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Cyberpunk 2077 dev breaks promise, will force employees to work six days a week – The Verge

Cyberpunk 2077 developer CD Projekt Red has told employees that six-day workweeks will be mandatory ahead of the games November 19th release date, even though the studio has repeatedly and explicitly promised it would never do that, Bloomberg reports.

On two separate occasions in 2019, studio co-founder Marcin Iwiski told game journalist Jason Schreier how it would address crunch, once even saying that we want to be more humane and treat people with respect. It seemed pretty clear from excerpts like this that mandatory crunch was not going to be part of it!

Jason: If Im a designer at CD Projekt Red and I say you know what I have kids, I have a family, Im going to work from 10am to 6pm every day, and thats it. Even until the very end. Am I going to be okay with that?

Iwiski: Yes. Yes.

Jason: No matter what.

Iwiski: Yes.

Jason: So you can commit to that?

Iwiski: Weve committed to that already.

While CD Projekt Red didnt completely throw crunch time out the window, the company was clear that employees would be able to say no. In one interview with Kotaku, Iwiski said the studio would have a non-obligatory crunch policy, meaning that while the company could still ask employees to work overtime, it would not be mandatory. The words in quotes are Iwiskis actual words.

But by January, it was already starting to look like the company wasnt going to keep its promise to employees. As Polygon notes, when asked whether the development team would be required to put in crunch hours during an investor call in January, CD Projekt CEO Adam Kicinski answered yes, suggesting that it was somehow out of his hands: We try to limit crunch as much as possible, but it is the final stage. We try to be reasonable in this regard, but yes. Unfortunately.

In an email obtained by Bloomberg, CD Projekt Red studio head Adam Badowski offered a similar excuse, suggesting that his company somehow has no alternative than to force employees to work harder to address the remaining bugs and glitches in the game even though a CD Projekt Red employee told Bloomberg that some staff had already been working nights and weekends for more than a year.

I take it upon myself to receive the full backlash for the decision, Badowski wrote in the email. I know this is in direct opposition to what weve said about crunch. Its also in direct opposition to what I personally grew to believe a while back that crunch should never be the answer. But weve extended all other possible means of navigating the situation, he said, apparently without describing any of the other possible means that the company has already tried.

Cyberpunk 2077 was originally supposed to launch on April 16th, but the studio pushed the games release to September 17th, saying the developers need more time to finish play-testing, fixing, and polishing the game. CD Projekt Red would then push the release date once again to November 19th, explaining that the development team needed extra time to go through everything, balance game mechanics, and fix a lot of bugs. Weve already waited this long and the game is almost done: could CD Projekt Red just push the release date one last time instead of forcing its developers to crunch?

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Cyberpunk 2077 dev breaks promise, will force employees to work six days a week - The Verge

Ghostrunner Interview The Other Cyberpunk from Poland, Also Featuring RTX and NVIDIA DLSS – Wccftech

Beyond Cyberpunk 2077, there's another first-person cyberpunk game coming soon from a Polish developer, and it's called Ghostrunner. Scheduled to launch on October 27th for PC, PlayStation 4, Xbox One and Nintendo Switch, the game just got an updated demo available through Steam, so you can grab it right now for free.

While the download goes on, you can read our full chat with three key members of One More Level (Game Director Radosaw Ratusznik, Narrative Designer Jan Gasior, and Gameplay Designer Marcin Kluzek) from a few days ago.

Can you tell me about your studio before talking about Ghostrunner?

Radosaw: Sure, we are a studio based in Krakow in Poland. We are over 30 developers right now who are working only on Ghostrunner, basically, right now. The studio was founded in 2014 and we published several titles, we released one platforming game, one visual novel game, and later we decided to move forward with something more hardcore. Last year, we released the game called God's Trigger, which is a top-down action game with cooperative mode. It featured that one hit, one kill mechanic which was inspired by Hotline Miami, it was kind of similar to Miami.

How long have you been working on Ghostrunner? Is it a couple of years yet?

Radosaw: No, it's not that much. As I mentioned before, we released our previous title in April last year. We basically were first working on Ghostrunner somewhere at the beginning of 2019, so it will be less than two years of development to the release of the game.

You are working on Unreal Engine for Ghostrunner, right?

Radosaw: Yeah, this is Unreal Engine 4. Our previous game God's trigger was made in Unity. So we changed the engine, which was quite a big step for us. But our artists were quite familiar and experienced in Unreal Engine, so the transition went smoothly, to be honest. It cost us time to get some knowledge for designers, programmers, but it wasn't such a big deal as we felt, maybe. It's a very good engine to work on.

I know that you're also supporting ray tracing on PC, right?

Radosaw: Yeah. We have a strong cooperation with Nvidia and we are using ray tracing. We are also working on DLSS technology, though it will be implemented for the release of the game. The cooperation with Nvidia is pretty close. We have access to the latest exclusive versions for Unreal Engine 4 and it's a good thing for us because we can work on the latest stuff.

What kind of raytracing effects are you specifically going to support in Ghostrunner? Reflections and shadows, perhaps?

Radosaw: Shadows, reflections, and ambient occlusion. Though the implementation of fake reflections in Unreal Engine 4 is pretty cool too. Of course, it's not as good as true reflections from raytracing, which are looking really spectacular.

As Ghostrunner is also coming out on consoles, are you planning to support the next-gen hardware as well with ray tracing since there is hardware support for that?

Radosaw: To be honest, right now, we are not announcing the next-gen version of Ghostrunner. This is something that we would love to bring, of course. But right now, we are focusing on the platforms that we announced, so it will be last-gen, or current-gen for two months. But yeah, for the release of the game, there will be no next-gen yet. But as I said, we would love to bring Ghostrunner to as many platforms as we can. I think it will be a no brainer to also port it someday to the next-gen.

Back to the game itself. How did you come out with the idea for it? Because it looks quite unique. I mean, it's kind of a platformer slash action game.

Radosaw: That's true. In terms of inspiration, when we are talking about the gameplay itself, the main inspiration was from our previous game God's Trigger. We were inspired by that one hit, one kill mechanic, but we wanted to bring it to another perspective to the first person. Also, Titanfall 2 and Mirror's Edge, those were huge inspirations in terms of wall running and the whole parkour system where you're sliding, dashing, dodging bullets. This is something also which we bring from, for example, Superhot. Some players have compared it to that feature where you can dodge a bullet in first person and each shot you get is fatal. That's about it for the main inspirations in terms of gameplay. I think that Jan and Martin could add something more to this.

Jan: There's plenty of inspirations because as you can see, there's many elements that are specific to the cyberpunk genre, but every and each one of us understands cyberpunk differently and loves it for different reasons. So basically, we tried to be inspired as much as we could, and everybody brought something else to the table. And of course, I'm speaking from my perspective, so more from the worldbuilding and design perspective, less from the gameplay perspective. You can pretty much find something from most of the biggest cyberpunk works. We try to always incorporate those inspirations as something fresh and new, not just reuse things from other places, because that wouldn't be very nice. And basically, all in all, we went for this kind of rugged, janky, rusty cyberpunk, that's not as polished and shiny and nice. It's got some postapocalyptic elements in it, you can see that the city is very dark. And many of the machinery that you see is quite literally rusty and used. It's reflected in the story and it's reflected in the atmosphere and individual design. You can tell that it's this very rundown world, and it's probably not very pleasant to live in. For my inspirations, I would say that, well, obviously you can't really not see inspiration from Blade Runner. This city is very Blade Runner like, and we're not trying to hide that. For me personally, when it comes to the story, one of the most inspirational works of cyberpunk was Battle Angel Alita, the manga from the 90s, which also had this very gritty, very brutal, kind of cyberpunk in it. About gameplay inspirations, I think marching will be able to tell you more.

Marcin: Keep in mind that everybody in the team has different inspirations and plays different games, so everybody contributed. My inspiration for example would be Dredd from 2012, the movie that takes place in one big tower. It's also like in this game, as Jan said, this is a postapocalyptic world where the whole of humanity basically lives in this one tower because the Earth is very deadly to live in and people have hidden in this big structure. The other thing is that we avoid the tropes of the corporation cast and the working class, everybody is affected by the cataclysm, everybody's poor and everything is broken, or in some way changed by the cataclysm. I would say that there's a touch of Matrix as well in the dodging bullets and the slow-mo.

About the gameplay, for me personally it's Titanfall 2 and of course our previous project, God's Trigger as Radek said. The main inspiration adding to that would be Apex Legends actually, because I think Apex Legends gets the parkour stuff a bit further. Those zip lines, for example, they were not really present in Titanfall 2 in that manner. Also Doom, because in Doom you have enemies that are quite defined, the enemy has its own pattern and weaknesses and strengths. Like in our game, each enemy requires the player to do a different motion. There's a guy with a shield and you have to get him from behind, for instance.

Do you have an estimate for how long it will take to finish Ghostrunner?

Radosaw: When we are looking at the current playtests, I think we can tell that 10 hours and maybe over ten hours is the gameplay time. It of course depends on the player skill, because our game won't feature any type of difficulty settings. You will have to play the game as we designed it.

Is there going to be any sort of side content in the game?

Radosaw: Not for the release. For the release, we'll just have that 'story mode'. But of course, you will be able to repeat the levels after beating them. You will be able to bring your character which can be more advanced, with unlocked new abilities and some upgrades. And you can try beating your time on past levels, beating your scores, because the game will feature online leaderboards. As we saw when the original demo was up on Steam, we've got a lot of potential in terms of speedrunning with Ghostrunner. The speedrunning community was very excited about the game, I think that there is a place to go and to extend it even more for the speedrunners, and we will also have post-launch support for the game. There, you can expect some new game modes, some bigger DLCs also.

Jan: I'd also add that there's gonna be an additional replayability factor due to the things you can find in-game, there's quite a lot of collectibles that you can find. And some of them are related to the story, and some of them are not, but you can always go back to the level that you've beaten before and look for them. So there's this extra factor of exploration going on.

Interesting. On the story aspect of the game, you've said earlier that this is basically a post-apocalyptic world. Judging from the released footage, the action essentially takes place on skyscrapers. Does that mean that the ground level is essentially uninhabitable due to some reason?

Jan: No, basically, the entirety of the game takes place inside one giant megastructure, and this whole city is inside it. And this is the middle section of this tower. So basically, the Ghostrunner starts at the very bottom and make his makes his way to the top throughout the game. The difference between the levels as you progress up shows in the level design, it shows in the way they look and in the way they play. You start in the quite cramped industrial underbelly of the tower, probably below the ground level, where there's plenty of heavy machinery and it's dangerous to even move around. And then you move up to the city, and this is how the city looks. Then you climb up even further to the more let's say elaborate part of the tower that was only accessible to the most to the elites, so to speak. As you move up, the environment changes and so does the gameplay. What we're showing right now is around the middle section of the tower called Dharma City. This is the commercial and residential district so it's akin to a normal city although this is all inside this giant structure.

Is the ultimate goal for players to climb up to the top and go kill Mara the Keymaster?

Jan: That's right. That's what the Ghostrunner finds out pretty soon. He's got his reasons to want to do that, they're going to be explored in the story and they have a bit of a backstory as you will find out and yeah, his main quest from the get-go is basically to climb the tower and confront the Keymaster. There is some nuance, there are some caveats to that but that's the gist of it.

Are there any other bosses throughout the game?

Radosaw: Yeah, sure. There will be a couple of boss fights during the game. We don't want to spoil it for you but it will be quite a different experience. As you know, each enemy in our game dies in one hit, you can just slice it with your sword, but on the boss fights it will be kind of a different approach. This is something that you will have to check out by yourself. We put a lot of effort into these boss fights, so we hope that players will enjoy it. And sometimes they are really spectacular.

I think you mentioned that there are some upgrades and new techniques to unlock in Ghostrunner, correct?

Radosaw: Yes, yes. We will have special abilities that you can see on the left bottom corner, there is this yellow bar that's filling up over time but also the big chunks of the bar are restoring when you are killing enemies. Each kill gives you like a big chunk of this ability bar and you can switch between your abilities during the gameplay. With your progression through the game and through the story of Ghostrunner, you will unlock new abilities, you will unlock new upgrades for your basic abilities. You can for example have more dashes on the ground than just one. So you will be able to enhance, extend it. Also, you will be able to tweak the special abilities a little bit to fit your gameplay style. You will be able to prepare some kind of builds for your character. There will be many ways to find out your favorite build, and after you've finished the whole game you will be able to play it again in the same levels with your fully unlocked character.

Like a New Game Plus mode of sorts.

Radosaw: Something like that.

I'm assuming the only available weapon in Ghostrunner is the katana, right?

Radosaw: Yes, this is the main weapon. Being completely honest, this is the only weapon. We will have several collectibles that are related to the katana but it will be just more like a visual representation rather than some changes in the gameplay for this katana. But yeah, that was our goal, the main challenge in Ghostrunner is to reach the enemy in one piece. We want to make the character quick and very agile, at the same time the players need to be very careful, but when they finally reach the enemy it's not that hard to attack. We have kind of assistance for the players when they are attacking...

Something like aim assist?

Radosaw: Yes, something like aim assist, but it's not the same as in shooters. This is more like in fighting games, for example, or some slasher games where you are magnetized to the enemy, something like that.

Did you consider doing a VR version of Ghostrunner? Because it could have serious potential.

Radosaw: To be honest with you, we haven't thought about it yet. Who knows what the future brings, but it couldn't be the same game. From my point of view, it should be something totally different if we ever decided to make some kind of VR take on Ghostrunner.

You are launching Ghostrunner less than a month before another cyberpunk game, which is a little more famous than yours but it's also made in Poland. I'm wondering if you think this hugely anticipated release will kind of benefit you indirectly in that, you know, players are now kind eager to go into the cyberpunk setting. And since you're launching first, they might as well go 'Let's try this as an appetizer of sorts'.

Radosaw: Yeah, you can treat it as an appetizer before Cyberpunk 2077. I think it will be a very tasteful appetizer! But yeah, we talked about that. People who are hyped over Cyberpunk 2077 (we are also hyped for it as players, as gamers) will probably like to try this kind of game, even before Cyberpunk 2077 releases or after they beat this game. They could also play it after they beat cyberpunk. So yeah, of course, we think that Cyberpunk 2077 is the most anticipated game during this year, that's for sure. But you know, Ghostrunner, it's like a totally different game. We are not trying to copy the RED's game. This is not an RPG, it's an action game. It's a way more intense experience than Cyberpunk 2077.

Indeed. Looking forward to it; thank you for your time!

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Ghostrunner Interview The Other Cyberpunk from Poland, Also Featuring RTX and NVIDIA DLSS - Wccftech

Anshar Studios on making Gamedec, cyberpunk RPG that occasinally makes fun of games, gamers and gaming industry – Game World Observer

Gamedec is an upcoming cyberpunk isometric RPG.It puts you in the shoes of a game detective, who solves crimes inside virtual worlds.The story adapts to the decisions you make, but those wont come easy to you. Players will haveto make their morally ambiguous choices and deductions under constant time pressure,never able to collect enough evidence to piece together the whole picture.

The game, which already has a bunch of prestigious awards and nominations under its belt,issetto releasein 2020. The demo has beenout for about a monthnow.

We reached out to the dev team to discuss the making of Gamedec. The good folks atAnshar Studioschose to be collectively identified asthe companys voice. So, in the spirit of adaptive RPGs, well stick with their choice and this companys voice persona throughout the interview.

Anshar Studios

Oleg Nesterenko, managing editor at GWO:Heyguys. Tell us about the studio.

Anshar Studios was founded in 2012, when our CEO, ukasz Hacura, decided to open his own video games studio after working as a programmer for one of the Polish companies. In 8 years, Anshar grew to be an almost 100 people company, delivering work-for-hire services for some of the most-known video game studios out there [most notably, Anshar has supported the development of Baldurs Gate 3 byLarian Studiosand is co-developing Observer: System Redux with Bloober Team Ed.].

As for the name: when we were thinking of a name for company, we were going through the Internet dictionaries of extinct languages, and we came across the word anshar, which in Sumerian means gates of heaven. We believe in the principle of sky is the limit and we believe that we will achieve a lot in the future, so the gates of heaven are a good reference point for our goals.

Gamedec art

Earlier, you made a couple of games for VR (Detached, Telefrag VR). Are you using any learnings from those experiences right now?

We were fascinated by how VR madeit possible to achieve the next level of immersion in some genres, but after two projects we decided to give it a rest and focus on games we always wanted to do RPGs. Gamedec is our first project in this genre, but given the experience we gained through various work-for-hire gigs, were full of optimism.

What is the synergy between your first-party and third-party projects?

Were in the luxurious position to decide which project we want to work on and can decline offers were not feeling ok with doing. Most of the workforce of the Anshar Studios is focused on the third-party orders, so were keeping the cash flow at a stable level, which makes a considerable budget for our first-party projects like Gamedec.

Working with Larian Studios and other top-league game companies is an honor in itself. Seeing how some games are constructed and how they approached certain issues is a profit we cant have underappreciated. Every third-party project helps us expand our know-how in a considerable way. thus, as a result, makes our games better.

Gamedec gameplay

Where do you want to be as a studio in five years time?

Our dream was always about making high-quality RPGs and constantly expanding our portfolio. Hopefully, Gamedec will prove our worth in this field and we will be blessed with a chance to make another game in this genre. Even beforeGamedecs release, we already know what features we would love to show you in our next project.

You self-funded your previous games. Why did you decide to run a Kickstarter campaign for Gamedec?

A Kickstarter campaign for Gamedec had two purposes. First was to gather feedback about our project and to develop it according to community opinions. That is why we decided to reach out for community support. We were hoping they could help us make a great game and show us where it can be improved. The Kickstarter campaign also had an additional impact on how much more we can add to the game before its release. Marketing, recognition and press presence were also taken into consideration.

Lets talk about the game. How did you decide to make Gamedec?

There was a time when our CEO approached Marcin Przybyek, the author of the Gamedec saga, and offered him a chance to deliver a game based on his books. Long story short they agreed it would be beneficial for both sides, as we felt the Gamedecverse is great, and Marcin is a big fan of video games and a gamer himself. He was delighted by the vision of making a Gamedec video game. We had a few takes on different genres before we all decided an RPG would be the best one to honor the source material.

The covers of the Gamedec book series byMarcin Przybyek

How involved isMarcin in the game development process?

Marcin Przybyek works as an in-studio consultant and a dialogue writer. He makes sure were in-sync with his lore and the world he created. If something wasnt shown in his books, hes the one to come up with the ideas on how it might be solved and hes in constant access for the designers team if they need to consult on any aspect of the Gamedecverse.

Non-linear writing in games still boggles my mind. Can you tell us how you design your quests?

Every case was played as a Pen & Paper RPG session within our core team so the outcomes might be surprising even for hardcore RPG veterans. Decisions made at the start of the case might impact the result of the case. Youre shaping your story, and you are the sum of your choices. If youre interested in the technical aspect of branching, we made an article about it, and you can dig into it right here.

Detroit: Become Human, for example, kind of punished players for choosing certain options by killing off characters. So, in a way, there wasnt all that much freedom. Any good or bad endings in Gamedec?

There will be consequences, for example killing a character you were supposed to help will antagonise his family or cut off a branching in next cases (since the character died), but there are no right or wrong solutions, just morally challenging.

Gamedec

Your game autosaves, and not all that often. Did you go with that feature to specifically prohibit save scumming?

We will be adding additional save points and checkpoints in the final release, as well as manual saves. For gamers who seek more thrill, there will be a mode unlocked via Kickstarter, where loading a game wont be an option. A decision you made once, will stick with you till the end of the game.

In August, you ran a survey among your backers on Kickstarter to get feedback on the demo available to them. What are you going to do with the insights you gained?

The build we shared with our Kickstarter backers was a pre-alpha build, and many things already changed or will be polished before the full release.

One of the things that came out in the survey is that many players (including myself) found the Deduction mechanic somewhat clear as opposed to making perfect sense. Are you going to tweak it somehow based on the feedback?

We will be having an additional tutorial on how the deduction system works, as well as an additional marker to show the players that what theyre supposed to do now is to make a deduction to push the investigation further.

There is an episode where a car blocks a way out for the gamedec in an in-game world. One of the options to get out is to kill your character and get respawned elsewhere. The postmodernism of it totally blew my mind. Will there be any other instances of the character taking advantage of the fact hes just a playable character when he is in Virtualia?

Of course Having multiple virtual worlds set in different genres and themes makes it very easy to implement many easter eggs or video games references (trolls, cheats, exploits). There will be many more of these to discover while playing the full game. Were players as well, and sometimes we make fun of games, gamers and industry just because the world and the system allows us to. Harvest Time, a second virtual world we showed you is an attempt to deal with a 22nd century free-to-play games in an unusual approach.Were sure some players will see it as a fun way to play with genres and themes.

Thank you for the interview! I look forward to playing the full game when it comes out.

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Anshar Studios on making Gamedec, cyberpunk RPG that occasinally makes fun of games, gamers and gaming industry - Game World Observer

How The Witcher 3 Could Have Hurt Cyberpunk 2077s Development – GameRant

The Witcher 3 may be CD Projekt Red's most successful game, but it could be detrimental to the development of Cyberpunk 2077 in some key ways.

Cyberpunk 2077 was announced by CD Projekt Red with the release of a reveal trailer all the way back in 2013. The company would go on to receive critical acclaim for The Witcher 3 in 2015, but the release of the final game in the Witcher trilogy was not exclusively affirmative for the studio.

CD Projekt Red has looked closely at The Witcher 3s reception, and the way fans reacted to different features has had a big influence on Cyberpunk 2077. The developer has already confirmed some changes which were made in Cyberpunk over the course of its long development as a direct response to feedback and analysis of how fans played The Witcher. However, not all of these changes will be ones many RPG fans will be happy with.

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CD Projekt Red has already announced that the main quest for Cyberpunk 2077 will be shorter than the main quest in The Witcher 3. Patrick Mills, a senior quest designer with the studio, explained that the main story run inCyberpunk 2077is slightly short thanThe Witcher 3. He went on to We got a lot of complaints aboutTheWitcher 3s storyjust being too long," adding that looking at the metrics, you see tremendous numbers of people played through that game really far but never made it to the end.

This might come as a concern to some RPG fans. The Witchers main story could be completed in roughly 50 hours, which could mean that Cyberpunk 2077s main story length is more similar to another first-person RPG like Skyrim.Skyrims main quest came in at about 15 to 30 hours.

The reason this might come as a concern to some fans is that while The Witcher 3s main quest was long and not completed by many players, that statistic doesnt necessarily speak to many player's experiences of playing the game, even those who did not complete the main story. Part of what made The Witcher 3 feel like an epic conclusion to the trilogy was that its sprawling plot took the player all over the world of The Witcher. The search for Ciri always felt like Geralts main motivation, but the fact that the main quest couldnt be quickly or easily completed was part of what made the other missions make sense.

Some will enjoy it being shorter, so this is more of a middling change to the overall game. But with this in mind, it's worth looking at why The Witcher works and how some changes could hurt Cyberpunk in the long run.

By having such a huge main quest, the game actually made completing side missions and Witcher contracts feel far more immersive. For example, near the start of The Witcher 3, Geralt has to help the Bloody Baron in order to learn more information about where Ciri might have gone. In a game like Skyrim, it can feel immersion breaking for some players to take on side quests once the player has already found out they are the Dragonborn and has been given a very clear goal they need to achieve stopping Alduin which makes getting involved in many of the side quests feel unjustifiable in a roleplay sense.

In The Witcher 3, the sense of scale in the main quest makes the game more immersive by allowing the player to complete side missions and Witcher contracts to survive without it feeling like a diversion, but instead a necessary part of Geralts long journey to save Ciri from the Wild Hunt. Indeed, one of the likely reasons many players never actually reached the end of the main quest is because this set up made completing the side quests in The Witcher 3 a uniquely immersive and enjoyable experience compared to many other RPGs.

CD Projekt Red has claimed thatevery side mission inCyberpunkshould feel like a full story, but it remains unclear exactly how this would be manifested in-game. Many Witcher contracts were short but compelling and enjoyable, and there is a risk that Cyberpunks narrative will feel spread thin over too many short stories without one big epic main story to tie it all together and focus the player character's motivation.

While many players did not finish the main quest of The Witcher 3, it seems unlikely that many RPG fans would complain about getting more value for their money with such a huge amount of content to enjoy that theypractically couldnt finish all of it. Not only that, but if Cyberpunk 2077 has been heavily influenced by perceived problems with The Witcher 3, there are other changes which could have been made which could also be worrying to some RPG fans.

RELATED:Cyberpunk 2077's Lifepaths May Be More Important Than You Realize

The comments made by CD Projekt Red regardingthe length of Cyberpunk 2077's main quest could imply that the game will have more stories, but will feel less like a single consistent narrative than The Witcher 3. The trouble is that one of the most successful aspects of The Witcher 3 was its ability to make its narrative feel like one single unfolding story. When Geralt travels to Skellige, for example, he does so because of the overarching narrative of the main quest, which makes the Witcher's side quests he completes there still feel like a part of the main story as a necessary means to his final goal.

With Cyberpunk potentially focusing more on making side missions feel like full stories, and with all of the game taking place in Night City instead of spread across the world in the same way as The Witcher, this could cause Cyberpunks open-world design and its blank-slate protagonist V to clash with CD Projekt Redsdesire to give its game a strong main story.

Cyberpunk 2077 is without a doubt an extremely ambitious game, however, and it is a good thing that CD Projekt Red is willing to risk experimenting and making changes from The Witcher despite that games huge success. Whether or not the studio is able to make Cyberpunk 2077 a next-generational RPG experience which fuses open-world freedom with strong storytelling remains to be seen, and fans will be keenly awaiting the games release in November to see just what the world ofCyberpunkhas in store.

Cyberpunk 2077will be available November 19th on PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One, with PS5, Stadia and Xbox Series X versions in development.

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How The Witcher 3 Could Have Hurt Cyberpunk 2077s Development - GameRant

Cyberpunk 2077 Will Definitely Play On Your PS5 And Xbox Series X – Press Start Australia

Ive seen a lot of people confused on social media about whether Cyberpunk 2077 will be available on PS5 and Xbox Series X. Its definitely a valid thing to be confused about, as its arguably the largest game of the year and is launching a week after both new consoles.

The short version is, you can buy Cyberpunk 2077 on either PS4 or Xbox One and it will work on your PS5 or Xbox Series X/S. Id even go as far as saying that I think youll be able to buy Cyberpunk 2077 digitally on your PS5/Xbox Series X.

The long (and slightly more confusing) version is that the PS5/Xbox Series X versions arent actually releasing until 2021. It will come as a free update for PS4/Xbox One owners and bring next-gen updates such as better assets, and ray-tracing. Its worth noting that the PS4/Xbox One version should run better on next-gen consoles by default and should load better thanks to the SSD in the next-gen consoles.

CD Projekt Red has confirmed time and time again that the game will work on next-gen consoles, so theres really no need to worry.

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Cyberpunk 2077 Will Definitely Play On Your PS5 And Xbox Series X - Press Start Australia

How The Witcher 3 Could Have Hurt Cyberpunk 2077s Development – GameRant

The Witcher 3 may be CD Projekt Red's most successful game, but it could be detrimental to the development of Cyberpunk 2077 in some key ways.

Cyberpunk 2077 was announced by CD Projekt Red with the release of a reveal trailer all the way back in 2013. The company would go on to receive critical acclaim for The Witcher 3 in 2015, but the release of the final game in the Witcher trilogy was not exclusively affirmative for the studio.

CD Projekt Red has looked closely at The Witcher 3s reception, and the way fans reacted to different features has had a big influence on Cyberpunk 2077. The developer has already confirmed some changes which were made in Cyberpunk over the course of its long development as a direct response to feedback and analysis of how fans played The Witcher. However, not all of these changes will be ones many RPG fans will be happy with.

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CD Projekt Red has already announced that the main quest for Cyberpunk 2077 will be shorter than the main quest in The Witcher 3. Patrick Mills, a senior quest designer with the studio, explained that the main story run inCyberpunk 2077is slightly short thanThe Witcher 3. He went on to We got a lot of complaints aboutTheWitcher 3s storyjust being too long," adding that looking at the metrics, you see tremendous numbers of people played through that game really far but never made it to the end.

This might come as a concern to some RPG fans. The Witchers main story could be completed in roughly 50 hours, which could mean that Cyberpunk 2077s main story length is more similar to another first-person RPG like Skyrim.Skyrims main quest came in at about 15 to 30 hours.

The reason this might come as a concern to some fans is that while The Witcher 3s main quest was long and not completed by many players, that statistic doesnt necessarily speak to many player's experiences of playing the game, even those who did not complete the main story. Part of what made The Witcher 3 feel like an epic conclusion to the trilogy was that its sprawling plot took the player all over the world of The Witcher. The search for Ciri always felt like Geralts main motivation, but the fact that the main quest couldnt be quickly or easily completed was part of what made the other missions make sense.

Some will enjoy it being shorter, so this is more of a middling change to the overall game. But with this in mind, it's worth looking at why The Witcher works and how some changes could hurt Cyberpunk in the long run.

By having such a huge main quest, the game actually made completing side missions and Witcher contracts feel far more immersive. For example, near the start of The Witcher 3, Geralt has to help the Bloody Baron in order to learn more information about where Ciri might have gone. In a game like Skyrim, it can feel immersion breaking for some players to take on side quests once the player has already found out they are the Dragonborn and has been given a very clear goal they need to achieve stopping Alduin which makes getting involved in many of the side quests feel unjustifiable in a roleplay sense.

In The Witcher 3, the sense of scale in the main quest makes the game more immersive by allowing the player to complete side missions and Witcher contracts to survive without it feeling like a diversion, but instead a necessary part of Geralts long journey to save Ciri from the Wild Hunt. Indeed, one of the likely reasons many players never actually reached the end of the main quest is because this set up made completing the side quests in The Witcher 3 a uniquely immersive and enjoyable experience compared to many other RPGs.

CD Projekt Red has claimed thatevery side mission inCyberpunkshould feel like a full story, but it remains unclear exactly how this would be manifested in-game. Many Witcher contracts were short but compelling and enjoyable, and there is a risk that Cyberpunks narrative will feel spread thin over too many short stories without one big epic main story to tie it all together and focus the player character's motivation.

While many players did not finish the main quest of The Witcher 3, it seems unlikely that many RPG fans would complain about getting more value for their money with such a huge amount of content to enjoy that theypractically couldnt finish all of it. Not only that, but if Cyberpunk 2077 has been heavily influenced by perceived problems with The Witcher 3, there are other changes which could have been made which could also be worrying to some RPG fans.

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The comments made by CD Projekt Red regardingthe length of Cyberpunk 2077's main quest could imply that the game will have more stories, but will feel less like a single consistent narrative than The Witcher 3. The trouble is that one of the most successful aspects of The Witcher 3 was its ability to make its narrative feel like one single unfolding story. When Geralt travels to Skellige, for example, he does so because of the overarching narrative of the main quest, which makes the Witcher's side quests he completes there still feel like a part of the main story as a necessary means to his final goal.

With Cyberpunk potentially focusing more on making side missions feel like full stories, and with all of the game taking place in Night City instead of spread across the world in the same way as The Witcher, this could cause Cyberpunks open-world design and its blank-slate protagonist V to clash with CD Projekt Redsdesire to give its game a strong main story.

Cyberpunk 2077 is without a doubt an extremely ambitious game, however, and it is a good thing that CD Projekt Red is willing to risk experimenting and making changes from The Witcher despite that games huge success. Whether or not the studio is able to make Cyberpunk 2077 a next-generational RPG experience which fuses open-world freedom with strong storytelling remains to be seen, and fans will be keenly awaiting the games release in November to see just what the world ofCyberpunkhas in store.

Cyberpunk 2077will be available November 19th on PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One, with PS5, Stadia and Xbox Series X versions in development.

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How The Witcher 3 Could Have Hurt Cyberpunk 2077s Development - GameRant

This Cyberpunk 2077 Johnny Silverhand 1/4 Scale Statue Is Perfection, But It’ll Cost You – Gaming Ideology

Not excessive longer before we can dive into the world of Night Citywith Cyberpunk 2077 For those that like gathering as much as I do, there is a new Johnny Silverhand statue that is so in-depth it will blow your mind. Itll also blow that wallet, since this bad young boy aint inexpensive.

From the exceptionally skilled studio over at PureArts comes their latest statue to hit racks. This 1/4 scale reproduction of Keanu Reeves character, Johnny Silverhand, is crafted to perfection. With detachable parts for the special edition like the guitar seen below and premium paint and very specific base, this statue continues on the quality understood under the PureArts umbrella.

As an enormous collector, I have a number of big pieces from this company and can vouch for the attention to information it has concerning each collectible. That being stated, PureArts is taking this one step even more by making this statue an interactive media experience! Each statue comes fully incorporated with a 13.3 inch HD LCD screen and dual speakers to play the games soundtrack and background screens from the RPG itself.

You can see the statue in action in the video at the top of the post, in addition to a couple of of the images seen above. Intrigued? Heres what you need to know:

ITEM HIGHLIGHTS:

ITEM FEATURES:

The regular edition retails for $849 while the luxurious edition comes in at just under $900. This item is available to snatch now ideal here through the PureArts store!

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This Cyberpunk 2077 Johnny Silverhand 1/4 Scale Statue Is Perfection, But It'll Cost You - Gaming Ideology

Cyberpunk – Wikipedia

Postmodern science fiction genre in a futuristic dystopian setting

Cyberpunk is a subgenre of science fiction in a dystopian futuristic setting that tends to focus on a "combination of low-life and high tech"[1] featuring advanced technological and scientific achievements, such as artificial intelligence and cybernetics, juxtaposed with a degree of breakdown or radical change in the social order.[2] Much of cyberpunk is rooted in the New Wave science fiction movement of the 1960s and 1970s, when writers like Philip K. Dick, Roger Zelazny, John Brunner, J.G. Ballard, Philip Jos Farmer and Harlan Ellison examined the impact of drug culture, technology, and the sexual revolution while avoiding the utopian tendencies of earlier science fiction.

Comics exploring cyberpunk themes began appearing as early as Judge Dredd, first published in 1977.[3] Released in 1984, William Gibson's influential debut novel Neuromancer would help solidify cyberpunk as a genre, drawing influence from punk subculture and early hacker culture. Other influential cyberpunk writers included Bruce Sterling and Rudy Rucker. The Japanese cyberpunk subgenre began in 1982 with the debut of Katsuhiro Otomo's manga series Akira, with its 1988 anime film adaptation later popularizing the subgenre.

Early films in the genre include Ridley Scott's 1982 film Blade Runner, one of several of Philip K. Dick's works that have been adapted into films. The films Johnny Mnemonic (1995)[4] and New Rose Hotel (1998),[5][6] both based upon short stories by William Gibson, flopped commercially and critically. The Matrix trilogy (1999-2003) were some of the most successful cyberpunk films. Newer cyberpunk media includes Blade Runner 2049 (2017), a sequel to the original 1982 film, as well as Upgrade (2018), Alita: Battle Angel (2019) based on the 1990s Japanese manga Battle Angel Alita, the 2018 Netflix TV series Altered Carbon based on Richard K. Morgan's 2002 novel of the same name, and the upcoming video game Cyberpunk 2077 (2020).

Lawrence Person has attempted to define the content and ethos of the cyberpunk literary movement stating:

Classic cyberpunk characters were marginalized, alienated loners who lived on the edge of society in generally dystopic futures where daily life was impacted by rapid technological change, an ubiquitous datasphere of computerized information, and invasive modification of the human body.

Cyberpunk plots often center on conflict among artificial intelligences, hackers, and megacorporations, and tend to be set in a near-future Earth, rather than in the far-future settings or galactic vistas found in novels such as Isaac Asimov's Foundation or Frank Herbert's Dune.[8] The settings are usually post-industrial dystopias but tend to feature extraordinary cultural ferment and the use of technology in ways never anticipated by its original inventors ("the street finds its own uses for things").[9] Much of the genre's atmosphere echoes film noir, and written works in the genre often use techniques from detective fiction.[10] There are sources who view that cyberpunk has shifted from a literary movement to a mode of science fiction due to the limited number of writers and its transition to a more generalized cultural formation.[11][12][13]

The origins of cyberpunk are rooted in the New Wave science fiction movement of the 1960s and 70s, where New Worlds, under the editorship of Michael Moorcock, began inviting and encouraging stories that examined new writing styles, techniques, and archetypes. Reacting to conventional storytelling, New Wave authors attempted to present a world where society coped with a constant upheaval of new technology and culture, generally with dystopian outcomes. Writers like Roger Zelazny, J.G. Ballard, Philip Jose Farmer, and Harlan Ellison often examined the impact of drug culture, technology, and the sexual revolution with an avant-garde style influenced by the Beat Generation (especially William S. Burroughs' own SF), Dadaism, and their own ideas.[14] Ballard attacked the idea that stories should follow the "archetypes" popular since the time of Ancient Greece, and the assumption that these would somehow be the same ones that would call to modern readers, as Joseph Campbell argued in The Hero with a Thousand Faces. Instead, Ballard wanted to write a new myth for the modern reader, a style with "more psycho-literary ideas, more meta-biological and meta-chemical concepts, private time systems, synthetic psychologies and space-times, more of the sombre half-worlds one glimpses in the paintings of schizophrenics."[15]

This had a profound influence on a new generation of writers, some of whom would come to call their movement "Cyberpunk". One, Bruce Sterling, later said:

In the circle of American science fiction writers of my generation cyberpunks and humanists and so forth [Ballard] was a towering figure. We used to have bitter struggles over who was more Ballardian than whom. We knew we were not fit to polish the mans boots, and we were scarcely able to understand how we could get to a position to do work which he might respect or stand, but at least we were able to see the peak of achievement that he had reached.[16]

Ballard, Zelazny, and the rest of New Wave was seen by the subsequent generation as delivering more "realism" to science fiction, and they attempted to build on this.

Similarly influential, and generally cited as proto-cyberpunk, is the Philip K. Dick novel Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, first published in 1968. Presenting precisely the general feeling of dystopian post-economic-apocalyptic future as Gibson and Sterling later deliver, it examines ethical and moral problems with cybernetic, artificial intelligence in a way more "realist" than the Isaac Asimov Robot series that laid its philosophical foundation. Dick's protege and friend K. W. Jeter wrote a very dark and imaginative novel called Dr. Adder in 1972 that, Dick lamented, might have been more influential in the field had it been able to find a publisher at that time.[citation needed] It was not published until 1984, after which Jeter made it the first book in a trilogy, followed by The Glass Hammer (1985) and Death Arms (1987). Jeter wrote other standalone cyberpunk novels before going on to write three authorized sequels to Do Androids Dream of electric sheep, named Blade Runner 2: The Edge of Human (1995), Blade Runner 3: Replicant Night (1996), and Blade Runner 4: Eye and Talon.

Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep was made into the seminal movie Blade Runner, released in 1982. This was one year after William Gibson's story, "Johnny Mnemonic" helped move proto-cyberpunk concepts into the mainstream. That story, which also became a film years later in 1995, involves another dystopian future, where human couriers deliver computer data, stored cybernetically in their own minds.

In 1983 a short story written by Bruce Bethke, called Cyberpunk, was published in Amazing Stories. The term was picked up by Gardner Dozois, editor of Isaac Asimov's Science Fiction Magazine and popularized in his editorials. Bethke says he made two lists of words, one for technology, one for troublemakers, and experimented with combining them variously into compound words, consciously attempting to coin a term that encompassed both punk attitudes and high technology.

He described the idea thus:

The kids who trashed my computer; their kids were going to be Holy Terrors, combining the ethical vacuity of teenagers with a technical fluency we adults could only guess at. Further, the parents and other adult authority figures of the early 21st Century were going to be terribly ill-equipped to deal with the first generation of teenagers who grew up truly speaking computer.[17]

Afterward, Dozois began using this term in his own writing, most notably in a Washington Post article where he said "About the closest thing here to a self-willed esthetic school would be the purveyors of bizarre hard-edged, high-tech stuff, who have on occasion been referred to as cyberpunks Sterling, Gibson, Shiner, Cadigan, Bear."[18]

About that time in 1984, William Gibson's novel Neuromancer was published, delivering a glimpse of a future encompassed by what became an archetype of cyberpunk "virtual reality", with the human mind being fed light-based worldscapes through a computer interface. Some, perhaps ironically including Bethke himself, argued at the time that the writers whose style Gibson's books epitomized should be called "Neuromantics", a pun on the name of the novel plus "New Romantics", a term used for a New Wave pop music movement that had just occurred in Britain, but this term did not catch on. Bethke later paraphrased Michael Swanwick's argument for the term: "the movement writers should properly be termed neuromantics, since so much of what they were doing was clearly Imitation Neuromancer".

Sterling was another writer who played a central role, often consciously, in the cyberpunk genre, variously seen as either keeping it on track, or distorting its natural path into a stagnant formula.[19] In 1986 he edited a volume of cyberpunk stories called Mirrorshades: The Cyberpunk Anthology, an attempt to establish what cyberpunk was, from Sterling's perspective.[20]

In the subsequent decade, the motifs of Gibson's Neuromancer became formulaic, climaxing in the satirical extremes of Neal Stephenson's Snow Crash in 1992.

Bookending the Cyberpunk era, Bethke himself published a novel in 1995 called Headcrash, like Snow Crash a satirical attack on the genre's excesses. Fittingly, it won an honor named after cyberpunk's spiritual founder, the Philip K. Dick Award.

It satirized the genre in this way:

...full of young guys with no social lives, no sex lives and no hope of ever moving out of their mothers' basements ... They're total wankers and losers who indulge in Messianic fantasies about someday getting even with the world through almost-magical computer skills, but whose actual use of the Net amounts to dialing up the scatophilia forum and downloading a few disgusting pictures. You know, cyberpunks.[21]

The impact of cyberpunk, though, has been long-lasting. Elements of both the setting and storytelling have become normal in science fiction in general, and a slew of sub-genres now have -punk tacked onto their names, most obviously Steampunk, but also a host of other Cyberpunk derivatives.

Primary figures in the cyberpunk movement include William Gibson, Neal Stephenson, Bruce Sterling, Bruce Bethke, Pat Cadigan, Rudy Rucker, and John Shirley. Philip K. Dick (author of Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?, from which the film Blade Runner was adapted) is also seen by some as prefiguring the movement.[22]

Blade Runner can be seen as a quintessential example of the cyberpunk style and theme.[8] Video games, board games, and tabletop role-playing games, such as Cyberpunk 2020 and Shadowrun, often feature storylines that are heavily influenced by cyberpunk writing and movies. Beginning in the early 1990s, some trends in fashion and music were also labeled as cyberpunk. Cyberpunk is also featured prominently in anime and manga (Japanese cyberpunk),[23] with Akira, Ghost in the Shell and Cowboy Bebop being among the most notable.[23]

Cyberpunk writers tend to use elements from crime fictionparticularly hardboiled detective fiction and film noirand postmodernist prose to describe an often nihilistic underground side of an electronic society. The genre's vision of a troubled future is often called the antithesis of the generally utopian visions of the future popular in the 1940s and 1950s. Gibson defined cyberpunk's antipathy towards utopian SF in his 1981 short story "The Gernsback Continuum," which pokes fun at and, to a certain extent, condemns utopian science fiction.[26][27][28]

In some cyberpunk writing, much of the action takes place online, in cyberspace, blurring the line between actual and virtual reality.[29] A typical trope in such work is a direct connection between the human brain and computer systems. Cyberpunk settings are dystopias with corruption, computers and internet connectivity. Giant, multinational corporations have for the most part replaced governments as centers of political, economic, and even military power.

The economic and technological state of Japan is a regular theme in the Cyberpunk literature of the '80s. Of Japan's influence on the genre, William Gibson said, "Modern Japan simply was cyberpunk."[25] Cyberpunk is often set in urbanized, artificial landscapes, and "city lights, receding" was used by Gibson as one of the genre's first metaphors for cyberspace and virtual reality.[30] The cityscapes of Hong Kong[31] and Shanghai[32] have had major influences in the urban backgrounds, ambiance and settings in many cyberpunk works such as Blade Runner and Shadowrun. Ridley Scott envisioned the landscape of cyberpunk Los Angeles in Blade Runner to be "Hong Kong on a very bad day".[33] The streetscapes of the Ghost in the Shell film were based on Hong Kong. Its director Mamoru Oshii felt that Hong Kong's strange and chaotic streets where "old and new exist in confusing relationships", fit the theme of the film well.[31] Hong Kong's Kowloon Walled City is particularly notable for its disorganized hyper-urbanization and breakdown in traditional urban planning to be an inspiration to cyberpunk landscapes.

One of the cyberpunk genre's prototype characters is Case, from Gibson's Neuromancer.[34] Case is a "console cowboy," a brilliant hacker who has betrayed his organized criminal partners. Robbed of his talent through a crippling injury inflicted by the vengeful partners, Case unexpectedly receives a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to be healed by expert medical care but only if he participates in another criminal enterprise with a new crew.

Like Case, many cyberpunk protagonists are manipulated, placed in situations where they have little or no choice, and although they might see things through, they do not necessarily come out any further ahead than they previously were. These anti-heroes"criminals, outcasts, visionaries, dissenters and misfits"[35]call to mind the private eye of detective fiction. This emphasis on the misfits and the malcontents is the "punk" component of cyberpunk.

Cyberpunk can be intended to disquiet readers and call them to action. It often expresses a sense of rebellion, suggesting that one could describe it as a type of cultural revolution in science fiction. In the words of author and critic David Brin:

...a closer look [at cyberpunk authors] reveals that they nearly always portray future societies in which governments have become wimpy and pathetic ...Popular science fiction tales by Gibson, Williams, Cadigan and others do depict Orwellian accumulations of power in the next century, but nearly always clutched in the secretive hands of a wealthy or corporate elite.[36]

Cyberpunk stories have also been seen as fictional forecasts of the evolution of the Internet. The earliest descriptions of a global communications network came long before the World Wide Web entered popular awareness, though not before traditional science-fiction writers such as Arthur C. Clarke and some social commentators such as James Burke began predicting that such networks would eventually form.[37]

Some observers cite that cyberpunk tends to marginalize sectors of society such as women and Africans. For instance, it is claimed that cyberpunk depicts fantasies that ultimately empower masculinity using fragmentary and decentered aesthetic that culminate in a masculine genre populated by male outlaws.[38] Critics also note the absence of any reference to Africa or an African-American character in the quintessential cyberpunk film Blade Runner[11] while other films reinforce stereotypes.[39]

Minnesota writer Bruce Bethke coined the term in 1983 for his short story "Cyberpunk," which was published in an issue of Amazing Science Fiction Stories.[40] The term was quickly appropriated as a label to be applied to the works of William Gibson, Bruce Sterling, Pat Cadigan and others. Of these, Sterling became the movement's chief ideologue, thanks to his fanzine Cheap Truth. John Shirley wrote articles on Sterling and Rucker's significance.[41] John Brunner's 1975 novel The Shockwave Rider is considered by many[who?] to be the first cyberpunk novel with many of the tropes commonly associated with the genre, some five years before the term was popularized by Dozois.[42]

William Gibson with his novel Neuromancer (1984) is arguably the most famous writer connected with the term cyberpunk. He emphasized style, a fascination with surfaces, and atmosphere over traditional science-fiction tropes. Regarded as ground-breaking and sometimes as "the archetypal cyberpunk work,"[7] Neuromancer was awarded the Hugo, Nebula, and Philip K. Dick Awards. Count Zero (1986) and Mona Lisa Overdrive (1988) followed after Gibson's popular debut novel. According to the Jargon File, "Gibson's near-total ignorance of computers and the present-day hacker culture enabled him to speculate about the role of computers and hackers in the future in ways hackers have since found both irritatingly nave and tremendously stimulating."[43]

Early on, cyberpunk was hailed as a radical departure from science-fiction standards and a new manifestation of vitality.[44] Shortly thereafter, however, some critics arose to challenge its status as a revolutionary movement. These critics said that the SF New Wave of the 1960s was much more innovative as far as narrative techniques and styles were concerned.[45] Furthermore, while Neuromancer's narrator may have had an unusual "voice" for science fiction, much older examples can be found: Gibson's narrative voice, for example, resembles that of an updated Raymond Chandler, as in his novel The Big Sleep (1939).[44] Others noted that almost all traits claimed to be uniquely cyberpunk could in fact be found in older writers' worksoften citing J. G. Ballard, Philip K. Dick, Harlan Ellison, Stanisaw Lem, Samuel R. Delany, and even William S. Burroughs.[44] For example, Philip K. Dick's works contain recurring themes of social decay, artificial intelligence, paranoia, and blurred lines between objective and subjective realities.[46] The influential cyberpunk movie Blade Runner (1982) is based on his book, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?.[47] Humans linked to machines are found in Pohl and Kornbluth's Wolfbane (1959) and Roger Zelazny's Creatures of Light and Darkness (1968).[citation needed]

In 1994, scholar Brian Stonehill suggested that Thomas Pynchon's 1973 novel Gravity's Rainbow "not only curses but precurses what we now glibly dub cyberspace."[48] Other important predecessors include Alfred Bester's two most celebrated novels, The Demolished Man and The Stars My Destination,[49] as well as Vernor Vinge's novella True Names.[50]

Science-fiction writer David Brin describes cyberpunk as "the finest free promotion campaign ever waged on behalf of science fiction." It may not have attracted the "real punks," but it did ensnare many new readers, and it provided the sort of movement that postmodern literary critics found alluring. Cyberpunk made science fiction more attractive to academics, argues Brin; in addition, it made science fiction more profitable to Hollywood and to the visual arts generally. Although the "self-important rhetoric and whines of persecution" on the part of cyberpunk fans were irritating at worst and humorous at best, Brin declares that the "rebels did shake things up. We owe them a debt."[51]

Fredric Jameson considers cyberpunk the "supreme literary expression if not of postmodernism, then of late capitalism itself".[52]

Cyberpunk further inspired many professional writers who were not among the "original" cyberpunks to incorporate cyberpunk ideas into their own works,[citation needed] such as George Alec Effinger's When Gravity Fails. Wired magazine, created by Louis Rossetto and Jane Metcalfe, mixes new technology, art, literature, and current topics in order to interest today's cyberpunk fans, which Paula Yoo claims "proves that hardcore hackers, multimedia junkies, cyberpunks and cellular freaks are poised to take over the world."[53]

The film Blade Runner (1982)adapted from Philip K. Dick's Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?is set in 2019 in a dystopian future in which manufactured beings called replicants are slaves used on space colonies and are legal prey on Earth to various bounty hunters who "retire" (kill) them. Although Blade Runner was largely unsuccessful in its first theatrical release, it found a viewership in the home video market and became a cult film.[54] Since the movie omits the religious and mythical elements of Dick's original novel (e.g. empathy boxes and Wilbur Mercer), it falls more strictly within the cyberpunk genre than the novel does. William Gibson would later reveal that upon first viewing the film, he was surprised at how the look of this film matched his vision for Neuromancer, a book he was then working on. The film's tone has since been the staple of many cyberpunk movies, such as The Matrix trilogy (1999-2003), which uses a wide variety of cyberpunk elements.

The number of films in the genre or at least using a few genre elements has grown steadily since Blade Runner. Several of Philip K. Dick's works have been adapted to the silver screen. The films Johnny Mnemonic[4] and New Rose Hotel,[5][6] both based upon short stories by William Gibson, flopped commercially and critically. These box offices misses significantly slowed the development of cyberpunk as a literary or cultural form although a sequel to the 1982 film Blade Runner was released in October 2017 with Harrison Ford reprising his role from the original film.

In addition, "tech-noir" film as a hybrid genre, means a work of combining neo-noir and science fiction or cyberpunk. It includes many cyberpunk films such as Blade Runner, Burst City,[55] Robocop, 12 Monkeys, The Lawnmower Man, Hackers, Hardware, and Strange Days.

The Japanese cyberpunk subgenre began in 1982 with the debut of Katsuhiro Otomo's manga series Akira, with its 1988 anime film adaptation, which Otomo directed, later popularizing the subgenre. Akira inspired a wave of Japanese cyberpunk works, including manga and anime series such as Ghost in the Shell, Battle Angel Alita, Cowboy Bebop, and Serial Experiments Lain.[56] Other early Japanese cyberpunk works include the 1982 film Burst City, the 1985 original video animation Megazone 23, and the 1989 film Tetsuo: The Iron Man.

In contrast to Western cyberpunk which has roots in New Wave science fiction literature, Japanese cyberpunk has roots in underground music culture, specifically the Japanese punk subculture that arose from the Japanese punk music scene in the 1970s. The filmmaker Sogo Ishii introduced this subculture to Japanese cinema with the punk film Panic High School (1978) and the punk biker film Crazy Thunder Road (1980), both portraying the rebellion and anarchy associated with punk, and the latter featuring a punk biker gang aesthetic. Ishii's punk films paved the way for Otomo's seminal cyberpunk work Akira.[57]

Cyberpunk themes are widely visible in anime and manga. In Japan, where cosplay is popular and not only teenagers display such fashion styles, cyberpunk has been accepted and its influence is widespread. William Gibson's Neuromancer, whose influence dominated the early cyberpunk movement, was also set in Chiba, one of Japan's largest industrial areas, although at the time of writing the novel Gibson did not know the location of Chiba and had no idea how perfectly it fit his vision in some ways. The exposure to cyberpunk ideas and fiction in the 1980s has allowed it to seep into the Japanese culture.

Cyberpunk anime and manga draw upon a futuristic vision which has elements in common with Western science fiction and therefore have received wide international acceptance outside Japan. "The conceptualization involved in cyberpunk is more of forging ahead, looking at the new global culture. It is a culture that does not exist right now, so the Japanese concept of a cyberpunk future, seems just as valid as a Western one, especially as Western cyberpunk often incorporates many Japanese elements."[58] William Gibson is now a frequent visitor to Japan, and he came to see that many of his visions of Japan have become a reality:

Modern Japan simply was cyberpunk. The Japanese themselves knew it and delighted in it. I remember my first glimpse of Shibuya, when one of the young Tokyo journalists who had taken me there, his face drenched with the light of a thousand media-sunsall that towering, animated crawl of commercial informationsaid, "You see? You see? It is Blade Runner town." And it was. It so evidently was.[25]

Cyberpunk themes have appeared in many anime and manga, including the ground-breaking Appleseed, Ghost in the Shell, Ergo Proxy, Megazone 23, Neo Tokyo, Goku Midnight Eye, Cyber City Oedo 808, Bubblegum Crisis, A.D. Police: Dead End City, Angel Cop, Extra, Blame!, Armitage III, Texhnolyze, Neon Genesis Evangelion and Psycho-Pass.

Akira (1982 manga) and its 1988 anime film adaptation have influenced numerous works in animation, comics, film, music, television and video games.[59][60] Akira has been cited as a major influence on Hollywood films such as The Matrix,[61] Chronicle,[62] Looper,[63] Midnight Special, and Inception,[59] as well as cyberpunk-influenced video games such as Hideo Kojima's Snatcher[64] and Metal Gear Solid,[56] Valve's Half-Life series[65][66] and Dontnod Entertainment's Remember Me.[67] Akira has also influenced the work of musicians such as Kanye West, who paid homage to Akira in the "Stronger" music video,[59] and Lupe Fiasco, whose album Tetsuo & Youth is named after Tetsuo Shima.[68] The popular bike from the film, Kaneda's Motorbike, appears in Steven Spielberg's film Ready Player One,[69] and CD Projekt's video game Cyberpunk 2077.[70]

Ghost in the Shell (1995) influenced a number of prominent filmmakers, most notably the Wachowskis in The Matrix (1999) and its sequels.[71] The Matrix series took several concepts from the film, including the Matrix digital rain, which was inspired by the opening credits of Ghost in the Shell, and the way characters access the Matrix through holes in the back of their necks.[72] Other parallels have been drawn to James Cameron's Avatar, Steven Spielberg's A.I. Artificial Intelligence, and Jonathan Mostow's Surrogates.[72] James Cameron cited Ghost in the Shell as a source of inspiration,[73] citing it as an influence on Avatar.[74]

The original video animation Megazone 23 (1985) has a number of similarities to The Matrix.[75] Battle Angel Alita (1990) has had a notable influence on filmmaker James Cameron, who was planning to adapt it into a film since 2000. It was an influence on his TV series Dark Angel, and he is the producer of the 2018 film adaptation Alita: Battle Angel.[76]

There are many cyberpunk video games. Popular series include Final Fantasy VII and its spin-offs and remake,[77] the Megami Tensei series, Kojima's Snatcher and Metal Gear series, Deus Ex series, Syndicate series, and System Shock and its sequel. Other games, like Blade Runner, Ghost in the Shell, and the Matrix series, are based upon genre movies, or role-playing games (for instance the various Shadowrun games).

Several RPGs called Cyberpunk exist: Cyberpunk, Cyberpunk 2020 and Cyberpunk v3, by R. Talsorian Games, and GURPS Cyberpunk, published by Steve Jackson Games as a module of the GURPS family of RPGs. Cyberpunk 2020 was designed with the settings of William Gibson's writings in mind, and to some extent with his approval[citation needed], unlike the approach taken by FASA in producing the transgenre Shadowrun game. Both are set in the near future, in a world where cybernetics are prominent. In addition, Iron Crown Enterprises released an RPG named Cyberspace, which was out of print for several years until recently being re-released in online PDF form. CD Projekt Red is currently developing Cyberpunk 2077, a cyberpunk first-person open world Role-playing video game (RPG) based on the tabletop RPG Cyberpunk 2020.[78][79][80]In 1990, in a convergence of cyberpunk art and reality, the United States Secret Service raided Steve Jackson Games's headquarters and confiscated all their computers. Officials denied that the target had been the GURPS Cyberpunk sourcebook, but Jackson would later write that he and his colleagues "were never able to secure the return of the complete manuscript; [...] The Secret Service at first flatly refused to return anything then agreed to let us copy files, but when we got to their office, restricted us to one set of out-of-date files then agreed to make copies for us, but said "tomorrow" every day from March 4 to March 26. On March 26 we received a set of disks which purported to be our files, but the material was late, incomplete and well-nigh useless."[81] Steve Jackson Games won a lawsuit against the Secret Service, aided by the new Electronic Frontier Foundation. This event has achieved a sort of notoriety, which has extended to the book itself as well. All published editions of GURPS Cyberpunk have a tagline on the front cover, which reads "The book that was seized by the U.S. Secret Service!" Inside, the book provides a summary of the raid and its aftermath.

Cyberpunk has also inspired several tabletop, miniature and board games such as Necromunda by Games Workshop. Netrunner is a collectible card game introduced in 1996, based on the Cyberpunk 2020 role-playing game. Tokyo NOVA, debuting in 1993, is a cyberpunk role-playing game that uses playing cards instead of dice.

Julie Romandetta[82]

Invariably the origin of cyberpunk music lies in the synthesizer-heavy scores of cyberpunk films such as Escape from New York (1981) and Blade Runner (1982).[83] Some musicians and acts have been classified as cyberpunk due to their aesthetic style and musical content. Often dealing with dystopian visions of the future or biomechanical themes, some fit more squarely in the category than others. Bands whose music has been classified as cyberpunk include Psydoll, Front Line Assembly, Clock DVA, Angelspit and Sigue Sigue Sputnik.

Some musicians not normally associated with cyberpunk have at times been inspired to create concept albums exploring such themes. Albums such as Gary Numan's Replicas, The Pleasure Principle and Telekon were heavily inspired by the works of Philip K. Dick. Kraftwerk's The Man-Machine and Computer World albums both explored the theme of humanity becoming dependent on technology. Nine Inch Nails' concept album Year Zero also fits into this category. Fear Factory concept albums are heavily based upon future dystopia, cybernetics, clash between man and machines, virtual worlds. Billy Idol's Cyberpunk drew heavily from cyberpunk literature and the cyberdelic counter culture in its creation. 1. Outside, a cyberpunk narrative fueled concept album by David Bowie, was warmly met by critics upon its release in 1995. Many musicians have also taken inspiration from specific cyberpunk works or authors, including Sonic Youth, whose albums Sister and Daydream Nation take influence from the works of Philip K. Dick and William Gibson respectively. Madonna's 2001 Drowned World Tour opened with a cyberpunk section, where costumes, asethetics and stage props were used to accentuate the dystopian nature of the theatrical concert.

Vaporwave and synthwave are also influenced by cyberpunk. The former has been inspired by one of the messages of cyberpunk and is interpreted as a dystopian[84] critique of capitalism[85] in the vein of cyberpunk and the latter is more surface-level, inspired only by the aesthetic of cyberpunk as a nostalgic retrofuturistic revival of aspects of cyberpunk's origins.

Some Neo-Futurism artworks and cityscapes have been influenced by cyberpunk.[citation needed] Writers David Suzuki and Holly Dressel describe the cafes, brand-name stores and video arcades of the Sony Center in the Potsdamer Platz public square of Berlin, Germany, as "a vision of a cyberpunk, corporate urban future".[86]

Several subcultures have been inspired by cyberpunk fiction. These include the cyberdelic counter culture of the late 1980s and early 90s. Cyberdelic, whose adherents referred to themselves as "cyberpunks", attempted to blend the psychedelic art and drug movement with the technology of cyberculture. Early adherents included Timothy Leary, Mark Frauenfelder and R. U. Sirius. The movement largely faded following the dot-com bubble implosion of 2000.

Cybergoth is a fashion and dance subculture which draws its inspiration from cyberpunk fiction, as well as rave and Gothic subcultures. In addition, a distinct cyberpunk fashion of its own has emerged in recent years[when?] which rejects the raver and goth influences of cybergoth, and draws inspiration from urban street fashion, "post apocalypse", functional clothing, high tech sports wear, tactical uniform and multifunction. This fashion goes by names like "tech wear", "goth ninja" or "tech ninja".

The Kowloon Walled City in Hong Kong (demolished in 1994) is often referenced as the model cyberpunk/dystopian slum as, given its poor living conditions at the time coupled with the city's political, physical, and economic isolation has caused many in academia to be fascinated by the ingenuity of its spawning.[87]

As a wider variety of writers began to work with cyberpunk concepts, new subgenres of science fiction emerged, some of which could be considered as playing off the cyberpunk label, others which could be considered as legitimate explorations into newer territory. These focused on technology and its social effects in different ways. One prominent subgenre is "steampunk," which is set in an alternate history Victorian era that combines anachronistic technology with cyberpunk's bleak film noir world view. The term was originally coined around 1987 as a joke to describe some of the novels of Tim Powers, James P. Blaylock, and K.W. Jeter, but by the time Gibson and Sterling entered the subgenre with their collaborative novel The Difference Engine the term was being used earnestly as well.[88]

Another subgenre is "biopunk" (cyberpunk themes dominated by biotechnology) from the early 1990s, a derivative style building on biotechnology rather than informational technology. In these stories, people are changed in some way not by mechanical means, but by genetic manipulation. Paul Di Filippo is seen as the most prominent biopunk writer, including his half-serious ribofunk. Bruce Sterling's Shaper/Mechanist cycle is also seen as a major influence. In addition, some people consider works such as Neal Stephenson's The Diamond Age to be postcyberpunk.

Cyberpunk works have been described as well situated within postmodern literature.[89]

In the United States, the term "Cyberpunk" is a registered trademark by R. Talsorian Games Inc. for its tabletop role-playing game[90].

Within the European Union, the "Cyberpunk" trademark is owned by two parties: CD Projekt SA for "games and online gaming services"[91] (particularly for the video game adaptation of the former) and by Sony Music for use outside games.[92]

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Cyberpunk - Wikipedia

Heres what you need to run Cyberpunk 2077 on PC – The Verge

Cyberpunk 2077 will be released in a few months, but ahead of its mid-November launch, developer CD Projekt Red unveiled the system requirements needed to run the PC version of the game, and shockingly, you dont need to upgrade your computer to play the game.

The games recommended specs are not too heavy, requiring only an Intel Core i7-4790 or an AMD Ryzen 3 3200G processor, and either an Nvidia GTX 1060 or an AMD Radeon R9 Fury graphics card. So if you have not upgraded your rig in a bit, youll likely still be able to run the game at 1080p. However, if you are looking to run the game at 1440p or 4K resolution or take advantage of the games technical features like ray tracing, you will need to upgrade to an RTX 20-series or RTX 30-series GPU.

Cyberpunk 2077 is set to release on November 19th for PC, PS4, and Xbox One. If you are buying it on console and plan to upgrade within the same console family, CD Projekt Red confirmed that PS5 and Xbox Series X / S owners will be able to play Cyberpunk 2077 at launch, too. The developer also promised a free next-gen upgrade at a later date.

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Heres what you need to run Cyberpunk 2077 on PC - The Verge

Cyberpunk 2077 system requirements revealed, here’s what you’ll need to play – GamesRadar+

The Cyberpunk 2077 system requirements have finally been revealed, and they're surprisingly approachable even if you have a low-to-mid tier machine.

Developer CD Projekt Red shared both the minimum system requirements and the recommended system requirements on the latest episode of Night City Wire. Here are both sets:

That's way more modest than I was expecting! Especially in terms of the GPU, which is nowhere near requiring those shiny new Nvidia GeForce RTX 3000 cards, and the hard drive space. There have been Call of Duty: Warzone updates that were almost as big as the entire Cyberpunk 2077 game.

Granted, you'll still get even better visuals and performance if your PC exceeds those specs. For instance, We know that Cyberpunk 2077 will capitalize on Nvidia GeForce RTX graphics effects, since the game got a beautiful trailer showcasing its performance on the new GeForce RTX 3000 series. Ray-traced reflections on shiny surfaces, beautifully fuzzy halos around bright neon light sources, and more all await if you're playing with an RTX card.

For your reference, these are the specs of the machine that CD Projekt Red used to run its big E3 2018 demo:

You'll be able to do missions or just get drinks with a lot of Cyberpunk 2077 companions - though some of them will probably end up wanting you dead.

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Cyberpunk 2077 system requirements revealed, here's what you'll need to play - GamesRadar+

First Cyberpunk 2077 Platinum trophy has already been claimed – GamesRadar+

The game itself might not be set to release for more than two months, but that hasnt stopped someone from claiming the first Cyberpunk 2077 Platinum trophy. Earlier today, ukasz Babiel, QA lead at developer CD Projekt Red, shared a screenshot showing off their 100% completion of the game with the caption just a normal day at work.

That claim was later corroborated by global community lead Marcin Momot, who congratulated Babiel as the first person to get that Platinum Trophy in Cyberpunk 2077. Babiel later confirmed, however, that the trophy was a collective effort, suggesting that multiple QA developers helped out with the process.

The team effort means that Babiel doesnt know exactly how long it took to grab the trophy, but his screenshot does show off how many achievements are available. It looks as though as well as the Platinum, Cyberpunk 2077 will feature 26 Bronze, 17 Silver, and one Gold trophy.

As member of CD Projekt Red staff, Babiel and co obviously have a significant headstart over the rest of us, who will have to wait until the Cyberpunk 2077 release date on November 19 to even start making our own trophy hunting progress. While the team might have had an advantage, however, theres no taking away from their achievement.

The fact that the QA staff seem to be testing trophies seems like a good omen. Cyberpunk 2077 has been delayed twice from its original April release date, but with all the trophies available and Babiel saying that the team is planning speedrun contests, its starting to look like the game is finally nearing completion.

Take our quiz and find out which Cyberpunk 2077 lifepath should you pick?

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First Cyberpunk 2077 Platinum trophy has already been claimed - GamesRadar+

Cyberpunk creator says its harder to reach fans directly in videogames The stakes are ridiculous – PCGamesN

During a keynote talk at this years PAX x EGX Online, Mike Pondsmith,the creator of the Cyberpunk table-top RPG that inspired Cyberpunk 2077, spoke on the contrast between developing for pen-and-paper and videogames.As he sees it, the latters abit more Hollywood than the former, raising the risk factor significantly.

Videogames are a little more like Hollywood, the stakes are ridiculous, Pondsmith explained. Theres a lot more of a problem with reaching and talking with the fans directly. Theres a wall there, between you and the people who use your game. He discusses how individual credits are often harder to find on videogames, leading to people being surprised when they find out who worked on what: I think theres a distance there.

Videogames tend to be much more expensive, too, and Pondsmith recalls his shock when he made the jump to digital game development. I can go and build a pretty good game, and maybe spend $10,000 at the most to get it printed, he says. When I did my first really large videogame project, I went in and said what are we budgeted for? and they said $20,000,000, and I went Im now responsible for figuring out what to do with $20,000,000? Oh, crud, so the stakes are higher.

The project Pondsmith is likely talking about there is The Matrix Online, the MMORPG game based on the movie trilogy he contributed to as a designer in 2005. His time in videogames was brief before agreeing to collaborate with CD Projekt Red on Cyberpunk 2077, anRPG game based on Pondsmiths 1988 RPG, Cyberpunk.

You can seea Twitch clip below you can watch the full speech here:

Were getting close to the Cyberpunk 2077 release date. CD Projekt has said fans can expect more DLC than The Witcher 3, the multiplayer microtransactions wont be aggressive, and it might even get a cookbook. If you just cant wait, we have the best cyberpunk games, and the best online board games, to keep you occupied.

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Cyberpunk creator says its harder to reach fans directly in videogames The stakes are ridiculous - PCGamesN

Cyberpunk 2077 Night City Wire: How To Watch Today’s Stream – GameSpot

As the November release for Cyberpunk 2077 draws closer, developer CD Projekt Red has prepared the third part in its Night City Wire series. The new episode will be streamed today, September 18, at 9 AM PT / 12 PM ET and will focus on Night City and the gangs who inhabit it.

You'll be able to watch the latest Cyberpunk 2077 Night City Wire video in several different places, including the official CD Projekt Red Twitch channel. You can also check the developer's official YouTube channel, or to make it even easier for you, we've embedded the stream below.

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Cyberpunk 2077 Night City Wire Episode 3 - With Pre and Post Show

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The first Night City Wire episode revealed Cyberpunk 2077's districts and the Braindance gameplay mechanic that allows players to hack into the psyches of various characters and explore their memories. A new anime adaptation called Cyberpunk 2077: Edgerunners was also announced, which will be produced by Kill La Kill's Studio Trigger for Netflix.

August's second episode revealed more of the various weapons that players will be able to wield, which include sub-machine guns with tracer rounds, sniper rifles that can pierce through barriers, and thermal katanas that can slice through enemies. Cyberpunk 2077 will launch on November 19 for PC, PS4, and Xbox One, and will include a free next-gen upgrade to PS5 and Xbox Series X/S.

For more on Cyberpunk 2077, be sure check out our hub where you can get the latest news on the game as well as deep dives into the lore of the sci-fi RPG series.

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Cyberpunk 2077: The Gangs of Night City | Game Rant – GameRant

Night City is the setting for Cyberpunk 2077 and contains nine main gangs each with their own methods and philosophies for players to explore.

The setting of Cyberpunk 2077 is packed full of street gangs that players will encounter on their journey through Night City. With every side-quest in the game supposed to be like a full story, it is likely that they wont just add flavor to the game but will have distinct territories and recognizably different styles of combat.

The gangs of Cyberpunk 2077 are extremely diverse in their MOs, aesthetics, and relationships with the technology and corporations of the Cyberpunk series. Here are all nine of the gangs of Night City that players can expect to meet in the upcoming CD Projekt Red game.

RELATED:Cyberpunk Creator Talks About The High Stakes of Making a Video Game

Animals are strongmen. Obsessed with achieving the peak of human physical capabilities, they use melee combat-enhancing cyberware and pump themselves full of something they call the Juice that works like some kind of super-steroid. Players will likely be able to get their hands on some in the game if they want to increase their strength and speed. Sasquatch is their current alpha female and has led the Animals as they ally themselves with NetWatch, an anti-cybercrime task force. They can also be found as bouncers across Night City and are in a gang war with the Voodoo Boys.

Maelstroms members dress in chrome and leather, and many have chosen to enhance themselves with so much cyberware that around a third of the gang is in full-on cyberpsychosis. They mostly deal in illegal meds, but when theyre hired for hit jobs have been known to execute them in spectacularly bizarre fashion. They are rumored to produce black market braindance records that are particularly violent and disturbing. Theyre fascinated by the Net and the occult.

Scavengers are a gang that kidnaps people with cyberware and forcibly harvests it from their bodies. They can be found all over Night City, in particular at black markets for those who arent squeamish about their methods. They are the most spread thin and least philosophically unified of the gangs of Night City, but their profit incentive keeps them as one of the most common types of gang member to encounter.

The Mox was formed in 2076, making it one of the newest gangs in Night City. The Mox claim to protect working girls and guys and were formed after the death of Lizzie Borden, a club owner and former prostitute who treated her workers fairly and protected them from abuse. The gang primarily works to protect sex workers and sexual minorities, though not without a fee. Most of their income is generated through Lizzies Bar, a braindance club in Night City where character Evelyn Parker has been seen in-game.

Tyger Claws is a Japanese gang that ruthlessly protects their territory in Night Citys Japantown. Formed in 2020, they rely on martial arts over cyberware. They are heavily based on the Yakuza both in and out of universe, and own more businesses in Night City than any of the other gangs, making most of their money through human trafficking and prostitution. They also create the drug glitter and have ties to the Arasaka megacorporation, one of the most powerful forces in the world of Cyberpunk.

The Valentinos have one goal: seduce the most attractive women in Night City. They are usually non-hostile, unless the husband of one of the subjects of their desire gets involved. They are one of the largest gangs by 2077, controlling parts of Heywood with high Latino populations, though anyone is able to join the gang. The gangs intense code of loyalty helps keep corporate enforcers and police out of their areas.

RELATED:Cyberpunk 2077 Reveals New Details For Grimes Lizzy Wizzy Character

Obsessed with strange rituals, natural drugs, and sadism, the Voodoo Boys often mutilate their victims to inspire terror across Night City. They are one of the NCPDs most wanted gangs due to the public and performative nature of their crimes. In 2077 they are a mostly Haitian gang that also helps the Haitian community established on the West Coast in the 2060s after a natural disaster decimated their home country. Little is known about their goals, but they are expert hackers and appear to be invested in uncovering the secrets of the Old Net.

The Wraiths are a gang of Raffen Shiv, a subculture of the Nomads which the player can choose as one of three Life Paths in Cyberpunk 2077. They are led by Dogkiller, who is said to wear clothes made from human skin when they attack at night. They make most of their income from the spoils of these night raids. They deck out the cars they use to travel the desert just beyond Night City's boundaries, and much of the time resemble Mad Max-style raiders in both their appearances and methods.

6th Street is a gang created by Americans who formed their own police force, feeling dissatisfied with the NCPD. Many of them are former cops or veterans, and they are obsessed with bringing their own idea of justice to Night City. They wrap themselves inpatriotic tropes in Cyberpunk, but they also engage in extortion, smuggling, robbery, and other typical gang activities. Unlike the other gangs, their close personal ties to the police has allowed them to operate without much threat from either corporations or the NCPD.

There are many more factions to be found across Cyberpunk 2077, but the gangs of Night City give insight into some of the political tensions and uneasy alliances formed between the street and corporate levels of Cyberpunks society. It remains unclear whether or not fans will be able to join some of these gangs or perhaps even change the balance of power in Night City through their actions in-game.

Cyberpunk 2077launches November 19 for PC, PS4, Stadia, and Xbox One, and later for PS5 and Xbox Series X.

MORE:Xbox Fan Designs Stellar Cyberpunk 2077 Special Edition Xbox Series S

Cyberpunk 2077 PC System Requirements Revealed

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Cyberpunk 2077: The Gangs of Night City | Game Rant - GameRant

HEALTH announce album of collaborations, share new song CYBERPUNK 2.0.2.0. – Brooklyn Vegan

Since 2017, industrial/pop noisemakers HEALTH have been rolling out a series of collaborative singles with an array of artists across multiple different genres, from rap to indie pop to deathgrind and beyond, including Soccer Mommy, Perturbator, Youth Code, JPEGMAFIA, Xiu Xiu, Full of Hell, Ghostemane, and NOLIFE, and now they've announced an album featuring all eight of those collaborations, plus new collabs with 100 gecs, The Soft Moon, and Brothel, and a new HEALTH song called "CYBERPUNK 2.0.2.0."

The album's called DISCO4 :: PART I, and it comes out October 16 via Loma Vista (pre-order). "In the past each HEALTH LP has been accompanied by a corresponding remix record," the band says. "This time, despite being called DISCO 4 in the interest of continuity, we offer you a collection of original collaborations with artists we admire. Also, FUCK 2020."

"CYBERPUNK 2.0.2.0" is out now along with the announcement, and it's yet another great HEALTH song that finds them exploring a haunting, ethereal side. Listen and watch the grainy, dystopic, Zev Deans-directed video below. Also check out the full tracklist and a playlist of the eight previously released collabs below.

Tracklist1. HEALTH - CYBERPUNK 2.0.2.02. HEALTH, Perturbator - BODY/PRISON3. HEALTH, 100 Gecs - POWER FANTASY4. HEALTH, Ghostemane - JUDGEMENT NIGHT5. HEALTH, Youth Code - INNOCENCE6. HEALTH, Full of Hell - FULL OF HEALTH7. HEALTH, The Soft Moon - COLORS8. HEALTH, JPEGMAFIA - HATE YOU9. HEALTH, Brothel - D.F. LOOKS10. HEALTH, Soccer Mommy - MASS GRAVE11. HEALTH, Xiu Xiu - DELICIOUS APE12. HEALTH, NOLIFE - HARD TO BE A GOD

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HEALTH announce album of collaborations, share new song CYBERPUNK 2.0.2.0. - Brooklyn Vegan

Hackers Is a Glorious Cyberpunk Classic That Might Actually Say Nothing About Technology – Jezebel

Hackers (1995)Screenshot: United Artists

No movie encapsulates the oft-maligned cyberpunk style of the 90s and 00s better than 1995s Hackers, 25 years old today. The film stars Dade Zero Cool Murphy (Jonny Lee Miller), Kate Acid Burn Libby (Angelina Jolie and her haircut), Ramon The Phantom Phreak Sanchez (Renoly Santiago), Emmanuel Cereal Killer Goldstein (Matthew Lillard), Paul Lord Nikon Cook (Laurence Mason) and Joey Pardella (Jesse Bradford long before he reaches heartthrob status in Bring It On) as a group of high school-aged, roller-blading hackers who use their intellect for run-of-the-mill delinquent debauchery that eventually leads to real criminal activity and the necessity of finding a fraudster in order to save themselves from prison time. Or maybe they felt the altruistic need to do the right thing in the face of corrupt authority? Really, the motivation doesnt matter, nor does the scheme, because Hackers is ultimately just a fun movie about rave clothes, a dance soundtrack (Orbital, The Prodigy, and Underworld are all represented), and an alternative reality where hacking is a skillset held by precocious, well-read teens and not political trolls looking to dismantle democracy, or whatever it is that real-life hackers do. In many ways, Hackers feels like proto-Mr. Robota collective of punk-y outcasts ripe for MIT who band together to create some good in the world and are almost destroyed because of it.

Ill try not to spoil the movie, even though it is now old enough to rent a car. But the plot to Hackers isnt what makes it worth watchingthe real attraction is the snapshot of now-vintage technology, a glimpse at what top-of-the-line gadgets looked like at the time and how optimistic a future run by floppy-disc-toting teens seemed. Everyone wore colored leather and helped each other out, and nothing hurt.

I rewatched Hackers on its 25th anniversaryhoping to draw some through-line between the retro-futurism depicted on screen and the tech-driven dystopia of modern-day existence. But that undercuts the true excellence of the film, which lies in the setting, not the plot. These teenage savants hang out at a New York City night club thats equal parts arcade, rave, laser tag, and roller rink while chain-smoking cigarettes, downing soda, and sharing classified digital security information with one anotheran image Ive carried with me since first watching the film and internalizing it as a pinnacle of 90s cool, as well as what I imagine the inside of Berghain to look like. Needless to say, it is a potent image.

The group of hackers, too, are more diverse than, say, Cher Horowitzs Clueless crew, another coming-of-age classic released in 1995. And yet, unlike Clueless, which doesnt sacrifice story for world-building, Hackers can get a little lost in its own ornamentation. The gadgety new world that these techno types inhabit [attracts] legitimate movie interest, even if it still hasnt proved gripping enough to sustain a whole film, critic Janet Maslin wrote in The New York Times in 1995. At first, Hackers stays enjoyable just by showing off the principals and their toys... But eventually Hackers turns tedious, perhaps not realizing that an audience can get tired of the same old equations floating in cyberspace. The same remains true in 2020.

That said, the specificity of the films aesthetic lends itself to revisionist viewing. Perhaps theres something to dissect about the teens ability to do what the government cannot and stop a massive cyberattack, but in reality, they wouldve been thwarted. I dont think any of it is that serious. Hackers might simply be a movie about technology that says very little about technology 25 years on, save for the fact that an interest in techno-futurism that was once subcultural is now a dominating force in everyday life. Or that technology becomes outmoded quickly, but when tethered to cultural iconographythe roller blades, the leather jackets, the asymmetrical punk haircuts all portrayed in a celebratory filmit becomes an art object worth feeling nostalgic over.

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However, would the kids of Hackers exist today, Im sure theyd all be found drinking soylent in Silicon Valley, and who wants to consider that reality? Instead, watching the movie so many years later, Im struck by the same details that drew me the first time I watched it: a comprehensive image of a well-developed world and the fascinating characters that live within it. Also, mesh tank tops and chain wallets. They still look cool as hell.

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Hackers Is a Glorious Cyberpunk Classic That Might Actually Say Nothing About Technology - Jezebel

Cyberpunk 2077 May Repeat the Mistakes of Skyrim | Game Rant – GameRant

While Cyberpunk 2077 will likely be many's game-of-the-year pick this fall, one aspect from the game's previews has been universally criticized.

There's no doubt thatSkyrim is one of the best RPGs on the market. The expansive, seemingly never-ending homeland of the Nords housed numerous expansive quests, bolstered by its free-form RPG mechanics that allowed for unique characters. While sword-wielding warrior builds were probably some of the more common progressions inSkyrim, the melee combat did have its fair share of functional clunkiness. Now, it seemsCyberpunk 2077 is tackling a similar issue with its own melee combat.

Granted, in all fairness,crafting a fully-fledged RPG in a cyberpunk setting means nailing down the gunplay and the unique cyberware abilities first. Even still, one of the most common complaints from early previews of Cyberpunk 2077 has beenthe lackluster melee combat in the game's current state. Visual feedback and evoking weight in melee combat was an issue inSkyrim that CD Projekt Red will likely need to address withCyberpunk 2077, despite being so close to release.

RELATED:Cyberpunk 2077 Developer Addresses Fan Concerns Regarding the Game

For RPGs, it's tough to balance the priorities in development depending on what type of game is being made. ForCyberpunk 2077, melee combat will be just as much of a core gameplay mechanic as the gunplay is. Multiple media previews of the game consistently praised the gunplay as being pretty fantastic for an expansive RPG that's also a first-person-shooter. As for the melee combat, the general consensus is that it's sub par and doesn't necessarily have enough weight or visual feedback behind it for bare knuckle brawling to be enjoyable.

Skyrim evokes a similar problem too, as melee combat just doesn't have enough weight to punches or attacks. Across all weapons, visual and audio cues that make a hit seem strong and impactful just aren't really present in Skyrim. Enemies all start to feel like butter that the Dragonborn is slicing through, and not because the player's character is overleveled. Opponents don't always flinch or fall over when attacked, so combat ends up looking like aWorld of Warcraft combat scenario where one person swings and then the other swings. The player and the enemy's health gauges deplete over time, but the game doesn't evoke the feeling that either is truly fighting another person.

CD Projekt Red's development team has recognized this feedbackand has stated publicly it wants to make improvements toCyberpunk 2077's melee combat in the remaining development time before launch. That gives about three months time for the team to make any tweaks/adjustments beforeCyberpunk's November launch window.Cyberpunk 2077's senior gameplay designer Pawel Kapala has stated thatthe team has fully recognized the issues with melee combat and has already made great strides towards improving it. Kapala specifically mentions visual feedback and the weight of connecting hits on an enemy, a common criticism ofSkyrim's combat.

Of course withSkyrim, the fix nowadays is just to mod the game, which frankly is acceptable for a Bethesda game that's nearly 11 years old now. But forCyberpunk 2077 and CD Projekt Red, that's not the answer for a game that has quite good gunplay already. Plus consideringThe Witcher's solid sword fighting combat, settling for subpar just isn't the move here.CD Projekt Red and Kapala theoretically have enough development time between now and release to hone and refine the combat to evoke a more natural feeling.

RELATED:Cyberpunk 2077 Poll Shows Which Lifepath is Most Popular

Now that's not to say melee combat will become a simulatoryUFC-like experience, as any kind of animation overhaul would take far too long at this point in the development cycle. More than likely the existing combat animations and fighting systems already inCyberpunk 2077 will receive visual and haptic feedback changes to make melee combat more natural. That could be anything from enemy behavior when getting hit by light/strong attacks, adjusting the blocking animation, camera behavior during fistfights, and numerous other minutiae. Often it's the little details that players don't even think about that can bring combat down.

Honing and refining the existing animations and combat feel is all that's likely for now, but it should be enough to make melee combat serviceably good inCyberpunk 2077. Hopefully, CD Projekt Red makes enough adjustments so melee doesn't become a damper on what would otherwise could be many's game-of-the-year pick this fall.

Cyberpunk 2077 launches on November 19 for PC, PS4, and Xbox One. Stadia, PS5, and Xbox Series X versions are planned to release in 2021.

MORE:Cyberpunk 2077 Needs to Avoid Skyrims NPC Problem

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Not actually a distant relative of Bob Dole, Rob Dolen is a Features Writer for Game Rant. Big fan of expansive lore and game analysis, video games are cool. Freedom Fighters is underrated. Probably not good at competitive Halo anymore.

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Cyberpunk 2077 May Repeat the Mistakes of Skyrim | Game Rant - GameRant

Everything You Need To Know About Cyberpunk 2077s Anime, Edgerunners – Fiction Talk

During the first of many planned live stream updates for the upcoming game Cyberpunk 2077 (dubbed as Night City Wire Episodes), CD Projekt Red announced a partnership between themselves, streaming juggernaut Netflix, and the Japanese animation studio, Trigger Inc.

Netflix has made itself fairly familiar with both companies before; having produced The Witcher television show (originating as a series of novels that was later adapted and popularised into a highly successful trilogy of video games by CDPR), as well as curating Studio Triggers previous works, and subsequently licensing their latest anime series, BNA: Brand New Animal.

Based on the 1988 pen and paper role-playing game, Cyberpunk as a franchise has garnered a lot of attention in recent years, due to media outlets and fans alike contributing to the ever-growing hype-spiral since the teaser trailer in 2013. We may have hit peak hype seven years on, but even still, its no wonder that there is interest in the opportunities to expand the franchise (especially since, as of writing, the game wont be released for another three months!).

Those of you who are well versed in the anime industry will be familiar with their productions, and perhaps even their staff. Comprised of notable Gainax alumni, Cyberpunk: Edgerunners is to be helmed by those whove worked on a number of quintessential anime properties, such as Neon Genesis Evangelion, Gurren Lagann, and FLCL. Although the studio is relatively new, the team behind Trigger Inc. has already forged its own legacy as pioneers of action within the anime sphere from the get-go.

With an explosive debut like 2013s Kill la Kill, Trigger left its mark on the anime worlds stage. Instantly establishing a unique art style by way of an overtly expressive, aggressive, diverse, and flamboyantly fluid movement Kill la Kill indulges in its extremes, constantly finding ways to push things further.

Even the premise is absolutely barmy: Transfer student vows to uncover her fathers murderer, leading her into stumbling upon a sentient sailor school uniform; which, together they pursue to dismantle her schools fashion-obsessed hyper-authoritarian regime, wielding only a longsword (thats half of a pair of scissors), and a sheer determination for revenge

This being said, the series is acutely aware of itself; a series where the layers of meta anime tropes can get so dense, that the show itself has its own character and personality.

Where Kill la Kill allows itself to be the crazy horse, high off sticky-toffee apples; the reigns are reeled in when it comes to their next hit Little Witch Academia. A quirky, light-hearted tale of an idealistic and aspiring non-magic born witch, who attends a prestigious academy where it becomes painfully evident that she is severely inept. On the surface, LWA deals with confronting the cynicism and expectation from her peers to be professional; but our protagonist wears her influences on her sleeve, chiefly, her love of a magic performer. All she desires to be is a source of joy and light in the world, where the broader magical society looks down at entertainers as lowly.

Though it is still very much a Trigger production with its trademark chaotic energy and slapstick extremism, the franchise exercises some restraint on the excessive, as it focuses on the more whimsical and magical, as evident in its inspiration of western (namely, British) contemporary novels & mysticism as seen in the likes of the Harry Potter series (and The Worst Witch although that may be too much of a deep cut for those not from the UK!).

As for their latest release, BNA: Brand New Animal demonstrates the best of both aforementioned worlds; developing a structured formula through its plot, characters, and thematic devices. Taking elements of fantasy and action from each show, you get the sense that Trigger as a studio has been honing its craft as a production company throughout the series.

The show deals with the differences and similarities of people who identify as separate from each other in this case, humans and their disdain for anthropomorphic humanoids (known as Beastmen and not to be confused with Beastars a different anthropomorphic Netflix anime series). BNA centers around a teen runaway who inexplicably transforms from Human to Beastman, as she seeks solitude and a solution for her condition in the only city dedicated to Beastfolk.

The mold for Cyberpunk: Edgerunners has been cast and ready to be set since Trigger Inc. released BNA: Brand New Animal. The premise of both these titles parallel neatly along with one another young vagabond vies to survive in a city filled with problems outside their own. Its not hard to imagine that the ultra-violence and creativity of Kill la Kill would seep into the fabric of Edgerunners either; nor would it be a stretch to envision how much of Night City (where the action of Cyberpunk takes place) could come alive, like BNAs Anima City, or as fantastical as Little Witch Academias Luna Nova Academy, and Kill la Kills Honn City.

We dont know too much about the more nuanced aspects of Cyberpunk: Edgerunners, other than what was told from a press release shortly after the formal announcement: A ten-episode series following a street kid making his way up the ranks in wetwork as an Edgerunner (an elusive, high ranking mercenary). Within the lore of the pen and paper series, Edgerunners serve as one of the archetypes available to the player. The Street-kid class is unique to the upcoming video-game, presenting the role as more of a rookie merc than an established hired gun.

Hopefully, sooner rather than later, the Corpos at Netflix or the Rockerboys of CD Projekt Red & Trigger Inc. will release more details about the much-anticipated anime adaptation.

Cyberpunk: Edgerunners is set to premiere on Netflix in 2022

List of those who are confirmed to be working on Cyberpunk: Edgerunners:Director: Hiroyuki Imaishi (Gurren Lagann, Kill la Kill, Promare)Assistant Director: Masahiko tsuka (Gurren Lagann, Promare)Creative Director: Hiromi Wakabayashi (Kill la Kill)Character Designers: Yoh Yoshinari (Little Witch Academia, BNA: Brand New Animal) Yuto Kaneko (Little Witch Academia)Screenplay Writers: Yoshiki Usa (SSSS.GRIDMAN, Promare)Masahiko tsuka (Gurren Lagann, Kill la Kill, Promare).Composer: Akira Yamaoka (Silent Hill series).

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Everything You Need To Know About Cyberpunk 2077s Anime, Edgerunners - Fiction Talk

The World of Cyberpunk 2077 Beyond Night City | Game Rant – GameRant

Cyberpunk 2077 is arguably one of the most anticipated games of the entire decade. In fact, that anticipation has lasted for almost the whole decade, as multiple delays mean that the first teaser trailer was released over 7 years ago.

Cyberpunk 2077 will be set in the vibrant and violent metropolis of Night City, in the Free State of Northern California. The rest of the Cyberpunk world, however, is also very different from the real. Here are a few key places in the world of Cyberpunk that, though players wont be visiting them in game, are sure to have an influence on Night City and its inhabitants.

RELATED:Areas of Cyberpunk 2077's World Have Been Impacted by Global Warming

The timeline of Cyberpunk and its affects on the world has undergone some different iterations, but in general fans can expect Cyberpunk 2077 to expand upon the timeline and political landscape established in Cyberpunk 2013 and 2020.

For a start, Cyberpunk 2077's Night City used to be Coronado City, California, and isrenamed in 1998 to Night City to honor its founder, Richard Night, after he was mysteriously killed. That same year, the landscape of Californiais changed by a huge earthquake registered at 10.5 on the Richter scale, killing 65000 people in Los Angeles and putting 35% of the city underwater.

New York is also heavily damaged back in 1993 when a small nuclear bomb is detonated by Colombian Drug-lords, killing 15,000 people. In 1998, a drought ravages the Midwest, and over the course of the coming century, chaos in America causes the Unification War which is triggered bythe establishment of Texas and Alaska as free states due to their huge oil reserves and ends in every other state fighting for independence for similar economic reasons.

In Central and South America, over one million contract workers are abandoned in 2010 at the end of the Second Central AmericanConflict War (2003-2010) becoming Nomads and triggering an event called The Long Walk as they tried to return home.

In Europe, the Soviet Union still collapses, but instead becomesthe Union of Sovereign Soviet Republics, keeping its Communist character but giving each state greater independence in a similar way to the USA's new divisions. The United Kingdom falls into political turmoil as the British Monarchy and a new faction called the Martial Law Authority battle for power of the nation.

In Germany, Hamburg is bought by the Euro Business Machines corporation and is peacefully declared an independent nation in 2005. Many other European countries are thrown into chaos over the course of the 21st century. Greeces government is ousted by a military coup in 2007, for example, and becomes an increasingly aggressive force in the region, causing relationships with Turkey to deteriorate further.

In 2013, Portugal sells itself to avoid bankruptcy, while the next year Vatican III is established with the neo-Catholic reformation, abolishing celibacy and allowing female priests. As a result, new conservative sects spring up worldwide. However, the Eurodollar, also called "eddies", becomes the main currency in both Europe and across the world in everywhere outside of the Soviet Sovereign Republics. This is the currency used in Night City.Under this economic union, thenon-Soviet European nations form the European Community.

Japan is one of the biggest military and economic powers in both Asia and the world of Cyberpunk at large. The mega-corporation Arasaka is established in Tokyo and dominates much of the new third world, which now includes America. In 2020, Arasaka began developing its own private army, and during the following Fourth Corporate War, the Japanese government nationalized the corporations' assets within its control to facein the international community, but was unable to reign in the company abroad.

China regains Hong Kong from Britain in 1997 but subsequently loses it to a biological weapons attack. By 2045, Hong Kong is enclosed within a 100-foot wall in order to stop the disease caused by the attack from spreading. It becomes a central base for Alt Cunningham, once girlfriend of Keanu Reeves character Johnny Silverhand, who by then has become a powerful AI. The Second Corporate War takes place between 2008 and 2010 in the South China sea, which destroys millions of lives in the region and causes a huge refugee crisis.

RELATED:Cyberpunk 2077 Dev Responds to Calls for Official Cookbook

In 1997, an event called The Meltdown takes place in Libya, which is covered by a radioactive cloud that also affectsAlgeria and Tunisia, temporarily halting the Islamic Movements. Risk tourism becomes a fad among Europes rich, though they avoid Algeria, dubbed the most dangerous country in the region. By 2019, an Islamic fundamentalist movement reemerges in Algeria after the country suffers considerably as a satellite state of the European Community.

New Zealand becomes host to the Papua New Guinea government in exile when Indonesia invades the country, renaming it East Irian Jaya. In 2010, experimental nano-tech designed to help clean up radioactive waste in Southern Australia gets out of control, taking over huge parts of the desert.

Australia's failure to recognize Aboriginal land causes both protests in the country and boycott from abroad, including New Zealand. Drought hits Adelaide,Australia in 2016, exacerbated by the pollution in the remaining water supply. Arasaka funds a desalination plant so that the Australians can make sea water potable, but in accepting their offer the Australians increase the corporation's influence over their nation.

Cyberpunk 2077 may be set in Night City, but there's no doubt the wider world will have a huge impact on what players can expect from the metropolis. Fans of Cyberpunk will know that nations themselves are increasingly less relevant than mega-corporations, making the far-reaching influence of companies like Arasaka felt all over the world. As a result, the world of Cyberpunk is very multicultural, with a particularly strong Japanese influence.

Furthermore, players can expect to see characters from all over the world who have set up new lives in Night City. With constant refugee crises as disasters and droughts devastate regions annually, Night City is sure to be as diverse as it is divided. For fans of Cyberpunk who want to find out more about the world and timeline of Cyberpunk at large, they can turn to the sourcebooks released for the table top games to which CD Projekt Red's upcoming title is a sequel. It remains to be seen how closely the studio sticks to all the details, but fans can be confident that the world of Cyberpunk will likely feel at once freshand strangely familiar.

Cyberpunk 2077launches November 19 on PC, PS4, and Xbox One, with PS5, Stadia, and Xbox Series X versions also in development.

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The World of Cyberpunk 2077 Beyond Night City | Game Rant - GameRant

Cyberpunk 2077 Is An RPG First, One Dev Reassures Fans (VIDEO) – Don’t Feed the Gamers

The recent installment of Night City Wire showed off some impressive gameplay, more on the music, and a lot of weapon action that will be featured in the game. However, after the episode, one developer made sure to reiterate that Cyberpunk 2077 is an RPG first, even with all of the FPS elements.

During a recent Discord discussion with Netrunner 2077 and some members of the community, senior quest designer Miles Tost made sure to reassure everyone that Cyberpunk 2077 is primarily a role-playing game. After all, we saw a lot of shooty bits in the recent Night City Wire episode, and the game is in a first person perspective, which has thrown some folks off. However, rest assured, for the title will run deep with the RPG goodies.

As for how much of an RPG Cyberpunk 2077 is, well, weve seen plenty so far. Everything from choosing a lifepath and customizing your character, to all of the dialogue that comes with these choices as well as the decisions that will need to be made, its going to be deep. Hell, players dont even need to finish the main story to beat the game, so you know there is some interesting things going on there that are related to the role-playing side of things. Plus, fans can go the entire game without killing anyone, so take that, FPS. Seriously, though: Cyberpunk 2077 is an RPG.

Cyberpunk 2077 is set to officially arrive on November 19th for PC, PlayStation 4, and Xbox One. As we approach the dreaded Day 91, lets brace for either disappointing news or one really good meme from the devs. Keep it tuned to Dont Feed the Gamers as this story develops, and for other gaming goodness going on right now, check out the following:

What say you, choombas? Excited to dive into Cyberpunk 2077 when it arrives later this year? Have you ever doubted the RPG-ness of the game? Sound off in the comments section below, and be sure to follow DFTG on Twitter for live gaming and entertainment news 24/7!

If you enjoy this writers work, please consider supporting them bytossing a KoFi their way! Every little bit helps and aims to keep DFTG independent and free of bias. Thank you so much for your support!

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