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How researchers are mapping the future of quantum computing, using the tech of today – GeekWire

Pacific Northwest National Laboratory computer scientist Sriram Krishnamoorthy. (PNNL Photo)

Imagine a future where new therapeutic drugs are designed far faster and at a fraction of the cost they are today, enabled by the rapidly developing field of quantum computing.

The transformation on healthcare and personalized medicine would be tremendous, yet these are hardly the only fields this novel form of computing could revolutionize. From cryptography to supply-chain optimization to advances in solid-state physics, the coming era of quantum computers could bring about enormous changes, assuming its potential can be fully realized.

Yet many hurdles still need to be overcome before all of this can happen. This one of the reasons the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory and Microsoft have teamed up to advance this nascent field.

The developer of the Q# programming language, Microsoft Quantum recently announced the creation of an intermediate bridge that will allow Q# and other languages to be used to send instructions to different quantum hardware platforms. This includes the simulations being performed on PNNLs own powerful supercomputers, which are used to test the quantum algorithms that could one day run on those platforms. While scalable quantum computing is still years away, these simulations make it possible to design and test many of the approaches that will eventually be used.

We have extensive experience in terms of parallel programming for supercomputers, said PNNL computer scientist Sriram Krishnamoorthy. The question was, how do you use these classical supercomputers to understand how a quantum algorithm and quantum architectures would behave while we build these systems?

Thats an important question given that classical and quantum computing are so extremely different from each other. Quantum computing isnt Classical Computing 2.0. A quantum computer is no more an improved version of a classical computer than a lightbulb is a better version of a candle. While you might use one to simulate the other, that simulation will never be perfect because theyre such fundamentally different technologies.

Classical computing is based on bits, pieces of information that are either off or on to represent a zero or one. But a quantum bit, or qubit, can represent a zero or a one or any proportion of those two values at the same time. This makes it possible to perform computations in a very different way.

However, a qubit can only do this so long as it remains in a special state known as superposition. This, along with other features of quantum behavior such as entanglement, could potentially allow quantum computing to answer all kinds of complex problems, many of which are exponential in nature. These are exactly the kind of problems that classical computers cant readily solve if they can solve them at all.

For instance, much of the worlds electronic privacy is based on encryption methods that rely on prime numbers. While its easy to multiply two prime numbers, its extremely difficult to reverse the process by factoring the product of two primes. In some cases, a classical computer could run for 10,000 years and still not find the solution. A quantum computer, on the other hand, might be capable of performing the work in seconds.

That doesnt mean quantum computing will replace all tasks performed by classical computers. This includes programming the quantum computers themselves, which the very nature of quantum behaviors can make highly challenging. For instance, just the act of observing a qubit can make it decohere, causing it to lose its superposition and entangled states.

Such challenges drive some of the work being done by Microsoft Azures Quantum group. Expecting that both classical and quantum computing resources will be needed for large-scale quantum applications, Microsoft Quantum has developed a bridge they call QIR, which stands for quantum intermediate representation. The motivation behind QIR is to create a common interface at a point in the programming stack that avoids interfering with the qubits. Doing this makes the interface both language- and platform-agnostic, which allows different software and hardware to be used together.

To advance the field of quantum computing, we need to think beyond just how to build a particular end-to-end system, said Bettina Heim, senior software engineering manager with Microsoft Quantum, during a recent presentation. We need to think about how to grow a global ecosystem that facilitates developing and experimenting with different approaches.

Because these are still very early days think of where classical computing was 75 years ago many fundamental components still need to be developed and refined in this ecosystem, including quantum gates, algorithms and error correction. This is where PNNLs quantum simulator, DM-SIM comes in. By designing and testing different approaches and configurations of these elements, they can discover better ways of achieving their goals.

As Krishnamoorthy explains: What we currently lack and what we are trying to build with this simulation infrastructure is a turnkey solution that could allow, say a compiler writer or a noise model developer or a systems architect, to try different approaches in putting qubits together and ask the question: If they do this, what happens?

Of course, there will be many challenges and disappointments along the way, such as an upcoming retraction of a 2018 paper in the journal, Nature. The original study, partly funded by Microsoft, declared evidence of a theoretical particle called a Majorana fermion, which could have been a major quantum breakthrough. However, errors since found in the data contradict that claim.

But progress continues, and once reasonably robust and scalable quantum computers are available, all kinds of potential uses could become possible. Supply chain and logistics optimization might be ideal applications, generating new levels of efficiency and energy savings for business. Since quantum computing should also be able to perform very fast searches on unsorted data, applications that focus on financial data, climate data analysis and genomics are likely uses, as well.

Thats only the beginning. Quantum computers could be used to accurately simulate physical processes from chemistry and solid-state physics, ushering in a new era for these fields. Advances in material science could become possible because well be better able to simulate and identify molecular properties much faster and more accurately than we ever could before. Simulating proteins using quantum computers could lead to new knowledge about biology that would revolutionize healthcare.

In the future, quantum cryptography may also become common, due to its potential for truly secure encrypted storage and communications. Thats because its impossible to precisely copy quantum data without violating the laws of physics. Such encryption will be even more important once quantum computers are commonplace because their unique capabilities will also allow them to swiftly crack traditional methods of encryption as mentioned earlier, rendering many currently robust methods insecure and obsolete.

As with many new technologies, it can be challenging to envisage all of the potential uses and problems quantum computing might bring about, which is one reason why business and industry need to become involved in its development early on. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach could yield all kinds of new ideas and applications and hopefully help to build what is ultimately a trusted and ethical technology.

How do you all work together to make it happen? asks Krishnamoorthy. I think for at least the next couple of decades, for chemistry problems, for nuclear theory, etc., well need this hypothetical machine that everyone designs and programs for at the same time, and simulations are going to be crucial to that.

The future of quantum computing will bring enormous changes and challenges to our world. From how we secure our most critical data to unlocking the secrets of our genetic code, its technology that holds the keys to applications, fields and industries weve yet to even imagine.

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How researchers are mapping the future of quantum computing, using the tech of today - GeekWire

Colorado makes a bid for quantum computing hardware plant that would bring more than 700 jobs – The Denver Post

The Colorado Economic Development Commission normally doesnt throw its weight behind unproven startups, but it did so on Thursday, approving $2.9 million in state job growth incentive tax credits to try and land a manufacturing plant that will produce hardware for quantum computers.

Given the broad applications and catalytic benefits that this companys technology could bring, retaining this company would help position Colorado as an industry leader in next-generation and quantum computing, Michelle Hadwiger, the deputy director of the Colorado Office of Economic Development & International Trade, told commissioners.

Project Quantum, the codename for the Denver-based startup, is looking to create up to 726 new full-time jobs in the state. Most of the positions would staff a new facility making components for quantum computers, an emerging technology expected to increase computing power and speed exponentially and transform the global economy as well as society as a whole.

The jobs would carry an average annual wage of $103,329, below the wages other technology employers seeking incentives from the state have provided, but above the average annual wage of any Colorado county. Hadwiger said the company is also considering Illinois, Ohio and New York for the new plant and headquarters.

Quantum computing is going to be as important to the next 30 years of technology as the internet was to the past 30 years, said the companys CEO, who only provided his first name Corban.

He added that he loves Colorado and doesnt want to see it surpassed by states like Washington, New York and Illinois in the transformative field.

If we are smart about it, and that means doing something above and beyond, we can win this race. It will require careful coordination at the state and local levels. We need to do something more and different, he said.

The EDC also approved $2.55 million in job growth incentive tax credits and $295,000 in Location Neutral Employment Incentives for Nextworld, a growing cloud-based enterprise software company based in Greenwood Village. The funds are linked to the creation of 306 additional jobs, including 59 located in more remote parts of the state.

But in a rare case of dissent, Nextworlds CEO Kylee McVaney asked the commission to go against staff recommendations and provide a larger incentive package.

McVaney, daughter of legendary Denver tech entrepreneur Ed McVaney, said the companys lease is about to expire in Greenwood Village and most employees would prefer to continue working remotely. The company could save substantial money by not renewing its lease and relocating its headquarters to Florida, which doesnt have an income tax.

We could go sign a seven-year lease and stay in Colorado or we can try this new grand experiment and save $11 million, she said.

Hadwiger insisted that the award, which averages out to $9,500 per job created, was in line with the amount offered to other technology firms since the Colorado legislature tightened the amount the office could provide companies.

But McVaney said the historical average award per employee was closer to $18,000 and the median is $16,000 and that Colorado was not competitive with Florida given that states more favorable tax structure.

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Colorado makes a bid for quantum computing hardware plant that would bring more than 700 jobs - The Denver Post

bp Joins the IBM Quantum Network to Advance Use of Quantum Computing in Energy – HPCwire

LONDON,Feb. 15, 2021 IBM today announcedbp has joined the IBM Quantum Network to advance the use of quantum computing in the energy industry.

By joining the IBM Quantum Network as an Industry Partner, bp will have access to IBMs quantum expertise and software and cloud-based access to the most advanced quantum computers available via the cloud. This includes access to a premium 65-qubit quantum computer, the largest universal quantum system available to industry today, and an important milestone on the IBM Quantum roadmapto a 1,000-plus qubit system, targeted for the end of 2023.

bp will work with IBMto explore using quantum computing to solve business and engineering challenges and explore the potential applications for driving efficiencies and reducing carbon emissions.

bps ambition is to become a net zero company by 2050 or sooner and help the world get to net zero. Next-generation computing capabilities such as quantum computing will assist in solving the science and engineering challenges we will face, enabling us to reimagine energy and design new lower carbon products, saidMorag Watson, senior vice president, digital science and engineering for bp.

Quantum computing has the potential to be applied in areas such as: modelling the chemistry and build-up of various types of clay in hydrocarbon wells a crucial factor in efficient hydrocarbon production; analyzing and managing the fluid dynamics of wind farms; optimizing autonomous robotic facility inspection; and helping create opportunities not yet imagined to deliver the clean energy the world wants and needs.

In 2020, bp announced its net zero ambition and its new strategy.By the end of this decade, it aims to have developed around 50 gigawatts of net renewable-generating capacity(a 20-fold increase), increased annual low carbon investment 10-fold to around$5 billionand cut its oil and gas production by 40%.

Joining the IBM Quantum Network will enhance bps ability to leverage quantum advances and applications as they emerge and then influence on how those breakthroughs can be applied to its industry and the energy transition.

bp joins a rapidly growing number of clients working with IBM to explore quantum computing to help accelerate the discovery of solutions to some of todays biggest challenges, addedDario Gil, Senior Vice President and Director of IBM Research. The energy industry is ripe with opportunities to see value from the use of quantum computing through the discovery of new materials designed to improve the generation, transfer, and storage of energy.

bp joins more than 130 members of the IBM Quantum Network, a global community of Fortune 500 companies, start-ups, academic institutions and research labs working to advance quantum computing and explore practical applications. Together, members of the Network and IBM Quantum teams are researching and exploring how quantum computing will help a variety of industries and disciplines, including finance, energy, chemistry, materials science, optimization and machine learning, among many others.

For more information about the IBM Quantum Network, as well as a full list of all partners, members, and hubs, visithttps://www.research.ibm.com/ibm-q/network/.

IBM Quantum Network is a trademark of International Business Machines Corporation.

About bp

bps purpose is to reimagine energy for people and our planet. It has set out an ambition to be a net zero company by 2050, or sooner, and help the world get to net zero, and recently announced its strategy for delivering on that ambition.For more information visitbp.com.

About IBM Quantum

IBM Quantum is an industry-first initiative to build universal quantum systems for business and science applications. For more information about IBMs quantum computing efforts, please visitwww.ibm.com/ibmq.

Source: IBM

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bp Joins the IBM Quantum Network to Advance Use of Quantum Computing in Energy - HPCwire

The Fourth Industrial Revolution AI, Quantum, and IoT Impacts on Cybersecurity – Security Boulevard

Technology changes at a breakneck pace, and to be of any use, the security we rely on to protect that technology must change alongside it.

Cybersecurity solutions, in particular, must keep up with the evolving needs of hybrid enterprise networks that connect an ever-expanding mesh of cloud devices, on-prem legacy hardware and everything in between.

The next cybersecurity challenge lies with the advances in quantum computing that are set to revolutionize tech while simultaneously equipping threat actors with a new arsenal of cyberweapons.

The fourth industrial revolution is upon us. Its a bold claim are we really about to usher in an era as potentially impactful as the steam engine, the age of science and mass production and the initial rise of digital technology?

Well, yes. According to several high-profile industry experts who spoke at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) 2021, advances in artificial intelligence (AI) and quantum computing are set to fundamentally change the way the world engages with technology.

As an emerging concept, the high-level technology industry has yet to arrive at a fully-consistent definition, but widespread consensus points to a focus on several key elements. The fourth industrial revolution will be marked by fundamental advances and interconnectivity between fields like:

Tying them all together is quantum computing, which we can define aswell, its not particularly simple to explain quantum computing for most of us. Even MIT, while trying to explain it like were five years old, refers to quantum computing as technology that harnesses some of the almost-mystical phenomena of quantum mechanics.

Still, its good to develop a high-level understanding so that we can view the impact on cybersecurity within a more informed context. The MIT explainer referenced above offers a relatively-accessible introduction, as does this Microsoft Azure guide. Without diving deep into a course on qubits, superposition and entanglement, however, we can also gain insight by considering how enterprises are already using quantum computing.

Volkswagen and Daimler, for example, are using quantum supercomputers to improve electric vehicle batteries based on chemical simulations. Simulating, at a molecular level, the behavior of matter is one way we will fundamentally change our approach to problem-solving in the age of quantum computing.

Quantum computing is based on technology weve yet to fully harness. However, the same constant remains true when it comes to bad actors: whatever the good guys understand about quantum computing, the bad guys do, too.

Unfortunately, there will always be an army of cyber criminals standing by, ready to apply their knowledge and talents to nefarious activity. Its safe to say that vulnerabilities will plague quantum systems just as theyve plagued every other next generation system.

In order for cybersecurity solutions to adequately guard quantum networks, they will need to address several key factors:

While each of these issues will require specific high-level and granular solutions, networks equipped with true self-learning AI capabilities will fare better when monitoring network activity, even as it occurs at whirlwind, quantum speeds.

MixModes predictive, proactive, efficient AI gives organizations a fighting chance at combating modern actors. Rules-based approaches are doomed to fail against cyberthreats in the quantum space.

On one level, its a simple matter of speed. The systems of tomorrow (and many of the systems of today) will move too quickly for modern SOCs to keep their security platforms up-to-date. Context-aware AI must live within enterprise systems in order to detect anomalies as they occur in such rapidly changing environments.

MixMode is ready to face quantum threats by thriving within quantum networks. MixMode is data- and feed-agnostic it can operate effectively and independently regardless of data format and type.

As systems rapidly expand and scale to allow for the increased data inputs organizations will need to monitor. For example, we can expect an influx of 5G-enabled IoT sensors and increased remote connections among a workforce forever changed by the 2020 pandemic.

Because MixModes third-wave, self-supervised AI doesnt need constant babysitting or continual rules-tweaking, the platform will protect quantum systems with an approach proven to identify threats and anomalies in network traffic, log systems, API, time-series, cloud data, and beyond.

Learn more about MixMode and set up a demo today.

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The Fourth Industrial Revolution AI, Quantum, and IoT Impacts on Cybersecurity - Security Boulevard

The Worldwide Quantum Computing Industry is Expected to Reach $1.7 Billion by 2026 – PRNewswire

DUBLIN, Feb. 16, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- The "Global Quantum Computing Market with COVID-19 Impact Analysis by Offering (Systems, Services), Deployment (On Premises, Cloud-based), Application, Technology, End-use Industry and Region - Forecast to 2026" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

The Global Quantum Computing Market is expected to grow from USD 472 million in 2021 to USD 1,765 million by 2026, at a CAGR of 30.2%.

The early adoption of quantum computing in the banking and finance sector is expected to fuel the growth of the market globally. Other key factors contributing to the growth of the quantum computing market include rising investments by governments of different countries to carry out research and development activities related to quantum computing technology.

Several companies are focusing on the adoption of QCaaS post-COVID-19. This, in turn, is expected to contribute to the growth of the quantum computing market. However, stability and error correction issues is expected to restrain the growth of the market.

Services segment is attributed to hold the largest share of the Quantum Computing market

The growth of services segment can be attributed to the increasing number of startups across the world that are investing in research and development activities related to quantum computing technology. This technology is used in optimization, simulation, and machine learning applications, thereby leading to optimum utilization costs and highly efficient operations in various end-use industries.

Cloud-based deployment to witness the highest growth in Quantum Computing market in coming years

With the development of highly powerful systems, the demand for cloud-based deployment of quantum computing systems and services is expected to increase. This, in turn, is expected to result in a significant revenue source for service providers, with users paying for access to noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) systems that can solve real-world problems. The limited lifespan of rapidly advancing quantum computing systems also favors cloud service providers. The flexibility of access offered to users is another factor fueling the adoption of cloud-based deployment of quantum computing systems and services. For the foreseeable future, quantum computers are expected not to be portable. Cloud can provide users with access to different devices and simulators from their laptops.

Optimization accounted for a major share of the overall Quantum Computing market

Optimization is the largest application for quantum computing and accounted for a major share of the overall Quantum Computing market. Companies such as D-Wave Systems, Cambridge Quantum Computing, QC Ware, and 1QB Information Technologies are developing quantum computing systems for optimization applications. Networked Quantum Information Technologies Hub (NQIT) is expanding to incorporate optimization solutions for resolving problems faced by the practical applications of quantum computing technology.

Trapped ions segment to witness highest CAGR of Quantum Computing market during the forecast period

The trapped ions segment of the market is projected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period as quantum computing systems based on trapped ions offer more stability and better connectivity than quantum computing systems based on other technologies. IonQ, Alpine Quantum Technologies, and Honeywell are a few companies that use trapped ions technology in their quantum computing systems.

Banking and finance is attributed to hold major share of Quantum Computing market during the forecast period

In the banking and finance end-use industry, quantum computing is used for risk modeling and trading applications. It is also used to detect the market instabilities by identifying stock market risks and optimize the trading trajectories, portfolios, and asset pricing and hedging. As the financial sector is difficult to understand; the quantum computing approach is expected to help users understand the complexities of the banking and finance end-use industry. Moreover, it can help traders by suggesting them solutions to overcome financial challenges.

APAC to witness highest growth of Quantum Computing market during the forecast period

APAC region is a leading hub for several industries, including healthcare and pharmaceuticals, banking and finance, and chemicals. Countries such as China, Japan, and South Korea are the leading manufacturers of consumer electronics, including smartphones, laptops, and gaming consoles, in APAC. There is a requirement to resolve complications in optimization, simulation, and machine learning applications across these industries. The large-scale development witnessed by emerging economies of APAC and the increased use of advanced technologies in the manufacturing sector are contributing to the development of large and medium enterprises in the region. This, in turn, is fueling the demand for quantum computing services and systems in APAC.

Key Topics Covered:

1 Introduction

2 Research Methodology

3 Executive Summary

4 Premium Insights4.1 Attractive Opportunities in Quantum Computing Market4.2 Market, by Offering4.3 Market, by Deployment4.4 Market in APAC, by Application and Country4.5 Market, by Technology4.6 Quantum Computing Market, by End-use Industry4.7 Market, by Region

5 Market Overview5.1 Introduction5.2 Market Dynamics5.2.1 Drivers5.2.1.1 Early Adoption of Quantum Computing in Banking and Finance Industry5.2.1.2 Rise in Investments in Quantum Computing Technology5.2.1.3 Surge in Number of Strategic Partnerships and Collaborations to Carry Out Advancements in Quantum Computing Technology5.2.2 Restraints5.2.2.1 Stability and Error Correction Issues5.2.3 Opportunities5.2.3.1 Technological Advancements in Quantum Computing5.2.3.2 Surge in Adoption of Quantum Computing Technology for Drug Discovery5.2.4 Challenges5.2.4.1 Dearth of Highly Skilled Professionals5.2.4.2 Physical Challenges Related to Use of Quantum Computers5.3 Value Chain Analysis5.4 Ecosystem5.5 Porter's Five Forces Analysis5.6 Pricing Analysis5.7 Impact of COVID-19 on Quantum Computing Market5.7.1 Pre-COVID-195.7.2 Post-COVID-195.8 Trade Analysis5.9 Tariff and Regulatory Standards5.9.1 Regulatory Standards5.9.1.1 P1913 - Software-Defined Quantum Communication5.9.1.2 P7130 - Standard for Quantum Technologies Definitions5.9.1.3 P7131 - Standard for Quantum Computing Performance Metrics and Benchmarking5.10 Technology Analysis5.11 Patent Analysis5.12 Case Studies

6 Quantum Computing Market, by Offering6.1 Introduction6.2 Systems6.2.1 Deployment of on Premises Quantum Computers at Sites of Clients6.3 Services6.3.1 Quantum Computing as a Service (QCaaS)6.3.1.1 Risen Number of Companies Offering QCaaS Owing to Increasing Demand for Cloud-Based Systems and Services6.3.2 Consulting Services6.3.2.1 Consulting Services Provide Customized Roadmaps to Clients to Help Them in Adoption of Quantum Computing Technology

7 Quantum Computing Market, by Deployment7.1 Introduction7.2 on Premises7.2.1 Deployment of on Premises Quantum Computers by Organizations to Ensure Data Security7.3 Cloud-based7.3.1 High Costs and Deep Complexity of Quantum Computing Systems and Services Drive Enterprises Toward Cloud Deployments

8 Quantum Computing Market, by Application8.1 Introduction8.2 Optimization8.2.1 Optimization Using Quantum Computing Technology Resolves Problems in Real-World Settings8.3 Machine Learning8.3.1 Risen Use of Machine Learning in Various End-use Industries8.4 Simulation8.4.1 Simulation Helps Scientists Gain Improved Understanding of Molecule and Sub-Molecule Level Interactions8.5 Others

9 Quantum Computing Market, by Technology9.1 Introduction9.2 Superconducting Qubits9.2.1 Existence of Superconducting Qubits in Series of Quantized Energy States9.3 Trapped Ions9.3.1 Surged Use of Trapped Ions Technology in Quantum Computers9.4 Quantum Annealing9.4.1 Risen Use of Quantum Annealing Technology for Solving Optimization Problems in Enterprises9.5 Others (Topological and Photonic)

10 Quantum Computing Market, by End-use Industry10.1 Introduction10.2 Space and Defense10.2.1 Risen Use of Quantum Computing in Space and Defense Industry to Perform Multiple Operations Simultaneously10.3 Banking and Finance10.3.1 Simulation Offers Assistance for Investment Risk Analysis and Decision-Making Process in Banking and Finance Industry10.4 Healthcare and Pharmaceuticals10.4.1 Surged Demand for Robust and Agile Computing Technology for Drug Simulation in Efficient and Timely Manner10.5 Energy and Power10.5.1 Increased Requirement to Develop New Energy Sources and Optimize Energy Delivery Process10.6 Chemicals10.6.1 Establishment of North America and Europe as Lucrative Markets for Chemicals10.7 Transportation and Logistics10.7.1 Surged Use of Quantum-Inspired Approaches to Optimize Traffic Flow10.8 Government10.8.1 Increased Number of Opportunities to Use Quantum Computing to Solve Practical Problems of Climate Change, Traffic Management, Etc.10.9 Academia10.9.1 Risen Number of Integrated Fundamental Quantum Information Science Research Activities to Fuel Market Growth

11 Geographic Analysis11.1 Introduction11.2 North America11.3 Europe11.4 APAC11.5 RoW

12 Competitive Landscape12.1 Introduction12.2 Revenue Analysis of Top Players12.3 Market Share Analysis, 201912.4 Ranking Analysis of Key Players in Market12.5 Company Evaluation Quadrant12.5.1 Quantum Computing Market12.5.1.1 Star12.5.1.2 Emerging Leader12.5.1.3 Pervasive12.5.1.4 Participant12.5.2 Startup/SME Evaluation Matrix12.5.2.1 Progressive Company12.5.2.2 Responsive Company12.5.2.3 Dynamic Company12.5.2.4 Starting Block12.6 Competitive Scenario12.7 Competitive Situations and Trends12.7.1 Other Strategies

13 Company Profiles13.1 Key Players13.1.1 International Business Machines (IBM)13.1.2 D-Wave Systems13.1.3 Microsoft13.1.4 Amazon13.1.5 Rigetti Computing13.1.6 Google13.1.7 Intel13.1.8 Toshiba13.1.9 Honeywell International13.1.10 QC Ware13.1.11 1QB Information Technologies13.1.12 Cambridge Quantum Computing13.20 Other Companies13.2.1 Huawei Technologies13.2.2 Bosch13.2.3 NEC13.2.4 Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HP)13.2.5 Nippon Telegraph and Telephone Corporation (NTT)13.2.6 Hitachi13.2.7 Northrop Grumman13.2.8 Accenture13.2.9 Fujitsu13.2.10 Quantica Computacao13.2.11 Zapata Computing13.2.12 Xanadu13.2.13 IonQ13.2.14 Riverlane13.2.15 Quantum Circuits13.2.16 EvolutionQ13.2.17 ABDProf13.2.18 Anyon Systems

14 Appendix14.1 Discussion Guide14.2 Knowledge Store: The Subscription Portal14.3 Available Customizations

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/8pglda

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The Worldwide Quantum Computing Industry is Expected to Reach $1.7 Billion by 2026 - PRNewswire

Light and a Single Electron Used to Detect Quantum Information Stored in 100,000 Nuclear Quantum Bits – SciTechDaily

Researchers have found a way to use light and a single electron to communicate with a cloud of quantum bits and sense their behavior, making it possible to detect a single quantum bit in a dense cloud.

The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, were able to inject a needle of highly fragile quantum information in a haystack of 100,000 nuclei. Using lasers to control an electron, the researchers could then use that electron to control the behavior of the haystack, making it easier to find the needle. They were able to detect the needle with a precision of 1.9 parts per million: high enough to detect a single quantum bit in this large ensemble.

The technique makes it possible to send highly fragile quantum information optically to a nuclear system for storage, and to verify its imprint with minimal disturbance, an important step in the development of a quantum internet based on quantum light sources. The results are reported in the journalNature Physics.

The first quantum computers which will harness the strange behavior of subatomic particles to far outperform even the most powerful supercomputers are on the horizon. However, leveraging their full potential will require a way to network them: a quantum internet. Channels of light that transmit quantum information are promising candidates for a quantum internet, and currently there is no better quantum light source than the semiconductor quantum dot: tiny crystals that are essentially artificial atoms.

However, one thing stands in the way of quantum dots and a quantum internet: the ability to store quantum information temporarily at staging posts along the network.

The solution to this problem is to store the fragile quantum information by hiding it in the cloud of 100,000 atomic nuclei that each quantum dot contains, like a needle in a haystack, said Professor Mete Atatre from Cambridges Cavendish Laboratory, who led the research. But if we try to communicate with these nuclei like we communicate with bits, they tend to flip randomly, creating a noisy system.

The cloud of quantum bits contained in a quantum dot dont normally act in a collective state, making it a challenge to get information in or out of them. However, Atatre and his colleagues showed in 2019 that when cooled to ultra-low temperatures also using light, these nuclei can be made to do quantum dances in unison, significantly reducing the amount of noise in the system.

Now, they have shown another fundamental step towards storing and retrieving quantum information in the nuclei. By controlling the collective state of the 100,000 nuclei, they were able to detect the existence of the quantum information as a flipped quantum bit at an ultra-high precision of 1.9 parts per million: enough to see a single bit flip in the cloud of nuclei.

Technically this is extremely demanding, said Atatre, who is also a Fellow of St Johns College. We dont have a way of talking to the cloud and the cloud doesnt have a way of talking to us. But what we can talk to is an electron: we can communicate with it sort of like a dog that herds sheep.

Using the light from a laser, the researchers are able to communicate with an electron, which then communicates with the spins, or inherent angular momentum, of the nuclei.

By talking to the electron, the chaotic ensemble of spins starts to cool down and rally around the shepherding electron; out of this more ordered state, the electron can create spin waves in the nuclei.

If we imagine our cloud of spins as a herd of 100,000 sheep moving randomly, one sheep suddenly changing direction is hard to see, said Atatre. But if the entire herd is moving as a well-defined wave, then a single sheep changing direction becomes highly noticeable.

In other words, injecting a spin wave made of a single nuclear spin flip into the ensemble makes it easier to detect a single nuclear spin flip among 100,000 nuclear spins.

Using this technique, the researchers are able to send information to the quantum bit and listen in on what the spins are saying with minimal disturbance, down to the fundamental limit set by quantum mechanics.

Having harnessed this control and sensing capability over this large ensemble of nuclei, our next step will be to demonstrate the storage and retrieval of an arbitrary quantum bit from the nuclear spin register, said co-first author Daniel Jackson, a PhD student at the Cavendish Laboratory.

This step will complete a quantum memory connected to light a major building block on the road to realising the quantum internet, said co-first author Dorian Gangloff, a Research Fellow at St Johns College.

Besides its potential usage for a future quantum internet, the technique could also be useful in the development of solid-state quantum computing.

Reference: Quantum sensing of a coherent single spin excitation in a nuclear ensemble by D. M. Jackson, D. A. Gangloff, J. H. Bodey, L. Zaporski, C. Bachorz, E. Clarke, M. Hugues, C. Le Gall and M. Atatre, 15 February 2021, Nature Physics.DOI: 10.1038/s41567-020-01161-4

The research was supported in part by the European Research Council (ERC), the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and the Royal Society.

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Light and a Single Electron Used to Detect Quantum Information Stored in 100,000 Nuclear Quantum Bits - SciTechDaily

Kangaroo Court: Quantum Computing Thinking on the Future – JD Supra

The promise of quantum computers is that certain computational tasks might be executed exponentially faster on a quantum processor than on a classical processor.

Quantum computing is a beautiful fusion of quantum physics with computer science. It incorporates some of the most stunning ideas of physics from the twentieth century into an entirely new way of thinking about computation. Quantum computers have the potential to resolve problems of a high complexity and magnitude across many different industries and application, including finance, transportation, chemicals, and cybersecurity. Solving the impossible in a few hours of computing time.

Quantum computing is often in the news: China teleported a qubit from earth to a satellite; Shors algorithm has put our current encryption methods at risk; quantum key distribution will make encryption safe again; Grovers algorithm will speed up data searches. But what does all this really mean? How does it all work?

Todays computers operate in a very straightforward fashion: they manipulate a limited set of data with an algorithm and give you an answer. Quantum computers are more complicated. After multiple units of data are input into qubits, the qubits are manipulated to interact with other qubits, allowing for several calculations to be done simultaneously. Thats where quantum computers are a lot faster than todays machines.

Quantum computers have four fundamental capabilities that differentiate them from todays classical computers:

All computations involve inputting data, manipulating it according to certain rules, and then outputting the final answer. For classical computations, the bit is the basic unit of data. For quantum computation, this unit is the quantum bit usually shortened to qubit.

The basic unit of quantum computing is a qubit. A classical bit is either 0 or 1. If its 0 and we measure it, we get 0. If its 1 and we measure 1, we get 1. In both cases the bit remains unchanged. The standard example is an electrical switch that can be either on or off. The situation is totally different for qubits. Qubits are volatile. A qubit can be in one of an infinite number of states a superposition of both 0 and 1 but when we measure it, as in the classical case, we just get one of two values, either 0 or 1. Qubits can also become entangled. In fact, the act of measurement changes the qubit. When we make a measurement of one of them, it affects the state of the other. Whats more, they interact with other qubits. In fact, these interactions are what make it possible to conduct multiple calculations at once.

Nobody really knows quite how or why entanglement works. It even baffled Einstein, who famously described it as spooky action at a distance. But its key to the power of quantum computers. In a conventional computer, doubling the number of bits doubles its processing power. But thanks to entanglement, adding extra qubits to a quantum machine produces an exponential increase in its number-crunching ability.

These three things superposition, measurement, and entanglement are the key quantum mechanical ideas. Controlling these interactions, however, is very complicated. The volatility of qubits can cause inputs to be lost or altered, which can throw off the accuracy of results. And creating a computer of meaningful scale would require hundreds of thousands of millions of qubits to be connected coherently. The few quantum computers that exist today can handle nowhere near that number. But the good news is were getting very, very close.

Quantum computing and classical computer are not two distinct disciplines. Quantum computing is the more fundamental form of computing anything that can be computed classically can be computed on a quantum computer. The qubit is the basic unit of computation, not the bit. Computation, in its essence, really means quantum computing. A qubit can be represented by the spin of an electron or the polarization of a photon.

In 2019 Google achieved a level of quantum supremacy when they reported the use of a processor with programmable superconducting qubits to create quantum states on 54 qubits, corresponding to a computational state-space of dimension 253(about 1016). This incredible achievement was slightly short of their mission goal for creating quantum states of 72 qubits. What is so special about this number? Classical computers can simulate quantum computers if the quantum computer doesnt have too many qubits, but as the number of qubits increases we reach the point where that is no longer possible.

There are 8 possible three-bit combinations: 000,001, 010, 011, 100, 101, 110, 111. The number 8 comes from 23. There are two choices for the first bit, two for the second and two for the third, and we might multiple these three 2s together. If instead of bits we switch to qubits, each of these 8 three-bit strings is associated with a basis vector, so the vector space is 8-dimensional. If we have 72 qubits, the number of basis elements is 2. This is about 4,000,000,000,000,000,000,000. It is a large number and is considered to be the point at which classical computers cannot simulate quantum computers. Once quantum computers have more than 72 or so qubits we truly enter the age of quantum supremacy when quantum computers can do computations that are beyond the ability of any classical computer.

To provide a little more perspective, lets consider a machine with 300 qubits. This doesnt seem an unreasonable number of the not too distant future. But 2300 is an enormous number. Its more than the number of elementary particles in the known universe. A computation using 300 qubits would be working with 2300 basis elements.

Some calculations required for the effective simulation of real-life scenarios are simply beyond the capability of classical computers whats known as intractable problems. Quantum computers, with their huge computational power, are ideally suited to solving these problems. Indeed, some problems, like factoring, are hard on a classical computer, but are easy on a quantum computer. This creates a world of opportunities, across almost every aspect of modern life.

Healthcare: classical computers are limited in terms of size and complexity of molecules they can simulate and compare (an essential process of early drug development). Quantum computers will allow much larger molecules to be simulated. At the same time, researchers will be able to model and simulate interactions between drugs and all 20,000+ proteins encoded in the human genome, leading to greater advancements in pharmacology.

Finance: one potential application is algorithmic trading using complex algorithms to automatically trigger share dealings based on a wide variety of market variables. The advantages, especially for high-volume transactions, are significant. Another application is fraud detection. Like diagnostics in healthcare, fraud detection is reliant upon pattern recognition. Quantum computers could deliver a significant improvement in machine learning capabilities; dramatically reducing the time taken to train a neural network and improving the detection rate.

Logistics: Improved data analysis and modelling will enable a wide range of industries to optimize workflows associated with transport, logistics and supply-chain management. The calculation and recalculation of optimal routes could impact on applications as diverse as traffic management, fleet operations, air traffic control, freight and distribution.

It is, of course, impossible to predict the long-term impact of quantum computing with any accuracy. Quantum computing is now in its infancy, and the comparison to the first computers seems apt. The machines that have been constructed so far tend to be large and not very powerful, and they often involve superconductors that need cooled to extremely low temperatures. To minimize the interaction of quantum computers with the environment, they are always protected from light and heat. They are shieled against electromagnetic radiation, and they are cooled. One thing that can happen in cold places is that certain materials become superconductors they lose all electrical resistance and superconductors have quantum properties that can be exploited.

Many countries are experimenting with small quantum networks using optic fiber. There is the potential of connecting these via satellite and being able to form a worldwide quantum network. This work is of great interest to financial institutions. One early impressive result involves a Chinese satellite that is devoted to quantum experiments. Its named Micius after a Chinese philosopher who did work in optics. A team in China connected to a team in Austria the first time that intercontinental quantum key distribution (QKD) had been achieved. Once the connection was secured, the teams sent pictures to one another. The Chinese team sent the Austrians a picture of Micius, and the Austrians sent a picture of Schrodinger to the Chinese.

To actually make practical quantum computers you need to solve a number of problems, the most serious being decoherence the problem of your qubit interacting with something from the environment that is not part of the computation. You need to set a qubit to an initial state and keep it in that state until you need to use it. Their quantum state is extremely fragile. The slightest vibration or change in temperature disturbances known as noise in quantum-speak can cause them to tumble out of superposition before their job has been properly done. Thats why researchers are doing the best to protect qubits from the outside world in supercooled fridges and vacuum chambers.

Alan Turing is one of the fathers of the theory of computation. In his landmark paper of 1936 he carefully thought about computation. He considered what humans did as they performed computations and broke it down to its most elemental level. He showed that a simple theoretical machine, which we now call a Turing machine, could carry out any algorithm. But remember, Turing was analyzing computation based on what humans do. With quantum computation the focus changes from how humans compute to how the universe computes. Therefore, we should think of quantum computation as not a new type of computation but as the discovery of the true nature of computation.

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Kangaroo Court: Quantum Computing Thinking on the Future - JD Supra

The global quantum computing race has begun. What will it take to win it? – ZDNet

The UK is now facing a huge challenge: after having secured a top spot in the quantum race, retaining the country's status is going to require some serious stepping up.

National quantum programs and decade-long quantum strategies are increasingly being announced by governments around the world. And as countries unlock billions-worth of budgets, it is becoming clear that a furious competition is gradually unrolling. Nations want to make sure that they are the place-to-be when quantum technologies start showing some real-world value and the UK, for one, is keen to prove that it is a quantum hotspot in the making.

"We have a very successful program that is widely admired and emulated around the world," said Peter Knight, who sits on the strategic advisory for the UK's national quantum technology program (NQTP), as he provided a virtual update on the NQTP's performance so far.

Speaking at an online conference last month, Knight seemed confident. The UK, said the expert, in line with the objectives laid out in the program, is on track to become "the go-to place" for new quantum companies to start, and for established businesses to base all manners of innovative quantum activities.

SEE: Hiring Kit: Computer Hardware Engineer (TechRepublic Premium)

The UK is just over halfway through the NQTP, which saw its second five-year phase kick off at the end of 2019, and at the same timehit an impressive milestone of 1 billion ($1.37 billion) combined investment. This, the government claims, is letting the UK keep pace with competitors who are also taking interest in quantum namely, the US and China.

There is no doubt that the country has made strides in the field of quantum since the start of the NQTP. New ground-breaking research papers are popping up on a regular basis, and so are news reports of rounds of funding from promising quantum startups.

But with still just under half of the national quantum program to carry out, and despite the huge sums already invested, the UK is now facing a bigger challenge yet: after having chased a top spot in the quantum race, retaining the country's status in the face of ferocious competition is going to require some serious stepping up.

Clearly playing in favor of the UK is the country's early involvement in the field. The NQTP was announced as early as 2013, and started operating in 2014, with an initial 270 million ($370 million) budget. The vision laid out in the program includes creating a "quantum-enabled economy", in which the technology would significantly contribute to the UK's economy and attract both strong investment and global talent.

"The national program was one of the first to kick off," Andrew Fearnside, senior associate specializing in quantum technologies at intellectual property firm Mewburn Ellis, tells ZDNet. "There are increasingly more national programs emerging in other countries, but they are a good few years behind us. The fact that there has been this sustained and productive long-term government initiative is definitely attractive."

The EU's Quantum Technologies Flagship, in effect,only launched in 2018; some countries within the bloc,like France, started their own quantum roadmaps on top of the European initiative even later. Similarly, the National Quantum Initiative Act wassigned into law by the Trump administration but that was also in 2018, years into the UK's national quantum technology program.

Since it launched in 2014, there has been abundant evidence of the academic successes of the initial phase of the NQTP. In Birmingham, the Quantum Sensing Hub is developing new types of quantum-based magnetic sensors that could help diagnose brain and heart conditions, while the Quantum Metrology Institute leads the development of quantum atomic clocks. There are up to 160 research groups and universities registered across the UK withprograms that are linked to quantum technologies, working on projects ranging from the design of quantum algorithms to the creation of new standards and verification methods.

A much harder challenge, however, is to transform this strong scientific foundation into business value and as soon as the UK government announced the second phase of the NQTP at the end of 2019,a clear messageemerged: quantum technology needed to come out of the lab, thanks to increased private sector investment that would accelerate commercialization.

Some key initiatives followed. A national quantum computing center was established for academics to work alongside commercial partners such as financial services company Standard Chartered, "possibly with an eye on financial optimization problems," notes Fearnside, given the business'established interest in leveraging quantum technologies. A 10 million ($13 million) "Discovery" program alsolaunched a few months ago, bringing together five quantum computing companies, three universities and the UK's national physical laboratory all for the purpose of making quantum work for businesses.

The government's efforts have been, to an extent, rewarded. The quantum startup ecosystem is thriving in the UK, with companies like Riverlane or Cambridge Quantum Computing completing strong rounds of private financing. In total, up to 204 quantum-related businesses have been listed so far in the country.

But despite these encouraging results, the UK is still faced with a big problem. Bringing university-born innovation to the real worldhas always been a national challenge, and quantum is no exception. A 2018 report from the Science and Technology committee, in fact,gave an early warning of the stumbling blocksthat the NQTP might run into, and stressed the need for improved awareness across industry of the potential of quantum technologies.

The committee urged the government to start conveying the near-term benefits that quantum could provide to businesses something that according to the report, CEOs and company chairs in North America worryingly seem to realize a whole lot better.

It's been three years since the report was published, and things haven't changed much. Speaking at the same forum as the NQTP's Peter Knight, Ian West, a partner at consultancy firm KPMG, said that there remained a huge barrier to the widespread take-up of quantum technologies in the UK. "Some of our clients feel they don't understand the technology, or feel it's one for the academics only," he argued.

"We need that demand from businesses who will be the ultimate users of quantum technologies, to encourage more investment," West added. "We need to do much more to explain the near-term and medium-term use cases for business applications of quantum technologies."

SEE: BMW explores quantum computing to boost supply chain efficiencies

Without sufficient understanding of the technology, funding problems inevitably come. The difficulty of securing private money for quantum stands in stark contrast to the situation across the Atlantic, where investors have historically done a better job of spotting and growing successful technology companies. Add the deep pockets of tech giants such as Google, IBM or Microsoft, which are all pouring money into quantum research, and it is easy to see why North America might have better prospects when it comes to winning the quantum game.

In the worst of cases, this has led to US technology hubs hoovering up some of the best quantum brains in the UK. In 2019, for example, PsiQ, a promising startup that was founded at the University of Bristol with the objective of producing a commercial quantum computer, re-located to Silicon Valley. The movewas reported to be partly motivated by a lack of access to capital in Europe. It was a smart decision: according to the company's latest update, PsiQ hasnow raised $215 million (156 million) in VC funding.

Pointing to the example of PsiQ, Simon King, partner and deep tech investor at VC firm Octopus Ventures, explains that to compete against the US, the UK needs to up its game when it comes to assessing the startups that show promise, and making sure that they are injected with adequate cash.

"The US remains the biggest competitor, with a big concentration of universities and academics and the pedigree and culture of commercializing university research," King tells ZDNet. "Things are definitely moving in the right direction, but the UK and Europe still lag behind the US, where there is a deeper pool of capital and there are more investors willing to invest in game-changing, but long-term technology like quantum."

US-based private investors are only likely to increase funding for the quantum ecosystem in the coming years, and significant amounts of public money will be backing the technology too. The National Quantum Initiative Act that was signed in 2018 came with $1.2 billion (870 million) to be invested in quantum information science over the next five years; as more quantum companies flourish, the budget can be expected to expand even further.

Competition will be coming from other parts of the world as well. In addition to the European Commission's 1 billion ($1.20 billion) quantum flagship, EU countries are also spending liberally on the technology. Germany, in particular, has launched a 2 billion ($2.4 billion) funding program for the promotion of quantum technologies in the country, surpassing by far many of its competitors; but France, the Netherlands, and Switzerland are all increasingly trying to establish themselves as hubs for quantum startups and researchers.

SEE: Less is more: IBM achieves quantum computing simulation for new materials with fewer qubits

Little data is available to measure the scope of the commercialization of quantum technology in China, but the country has made no secret of its desire to secure a spot in the quantum race, too. The Chinese government has ramped up its spending on research and development, and the impact of that investment has already shown in the countryachieving some significant scientific breakthroughs in the field.

In the midst of this ever-more competitive landscape, whether the UK can effectively distinguish itself as the "go-to place" for quantum technologies remains to be seen. One thing is for certain: the country has laid some very strong groundwork to compete. "The UK has some genuinely world-class universities with some really brilliant academics, so while the objective is certainly ambitious, it's not out of the question," argues King.

But even top-notch researchers and some of the most exciting quantum startups might not cut it. The UK has positioned itself well from an early stage in the quantum race, but becoming a frontrunner was only one part of the job. Preserving the country's position for the coming years might prove to be the hardest challenge yet.

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The global quantum computing race has begun. What will it take to win it? - ZDNet

Quantum Computers May Steal Bitcoin by Deriving Private Keys once Advanced Enough in 5-30 Years, Experts Claim – Crowdfund Insider

John Smith, who has been regularly keeping up with computer science, quantum computing, and cryptocurrency-related developments, claims that the future of crypto is quantum-resistant, meaning we must build systems that can protect themselves against the potential attack from quantum computers (QCs) when they become powerful enough to present a challenge to digital asset networks.

While discussing what the future threat to Bitcoin (BTC) from Quantum Computing might be, and how big of a deal it really is, Smith claims that the threat is that quantum computers will eventually be able to break Bitcoins current digital signatures, which could render the network insecure and cause it to lose value.

He goes on to question why there isnt already a solution as trivial as simply upgrading the signatures? He explains that this might not be possible due to the decentralized nature of Bitcoin and other large crypto-asset networks such as Ethereum (ETH).

While discussing how long until someone actually develops a quantum computer that can steal BTC by quickly deriving private keys from their associated public keys, Smith reveals that serious estimates range somewhere from 5 to over 30 years, with the median expert opinion being around 15 years.

Smooth added:

Banks/govts/etc. will soon upgrade to quantum-resistant cryptography to secure themselves going forward. Bitcoin, however, with large financial incentives for attacking it and no central authority that can upgrade *for* users, faces a unique set of challenges.

Going on to mention the main challenges, Smith notes that we can separate vulnerable BTC into three classes, including lost coins (which are estimated to be several million), non-lost coins residing in reused/taproot/otherwise-vulnerable addresses, and coins in the mempool (i.e., being transacted).

Beginning with lost coins, why are they even an issue? Because its possible to steal a huge number all at once and then selling them in mass quantities which could tank the entire crypto market. He added that if that seems imminent, the market could preemptively tank. He also mentioned that an attacker may profit greatly by provoking either of the above and shorting BTC.

While proposing potential solutions, Smith suggests preemptively burning lost coins via soft fork (or backwards compatible upgrade). He clarifies that just how well this works will depend on:

He further noted:

Another potential way around the problem of millions of lost BTC is if a benevolent party were to steal & then altruistically burn them. Not clear how realistic this is, given the financial incentives involved & who the parties likely to have this capability would be.

He added:

Moving on why are non-lost coins with vulnerable public keys an issue? This is self-evident. The primary threat to the wealth of BTC holders is their BTC being stolen. And as with lost coins, a related threat is that the market starts to fear such an attack is possible.

He also mentioned that another solution could be that Bitcoin adds a quantum-resistant signature and holders proactively migrate. He points out that how well this all works will depend on:

While discussing the vulnerability of coins in the mempool, Smith mentioned that it could complicate migration to quantum-resistant addresses *after* large QCs are built or it could greatly magnify the threat posed by an unanticipated black swan advance in QC.

While proposing other solutions, Smith noted:

A commit-reveal tx scheme can be used to migrate coins without mempool security. This gets around the vulnerability of a users old public key by adding an extra encryption/decryption step based on their new quantum-resistant key but w/ crucial limitations.

He added:

Considerations w/ commit-reveal migration [are that] its not foolproof unless a user starts with their coins stored in a non-vulnerable address, because attackers can steal any vulnerable coins simply by beating the original owner to the punch.

Considerations with commit-reveal migration are also that commit transactions introduce technical hurdles (vs. regular txs) & increase the load on the network. Neither of these are insurmountable by any means, but they suggest that this method should not be relied upon too heavily, Smith claims.

He also noted that how well the commit-reveal transaction type works will depend on:

He added:

One potential way around the network overhead & just plain hassle of commit-reveal migration would be if a highly efficient quantum-resistant zero-knowledge proof were discovered. Current QR ZK algorithms are far too large to use in Bitcoin, but that could change. Worth noting.

While sharing other potential solutions, Smith noted that theres the tank the attack & rebuild.

He pointed out that Bitcoins network effects are massive, so it is challenging to accurately estimate or predict what the crypto ecosystem will look like in the future, but the potential economic disruption of BTC failing may incentivize extraordinary measures to save the network.

He added:

Bitcoins ability to tank a quantum-computing-related market crash will depend on [whether theres] another chain capable of replacing BTC as the main crypto store of value [and whether] BTC [can] avoid a mining death spiral? Also, how far will stakeholders go to ensure the network survives & rebounds?

Smith also mentioned that for people or institutions holding Bitcoin, some good measures may be purchasing insurance, and/or hedging BTC exposure with an asset that would be expected to increase in value in the case of an attack.

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Quantum Computers May Steal Bitcoin by Deriving Private Keys once Advanced Enough in 5-30 Years, Experts Claim - Crowdfund Insider

Danna Freedman to Discuss Applications of Quantum Technology at AAAS Annual Meeting, Feb. 8-11 – HPCwire

Feb. 9, 2021 Northwestern Universitys Danna Freedman will share novel insights on quantum chemistrys ability to unlock access to molecules and open new fields of study at the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) annual meeting.

Freedman is a founding member of Q-NEXT, a transformative 100-person cross-institutional Department of Energy National Quantum Information Science Research Center at the Argonne National Laboratory.

Freedmans research approaches quantum systems from the bottom up rather than building quantum bits from the same components as everyday electronics will enable the creation of next-generation quantum technology.

Molecular chemistry enables a new paradigm for creating quantum information systems from the ground up, Freedman said. Molecules enable the construction of complex architectures by conferring structural precision and reproducibility.

Freedman will discuss this work in her presentation Molecular Quantum Information Technology: A New Way to Access Quantum Computers during a group scientific session called Designer Molecules: Understanding and Utilizing Their Quantum Nature.

Participants can register for the virtual 2021 AAAS Annual Meeting, which will take place Feb. 8 to 11, here.

Freedman, a professor of chemistry in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences at Northwestern, applies synthetic inorganic chemistry to overcome fundamental obstacles in physics and energy research.

Molecules are critical to our understanding of some of sciences most fundamental questions such as the Big Bang, star formation and access to quantum computing techniques. However, researchers have long considered molecules as too complex to study effectively.

Freedmans research challenges this assumption and paves the way for new understandings of molecules in ways that previously seemed impossible. Her cross-disciplinary team chemically synthesizes molecules that encode quantum information into their magnetic, or spin, states.

Source: NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY

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Danna Freedman to Discuss Applications of Quantum Technology at AAAS Annual Meeting, Feb. 8-11 - HPCwire

The Quantum Computing market is expected to grow from USD 472 million in 2021 to USD 1,765 million by 2026, at a CAGR of 30.2% – Yahoo Finance

The early adoption of quantum computing in the banking and finance sector is expected to fuel the growth of the market globally. Other key factors contributing to the growth of the quantum computing market include rising investments by governments of different countries to carry out research and development activities related to quantum computing technology.

New York, Feb. 10, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report "Quantum Computing Market with COVID-19 impact by Offering, Deployment, Application, Technology, End-use Industry and Region - Global Forecast to 2026" - https://www.reportlinker.com/p05064748/?utm_source=GNW Several companies are focusing on the adoption of QCaaS post-COVID-19. This, in turn, is expected to contribute to the growth of the quantum computing market. However, stability and error correction issues is expected to restrain the growth of the market.

Services segment is attributed to hold the largest share of the Quantum Computing marketThe growth of services segment can be attributed to the increasing number of startups across the world that are investing in research and development activities related to quantum computing technology. This technology is used in optimization, simulation, and machine learning applications, thereby leading to optimum utilization costs and highly efficient operations in various end-use industries.

Cloud based deployment to witness the highest growth in Quantum Computing market in coming yearsWith the development of highly powerful systems, the demand for cloud-based deployment of quantum computing systems and services is expected to increase.This, in turn, is expected to result in a significant revenue source for service providers, with users paying for access to noisy intermediate-scale quantum (NISQ) systems that can solve real-world problems.

The limited lifespan of rapidly advancing quantum computing systems also favors cloud service providers.The flexibility of access offered to users is another factor fueling the adoption of cloud-based deployment of quantum computing systems and services.

For the foreseeable future, quantum computers are expected not to be portable. Cloud can provide users with access to different devices and simulators from their laptops.

Optimization accounted for a major share of the overall Quantum Computing marketOptimization is the largest application for quantum computing and accounted for a major share of the overall Quantum Computing market.Companies such as D-Wave Systems, Cambridge Quantum Computing, QC Ware, and 1QB Information Technologies are developing quantum computing systems for optimization applications.

Networked Quantum Information Technologies Hub (NQIT) is expanding to incorporate optimization solutions for resolving problems faced by the practical applications of quantum computing technology.

Trapped ions segment to witness highest CAGR of Quantum Computing market during the forecast periodThe trapped ions segment of the market is projected to grow at the highest CAGR during the forecast period as quantum computing systems based on trapped ions offer more stability and better connectivity than quantum computing systems based on other technologies. IonQ, Alpine Quantum Technologies, and Honeywell are a few companies that use trapped ions technology in their quantum computing systems.

Banking and finance is attributed to hold major share of Quantum Computing market during the forecast periodIn the banking and finance end-use industry, quantum computing is used for risk modeling and trading applications.It is also used to detect the market instabilities by identifying stock market risks and optimize the trading trajectories, portfolios, and asset pricing and hedging.

As the financial sector is difficult to understand; the quantum computing approach is expected to help users understand the complexities of the banking and finance end-use industry. Moreover, it can help traders by suggesting them solutions to overcome financial challenges.

APAC to witness highest growth of Quantum Computing market during the forecast periodAPAC region is a leading hub for several industries, including healthcare and pharmaceuticals, banking and finance, and chemicals.Countries such as China, Japan, and South Korea are the leading manufacturers of consumer electronics, including smartphones, laptops, and gaming consoles, in APAC.

There is a requirement to resolve complications in optimization, simulation, and machine learning applications across these industries.The large-scale development witnessed by emerging economies of APAC and the increased use of advanced technologies in the manufacturing sector are contributing to the development of large and medium enterprises in the region.

This, in turn, is fueling the demand for quantum computing services and systems in APAC.In APAC, the investments look promising, as most countries such as China, Japan, and South Korea have successfully contained the virus compared with the US and European countries.China is easing the restrictions placed on factory lockdowns and worker movement.

Despite being the epicenter of COVID-19, China has maintained its dominant position as a global network leader.

The break-up of primary participants for the report has been shown below: By Company Type: Tier 1 - 18%, Tier 2 - 22%, and Tier 3 - 60% By Designation: C-level Executives - 21%, Manager Level - 35%, and Others - 44% By Region: North America - 45%, Europe - 38%, APAC - 12%, and RoW - 5%

The Quantum Computing market was dominated by International Business Machines (US), D-Wave Systems (Canada), Microsoft (US), Amazon (US), and Rigetti Computing (US).

Research Coverage:This research report categorizes the Quantum Computing based on offering, deployment, application, technology, end-use industry and region. The report describes the major drivers, restraints, challenges, and opportunities pertaining to the Quantum Computing market and forecasts the same till 2026.

Key Benefits of Buying the Report

The report would help leaders/new entrants in this market in the following ways:1. This report segments the Quantum Computing market comprehensively and provides the closest market size projection for all subsegments across different regions.2. The report helps stakeholders understand the pulse of the market and provides them with information on key drivers, restraints, challenges, and opportunities for market growth.3. This report would help stakeholders understand their competitors better and gain more insights to improve their position in the business. The competitive landscape section includes product launches and developments, partnerships, and collaborations.4. This report would help understand the pre and post-COVID-19 scenarios as to how would the penetration of quantum computing will look like for the forecast period. The region segment includes the country wise impact analysis of COVID-19 and initiatives taken to overcome these impacts.

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05064748/?utm_source=GNW

About ReportlinkerReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need - instantly, in one place.

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The Quantum Computing market is expected to grow from USD 472 million in 2021 to USD 1,765 million by 2026, at a CAGR of 30.2% - Yahoo Finance

Quantum venture funding dipped 12% in 2020, but quantum investments rose 46% – VentureBeat

Sorting through the hype surrounding quantum computing these days isnt easy for enterprises trying to figure out the right time to jump in. Skeptics say any real impact is still years away, and yet quantum startups continue to seduce venture capitalists in search of the next big thing.

A new report from CB Insights may not resolve this debate, but it does add some interesting nuance. While the number of venture capital deals for quantum computing startups rose 46% to 37 in 2020 compared to 2019, the total amount raised in this sector fell 12% to $365 million.

Looking at just the number of deals, the annual tally has ticked up steadily from just 6 deals in 2015. As for the funding total, while it was down from $417 million in 2019, it remains well above the $73 million raised in 2015.

Theres a couple of conclusions to draw from this.

First, the number of startups being drawn into this space is clearly rising. As research has advanced, more entrepreneurs with the right technical chops feel the time is now to start building their startup.

Second, the average deal size for 2020 was just under $10 million. And if you include the $46 million IQM raised, that squeezes the average for most other deals down even further. That certainly demonstrates optimism, but its far from the kind of financial gusher or valuations that would indicate any kind of quantum bubble.

Finally, its important to remember that startups are likely a tiny slice of whats happening in quantum these days. A leading indicator? Perhaps.But a large part of the agenda is still being driven by tech giants who have massive resources to invest in a technology that may have a long horizon and could be years away from generating sufficient revenues. That includes Intel, IBM, Google, Microsoft, and Amazon.

Indeed, Amazon just rolled out a new blog dedicated to quantum computing.Last year, Amazon Web Services launched Amazon Braket, a product that lets enterprises start experimenting with quantum computing. Even so, AWS quantum computing director Simone Severini wrote in the inaugural blog post that business customers are still scratching their heads over the whole phenomenon.

We heard a recurring question, When will quantum computing reach its true potential? My answer was, I dont know.' she wrote. No one does. Its a difficult question because there are still fundamental scientific and engineering problems to be solved. The uncertainty makes this area so fascinating, but it also makes it difficult to plan. For some customers, thats a real issue. They want to know if and when they should focus on quantum computing, but struggle to get the facts, to discern the signal from all the noises.

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Quantum venture funding dipped 12% in 2020, but quantum investments rose 46% - VentureBeat

Microsoft Scientists Build Chip That Can Handle Thousands Of Qubits – Analytics India Magazine

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Scientists and engineers at the University of Sydney and Microsoft Corporation have developed a device that can handle thousands of qubits. To put things in perspective, the current state-of-the-art quantum computer can control only 50 qubits at a time.

Scaled-up quantum computers require control interfaces to manipulate or readout a large number of qubits, which usually operate at temperatures close to absolute zero (1 Kelvin or -273 degrees celsius).

The complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology has its limitations due to high thermodynamic dissipation, leading to heating of the fragile quantum bits. Overheating of quantum bits compromises its quantumness, the property of being in two states at the same time (also called superposition).

The current architecture uses multiple connections as every qubit is controlled by external circuitry with a separate electrical connection, generating a lot of heat.

The scientists from the University of Sydney built a CMOS interface between the qubits and the external circuitry, in such a way that the CMOS chip can generate control pulses for multiple qubits, with just four low-bandwidth wires, at 0.1 Kelvin, a temperature 30 times colder than deep space, with ultralow power dissipation.

The interface consists of four low-bandwidth wires at room temperature to provide input signals to the chip, which then configures 32 analogue circuit blocks to control the qubits that use dynamic voltage signals.

Analogue circuit boards use the low leakage of the transistors to generate dynamic voltage signals for manipulating qubits, consuming significantly less power.

Quantum computers are at a similar stage that classical computers were in their 40s when machines needed control rooms to function.

However, this chip, according to the scientists, is the most advanced integrated circuit ever built to operate at deep cryogenic temperatures.

The quantum computers that we have now are still lab prototypes and are not commercially relevant yet. Hence, this is definitely a big step towards building practical and commercially relevant quantum computers, said Mr Viraj Kulkarni, But I think that we are still far away from it.

This is because of the Error Correction. Any computing device always has errors in it and no electronic device can be completely perfect. There are various techniques that computers use to correct those errors.

Now the problem with quantum computing is that qubits are very fragile. Even a slight increase in temperature, vibrations, or even cosmic rays can make qubits lose their quantumness, and this introduces errors. So the key question of whether we can really control these errors is still relevant.

Nivedita Dey, research coordinator at Quantum Research and Development Labs, said the qubit noise is still a roadblock in developing quantum computers.

One of the biggest challenges in implementing a quantum circuit in this Noisy Intermediate Scale Quantum (NISQ) era is qubit noise, which causes hindrance in commercial availability of fault-tolerant full-scale quantum computers, said Ms Dey.

This approach can be well suited for practical quantum applications and might reduce the number of error-correcting qubits to be associated with noisy qubits, she added.

If quantum computing does prove to be commercially viable, it will open up completely new avenues.

A plane is not just faster than a car, it can also fly, said Mr Kulkarni, drawing an analogy between quantum computers and conventional computers. The idea is that quantum computers are not just faster, but at the same time will provide us with solutions that are better, especially in AI.

Hence, many applications in AI including complex mathematical equations, drug discovery by enabling chemical simulations, or building financial applications to come up with a better strategy will be solved in a faster and efficient way.

In the end its a tool, so any function a conventional computer can achieve, quantum computers will be able to do it faster and better.

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Microsoft Scientists Build Chip That Can Handle Thousands Of Qubits - Analytics India Magazine

A Swiss company claims it used quantum computers to find weakness in encryption – HT Tech

Security experts have long worried that advances in quantum computing could eventually make it easier to break encryption that protects the privacy of peoples data. Thats because these sophisticated machines can perform calculations at speeds impossible for conventional computers, potentially enabling them to crack codes previously thought indecipherable.

Now, a Swiss technology company says it has made a breakthrough by using quantum computers to uncover vulnerabilities in commonly used encryption. The company believes its found a security weakness that could jeopardize the confidentiality of the worlds internet data, banking transactions and emails.

Terra Quantum AG said its discovery upends the current understanding of what constitutes unbreakable encryption and could have major implications for the worlds leading technology companies, such as Alphabet Inc.s Google, Microsoft Corp., and International Business Machines Corp.

Don't miss: ProtonMail, Threema, Tresorit and Tutanota warn EU of risks of weakening encryption

But some other security experts said they arent nearly ready to declare a major breakthrough, at least not until the company publishes the full details of its research. If true, this would be a huge result, said Brent Waters, a computer science professor who specialises in cryptography at the University of Texas at Austin. It seems somewhat unlikely on the face of it. However, it is pretty hard for experts to weigh in on something without it being published.

IBM spokesman Christopher Sciacca said his company has known the risks for 20 years and is working on its own solutions to address the issue of post-quantum security. This is why the National Institute of Science & Technology (NIST) has been hosting a challenge to develop a new quantum safe crypto standard, he said in an email. IBM has several proposals for this new standard in the final round, which is expected in a few years.

Brian LaMacchia, distinguished engineer at Microsoft, said company cryptographers are collaborating with the global cryptographic community to prepare customers and data centers for a quantum future. Preparing for security in a post-quantum world is important not only to protect and secure data in the future but also to ensure that future quantum computers are not a threat to the long-term security of todays information.

Google didnt reply to a message seeking comment.

Terra Quantum AG has a team of about 80 quantum physicists, cryptographers and mathematicians, who are based in Switzerland, Russia, Finland and the US What currently is viewed as being post-quantum secure is not post-quantum secure, said Markus Pflitsch, chief executive officer and founder of Terra Quantum, in an interview. We can show and have proven that it isnt secure and is hackable.

Also read: Heres how an encrypted, locked Android and Apple phone gets bypassed

Pflitsch founded the company in 2019. Hes a former finance executive who began his career as a research scientist at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research. Terra Quantums research is led by two chief technology officers Gordey Lesovik, head of the Laboratory of Quantum Information Technology at the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology, and Valerii Vinokur, a Chicago-based physicist who in 2020 won the Fritz London Memorial Prize for his work in condensed matter and theoretical physics.

The company said that its research found vulnerabilities that affect symmetric encryption ciphers, including the Advanced Encryption Standard, or AES, which is widely used to secure data transmitted over the internet and to encrypt files. Using a method known as quantum annealing, the company said its research found that even the strongest versions of AES encryption may be decipherable by quantum computers that could be available in a few years from now.

Vinokur said in an interview that Terra Quantums team made the discovery after figuring out how to invert whats called a hash function, a mathematical algorithm that converts a message or portion of data into a numerical value. The research will show that what was once believed unbreakable doesnt exist anymore, Vinokur said, adding that the finding means a thousand other ways can be found soon.

Read more: Chinese scientists make world's first light-based quantum computer: Report

The company, which is backed by the Zurich-based venture capital firm Lakestar LP, has developed a new encryption protocol that it says cant be broken by quantum computers. Vinokur said the new protocol utilizes a method known as quantum key distribution.

Terra Quantum is currently pursuing a patent for the new protocol. But the company will make it available for free, according to Pflitsch. We will open up access to our protocol to make sure we have a safe and secure environment, said Pflitsch. We feel obliged to share it with the world and the quantum community.

The US government, like China, has made research in quantum computing research an economic and national security priority, saying that the world is on the cusp of what it calls a new quantum revolution. In addition, technology companies including Google, Microsoft, and IBM have made large investments in quantum computing in recent years.

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A Swiss company claims it used quantum computers to find weakness in encryption - HT Tech

Fujitsu and Entanglement Solve Problems Related to COVID-19 and Other Previously Unsolvable Problems through Quantum-Inspired Technology – PRNewswire

SUNNYVALE, Calif., Feb. 10, 2021 /PRNewswire/ --Fujitsu partnered with Entanglement, Inc. to demonstrate and validate the capabilities of the Digital Annealer (DA), a quantum-inspired computing platform and related services, to address large scale logistical combinatorial optimization challenges related to the COVID-19 pandemic and other intractable challenges facing humankind.

From the beginning of the pandemic, provisioning Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) to high demand areas continues to pose an enormous logistical challenge. Through a Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) with the Department of Defense, Fujitsu and Entanglement offered to deliver a theoretical nationwide optimization model to solve the challenge, optimizing the equitable resource allocation of the potentially available stock of PPE in the United States, while minimizing the mileage and time traveled to emerging hotspots.

A report prepared by the CRADA validated that this highly complex, combinatorial challenge is solvable in seconds using the DA solution, versus days or weeks for other traditional computing algorithms. In fact, one metric in the report the efficiency of overall supply and demand allocation showed the DA outperformed a comparative Evolutionary Algorithm by 90 percent. Using real-time data from an array of public and private sources, Digital Annealer efficiency increases exponentially with the addition of diverse variables and larger datasets.

"Traditional logistics tools are simply too slow and incapable of managing the complexities of these huge combinatorial problems," said Jason Turner, CEO of Entanglement, Inc. "Fujitsu's Digital Annealing technology and related services, in combination with our advanced computational and quantum computing expertise, not only solve these problems quickly, but do so in a way that is scalable, effective, iterative, equitable, and transparent. The best part? The more complex the problem, the more it shines, producing evermore accurate and efficient results the more its stressed."

Fujitsu and Entanglement formed their partnership in May of 2020 based on their common core values, which together aim to deliver advanced technology ecosystems that assist in solving large-scale, human-centric problems for end users. Fujitsu intellectual property and DA technology, combined with Entanglement's intellectual property, domain experience and commitment to demonstrate and accelerate quantum information science and artificial intelligence, created an optimum environment for the two companies to spotlight computing capabilities beyond the reach of traditional computing systems in the market today, and make a significant impact.

"While our initial collaborations centered on commercial prospects leveraging the emerging mobility ecosystem, the COVID-19 pandemic made it abundantly clear we needed to redeploy our conceptual thinking and quickly offer new models that accelerated our response to the virus," said Paul Warburton, Global Head of Mobility DX business at Fujitsu. "Both companies felt and embraced a deep responsibility to use our capabilities for good, and there is no area of greater need today than fighting this pandemic."

The DA solution, related consultancy and professional services, together with the advanced research, experienced team and purpose-built laboratory capabilities from Entanglement, make the particular use case for PPE optimization highly transferrable to a number of different applications in a variety of public and private sector endeavors. Agile and adaptive, the quantum-inspired model is designed to tackle a variety of linear parallel processes including predictive modeling for financial markets and portfolio optimization; supply chain logistics; transport and mobility; drug discovery; diagnosing, preventing and treating disease; predicting and preventing cyber threats; and modeling simulations, to name a few. The DA also adapts to fast-moving environments and integrates with existing systems, making it non-disruptive to ongoing and transforming operations.

Online Resources- More on the Fujitsu Digital Annealer: https://www.fujitsu.com/global/services/business-services/digital-annealer/- Read the Fujitsu blog: http://blog.ts.fujitsu.com- Follow Fujitsu on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/FujitsuAmerica- Follow us on LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/fujitsu-america- Find Fujitsu on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/Fujitsu- Fujitsu pictures and media server: http://mediaportal.ts.fujitsu.com/pages/portal.php- For regular news updates, bookmark the Fujitsu newsroom: http://www.fujitsu.com/us/about/resources/news/

About FujitsuFujitsu is the leading Japanese information and communication technology (ICT) company offering a full range of technology products, solutions and services. Approximately 130,000 Fujitsu people support customers in more than 100 countries. We use our experience and the power of ICT to shape the future of society with our customers. Fujitsu Limited (TSE:6702) reported consolidated revenues of 3.9 trillion yen (US$35 billion) for the fiscal year ended March 31, 2020. For more information, please see http://www.fujitsu.com.

About Fujitsu AmericasFujitsu America, Inc. is the parent and/or management company of a group of Fujitsu-owned companies operating in North, Central and South America and Caribbean, dedicated to delivering a comprehensive range of digital transformation solutions and services to clients in the Western Hemisphere. These companies are collectively referred to as Fujitsu Americas. Fujitsu enables clients to meet their business objectives through integrated offerings and solutions, including consulting and professional services, systems integration, managed services, outsourcing and cloud services for infrastructure, platforms and applications; AI and data analytics; and quantum-inspired computing solutions. For more information, please visit: http://fujitsu.com/us and http://twitter.com/fujitsuamerica.

About Entanglement, Inc.Entanglement is an early-stage deep technology company dedicated, inter alia, to providing unprecedented commercial access to diverse and advanced computing systems (including quantum computing, high-performance / super- computing and purpose-built computing systems) to a broad range of customers. Focused to accelerate the development of quantum information science (QIS) and artificial intelligence (AI) without enormous up-front capital investment, Entanglement has designed an environment for rapid experimentation and breakthroughs. Through the democratization of these integrated computing capabilities and the experience of its team, the company lowers the barriers to entry for solving seemingly unsolvable real-world problems today. It provides a bridge from classical to quantum computation. Entanglement, together with its partners and customers, push "Beyond Binary." For more information, please visit: https://www.entanglement.ai

All other company or product names mentioned herein are trademarks or registered trademarks of their respective owners. Information provided in this press release is accurate at time of publication and is subject to change without advance notice.

SOURCE Fujitsu America, Inc.

http://www.fujitsu.com

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Fujitsu and Entanglement Solve Problems Related to COVID-19 and Other Previously Unsolvable Problems through Quantum-Inspired Technology - PRNewswire

University of Exeter: University of Exeter partnership develops novel algorithms with the power to transform the use of quantum computers – India…

With the development of quantum hardware, this new approach will provide a cheaper and quicker way of solving complex differential equations

University of Exeter partnership develops novel algorithms with the power to transform the use of quantum computersDr Oleksandr Kyriienko, lead of the University of Exeters Quantum Dynamics, Optics, and Simulation group (QuDOS) is working in close partnership with Dutch start-up Qu & Co to develop quantum software with the potential to transform the way we use the huge power of quantum computers in industry.

Working with the University of Exeter, Qu & Co have created a novel algorithm, which offers a way to solve complex nonlinear differential equations using quantum computers and devices.

Nonlinear differential equations are used in all branches of science, including chemistry, biology and epidemiology. The new algorithm has already been used in fluid dynamics, to accurately predict the airflow in a nozzle of a prototype rocket turbine. Qu & Co are now investigating further industrial applications.

Classical methods require a large and complex network of conventional computers. With the development of quantum hardware, this new approach will provide a cheaper and quicker way of solving complex differential equations. The approach has just been published and is now under peer review.

Dr Oleksandr Kyriienko explains: Quantum computing has rapidly progressed from a purely theoretical concept to a disrupting computational tool. We know it is capable of solving problems that a classical computer cannot. Yet, finding real-world applications that can benefit from near-term quantum computers remains an outstanding challenge. With the deep industrial knowledge of Qu & Co, we focus on and solve problems that prove the value of quantum computing.

Qu & Co have also sponsored major part of the PhD studies of Annie Paine under the supervision of Dr Oleksandr Kyriienko. Annie conducts pioneering research in the field of differential equations, and develops programmes for quantum chips.

Vincent E. Elfving, Chief Technology Officer at Qu & Co said: In partnership with the University of Exeter we develop cutting-edge algorithms for near-term quantum computers, and we expect rapid progress in this evolving field. The research conducted at University of Exeter has a significant impact on relevant applications and business development. We are happy to continue our fruitful collaboration in the future.

The partnership is managed by the Innovation, Impact and Business team at the University of Exeter, who match organisations with the academic expertise required to solve industrial challenges.

Sean Fielding, Director of Innovation, Impact and Business said: The University of Exeter is proud to support cutting edge quantum research which will make a real difference in the world. This partnership has the potential to create a step change in the way quantum computers can be used, and were delighted to see it already delivering such great results another fantastic example of academia and industry working together.

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University of Exeter: University of Exeter partnership develops novel algorithms with the power to transform the use of quantum computers - India...

A fridge thats colder than outer space could take quantum computing to new heights – TechRadar

For most of us, the refrigerator is where we keep our dairy, meat and vegetables. For Ilana Wisby, CEO at Oxford Quantum Circuits (OQC), refrigeration means something else entirely.

Her company, operator of the UKs only commercially available quantum computer, has recently announced a new partnership with Oxford Instruments Nanoscience, a manufacturer of ultra-low temperature refrigerators.

As per the agreement, OQC will be the first to deploy the new Proteox cryo-refrigerator, which reaches temperatures as low as 5-8 millikelvin (circa -273 C/-460 F), significantly colder than outer space.

According to Wisby, the arrival of powerful new refrigerators will allow organizations like hers to take quantum computing to new heights, by improving the "quality" of superconducting quantum bits (qubits).

Quantum effects only happen in really low-energy environments, and energy is temperature. Ultimately, we need to be at incredibly low temperatures, because were working at single-digit electron levels, she explained

A qubit is an electronic circuit made from aluminum, built with a piece of silicon, which we cool down until it becomes superconducting and then further until single electron effects are happening.

The colder the system the less noise and mess there is, she told TechRadar Pro, because all the other junk is frozen out. With the Proteox, then, OQC hopes to be able to scale up the architecture of its quantum machine in a significant way.

The meaning of quantum computing, let alone its significance, can be difficult to grasp without a background in physics. At the end of our conversation, Wisby herself told us she had found it difficult to balance scientific integrity with the need to communicate the concepts.

But, in short, quantum computers approach problem solving in an entirely different way to classical machines, making use of certain symmetries to speed up processing and allow for far greater scale.

Quantum computers exploit a number of principles that define how the world works at an atomic level. Superposition, for example, is a principle whereby something can be in two positions at once, like a coin thats both a head and a tail, said Wisby.

Ultimately, that can happen with information as well. We are therefore no longer limited to just ones and zeros, but can have many versions of numbers in between, superimposed.

Instead of running calculation after calculation in a linear fashion, quantum machines can run them in parallel, optimizing for many more variables - and doing so extremely quickly.

Advances in the field, which is really still only in its nascent stages, are expected to have a major impact on areas such as drug discovery, logistics, finance, cybersecurity and almost any other market that needs to process massive volumes of information.

Quantum computers in operation today, however, can not yet consistently outperform classical supercomputers. There are also very few quantum computing resources available for businesses to utilize; OQC has only a small pool of rivals worldwide in this regard.

The most famous milestone held aloft as a marker of progress is that of quantum supremacy, the point at which quantum computers are able to solve problems that would take classical machines an infeasible amount of time.

In October 2019, Google announced it was the first company to reach this landmark, performing a task with its Sycamore prototype in 200 seconds that would take another machine 10,000 years.

But the claim was very publicly contested by IBM, which dialled up its Summit supercomputer (previously the worlds fastest) to prove it was capable of processing the same workload in roughly two and a half days.

Although the quantum supremacy landmark remains disputed, and quantum computers have not yet been responsible for any major scientific discoveries, Wisby is bullish about the industrys near-term prospects.

Were not there yet, but we will be very soon. Were at a tipping point after which we should start to see discoveries and applications that were fundamentally impossible before, realistically in the next three years.

In pharma, that might mean understanding specific molecules, even better understanding water. We hope to see customers working on new drugs that have been enabled by a quantum computer, at least partially, in the not too distant future.

The challenge facing organizations working to push quantum computing to the next level is balancing quality, scale and control. Currently, as quantum systems are scaled and an appropriate level of control asserted, the quality decreases and information is lost.

Achieving all these things in parallel is whats going to unlock a quantum-enabled future, says Wisby.

There is work to be done, in other words, before quantum fulfils its potential. But steps forward in the ability to fabricate superconducting devices at scale and developments in areas such as refrigeration are setting the stage.

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A fridge thats colder than outer space could take quantum computing to new heights - TechRadar

University of Glasgow partners with Oxford Instruments NanoScience on quantum computing – SelectScience

The University of Glasgow, one of thepioneering institutions at the leading edge of quantum technology development and home of the Quantum Circuits Group, has announced its using Oxford Instruments next-generation Cryofree refrigerator, Proteox, as part of its research to accelerate the commercialization of quantum computing in the UK.

Were excited to be using Proteox, the latest in cryogen-free refrigeration technology, and to have the system up and running in our lab, comments Professor Martin Weides, Head of the Quantum Circuits Group. Oxford Instruments is a long-term strategic partner and todays announcement highlights the importance of our close collaboration to the future of quantum computing development. Proteox is designed with quantum scale-up in mind, and through the use of its Secondary Insert technology, were able to easily characterize and develop integrated chips and components for quantum computing applications.

The University of Glasgow, its subsidiary and commercialization partner, Kelvin Nanotechnology, and Oxford Instruments NanoScience are part of a larger consortium supported by funding from Innovate UK, the UKs innovation agency, granted in April 2020. The consortium partners will boost quantum technology development by the design, manufacture, and test of superconducting quantum devices.

Today'sannouncement demonstrates the major contribution Oxford Instruments is making towards pioneering quantum technology work in the UK, states Stuart Woods, Managing Director of Oxford Instruments NanoScience. With our 60 years of experience of in-house component production and global service support, we are accelerating the commercialization of quantum to discover whats next supporting our customers across the world.

Proteox is a next-generation Cryofree system that provides a step change in modularity and adaptability for ultra-low temperature experiments in condensed-matter physics and quantum computing industrialization. The Proteox platform has been developed to provide a single, interchangeable modular solution that can support multiple users and a variety of set-ups or experiments. It also includes remote management software which is integral to the system design, enabling, for example, the system to be managed from anywhere in the world.

Want the latest science news straight to your inbox? Become a SelectScience member for free today>>

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University of Glasgow partners with Oxford Instruments NanoScience on quantum computing - SelectScience

Tech 24 – Welcome to the quantum era – FRANCE 24

Issued on: 25/01/2021 - 13:19Modified: 25/01/2021 - 14:18

The first quantum revolution gave way to lasers and transistors while the secondushered in MRIs and GPS. But the technology still holds much more promisefor the future. We tell you why quantum computing is becomingsuch a strategic sector.

Quantum physics constitutes a huge change in how one understands the world and conceives reality. There is a shift from the intuitive, straightforward classical paradigmto the quantum world that describesmuch more complex, counterintuitive and amazing phenomena. In this edition, we attempt to explain the fundamental mechanism of quantum physics, a demonstration of how little we actually know about our world.

We dig deeper into the prospect of quantum computers with Eleni Diamanti, a senior researcher at LIP6 Sorbonne. She tells us how much this technology is set to revolutionise certain sectors like communications, medtech and theInternet of Things, plus how nations and companies are now engaged in an arms race for quantum supremacy.

And in Test 24, wetake a look at the French startup Vaonis' latest deviceVespera, a perfect hybrid between a smart telescope and a camera that picked up the best innovation award at this year's CES trade show.

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Tech 24 - Welcome to the quantum era - FRANCE 24

Analysis: Opportunities and Restraint of the Quantum Computing Market KSU | The Sentinel Newspaper – KSU | The Sentinel Newspaper

The globalquantum computing marketis valued at $667.3 million by 2027, surging from $88.2 million in 2019 at a noteworthy CAGR of 30.0%.

Impact Analysis of COVID-19 on the Quantum Computing Market

The global market for quantum computing services is projected to experience considerable impact due to the emergence of the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19). In the fight against COVID-19, quantum computing platform has joined the force of disruptive technologies at the service to better control the global outbreak. The current coronavirus crisis provides a valuable stage for zooming in the real potential applications of quantum computing in highly-impacted and complex situations. The esteemed companies operating in global quantum computing market are trying their best to provide integrated platform amidst the shutdown. For instance, in September 2020, IBM, an American multinational technology and consulting company, announced to conduct IBM Quantum Summit 2020 to discover chemical compounds that could contribute to the fight against COVID-19 pandemic.

On the other hand, quantum computing is very helpful in the discovery of lot of drugs which is a computationally-intensive task. Quantum computing can analyze the the interaction between biomolecules, and this can be helpful in tackling infectious agents such as coronavirus and others. There can be no other better way than to model the problem on a computer and conduct extensive research on the same. For instance in March, D-Wave announced that they are offering quantum computers free to anyone working on the coronavirus crisis for research and other work related to covid19. Therefore, there are many companies expirenced upsurge in growth, throughout the pandemic period. These type of factors may lead lucrative opportunities for the investors in the forecast period.

Quantum Computing Market Analysis:

The enormous growth of the global quantum computing market is mainly attributed to the increasing integration of quantum computing platforms in healthcare. Companies such as 1QB Information Technologies Inc., QxBranch, LLC, D-Wave Systems Inc. are working in the field of material simulation to enhance the accessibility, availability, and usability of quantum computers in material simulation applications. In addition, these players are following strategic collaborations, business expansion and technological innovations to acquire the largest share in the global industry. For instance, in October 2020, Cambridge Quantum Computing announced that they are opening Ph.D. internships with multinational pharmaceutical companies for drug designing through quantum algorithms. These key factors may lead to a surge in the demand for quantum computing services in the global market.

Lack of knowledge and skills may create a negative impact on global quantum computing services throughout the analysis timeframe. This type of factors may hamper the quantum computing market growth during the analysis period.

The global quantum computing industry is growing extensively across various fields, but fastest growing adoption of quantum computing is in agriculture. Quantum computing offers software solutions for agriculture in large businesses and startups all over the world to develop innovative solutions in agriculture. For instance Quantum, a software and data science company launched a software named AgriTech, ths software helps farmers to monitor crops, agricultural fields and it will respond quickly to all the issues related to agriculture. These factors may provide lucrative opportunities for the global quantum computing market, in the coming years.

The consulting solutions sub-segment of the quantum computing market will have the fastest growth and it is projected to surpass $354.0 million by 2027, with an increase from $37.1 million in 2019. This is mainly attributed to its application in blind quantum computing and quantum cryptography playing a major role to secure cloud computing services. Moreover, the consulting solutions segment for quantum computing technologies covers broad range of end-user industries including automotive, space & defense, chemicals, healthcare, and energy & power, and others.

Moreover systems offering sub-segment type will have a significant market share and is projected to grow at a CAGR of 26.7% by registering a revenue of $313.3 million by 2027. This growth is mainly attributed to many government authorities across the developed as well as developing economies that are heavily investing into quantum computing technologies. For instance, in February 2020, the Indian government announces that they are going to invest $1120 million in quantum computing research. This type of government support and scheme is expected to flourish the research for technology under the National Mission of Quantum Technology and Application project. Such government support may bolster the segmental growth, in the analysis period.

Machine learning sub-segment for the quantum computing industry shall have rapid growth and it is anticipated to generate a revenue of $236.9 million by 2027, during the forecast period. This growth is mainly attributed to higher applications of quantum computing in the broad range of areas such as drug discovery, multi-omics data integration, and many among others. These factors may offer lucrative opportunities for the segment, during the forecast timeframe.

The banking and finance sub-segment will be the fastest-growing segment and it is expected to register a revenue of $159.2 million by 2027, throughout the analysis timeframe. The enormously growing quantum computing in the finance sector across the globe has advanced with developments in smartphone technology and computer processing. In addition, the quantum computing platform helps speed up the transactional activities in cost-effective ways. Hence, the quantum computing platform is extensively attracting the interest of BFSI firms that are seeking to boost their data speed, trade, and transactions. Such factors are projected to upsurge the growth of the segment, during the projected timeframe.

The quantum computing market for the Asia-Pacific region will be a rapidly-growing market and it has generated a revenue of $18.1 million in 2019 and is further projected to reach up to $150.3 million by 2027. The demand for quantum computing services is surging in the Asia pacific region, specifically because of the strategic collaboration and development. For instance, in December 2019, D-Wave Systems came in a partnership with Japans NEC for building of quantum apps and hybrid HPC for exploring the capabilities NECs high-performance computers and D-Waves quantum systems. Such partnerships may further surge the growth of market, during the analysis timeframe.

The Europe quantum computing market shall have a dominating market share and is anticipated to reach up to $ 221.2 million by the end of 2027 due to its higher application in fields such as development and discovery of new drugs, cryptography, cyber security, defense sector, among others. In addition, the use of quantum computing will also have positive consequences in development of AI as well as in machine learning. For instance, in July 2019, Utimaco GmbH, software & hardware provider came in partnership with ISARA to utilize post quantum cryptography; this partnership will help their users to have secured and encrypted communication that cannot be decrypted by other computers. These initiatives may create a positive impact on the Asia-pacific quantum computing market, during the forecast period.

Key Market Players

Porters Five Forces Analysis for Quantum Computing Market:

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