found in some form in almost every ethical tradition”.[20]

A rule of altruistic reciprocity was first stated positively in a well-known Torah verse (Hebrew: ):

You shall not take vengeance or bear a grudge against your kinsfolk. Love your neighbor as yourself: I am the LORD.

Hillel the Elder (c. 110 BC 10 AD),[21] used this verse as a most important message of the Torah for his teachings. Once, he was challenged by a gentile who asked to be converted under the condition that the Torah be explained to him while he stood on one foot. Hillel accepted him as a candidate for conversion to Judaism but, drawing on Leviticus 19:18, briefed the man:

What is hateful to you, do not do to your fellow: this is the whole Torah; the rest is the explanation; go and learn.

Hillel recognized brotherly love as the fundamental principle of Jewish ethics. Rabbi Akiva agreed and suggested that the principle of love must have its foundation in Genesis chapter 1, which teaches that all men are the offspring of Adam, who was made in the image of God (Sifra, edoshim, iv.; Yer. Ned. ix. 41c; Genesis Rabba 24).[22] According to Jewish rabbinic literature, the first man Adam represents the unity of mankind. This is echoed in the modern preamble of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.[23][24] And it is also taught, that Adam is last in order according to the evolutionary character of God’s creation:[22]

Why was only a single specimen of man created first? To teach us that he who destroys a single soul destroys a whole world and that he who saves a single soul saves a whole world; furthermore, so no race or class may claim a nobler ancestry, saying, ‘Our father was born first’; and, finally, to give testimony to the greatness of the Lord, who caused the wonderful diversity of mankind to emanate from one type. And why was Adam created last of all beings? To teach him humility; for if he be overbearing, let him remember that the little fly preceded him in the order of creation.[22]

The Jewish Publication Society’s edition of Leviticus states:

Thou shalt not hate thy brother. in thy heart; thou shalt surely rebuke thy neighbour, and not bear sin because of him. 18 Thou shalt not take vengeance, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the LORD.[25]

This Torah verse represents one of several versions of the Golden Rule, which itself appears in various forms, positive and negative. It is the earliest written version of that concept in a positive form.[26]

At the turn of the eras, the Jewish rabbis were discussing the scope of the meaning of Leviticus 19:18 and 19:34 extensively:

The stranger who resides with you shall be to you as one of your citizens; you shall love him as yourself, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt: I the LORD am your God.

Commentators summed up foreigners (= Samaritans), proselytes (= ‘strangers who resides with you’) (Rabbi Akiva, bQuid 75b) or Jews (Rabbi Gamaliel, yKet 3, 1; 27a) to the scope of the meaning.

On the verse, “Love your fellow as yourself,” the classic commentator Rashi quotes from Torat Kohanim, an early Midrashic text regarding the famous dictum of Rabbi Akiva: “Love your fellow as yourself Rabbi Akiva says this is a great principle of the Torah.”[27]

Israel’s postal service quoted from the previous Leviticus verse when it commemorated the Universal Declaration of Human Rights on a 1958 postage stamp.[28]

The “Golden Rule” was given by Jesus of Nazareth (Matthew 7:12 NCV, see also Luke 6:31). The common English phrasing is “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you”. A similar form of the phrase appeared in a Catholic catechism around 1567 (certainly in the reprint of 1583).[29]The Golden Rule is stated positively numerous times in the Old Testament: Leviticus 19:18 (“Thou shalt not avenge, nor bear any grudge against the children of thy people, but thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself: I am the LORD.”; see also Great Commandment) and Leviticus 19:34 (“But treat them just as you treat your own citizens. Love foreigners as you love yourselves, because you were foreigners one time in Egypt. I am the Lord your God.”).

The Old Testament Deuterocanonical books of Tobit and Sirach, accepted as part of the Scriptural canon by Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodoxy, and the Non-Chalcedonian Churches, express a negative form of the golden rule:

“Do to no one what you yourself dislike.”

Tobit 4:15

“Recognize that your neighbor feels as you do, and keep in mind your own dislikes.”

Sirach 31:15

Two passages in the New Testament quote Jesus of Nazareth espousing the positive form of the Golden rule:

Matthew 7:12

Do to others what you want them to do to you. This is the meaning of the law of Moses and the teaching of the prophets.

Luke 6:31

Do to others what you would want them to do to you.

A similar passage, a parallel to the Great Commandment, is Luke 10:25-28

25And one day an authority on the law stood up to put Jesus to the test. “Teacher,” he asked, “what must I do to receive eternal life?”

26What is written in the Law?” Jesus replied. “How do you understand it?”27He answered, ” Love the Lord your God with all your heart and with all your soul. Love him with all your strength and with all your mind.(Deuteronomy 6:5) And, Love your neighbor as you love yourself. “28”You have answered correctly,” Jesus replied. “Do that, and you will live.”.

The passage in the book of Luke then continues with Jesus answering the question, “Who is my neighbor?”, by telling the parable of the Good Samaritan, indicating that “your neighbor” is anyone in need.[30] This extends to all, including those who are generally considered hostile.

Jesus’ teaching goes beyond the negative formulation of not doing what one would not like done to themselves, to the positive formulation of actively doing good to another that, if the situations were reversed, one would desire that the other would do for them. This formulation, as indicated in the parable of the Good Samaritan, emphasizes the needs for positive action that brings benefit to another, not simply restraining oneself from negative activities that hurt another.[31]

In one passage of the New Testament, Paul the Apostle refers to the golden rule:

Galatians 5:14

14For all the law is fulfilled in one word, even in this; Thou shalt love thy neighbour as thyself.

The Arabian peninsula was known to not practice the golden rule prior to the advent of Islam. “Pre-Islamic Arabs regarded the survival of the tribe, as most essential and to be ensured by the ancient rite of blood vengeance”[according to whom?][32]

However, this all changed when Muhammad came on the scene:

Fakir al-Din al-Razi and several other Qur’anic commentators have pointed out that Qur’an 83:1-6 is an implicit statement of the Golden Rule, which is explicitly stated in the tradition, “Pay, Oh Children of Adam, as you would love to be paid, and be just as you would love to have justice!” [33]

Similar examples of the golden rule are found in the hadith of the prophet Muhammad. The hadith recount what the prophet is believed to have said and done, and traditionally Muslims regard the hadith as second to only the Qur’an as a guide to correct belief and action.”[according to whom?][34]

From the hadith, the collected oral and written accounts of Muhammad and his teachings during his lifetime:

A Bedouin came to the prophet, grabbed the stirrup of his camel and said: O the messenger of God! Teach me something to go to heaven with it. Prophet said: “As you would have people do to you, do to them; and what you dislike to be done to you, don’t do to them. Now let the stirrup go!” [This maxim is enough for you; go and act in accordance with it!]”

None of you [truly] believes until he wishes for his brother what he wishes for himself.

Seek for mankind that of which you are desirous for yourself, that you may be a believer.

That which you want for yourself, seek for mankind.[36]

The most righteous person is the one who consents for other people what he consents for himself, and who dislikes for them what he dislikes for himself.[36]

Ali ibn Abi Talib (4th Caliph in Sunni Islam, and first Imam in Shia Islam) says:

O’ my child, make yourself the measure (for dealings) between you and others. Thus, you should desire for others what you desire for yourself and hate for others what you hate for yourself. Do not oppress as you do not like to be oppressed. Do good to others as you would like good to be done to you. Regard bad for yourself whatever you regard bad for others. Accept that (treatment) from others which you would like others to accept from you… Do not say to others what you do not like to be said to you.

The writings of the Bah’ Faith encourages everyone to treat others as they would treat themselves and even prefer others over oneself:

O SON OF MAN! Deny not My servant should he ask anything from thee, for his face is My face; be then abashed before Me.

Blessed is he who preferreth his brother before himself.

And if thine eyes be turned towards justice, choose thou for thy neighbour that which thou choosest for thyself.

Ascribe not to any soul that which thou wouldst not have ascribed to thee, and say not that which thou doest not.

Those acts that you consider good when done to you, do those to others, none else.

One should never do that to another which one regards as injurious to ones own self. This, in brief, is the rule of dharma. Other behavior is due to selfish desires.

By making dharma your main focus, treat others as you treat yourself[48]

Also,

If the entire Dharma can be said in a few words, then it isthat which is unfavorable to us, do not do that to others.

Buddha (Siddhartha Gautama, c. 623543 BC)[49][50] made this principle one of the cornerstones of his ethics in the 6th century BC. It occurs in many places and in many forms throughout the Tripitaka.

Comparing oneself to others in such terms as “Just as I am so are they, just as they are so am I,” he should neither kill nor cause others to kill.

One who, while himself seeking happiness, oppresses with violence other beings who also desire happiness, will not attain happiness hereafter.

Hurt not others in ways that you yourself would find hurtful.

Putting oneself in the place of another, one should not kill nor cause another to kill.[51]

The Golden Rule is paramount in the Jainist philosophy and can be seen in the doctrines of Ahimsa and Karma. As part of the prohibition of causing any living beings to suffer, Jainism forbids inflicting upon others what is harmful to oneself.

The following quotation from the Acaranga Sutra sums up the philosophy of Jainism:

Nothing which breathes, which exists, which lives, or which has essence or potential of life, should be destroyed or ruled over, or subjugated, or harmed, or denied of its essence or potential.

In support of this Truth, I ask you a question “Is sorrow or pain desirable to you?” If you say “yes it is”, it would be a lie. If you say, “No, It is not” you will be expressing the truth. Just as sorrow or pain is not desirable to you, so it is to all which breathe, exist, live or have any essence of life. To you and all, it is undesirable, and painful, and repugnant.[52]

A man should wander about treating all creatures as he himself would be treated.

In happiness and suffering, in joy and grief, we should regard all creatures as we regard our own self.

Lord Mahavira, 24th Tirthankara

Saman Suttam of Jinendra Varni[53] gives further insight into this precept:-

Just as pain is not agreeable to you, it is so with others. Knowing this principle of equality treat other with respect and compassion.

Suman Suttam, verse 150

Killing a living being is killing one’s own self; showing compassion to a living being is showing compassion to oneself. He who desires his own good, should avoid causing any harm to a living being.

Suman Suttam, verse 151

Precious like jewels are the minds of all. To hurt them is not at all good. If thou desirest thy Beloved, then hurt thou not anyone’s heart.

Guru Arjan Dev Ji 259, Guru Granth Sahib

The same idea is also presented in V.12 and VI.30 of the Analects (c. 500 BC), which can be found in the online Chinese Text Project. The phraseology differs from the Christian version of the Golden Rule. It does not presume to do anything unto others, but merely to avoid doing what would be harmful. It does not preclude doing good deeds and taking moral positions.

The sage has no interest of his own, but takes the interests of the people as his own. He is kind to the kind; he is also kind to the unkind: for Virtue is kind. He is faithful to the faithful; he is also faithful to the unfaithful: for Virtue is faithful.

Regard your neighbor’s gain as your own gain, and your neighbor’s loss as your own loss.

If people regarded other peoples states in the same way that they regard their own, who then would incite their own state to attack that of another? For one would do for others as one would do for oneself. If people regarded other peoples cities in the same way that they regard their own, who then would incite their own city to attack that of another? For one would do for others as one would do for oneself. If people regarded other peoples families in the same way that they regard their own, who then would incite their own family to attack that of another? For one would do for others as one would do for oneself. And so if states and cities do not attack one another and families do not wreak havoc upon and steal from one another, would this be a harm to the world or a benefit? Of course one must say it is a benefit to the world.

Mozi regarded the golden rule as a corollary to the cardinal virtue of impartiality, and encouraged egalitarianism and selflessness in relationships.

Do not do unto others whatever is injurious to yourself.– Shayast-na-Shayast 13.29

Here ye these words and heed them well, the words of Dea, thy Mother Goddess, “I command thee thus, O children of the Earth, that that which ye deem harmful unto thyself, the very same shall ye be forbidden from doing unto another, for violence and hatred give rise to the same. My command is thus, that ye shall return all violence and hatred with peacefulness and love, for my Law is love unto all things. Only through love shall ye have peace; yea and verily, only peace and love will cure the world, and subdue all evil.”

The Way to Happiness expresses the Golden Rule both in its negative/prohibitive form and in its positive form. The negative/prohibitive form is expressed in Precept 19 as:

19. Try not to do things to others that you would not like them to do to you.

The positive form is expressed in Precept 20 as:

20. Try to treat others as you would want them to treat you.

One who is going to take a pointed stick to pinch a baby bird should first try it on himself to feel how it hurts.

Yoruba Proverb

Egbe bere, ugo bere. (Let the eagle perch, let the hawk perch.)

Igbo Proverb

Nke si ibe ya ebene gosi ya ebe o ga-ebe. (Whoever says the other shall not perch, may they show the other where to perch.)

Igbo Proverb

Philosophers, such as Immanuel Kant[76] and Friedrich Nietzsche,[77] have objected to the rule on a variety of grounds. The most serious among these is its application. How does one know how others want to be treated? The obvious way is to ask them, but this cannot be done if one assumes they have not reached a particular and relevant understanding.

George Bernard Shaw wrote, “Do not do unto others as you would that they should do unto you. Their tastes may be different.”[78] This suggests that if your values are not shared with others, the way you want to be treated will not be the way they want to be treated. Hence, the Golden Rule of “do unto others” is “dangerous in the wrong hands,”[79] according to philosopher Iain King, because “some fanatics have no aversion to death: the Golden Rule might inspire them to kill others in suicide missions.”[80]

Immanuel Kant famously criticized the golden rule for not being sensitive to differences of situation, noting that a prisoner duly convicted of a crime could appeal to the golden rule while asking the judge to release him, pointing out that the judge would not want anyone else to send him to prison, so he should not do so to others.[76] Kant’s Categorical Imperative, introduced in Groundwork of the Metaphysic of Morals, is often confused with the Golden Rule.

In his book How to Make Good Decisions and Be Right All the Time, philosopher Iain King has argued that “(although) the idea of mirroring your treatment of others with their treatment of you is very widespread indeed most ancient wisdoms express this negatively advice on what you should not do, rather than what you should.”[81] He argues this creates a bias in favour of inertia which allows bad actions and states of affairs to persist. The positive formulation, meanwhile, can be “incendiary”,[82] since it “can lead to cycles of tit-for-tat reciprocity,” unless it is accompanied by a corrective mechanism, such as a concept of forgiveness.[82] Therefore, he concludes that there can be no viable formulation of the Golden Rule, unless it is heavily qualified by other maxims.[83]

Walter Terence Stace, in The Concept of Morals (1937), wrote:

Mr. Bernard Shaw’s remark “Do not do unto others as you would that they should do unto you. Their tastes may be different” is no doubt a smart saying. But it seems to overlook the fact that “doing as you would be done by” includes taking into account your neighbor’s tastes as you would that he should take yours into account. Thus the “golden rule” might still express the essence of a universal morality even if no two men in the world had any needs or tastes in common.[84]

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Golden Rule – Wikipedia

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3-Way (The Golden Rule) (feat. Justin Timberlake & Lady Gaga)

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Golden Rule | ethical precept | Britannica.com

Golden Rule, precept in the Gospel of Matthew (7:12): In everything, do to others what you would have them do to you. . . . This rule of conduct is a summary of the Christians duty to his neighbour and states a fundamental ethical principle. In its negative form, Do not do to others what you would not like done to yourselves, it occurs in the 2nd-century documents Didach and the Apology of Aristides and may well have formed part of an early catechism. It recalls the command to love the stranger (sojourner) as found in Deuteronomy. It is not, however, peculiar to Christianity. Its negative form is to be found in Tob. 4:15, in the writings of the two great Jewish scholars Hillel (1st century bc) and Philo of Alexandria (1st centuries bc and ad), and in the Analects of Confucius (6th and 5th centuries bc). It also appears in one form or another in the writings of Plato, Aristotle, Isocrates, and Seneca.

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The Golden Rule – Think Humanism

Humanists try to embrace the moral principle known as the Golden Rule, otherwise known as the ethic of reciprocity, which means we believe that people should aim to treat each other as they would like to be treated themselves with tolerance, consideration and compassion.

Humanists like the Golden Rule because of its universality, because it is derived from human feelings and experience and because it requires people to think about others and try to imagine how they might think and feel. It is a simple and clear default position for moral decision-making.

Sometimes people argue that the Golden Rule is imperfect because it makes the assumption that everyone has the same tastes and opinions and wants to be treated the same in every situation. But the Golden Rule is a general moral principle, not a hard and fast rule to be applied to every detail of life. Treating other people as we would wish to be treated ourselves does not mean making the assumption that others feel exactly as we do about everything. The treatment we all want is recognition that we are individuals, each with our own opinions and feelings and for these opinions and feelings to be afforded respect and consideration. The Golden Rule is not an injunction to impose ones will on someone else!

Trying to live according to the Golden Rule means trying to empathise with other people, including those who may be very different from us. Empathy is at the root of kindness, compassion, understanding and respect qualities that we all appreciate being shown, whoever we are, whatever we think and wherever we come from. And although it isnt possible to know what it really feels like to be a different person or live in different circumstances and have different life experiences, it isnt difficult for most of us to imagine what would cause us suffering and to try to avoid causing suffering to others. For this reason, many people find the Golden Rules corollary do not treat people in a way you would not wish to be treated yourself more pragmatic.

The Golden Rule cannot be claimed for any one philosophy or religion; indeed, the successful evolution of communities has depended on its use as a standard through which conflict can be resolved. Throughout the ages, many individual thinkers and spiritual traditions have promoted one or other version of it. Here are some examples of the different ways it has been expressed:

Maria MacLachlanOctober 2007

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Golden rule Synonyms, Golden rule Antonyms | Thesaurus.com

The golden rule of the Sermon on the Mount is not applied to them.

The missionary approaches and beseeches him to regard the Golden Rule.

Emancipation–Ruin–Golden Rule, in your meaning, carried out.

Lao taught the golden rule: “Recompense injury,” he said, “with kindness.”

This is the golden rule which has been handed down through centuries.

We should like very much to do business according to the Golden Rule.

That as I understand it is the psychology of the Golden Rule.

Every age has needed a revival of the Golden Rule in business.

Remember the golden rule, Do unto others as you would that they should do unto you.

The golden rule is not natural to children: it has to be taught them.

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Marriott | Golden Rule

I traveled “home” to Lake Charles, LA for a family funeral, and when my housekeeper discovered this, she shared with her team. The next evening, returning to my room after a long and especially difficult day, there was a lovely sympathy card from the hotel staff on my bed. It was such a lovely gesture, and really made my day. I just thought that sort of kindness needed to be recognized by the company.

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Golden rule (law) – Wikipedia

In Becke v Smith (1836) Justice Parke (later Lord Wensleydale) stated:

It is a very useful rule in the construction of a statute to adhere to the ordinary meaning of the words used, and to the grammatical construction, unless that is at variance with the intention of the legislature to be collected from the statute itself, or leads to any manifest absurdity or repugnance, in which case the language may be varied or modified so as to avoid such inconvenience but no further.

Twenty years later, Lord Wensleydale restated the rule in different words in Grey v. Pearson (1857):

[I]n construing statutes, and all written instruments, the grammatical and ordinary sense of the words is to be adhered to, unless that would lead to some absurdity or inconsistency with the rest of the instrument, in which case the grammatical and ordinary sense of the words may be modified, so as to avoid that absurdity or inconsistency, but not farther.

The rule may be applied in the narrower sense where there is some ambiguity or absurdity in the words themselves.[1]

In the leading case of R v Allen (1872) the defendant was charged with bigamy under Section 57 of the Offences against the Person Act 1861 which made it an offence to marry while one’s spouse is still alive and not divorced. The court held that the word ‘marry’ could not in that context mean ‘become legally married’ since that could never apply to someone who is already married to someone else. To make sense of the provision, the word should be interpreted as meaning to ‘go through a second ceremony of marriage’.[1]

In its wider sense the rule may be used to avoid a result that is obnoxious to principles of public policy, even where words may prima facie carry only one meaning.

The rule was applied in this sense in In re Sigsworth[2] (1935) in the context of the Administration of Estates Act 1925. A man had murdered his mother and then committed suicide. Under the plain terms of section 46, as the woman had died intestate her murderer stood to inherit substantially her entire estate, which would then have passed to his descendants. This was challenged by other members of the woman’s family. The court used the golden rule to find in favour of the family, preventing the son’s descendants as a matter of public policy from profiting from his crime.[3][4] The rule as applied in that particular case has subsequently been put onto a statutory footing in the Forfeiture Act 1982 and the Estates of Deceased Persons (Forfeiture Rule and Law of Succession) Act 2011.

The leading case on the wider approach is Adler v George (1964) in which the defendant was charged with obstructing a military guard in the execution of his duty. In order to succeed, the prosecution had to show that the act took place in the vicinity of a military establishment. The defendant argued that in the vicinity meant ‘outside or in the proximity or area’ of the establishment, whereas he was in fact inside. The court decided that such an interpretation would lead to an absurd result, and interpreted in the vicinity of to cover a person already on the premises.[1]

Read more:

Golden rule (law) – Wikipedia

Golden Rule Insurance Review & Complaints | Healthcare

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Golden Rule Insurance was founded in 1940 in Indianapolis, Indiana, and became a part of UnitedHealthCare in 2003. Their products are sold under the UnitedHealthOne banner, which is the branding used for individual products that are underwritten by a variety of subsidiary companies owned by United.

Golden Rules product lineup is centered on individual health insurance plans. The company has a history of political support for candidates pushing the increased use of HSAs in health care reform. Our research, however, did not show any products from Golden Rule that utilize an HSA this may be due to the states in which we looked or a change in their offerings.

Golden Rule underwrites a variety of products under the UnitedHealthCare name. These include dental, vision, short-term medical, supplemental health, and prescription drug plans. Currently, there does not appear to be any major medical plans offered by Golden Rule (although other UnitedHealth companies do offer this type of plan).

Golden Rule continues to operate out of Indianapolis and offers their products in 40 states as well as the District of Columbia.

Which of the companies under the UnitedHealthOne brand will underwrite the insurance depends on the state of residence; for example, when we attempted to get product information for California we found only dental, critical illness, vision, and prescription discount plans available. Hospital and medical indemnity coverage is offered in the state by a different UnitedHealth subsidiary.

Because of the long list of products and the various versions of those products make it difficult to provide details, we have tried to give an overview of each of the products Golden Rule writes. We drew from both California and Indiana to get a look at the products not offered in one single state.

Short Term Medical

Golden Rule has a variety of short-term medical plans designed to provide catastrophic coverage for those that are in between major medical plans for a variety of reasons, including job changes.

The plans we saw in Indiana range from 60/40 coinsurance up to 80/20 coinsurance. Deductibles are either $10,000 or $12,500. These are high because this type of plan is meant to be in place to protect against catastrophic medical bills, and not for regular ongoing medical care.

Hospital and Doctor Insurance

Golden Rules Hospital and Doctor insurance plans pay a flat rate per day to cover fees for inpatient hospital care that are not paid for under major medical insurance.

The plans listed for Indiana start at coverage of $1,000 a day and go up by $1,000 increments to $5,000 a day.

Dental

In both states we looked at, Golden Rule has six different dental insurance plans available. These plans all offer similar basic coverage but differ in terms of copays and coinsurance amounts. Some plans include coverage for major dental service, while others cover only basics. None of the plans we looked at include orthodontia coverage.

Vision

There are two plans available in both states we looked at. The vision plans all include annual exams and benefits for eyeglasses and contacts. These plans can be bundled with the dental plans.

Critical Illness

Golden Rules Critical Illness insurance plans pay a flat rate benefit upon diagnosis with any of the covered critical illnesses.

The payout benefits start at $10,000 and go up to $50,000.

Accident

Golden Rule offers three different accident insurance plans in Indiana. Each of the three plans offers an increasing level of benefits to pay for medical costs arising from an accident. Coverage pays for doctor visits but does not provide any benefits for prescription drugs.

Discount Card

In both of our sample states Golden Rule offers a discount program that provides discounted services for both medical care and for prescription drugs.

Term Life

In Indiana, Golden Rule writes 10 or 20-year term life insurance plans with death benefit amounts going up to $200,000. An optional Critical Illness rider can be added to the plans.

We looked at the rates for a 30-year-old male, which are readily available and easy to locate on the UnitedHealthOne site. Since there are so many different plans, we are listing some of the more common options.

Short-term medical starts at $44.40 (in Indiana, as this coverage is not available in California) and goes up to $64.20.

Dental insurance plans start at $27.95 in California and go up to $76.90 a month. Rates in Indiana are a bit lower which is not surprising and start at $21.03

Hospital and Doctor insurance is not underwritten by Golden Rule in California. The Indiana rates start at $52.59 a month for this product.

The last rates we gathered are for term life insurance. A 10-year term policy with a death benefit of $25,000 came in at $6.81 a month. A 20-year-term policy at $200,000 has a monthly rate of $56.33.

We did not find much in the way of claims information on the companys website. Although most health insurance plans handle claims directly with the provider, some of the policies that are underwritten by Golden Rule will require the filing of claims directly by the insured.

On the contact page, there is both a mailing address and a fax number for claims. A phone number is not listed, but United does have a main customer service line where claims questions can likely be directed. There is also a member portal where existing customers can check on existing claims.

Golden Rule Insurance Company has an A+ rating with the Better Business Bureau (BBB). They have been accredited since 1985 and have a total of 17 complaints on file in the past three years. There are five negative reviews on the BBB page citing issues of claims denial and long wait times on hold with the company.

There are 85 reviews of Golden Rule on Consumer Affairs and an overall one-star rating. The complaints on this site are much the same, including billing issues and claims issues. There are also multiple complaints about the difficulty of getting a person on the phone.

The complaint volume for Golden Rule is not high for the size of the company, and the type of complaints are fairly common to this sort of insurance company. It does seem like there is an issue with hold times for customer service, which is a problem that Golden Rule needs to address, but this is often common to large insurance companies that have outgrown their staff.

Golden Rules branding under UnitedHealthOne is a bit confusing, and the other companies under the same brand add to that confusion, but the brand does provide name recognition. They have a long list of products that differ from state to state and may be a good value depending on your needs.

For a list of companies that we recommend, visit our Best Insurance Companies page.

Summary

Reviewer

Eric Stauffer

Review Date

2018-10-31

Reviewed

Golden Rule

Author Rating

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Golden Rule Insurance Review & Complaints | Healthcare


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