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University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMass Medical …

Top story: FDA approves first drug to use RNA interference, based on discoveries made at UMass Medical School

The new drug, patisiran, approved Aug. 10 by the FDA, is based on the discovery of RNAi made by Craig Mello, PhD, and Andrew Fire, PhD. It was developed by Alnylam, an RNAi-based drug development company co-founded by Phillip Zamore, PhD.

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University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMass Medical …

Miller School of Medicine | University of Miami

Latest NewsUHealth Welcomes Internationally Renowned Cardiac Surgeon Joseph Lamelas, M.D.

Joseph Lamelas, M.D.

Joseph Lamelas, M.D., an internationally recognized expert cardiac surgeon who helped pioneer minimally invasive approaches to cardiac surgery, has joined UHealth the University of Miami Health System as chief of cardiothoracic surgery and professor of surgery in the Miller School of Medicine. He will begin his new role on January 21. Dr. Lamelas has performed more than 16,000 cardiac surgeries throughout his 28-year career, 7,000 of which have employed a minimally invasive approach.

Dr. Lamelas is internationally recognized for his outstanding skills, outcomes, and innovation in cardiac surgery. His arrival at the University of Miami strengthens our luminary program in cardiovascular disease, said Edward Abraham, M.D., executive vice president for health affairs and CEO of the University of Miami Health System. Having Dr. Lamelas as our chief of cardiothoracic surgery solidifies UHealth as the preeminent center for cardiovascular disease in South Florida, and one of the truly elite institutions in the country.

Read more about Dr. Lamelas

Stem cells (so-called master cells) are unique and important in the body because they can do almost anything, and scientists have only begun to discover their potential. Thats why researchers use of them has created controversy, attracting the attention of scientists, policymakers, and bioethicists across the globe. Stem cells can transform into any of the bodys more than 200 cell types.

Read more about the commentary

Sabrina Taldone, M.D., MBA, a chief resident in the Division of Internal Medicine at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Having earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Miami, Dr. Taldone saw the need for a health care administration elective and decided to do something about it.

Read more about the new elective

With hammers smashing through a fake brick wall, the opening of a first-of-its-kind center designed to bring an end to blinding eye disease moved a significant step closer to reality. A ceremonial wall-breaking was held Dec. 14 at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Palm Beach Gardens to signal the beginning of construction of the Lois Pope Center for Retinal and Macular Degeneration Research.

Employing advanced technology, innovative thinking, and some adaptive strategies, researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have discovered a way to identify combinations of available medications that could optimally treat people diagnosed with glioblastoma, the most common and deadliest form of primary adult brain cancer.

Read more about the study

In Dr. Jonathan Schatzs laboratory at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, researchers have pioneered a new use for CRISPR, the genomic editing tool at the center of much media attention.

Read more about CRISPR

News & Events

See the article here:

Miller School of Medicine | University of Miami

Indiana University School of Medicine

Integrated Medical Education

IU School of Medicine is the largest medical school in the United States. Comprised of eight basic science departments and 18 clinical science departments, IU School of Medicine offers exceptional training for students wishing to pursue a medical degree. With the Class of 2020, the school implemented a new medical education curriculum that better reflects the modern U.S. health care environment and delivery models, readying students to practice medicine in a team-based, interdisciplinary setting.

IU School of Medicine MD Curriculum

Ready to take the next step in your medical education? Explore IU School of Medicine education programs and find requirements, curriculum and application information.

The rest is here:

Indiana University School of Medicine

Home | Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar

Future Students

High school students are invited to explore our pre-college programs and learn more about the admissions process.

WCM-Q offers the cohesive Six-Year Medical Education Program for high school students and the Four-Year Medical Curriculum for college/university students.

WCM-Q has established a center of excellence in basic, translational & clinical biomedical research with a world-class infrastructure, & outstanding scientists.

Continue reading here:

Home | Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar

Albany Medical Center

Visitation guidelines took effect Monday, December 31, at several regional hospitals to further protect patients from influenza and other infectious diseases.

Albany Med has earned The Joint Commissions Gold Seal of Approval and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Associations Heart-Check mark for Advanced Certification for Comprehensive Stroke Centers.

Albany Med is excited to announce the new RouteFinder App, offering easy-to-use walking and driving directions on your smartphone, tablet or computer.

Dr. Barbara E. Ostrov has joined Albany Meds Department of Pediatrics as the director of the Bernard & Millie Duker Childrens Hospital and the Martha Lepow, M.D., Endowed Chair in Pediatrics.

Albany Med is proud to announce a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held to open The Massry Family Childrens Emergency Center, the only pediatric emergency department in northeastern New York and western New England.

Thank you to Capital Region residents for once again voting Albany Med the “Best Hospital” in the Capital Region through the Albany Times Union’s 2018 “Best Of” Survey.

Continued here:

Albany Medical Center

Home | Perelman School of Medicine | Perelman School of …

We are the Perelman School of Medicine — the Nation’s First — and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania — the nation’s first hospital built by a medical school. Our heritage is the cornerstone for our future and the legacy which supports our pursuit of the highest standards in education, research, and patient care.

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Home | Perelman School of Medicine | Perelman School of …

Medical School – University of Minnesota

Welcome to the University of Minnesota Medical School, a world-class institution with a longhistoryof leadership and discoveries that have changed the practice of medicine. Weengage undergraduates in science and medicine, train medical students, produce PhDs in research, and enrich the experience of post-doctoral students, residentsandfellows…

Originally posted here:

Medical School – University of Minnesota

University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMass Medical …

Top story: FDA approves first drug to use RNA interference, based on discoveries made at UMass Medical School

The new drug, patisiran, approved Aug. 10 by the FDA, is based on the discovery of RNAi made by Craig Mello, PhD, and Andrew Fire, PhD. It was developed by Alnylam, an RNAi-based drug development company co-founded by Phillip Zamore, PhD.

Continue reading here:

University of Massachusetts Medical School (UMass Medical …

Indiana University School of Medicine

Integrated Medical Education

IU School of Medicine is the largest medical school in the United States. Comprised of eight basic science departments and 18 clinical science departments, IU School of Medicine offers exceptional training for students wishing to pursue a medical degree. With the Class of 2020, the school implemented a new medical education curriculum that better reflects the modern U.S. health care environment and delivery models, readying students to practice medicine in a team-based, interdisciplinary setting.

IU School of Medicine MD Curriculum

Ready to take the next step in your medical education? Explore IU School of Medicine education programs and find requirements, curriculum and application information.

Original post:

Indiana University School of Medicine

Miller School of Medicine | University of Miami

Latest NewsCeremonial Wall-Breaking for the Lois Pope Center for Retinal and Macular Degeneration Research

From left, Eduardo C. Alfonso, M.D., Palm Beach Gardens Mayor Maria G. Marino, Julio Frenk, Lois Pope, and Henri R. Ford, M.D., MHA.

With hammers smashing through a fake brick wall, the opening of a first-of-its-kind center designed to bring an end to blinding eye disease moved a significant step closer to reality.

A ceremonial wall-breaking was held Dec. 14 at Bascom Palmer Eye Institute in Palm Beach Gardens to signal the beginning of construction of the Lois Pope Center for Retinal and Macular Degeneration Research. The center, which promises to serve as the hub for clinical care and research studies to battle age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and retinal diseases, is the result of a historic $12 million donation from philanthropist Lois Pope, the largest gift in Bascom Palmers history.

Stem cells (so-called master cells) are unique and important in the body because they can do almost anything, and scientists have only begun to discover their potential. Thats why researchers use of them has created controversy, attracting the attention of scientists, policymakers, and bioethicists across the globe. Stem cells can transform into any of the bodys more than 200 cell types.

Read more about the commentary

Sabrina Taldone, M.D., MBA, a chief resident in the Division of Internal Medicine at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine. Having earned her undergraduate and graduate degrees from the University of Miami, Dr. Taldone saw the need for a health care administration elective and decided to do something about it.

Read more about the new elective

Employing advanced technology, innovative thinking, and some adaptive strategies, researchers at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine have discovered a way to identify combinations of available medications that could optimally treat people diagnosed with glioblastoma, the most common and deadliest form of primary adult brain cancer.

Read more about the study

In Dr. Jonathan Schatzs laboratory at Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, researchers have pioneered a new use for CRISPR, the genomic editing tool at the center of much media attention.

Read more about CRISPR

Stephen L. Demers, senior vice president for ambulatory and clinical services at Lahey Hospital & Medical Center in Burlington, Massachusetts, will join UHealth the University of Miami Health System on January 21 as chief operating officer.

Read more about Stephen L. Demers

News & Events

Read the original here:

Miller School of Medicine | University of Miami

Home | Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar

Future Students

High school students are invited to explore our pre-college programs and learn more about the admissions process.

WCM-Q offers the cohesive Six-Year Medical Education Program for high school students and the Four-Year Medical Curriculum for college/university students.

WCM-Q has established a center of excellence in basic, translational & clinical biomedical research with a world-class infrastructure, & outstanding scientists.

More:

Home | Weill Cornell Medicine – Qatar

Albany Medical Center

Albany Med has earned The Joint Commissions Gold Seal of Approval and the American Heart Association/American Stroke Associations Heart-Check mark for Advanced Certification for Comprehensive Stroke Centers.

After serving as interim chair and overseeing the recent opening of The Massry Family Childrens Emergency Center, Dr. Denis Pauz has been appointed chair of the Department of Emergency Medicine at Albany Med.

Albany Med is excited to announce the new RouteFinder App, offering easy-to-use walking and driving directions on your smartphone, tablet or computer.

Dr. Barbara E. Ostrov has joined Albany Meds Department of Pediatrics as the director of the Bernard & Millie Duker Childrens Hospital and the Martha Lepow, M.D., Endowed Chair in Pediatrics.

Albany Med is proud to announce a ribbon-cutting ceremony was held to open The Massry Family Childrens Emergency Center, the only pediatric emergency department in northeastern New York and western New England.

Thank you to Capital Region residents for once again voting Albany Med the “Best Hospital” in the Capital Region through the Albany Times Union’s 2018 “Best Of” Survey.

See the article here:

Albany Medical Center

Home | Perelman School of Medicine | Perelman School of …

We are the Perelman School of Medicine — the Nation’s First — and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania — the nation’s first hospital built by a medical school. Our heritage is the cornerstone for our future and the legacy which supports our pursuit of the highest standards in education, research, and patient care.

See the original post here:

Home | Perelman School of Medicine | Perelman School of …

Apollo Astronaut: It Would Be “Stupid” to Send People to Mars

According to Apollo 8 astronaut Bill Anders, crewed missions to Mars and hyped-up chatter of settling the planet are all a waste of time and money.

Fool’s Errand

According to one of the astronauts aboard NASA’s 1968 Apollo 8 mission, it would be “stupid” and “almost ridiculous” to pursue a crewed mission to Mars.

“What’s the imperative? What’s pushing us to go to Mars? I don’t think the public is that interested,” said Bill Anders, who orbited the Moon before returning to Earth 50 years ago, in a new documentary by BBC Radio 5 Live.

Anders argued that there are plenty of things that NASA could be doing that would be a better use of time and money, like the unmanned InSight rover that recently touched down to study Mars’ interior. The comments, by one of the most accomplished space explorers in human history, illustrates a deep and public philosophical rift about whether the future of spaceflight will be characterized by splashy crewed missions or less expensive automated ones.

Mars Bars

The crux of Anders’ argument on the BBC boils down to his perception that NASA is fueling a vicious cycle of highly-publicized missions that bolster its image, improve its funding, and attract top talent so that it can launch more highly-publicized missions. Sending an astronaut to Mars would dominate the news cycle, but wouldn’t push the frontier of practical scientific knowledge, Anders argued — a mismatch, essentially, between the priorities of NASA and those of the public.

That skepticism places Anders among the ranks of other high-profile critics of NASA, Elon Musk’s SpaceX, and Jeff Bezos’ Blue Origin — all three of which have set their sights on the Red Planet.

For instance, science communicator and advocate Bill Nye predicted last year that no layperson would want to settle Mars. Nye also doubled down last month to say that anyone planning on terraforming Mars must be high on drugs.

Robust Explanation

But Anders’ own Apollo 8 crewmate Frank Borman disagreed, arguing in the documentary that crewed exploration is important.

“I’m not as critical of NASA as Bill is,” Borman told BBC. “I firmly believe that we need robust exploration of our Solar System and I think man is part of that.”

However, even Borman draws the line somewhere between exploration and settlement.

“I do think there’s a lot of hype about Mars that is nonsense,” Borman said. “Musk and Bezos, they’re talking about putting colonies on Mars. That’s nonsense.”

READ MORE: Sending astronauts to Mars would be stupid, astronaut says [BBC]

More on reaching Mars: Four Legal Challenges to Resolve Before Settling on Mars

The post Apollo Astronaut: It Would Be “Stupid” to Send People to Mars appeared first on Futurism.

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Apollo Astronaut: It Would Be “Stupid” to Send People to Mars

Elon Musk Tweets Image of SpaceX’s Stainless Steel Starship

Stainless steel starship

Big Picture

Christmas came early for Elon Musk’s Twitter followers.

The SpaceX CEO took to the social media platform on Christmas Eve to share a new image of a prototype version of the Starship spacecraft at the company’s Texas testing facilities.

The massive rocket with the ever-changing name — it was previously known as the “Mars Colonial Transporter,” the “Interplanetary Transport System,” and the “Big Falcon Rocket” — could one day ferry passengers to Mars. And Musk’s new photo reveals that the key to making that possible might be a material you’ve got in your kitchen right now.

Stainless Steel Starship

The new Starship is made out of stainless steel,  according to the tweet, a material which handles extreme heat very well — polish it up, and its mirror-like finish will reflect thermal energy far better than the carbon-based materials used for many rockets.

That could help Starship withstand the strain of long-term spaceflight, but stainless steel is heavier than carbon fiber, and keeping weight down is extremely important in space travel.

From an impromptu Twitter Q&A following the reveal of the Starship prototype, we learned that by exposing the stainless steel to extremely cold temperatures — that is, giving it a cryogenic treatment — SpaceX was able to get around the issue of the material weighing more than carbon fiber. According to a Musk tweet, “Usable strength/weight of full hard stainless at cryo is slightly better than carbon fiber, room temp is worse, high temp is vastly better.”

Stainless Steel Starship pic.twitter.com/rRoiEKKrYc

— Elon Musk (@elonmusk) December 24, 2018

Countdown to Liftoff

Perhaps the most exciting Starship revelation of the past week, though, is Musk’s assertion that the prototype could be ready for liftoff in just a few months’ time.

On December 22, he tweeted that he would “do a full technical presentation of Starship” after the prototype’s test flight, which could happen in March or April. If all goes well with that test flight, SpaceX could be one step closer to achieving Musk’s vision of making humanity a multiplanetary species.

READ MORE: SpaceX CEO Elon Musk: Starship Prototype to Have 3 Raptors and “Mirror Finish” [Teslarati]

More on Starship: Elon Musk Just Changed the BFR’s Name for a Fourth Time

The post Elon Musk Tweets Image of SpaceX’s Stainless Steel Starship appeared first on Futurism.

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Elon Musk Tweets Image of SpaceX’s Stainless Steel Starship

Startup Claims Its Underwear Stay Odor-Free Through Weeks of Wear

Startup Organic Basics claims its silver-coated underwear remain odor-free after weeks of wear, but several testers disagree.

Under Where?

Want to wear the same pair of underwear for weeks at a time? Go right ahead.

A Danish startup called Organic Basics claims its underwear remain fresh through weeks of wear, eliminating the need for frequent washing. And this could be a boon for the environment — if it’s actually true.

Silver Skivvies

When your sweat meets your clothing, it creates an ideal environment for bacteria. It’s this bacteria that actually produces a foul-smelling odor. Silver is antimicrobial, meaning it kills bacteria and other microorganisms.

By treating their underwear with Polygiene, a product that uses silver chloride to control smells, Organic Basics says it can prevent the growth of 99.9 percent of this bacteria, which it claims prevents the underwear from smelling bad as quickly.

“It works,” CEO Mads Fibiger told Business Insider Nordic in May. “You can wear our underwear much longer before washing.”

Smell Test

Fibiger might claim the coating “works,” but not everyone agrees.

A reporter for New York magazine claimed she noticed a “less-than-fresh scent” on just the second day wearing Organic Basics’s women’s briefs, noting that she “didn’t feel comfortable pushing [her] luck with a third day of testing.” Her male colleague also tossed his Organic Basics boxer briefs in the laundry hamper after just 48 hours.

Even if the underwear did maintain the desired level of freshness, though, people might not be able get over the mental hurdle of wearing the same undergarments for weeks at a time — just this week, Elle reporter R. Eric Thomas wrote that reading about the undies made him want to “bleach [his] eyes.”

Futuristic Fashion

Organic Basics isn’t just trying to help people avoid laundry day, though. “The traditional way of buying, wearing, washing, and throwing away overpriced underwear is…extremely harmful to the environment,” Fibiger told Business Insider.

And he’s right. Washing and drying clothing requires water and energy, so the more often you clean your underwear, the greater the garment’s impact on the environment.

Still, the environmental benefits of wearing the same pair of underwear for weeks at a time might not be enough to get even the most environmentally conscious among us to wear Organic Basics’s underwear if they don’t actually smell fine on day three and beyond.

READ MORE: A Danish Startup Invented Underwear You Can Wear for Weeks Without Washing [Business Insider Nordic]

More on sustainable fashion: These Clothes Grow With Your Child and Are a Step Towards Sustainable Fashion

The post Startup Claims Its Underwear Stay Odor-Free Through Weeks of Wear appeared first on Futurism.

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Startup Claims Its Underwear Stay Odor-Free Through Weeks of Wear

Microorganisms That Eat Seaweed Can Create Biodegradable Plastic

bioplastic

Ocean of Opportunity

Earth’s oceans contain tens of millions of tons of plastic pollution. But a new technique that creates biodegradable plastics out of seaweed could finally give the oceans relief.

Bioplastics are plastics manufactured from biomass sources instead of fossil fuels. Many degrade far more quickly than traditional plastics, but creating them typically requires fertile soil and fresh water, which aren’t available everywhere.

Now, researchers have found a way to create a bioplastic using seaweed, a far more accessible resource — a promising new approach that could both reduce strain on the plastic-clogged oceans and reduce the Earth’s dependence on fossil fuels.

Scarfing Seaweed

Researchers from the University of Tel Aviv describe their new bioplastic production process in a study published recently in the journal Bioresource Technology.

Certain microorganisms naturally produce a polymer called polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA). Some factories already create plastics from PHA, but they do so using microorganisms that feed on plants that grow on land using fresh water.

Through their experiments, the team found it was possible to derive PHA from Haloferax mediterranei, a microorganism that feeds on seaweed.

“We have proved it is possible to produce bioplastic completely based on marine resources in a process that is friendly both to the environment and to its residents,” researcher Alexander Golberg said in a press release.

Plastic Problem

Every year, 8 million metric tons of plastic finds its way into the Earth’s oceans, and researchers estimate that plastic will outweigh fish by 2050. That plastic is killing marine life, destroying coral reefs, and even affecting human health.

Efforts are already underway to remove plastic from the ocean, and several governments are banning certain plastics altogether. But plastic pollution is a huge problem that will require a multi-pronged solution — and a biodegradable plastic could be one of those prongs.

READ MORE: Sustainable “Plastics” Are on the Horizon [Tel Aviv University]

More on plastic pollution: The EU Just Voted to Completely Ban Single-Use Plastics

The post Microorganisms That Eat Seaweed Can Create Biodegradable Plastic appeared first on Futurism.

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Microorganisms That Eat Seaweed Can Create Biodegradable Plastic


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