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What is Neurohacking? – Home – Neurohacker Collective

The term hacker has its origins in computer programming subcultures from the 60s, and was used to describe people who wanted to take on hard problems in a spirit of playful exploration and a resistance to unearned authority. Although the methods, means and intentions of hackers varied widely, all seemed to share a unique ethos that mixed a deep commitment to individual autonomy and agency with an equally deep commitment to collaboration and co-creation.

Over time, the concept of hacking has traveled far from its origins, finding its way into a number of domains like Biohacking, Consciousness Hacking, Flow Hacking and Life Hacking. Each is a kind of hacking because each shares this hackers ethos and a commitment to using it to find the most effective ways to optimize the human experience.

We call the common thread that links these hacking communities together, empowered responsibility. This notion expresses the dual recognition that we are no longer able to rely on external authorities to take care of us (in any domain) but through a combination of ubiquitous information, individual experimentation and open collaboration, we are increasingly empowered to take responsibility for ourselves.

In the Biohacking community, the spirit of empowered responsibility drives the process of optimizing ones biological health and performance. Biohackers learn from each other how they can modify their nutrition, exercise, sleep, movement, and mindset to achieve the specific kind of well-being that they individually desire.

The Consciousness Hacking community takes empowered responsibility in using technology as a catalyst for psychological, emotional and spiritual flourishing. They utilize mindfulness techniques and biofeedback tools for self-exploration, taking personal responsibility for their conscious experience in this most individual of journeys.

Emerging from within and alongside these movements, we are observing the coalescence of a new and important domain: Neurohacking.

Whereas biohacking concentrates on the body, and consciousness hacking explores the inner experience, neurohacking is somewhere in the middle, focusing on the mind-brain interface – the intersection of neurology and consciousness. Specifically, neurohacking involves applying science and technology to influence the brain and body in order to optimize subjective experience.

The desired outcomes of neurohacking cover everything from focused productivity, to expanded creativity, more restful sleep, reduced anxiety, enhanced empathy, and anything else that contributes to the psychological well-being and emotional health of whole, thriving human beings.

The technologies of neurohacking run the gamut from chemical technologies like nootropics and entheogens, probiotics to support the gut-brain connection, bioelectrical technologies like neurofeedback and transcranial stimulation, photic therapies like low level laser therapy and all the way to embodied practices like somatics and meditation. So long as there is a scientifically accessible biological mechanism for effecting subjective experience, it belongs in the domain of neurohacking.

Of course, like all emergent phenomena, neurohacking didnt just come from nowhere. For years there have been many movements and communities out there, playing in and pioneering some aspect of the neurohacking space.

Some of these domains include:

We propose that it is now timely and useful to perceive the commonality among these different movements and communities as shared aspects of Neurohacking. And in an effort to make these commonalities more visible and legible to each other, in the upcoming weeks we will take a deeper dive into each, highlight some notable people and projects in each space and explore the frontiers of the community from the point of view of Neurohacking.

In our next post, we will begin this exploration with the domain of Nootropics.

Read this article:

What is Neurohacking? – Home – Neurohacker Collective

John Muschelli – about

Imaging in R

Faculty Office Hour

Stats in Imaging Talk in Pittsburgh 2017

Imaging in R (aka Neurohacking 2.0)

My name is John Muschelli (pronounced Moo-shell-e), and I am currently a Assistant Scientist at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH). I received my Master’s of Science (ScM) under the advising of Brian Caffo and my PhD under Ciprian Crainiceanu in Biostatistics from JHSPH, and a BS in Biomathematics and Neuroscience from the University of Scranton.I work on processing and analyzing medical images, usually of the brain. My blog, a HopStat and a Jump away is updated much more frequently than this website. My primary collaborators are Ciprian Crainiceanu, Brian Caffo, Dan Hanley, and Stewart Mostofsky.

Link:

John Muschelli – about

Revolution Women’s Fitness Program – Body Spartan

DescriptionCombining the mind, body, and the keto diet for ultimate results

Designed by Body Spartan Co-Founder, WNSO Pro Fitness Competitor, and Master Sports Nutritionist, Priscilla Tuft, Revolution Womens Fitness Program is unlike any other fitness program. It takes the most powerful element known to the human race, your mind, and combines it with a complete 12-week workout program, a custom keto diet, and cardio plan that will completely transform your body. This revolutionary fitness program uses cutting edge neurohacking techniques to amplify the effects of everything youre doing and exponentially increase your success rate!

Created by Body Spartan Co-Founder, Priscilla Tuft, a former WNSO Pro Fitness Competitor, Ms. Bikini America, and cover model for magazines such as MuscleMag. This workout program was designed to specifically address the emotional needs of females during their fitness journey. Success starts in the mind and Priscilla is an expert at mind reprogramming for fitness.

A keto diet will place your body into a state of ketosis. In ketosis, your body will burn fats for fuel instead of carbohydrates. On a regular diet that includes carbohydrates, your body will produce different hormones that store fat and also produce glucose.

In a carbohydrate rich diet, glucose will be used as a primary energy source and your fats are not needed and are then stored as body fat. By decreasing the carbohydrate intake with a keto diet, your body will be induced into a state of ketosis where it burns fat for fuel, instead of glucose.

The Revolution Program uses a cyclonic keto diet. With this type of keto diet, you will have five days of low carb intake each week, followed by one refeed day or Phase II day, as we call it, on the sixth day. The Phase II day is also your rest day and allows for your muscle cells to uptake the carbohydrates as glycogen. This is essential for you to retain your strength for the upcoming workout routines.

My husband has been doing the Body Spartan programs for over a year (with some breaks in between) Ive seen his progress and was excited when they came out with one for women!! Granted Im only in my first week of the program and have been taking more days off than required due to extreme soreness obviously Ill restart the program with the required off days but other than my slacking because of being sore I absolutely love the program so far and even though I know results cant be seen I can feel them – January 12, 2018

Read this article:

Revolution Women’s Fitness Program – Body Spartan

What is Neurohacking? – Home – Neurohacker Collective

The term hacker has its origins in computer programming subcultures from the 60s, and was used to describe people who wanted to take on hard problems in a spirit of playful exploration and a resistance to unearned authority. Although the methods, means and intentions of hackers varied widely, all seemed to share a unique ethos that mixed a deep commitment to individual autonomy and agency with an equally deep commitment to collaboration and co-creation.

Over time, the concept of hacking has traveled far from its origins, finding its way into a number of domains like Biohacking, Consciousness Hacking, Flow Hacking and Life Hacking. Each is a kind of hacking because each shares this hackers ethos and a commitment to using it to find the most effective ways to optimize the human experience.

We call the common thread that links these hacking communities together, empowered responsibility. This notion expresses the dual recognition that we are no longer able to rely on external authorities to take care of us (in any domain) but through a combination of ubiquitous information, individual experimentation and open collaboration, we are increasingly empowered to take responsibility for ourselves.

In the Biohacking community, the spirit of empowered responsibility drives the process of optimizing ones biological health and performance. Biohackers learn from each other how they can modify their nutrition, exercise, sleep, movement, and mindset to achieve the specific kind of well-being that they individually desire.

The Consciousness Hacking community takes empowered responsibility in using technology as a catalyst for psychological, emotional and spiritual flourishing. They utilize mindfulness techniques and biofeedback tools for self-exploration, taking personal responsibility for their conscious experience in this most individual of journeys.

Emerging from within and alongside these movements, we are observing the coalescence of a new and important domain: Neurohacking.

Whereas biohacking concentrates on the body, and consciousness hacking explores the inner experience, neurohacking is somewhere in the middle, focusing on the mind-brain interface – the intersection of neurology and consciousness. Specifically, neurohacking involves applying science and technology to influence the brain and body in order to optimize subjective experience.

The desired outcomes of neurohacking cover everything from focused productivity, to expanded creativity, more restful sleep, reduced anxiety, enhanced empathy, and anything else that contributes to the psychological well-being and emotional health of whole, thriving human beings.

The technologies of neurohacking run the gamut from chemical technologies like nootropics and entheogens, probiotics to support the gut-brain connection, bioelectrical technologies like neurofeedback and transcranial stimulation, photic therapies like low level laser therapy and all the way to embodied practices like somatics and meditation. So long as there is a scientifically accessible biological mechanism for effecting subjective experience, it belongs in the domain of neurohacking.

Of course, like all emergent phenomena, neurohacking didnt just come from nowhere. For years there have been many movements and communities out there, playing in and pioneering some aspect of the neurohacking space.

Some of these domains include:

We propose that it is now timely and useful to perceive the commonality among these different movements and communities as shared aspects of Neurohacking. And in an effort to make these commonalities more visible and legible to each other, in the upcoming weeks we will take a deeper dive into each, highlight some notable people and projects in each space and explore the frontiers of the community from the point of view of Neurohacking.

In our next post, we will begin this exploration with the domain of Nootropics.

Originally posted here:

What is Neurohacking? – Home – Neurohacker Collective

John Muschelli – about

Imaging in R

Faculty Office Hour

Stats in Imaging Talk in Pittsburgh 2017

Imaging in R (aka Neurohacking 2.0)

My name is John Muschelli (pronounced Moo-shell-e), and I am currently a Assistant Scientist at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health (JHSPH). I received my Master’s of Science (ScM) under the advising of Brian Caffo and my PhD under Ciprian Crainiceanu in Biostatistics from JHSPH, and a BS in Biomathematics and Neuroscience from the University of Scranton.I work on processing and analyzing medical images, usually of the brain. My blog, a HopStat and a Jump away is updated much more frequently than this website. My primary collaborators are Ciprian Crainiceanu, Brian Caffo, Dan Hanley, and Stewart Mostofsky.

More here:

John Muschelli – about

What is Neurohacking? – Neurohacker Collective

The term hacker has its origins in computer programming subcultures from the 60s, and was used to describe people who wanted to take on hard problems in a spirit of playful exploration and a resistance to unearned authority. Although the methods, means and intentions of hackers varied widely, all seemed to share a unique ethos that mixed a deep commitment to individual autonomy and agency with an equally deep commitment to collaboration and co-creation.

Over time, the concept of hacking has traveled far from its origins, finding its way into a number of domains like Biohacking, Consciousness Hacking, Flow Hacking and Life Hacking. Each is a kind of hacking because each shares this hackers ethos and a commitment to using it to find the most effective ways to optimize the human experience.

We call the common thread that links these hacking communities together, empowered responsibility. This notion expresses the dual recognition that we are no longer able to rely on external authorities to take care of us (in any domain) but through a combination of ubiquitous information, individual experimentation and open collaboration, we are increasingly empowered to take responsibility for ourselves.

In the Biohacking community, the spirit of empowered responsibility drives the process of optimizing ones biological health and performance. Biohackers learn from each other how they can modify their nutrition, exercise, sleep, movement, and mindset to achieve the specific kind of well-being that they individually desire.

The Consciousness Hacking community takes empowered responsibility in using technology as a catalyst for psychological, emotional and spiritual flourishing. They utilize mindfulness techniques and biofeedback tools for self-exploration, taking personal responsibility for their conscious experience in this most individual of journeys.

Emerging from within and alongside these movements, we are observing the coalescence of a new and important domain: Neurohacking.

Whereas biohacking concentrates on the body, and consciousness hacking explores the inner experience, neurohacking is somewhere in the middle, focusing on the mind-brain interface – the intersection of neurology and consciousness. Specifically, neurohacking involves applying science and technology to influence the brain and body in order to optimize subjective experience.

The desired outcomes of neurohacking cover everything from focused productivity, to expanded creativity, more restful sleep, reduced anxiety, enhanced empathy, and anything else that contributes to the psychological well-being and emotional health of whole, thriving human beings.

The technologies of neurohacking run the gamut from chemical technologies like nootropics and entheogens, probiotics to support the gut-brain connection, bioelectrical technologies like neurofeedback and transcranial stimulation, photic therapies like low level laser therapy and all the way to embodied practices like somatics and meditation. So long as there is a scientifically accessible biological mechanism for effecting subjective experience, it belongs in the domain of neurohacking.

Of course, like all emergent phenomena, neurohacking didnt just come from nowhere. For years there have been many movements and communities out there, playing in and pioneering some aspect of the neurohacking space.

Some of these domains include:

We propose that it is now timely and useful to perceive the commonality among these different movements and communities as shared aspects of Neurohacking. And in an effort to make these commonalities more visible and legible to each other, in the upcoming weeks we will take a deeper dive into each, highlight some notable people and projects in each space and explore the frontiers of the community from the point of view of Neurohacking.

In our next post, we will begin this exploration with the domain of Nootropics.

Read the original:

What is Neurohacking? – Neurohacker Collective

Revolution Women’s Fitness Program – Body Spartan

DescriptionCombining the mind, body, and the keto diet for ultimate results

Designed by Body Spartan Co-Founder, WNSO Pro Fitness Competitor, and Master Sports Nutritionist, Priscilla Tuft, Revolution Womens Fitness Program is unlike any other fitness program. It takes the most powerful element known to the human race, your mind, and combines it with a complete 12-week workout program, a custom keto diet, and cardio plan that will completely transform your body. This revolutionary fitness program uses cutting edge neurohacking techniques to amplify the effects of everything youre doing and exponentially increase your success rate!

Created by Body Spartan Co-Founder, Priscilla Tuft, a former WNSO Pro Fitness Competitor, Ms. Bikini America, and cover model for magazines such as MuscleMag. This workout program was designed to specifically address the emotional needs of females during their fitness journey. Success starts in the mind and Priscilla is an expert at mind reprogramming for fitness.

A keto diet will place your body into a state of ketosis. In ketosis, your body will burn fats for fuel instead of carbohydrates. On a regular diet that includes carbohydrates, your body will produce different hormones that store fat and also produce glucose.

In a carbohydrate rich diet, glucose will be used as a primary energy source and your fats are not needed and are then stored as body fat. By decreasing the carbohydrate intake with a keto diet, your body will be induced into a state of ketosis where it burns fat for fuel, instead of glucose.

The Revolution Program uses a cyclonic keto diet. With this type of keto diet, you will have five days of low carb intake each week, followed by one refeed day or Phase II day, as we call it, on the sixth day. The Phase II day is also your rest day and allows for your muscle cells to uptake the carbohydrates as glycogen. This is essential for you to retain your strength for the upcoming workout routines.

My husband has been doing the Body Spartan programs for over a year (with some breaks in between) Ive seen his progress and was excited when they came out with one for women!! Granted Im only in my first week of the program and have been taking more days off than required due to extreme soreness obviously Ill restart the program with the required off days but other than my slacking because of being sore I absolutely love the program so far and even though I know results cant be seen I can feel them – January 12, 2018

More here:

Revolution Women’s Fitness Program – Body Spartan

What is Neurohacking? – Neurohacker Collective

The term hacker has its origins in computer programming subcultures from the 60s, and was used to describe people who wanted to take on hard problems in a spirit of playful exploration and a resistance to unearned authority. Although the methods, means and intentions of hackers varied widely, all seemed to share a unique ethos that mixed a deep commitment to individual autonomy and agency with an equally deep commitment to collaboration and co-creation.

Over time, the concept of hacking has traveled far from its origins, finding its way into a number of domains like Biohacking, Consciousness Hacking, Flow Hacking and Life Hacking. Each is a kind of hacking because each shares this hackers ethos and a commitment to using it to find the most effective ways to optimize the human experience.

We call the common thread that links these hacking communities together, empowered responsibility. This notion expresses the dual recognition that we are no longer able to rely on external authorities to take care of us (in any domain) but through a combination of ubiquitous information, individual experimentation and open collaboration, we are increasingly empowered to take responsibility for ourselves.

In the Biohacking community, the spirit of empowered responsibility drives the process of optimizing ones biological health and performance. Biohackers learn from each other how they can modify their nutrition, exercise, sleep, movement, and mindset to achieve the specific kind of well-being that they individually desire.

The Consciousness Hacking community takes empowered responsibility in using technology as a catalyst for psychological, emotional and spiritual flourishing. They utilize mindfulness techniques and biofeedback tools for self-exploration, taking personal responsibility for their conscious experience in this most individual of journeys.

Emerging from within and alongside these movements, we are observing the coalescence of a new and important domain: Neurohacking.

Whereas biohacking concentrates on the body, and consciousness hacking explores the inner experience, neurohacking is somewhere in the middle, focusing on the mind-brain interface – the intersection of neurology and consciousness. Specifically, neurohacking involves applying science and technology to influence the brain and body in order to optimize subjective experience.

The desired outcomes of neurohacking cover everything from focused productivity, to expanded creativity, more restful sleep, reduced anxiety, enhanced empathy, and anything else that contributes to the psychological well-being and emotional health of whole, thriving human beings.

The technologies of neurohacking run the gamut from chemical technologies like nootropics and entheogens, probiotics to support the gut-brain connection, bioelectrical technologies like neurofeedback and transcranial stimulation, photic therapies like low level laser therapy and all the way to embodied practices like somatics and meditation. So long as there is a scientifically accessible biological mechanism for effecting subjective experience, it belongs in the domain of neurohacking.

Of course, like all emergent phenomena, neurohacking didnt just come from nowhere. For years there have been many movements and communities out there, playing in and pioneering some aspect of the neurohacking space.

Some of these domains include:

We propose that it is now timely and useful to perceive the commonality among these different movements and communities as shared aspects of Neurohacking. And in an effort to make these commonalities more visible and legible to each other, in the upcoming weeks we will take a deeper dive into each, highlight some notable people and projects in each space and explore the frontiers of the community from the point of view of Neurohacking.

In our next post, we will begin this exploration with the domain of Nootropics.

Read the original post:

What is Neurohacking? – Neurohacker Collective

For Newbies – The Basics (What is Neurohacking)

JPAGE_CURRENT_OF_TOTAL

Seeking a Definition for Neurohacking…?

Rather than giving you one strict definition, which is never the truth for everyone, we asked group members: How would you explain what neurohacking is, and why do you do it? The comments below are their replies:

I see neurohacking simply as neuroscience-based self-improvement, and I do it to narrow the gap between the life I have and the life I want.

***

Neurohacking teaches you how your brain works and how you can improve your mood and health. For me it was a way to repair some problems because I got rid of migraine and backaches by learning one of the first things, the relaxation response. Then I got into biofeedback because that way I didnt need tablets for blood pressure because I can control it. I notice that my confidence has got better as well.

***

Neurohacking is about ways of keeping your mind healthy and your brain performing at its best. I do it for maintaining and improving my mental health and partly to avoid decline with age, the same reasons I go to the gym for health of my body.

Why have a fit healthy body and a weak confused mind?

***

Neurohacking helps you to understand yourself. When doing NH you can go beyond “I must have got out of bed on the wrong side” way of thinking and figure out which side exactly is better to get out of bed on.

***

The Matrix had me. Neurohacking was the Red pill.

***

Neurohacking is changing your mind by changing your brain chemistry and learning how to control these states and work with them. Sometimes we humans do this just for fun, but it is what shamans have been doing since ages past. I like experimenting with drugs and methods of changing perception. Im also interested in intelligence augmentation or as I would call it the pursuit of Wisdom and enhancing our creativity and imagination, basically expanding all the frontiers of our minds, working with nature and our biology.

***

“Neurohacking is The act of evolving from a simple lab-rat to a pandimensional being.”

“Self-Help gone right.”

“Trying to keep the fragile balance required to be a sturdy human being.”

***

To me, neurohacking begins with the acknowledgement that you are your bodybrain. From there, it’s just a system of practical advice designed to reground yourself in the physical and mental capabilities that you were born with. It’s not ‘hacking’ in the sense of overclocking, but in the sense of ‘lifting the hood, understanding what’s going on, and making obvious and natural improvements’. It’s open-source and voluntary.

***

“The culmination of millenia old philosophy, psychology, physiology and more, in one little red pill. The fastest means to achieve the most valuable human resource: Freedom. Why do I do it? There is no way not to do it, I only get it (right).” (Marcos Rojas)

***

For me, neurohacking (the concept as it has evolved for me, as a part of this forum), is simply having some knowledge and techniques for improving the functioning of my body/mind/emotions, to improve the overall quality of my life, including longevity, health/vitality, mental functioning, emotional balance, as well as interpersonal communication, cooperative ventures, including art, music, poetry/prose/ songwriting, etc., and even on-line discussion.

For me, knowing things and learning things are not the ultimate achievements in my life, however theycan help me to create a much better foundation and framework, (or matrix) for what I dovalue most. ( a synergy of physical emotional, mental and spiritualgrowth or evolution ofconsciousness, interaction/communication, and expression.)

***

Neurohacking is the ‘practical’ to the ‘theory’ of neuroscience. Neuroscience gives you knowledge as facts about the brain and mind and intelligence. Neurohacking gives you knowledge as ability to use that information to improve yourself.

***

Neurohacking is another word for ‘entelechy’ for me that means learning how to do the most beneficial things for the good of intelligence, and that has fulfilled me personally as well. I have always been interested in how intelligence works. The more I learn, the more interested I get. I now see NH as a path to imaginative creativity in all things, interactions and relationships. I am hoping to learn enough to start running workshops and courses in the future.

***

I would say that neurohacking is having a conscious awareness of the forces shaping your consciousness, and consciously altering those forces in order to improve the interaction between your consciousness and the outside world. Neurohacking is inherently recursive, since the system doing the altering is also the system being altered, and I would say that any form of ‘self-improvement’ that has that feature probably qualifies as a neurohacking technique.

***

Neurohacking is just like computer hacking you change the system to do something better, to perform better, or sometimes to stop someone doing something nasty to you. Im interested in “Artificial Intelligence” and biotechnology stuff like mind/brain-computer interface and uploading, virtual reality. Intelligence is like the most important thing that humans (and machines) have access to, but most of them dont really even have a clue what it is and what it can do.

***

“Hacking is often associated with the quest for efficiency, expanding the concept to the ultimate machine, our own brains, seems toencompass much more than just brain efficiency, since the brain can assimilate the real world and expand its domain overit. True freedom of choice is impossible without knowing the full spectrum of your choices.

Expanding your mind is arequirement to fit that spectrum in, and start to glance its magnificence.

NGI = Natural General Intelligence. (contrasting with the search for AGI)

***

“Neurohacking is any act of intentionally altering/modifying your bodybrain state resulting in eithertemporary or long-term effects. The primary goal of NH is developing a bodybrain in full health with access to all it’s functions in all networks, and in the process repairing any pre-existing damage and building the potential for experiencing an extraordinary life.”

***

Theres a formal definition of Neurohacking (NH) here:

Wiki Page

I like being able to learn the latest discoveries about intelligence and discuss it. My reasons are various: intellectually & scientific interest, improving my intelligence and to keep my mind sharp as I get older, personally because the relief at being free from anxiety and really feeling personal power in my life has made me a much happier person and my life much happier (and much better organized!) I can only describe the process as like stepping out of a cloud and its a clear day.

***

Neurohacking for me is used for a spiritual path, but I know it can be used for many more purposes. The Dalai Lamas talks got me interested in neuroscience. I use some biofeedback to aid my meditation progress and I plan my diet and things like Tai Chi exercises. I also do NH techniques to support emotional stability and clarity of perception. My goal is I seek wisdom, understanding, and unity.

***

Neurohacking is any ability distilled by knowledge that deliberately seeks to promote the growth of complexity in any intelligent system.”

A Couple of Personal Accounts:

To be completely honest, neurohacking is the story of my life; as long as I can remember I’ve been fighting those dragons: beings, institutions and ideas that wanted to implant in my head the seeds of their controlled universe. Yes, way back to the times when even the word “hacking” was not part of my vocabulary, I remember… I remember the terrible shock of their blades, I remember the dry sound of their shields blocking my sword, I remember the smell of my skin burning under the repeated assaults of their fire-breathing steeds, and I remember the loneliness. I remember how I could have felt so alone in this never ending struggle, desperately seeking to meet some other brave knights out there, ready to stand and fight at my side. It took me 34 long years to find the first one, his name was Sir Alexander Ramonsky…

So yeah, maybe you can now better understand what kind of relief it was for me to find a neuroscientist who actually confirmed the righteousness of my holy war. And it might explain why, at first, I was rather focused on the will to build something like the New Camelot, reforming the old Round Table, and living in that golden stronghold with young and strong and brave knights, patiently furbishing our weapons, preparing for the day of revenge… I was so hurt, so weary, I needed a place for retreat. Although the quest for a 100% hassle-free zone was like another unattainable Holy Grail unworthy of our – quite limited – time. Avalon is the resting place of the dead, it is not made for the living.

So these days are over now. Today, my own neurohacking practice have led me to the land where Voltaire spent his late years, or as Candide himself did put it: “we must cultivate our garden”. And then I understood that even if I spent so many years wondering what was my true mission on this planet, still I’ve always fulfilled it by being true to myself, by being the living example that one can refuse all the bullshit they pretend to seriously care about. What has changed, though, is that today I know why by cultivating my own garden I’m doing precisely the only best thing I can do to utterly slain all the dragons…

That’s what neurohacking has done in my case, that’s what neurohacking does anyway, because it simply allows Intelligence to blossom naturally; and if Intelligence speaks many languages, it speaks only in one voice. Hence the delicious feeling of unity in which my mind is increasingly wandering these days.

So from now on, my focus will simply be on participating in this wide movement which – somehow – will consist in offering to the Spirit of Candide, of Voltaire and of the Enlightenment philosophers, but above all to any living dude who’ll be smart enough to really care about it, what Iwould dare to call: a ‘Science of Gardening’…” – Scalino Corleone di Napoli

***

I work in Biological Psychology and I got into Neurohacking as part of a search for the truth about what intelligence really is and whats happened to most peoples minds. I searched because I had to; I was driven, because for my life to have personal meaning it has to make sense to me, and the way my society was structured and the way that most people behaved did not make sense to me.

I searched because I knew there was something wrong, and that it was hidden from our eyes, like a computer virus running in the undercurrents of society, running in the unconscious minds of people going about their conscious business, living out their lives like duped slaves in a mindless soap-opera-in-the-matrix existence, oblivious to any real truth or any real satisfaction, and because I knew that whatever was wrong was going wrong in epidemic proportions.

I searched because I knew there was something more. Along the way I met others, potential explorers driven by their own needs, people baffled by their own experiences that did not make sense, thrown off balance by sentiments and anxieties that should not exist in healthy human intelligence (and to be truly human, or truly intelligent, I have now come to believe is the very thing humans may have to fight for). Chronic anxiety rules the world, creating the very problem that makes people unable to face it.

I went looking for the causes of humanitys dysfunctional state and my own, and I found them, in the hard, undeniable evidence of human science. The truth is way too much to swallow, for the many. Trying to think intelligently with anxiety is like trying to swim in quicksand. You can get out if you stop struggling and let intelligence save you, but most people really do not want to be unplugged. Most people are too busy hiding from, rather than looking for, the answers.

But nevertheless, Im here because its in biological psychology that I found my answers, and through neurohacking I managed to change my mind.

I am not MorpheusIf people want to be unplugged, seek to understand the truth about intelligence, and want to free their minds, Im here to work with them, but if they want to ‘stay in the matrix’, they can stay by all means. Neurohacking is not for wimps. It’s Red Pillsville, buckle your seatbelt, and Kansas is about to go bye bye. There are lots of potentials (the many) but very few actuals (the few’).

And now its a part of my life to work with the few, wherever I can. Mend the wires. Stop the virus. Make healthy intelligence ‘software’ and mental health information open source. Create a space for intelligent people to get on with real things. I make no predictions about what Ill be doing next, because from my point of view its as simple as “whatever’s necessary”.

Why are we here? “Because there is still some good in the world, Mr Frodo, and its worth fighting for”.”

***

Now Perhaps you can empathize with some of the views above or perhaps you will discover your own definitions and reasons; whatever they are you are welcome aboard

We hope you now have a clearer idea of what NH is about and what we are doing here.

More here:

For Newbies – The Basics (What is Neurohacking)

What is Neurohacking? – Neurohacker Collective

The term hacker has its origins in computer programming subcultures from the 60s, and was used to describe people who wanted to take on hard problems in a spirit of playful exploration and a resistance to unearned authority. Although the methods, means and intentions of hackers varied widely, all seemed to share a unique ethos that mixed a deep commitment to individual autonomy and agency with an equally deep commitment to collaboration and co-creation.

Over time, the concept of hacking has traveled far from its origins, finding its way into a number of domains like Biohacking, Consciousness Hacking, Flow Hacking and Life Hacking. Each is a kind of hacking because each shares this hackers ethos and a commitment to using it to find the most effective ways to optimize the human experience.

We call the common thread that links these hacking communities together, empowered responsibility. This notion expresses the dual recognition that we are no longer able to rely on external authorities to take care of us (in any domain) but through a combination of ubiquitous information, individual experimentation and open collaboration, we are increasingly empowered to take responsibility for ourselves.

In the Biohacking community, the spirit of empowered responsibility drives the process of optimizing ones biological health and performance. Biohackers learn from each other how they can modify their nutrition, exercise, sleep, movement, and mindset to achieve the specific kind of well-being that they individually desire.

The Consciousness Hacking community takes empowered responsibility in using technology as a catalyst for psychological, emotional and spiritual flourishing. They utilize mindfulness techniques and biofeedback tools for self-exploration, taking personal responsibility for their conscious experience in this most individual of journeys.

Emerging from within and alongside these movements, we are observing the coalescence of a new and important domain: Neurohacking.

Whereas biohacking concentrates on the body, and consciousness hacking explores the inner experience, neurohacking is somewhere in the middle, focusing on the mind-brain interface – the intersection of neurology and consciousness. Specifically, neurohacking involves applying science and technology to influence the brain and body in order to optimize subjective experience.

The desired outcomes of neurohacking cover everything from focused productivity, to expanded creativity, more restful sleep, reduced anxiety, enhanced empathy, and anything else that contributes to the psychological well-being and emotional health of whole, thriving human beings.

The technologies of neurohacking run the gamut from chemical technologies like nootropics and entheogens, probiotics to support the gut-brain connection, bioelectrical technologies like neurofeedback and transcranial stimulation, photic therapies like low level laser therapy and all the way to embodied practices like somatics and meditation. So long as there is a scientifically accessible biological mechanism for effecting subjective experience, it belongs in the domain of neurohacking.

Of course, like all emergent phenomena, neurohacking didnt just come from nowhere. For years there have been many movements and communities out there, playing in and pioneering some aspect of the neurohacking space.

Some of these domains include:

We propose that it is now timely and useful to perceive the commonality among these different movements and communities as shared aspects of Neurohacking. And in an effort to make these commonalities more visible and legible to each other, in the upcoming weeks we will take a deeper dive into each, highlight some notable people and projects in each space and explore the frontiers of the community from the point of view of Neurohacking.

In our next post, we will begin this exploration with the domain of Nootropics.

Go here to see the original:

What is Neurohacking? – Neurohacker Collective

Revolution Women’s Fitness Program – Body Spartan

DescriptionCombining the mind, body, and the keto diet for ultimate results

Designed by Body Spartan Co-Founder, WNSO Pro Fitness Competitor, and Master Sports Nutritionist, Priscilla Tuft, Revolution Womens Fitness Program is unlike any other fitness program. It takes the most powerful element known to the human race, your mind, and combines it with a complete 12-week workout program, a custom keto diet, and cardio plan that will completely transform your body. This revolutionary fitness program uses cutting edge neurohacking techniques to amplify the effects of everything youre doing and exponentially increase your success rate!

Created by Body Spartan Co-Founder, Priscilla Tuft, a former WNSO Pro Fitness Competitor, Ms. Bikini America, and cover model for magazines such as MuscleMag. This workout program was designed to specifically address the emotional needs of females during their fitness journey. Success starts in the mind and Priscilla is an expert at mind reprogramming for fitness.

A keto diet will place your body into a state of ketosis. In ketosis, your body will burn fats for fuel instead of carbohydrates. On a regular diet that includes carbohydrates, your body will produce different hormones that store fat and also produce glucose.

In a carbohydrate rich diet, glucose will be used as a primary energy source and your fats are not needed and are then stored as body fat. By decreasing the carbohydrate intake with a keto diet, your body will be induced into a state of ketosis where it burns fat for fuel, instead of glucose.

The Revolution Program uses a cyclonic keto diet. With this type of keto diet, you will have five days of low carb intake each week, followed by one refeed day or Phase II day, as we call it, on the sixth day. The Phase II day is also your rest day and allows for your muscle cells to uptake the carbohydrates as glycogen. This is essential for you to retain your strength for the upcoming workout routines.

My husband has been doing the Body Spartan programs for over a year (with some breaks in between) Ive seen his progress and was excited when they came out with one for women!! Granted Im only in my first week of the program and have been taking more days off than required due to extreme soreness obviously Ill restart the program with the required off days but other than my slacking because of being sore I absolutely love the program so far and even though I know results cant be seen I can feel them – January 12, 2018

See the article here:

Revolution Women’s Fitness Program – Body Spartan

Revolution Women’s Fitness Program – Body Spartan

DescriptionCombining the mind, body, and the keto diet for ultimate results

Designed by Body Spartan Co-Founder, WNSO Pro Fitness Competitor, and Master Sports Nutritionist, Priscilla Tuft, Revolution Womens Fitness Program is unlike any other fitness program. It takes the most powerful element known to the human race, your mind, and combines it with a complete 12-week workout program, a custom keto diet, and cardio plan that will completely transform your body. This revolutionary fitness program uses cutting edge neurohacking techniques to amplify the effects of everything youre doing and exponentially increase your success rate!

Created by Body Spartan Co-Founder, Priscilla Tuft, a former WNSO Pro Fitness Competitor, Ms. Bikini America, and cover model for magazines such as MuscleMag. This workout program was designed to specifically address the emotional needs of females during their fitness journey. Success starts in the mind and Priscilla is an expert at mind reprogramming for fitness.

A keto diet will place your body into a state of ketosis. In ketosis, your body will burn fats for fuel instead of carbohydrates. On a regular diet that includes carbohydrates, your body will produce different hormones that store fat and also produce glucose.

In a carbohydrate rich diet, glucose will be used as a primary energy source and your fats are not needed and are then stored as body fat. By decreasing the carbohydrate intake with a keto diet, your body will be induced into a state of ketosis where it burns fat for fuel, instead of glucose.

The Revolution Program uses a cyclonic keto diet. With this type of keto diet, you will have five days of low carb intake each week, followed by one refeed day or Phase II day, as we call it, on the sixth day. The Phase II day is also your rest day and allows for your muscle cells to uptake the carbohydrates as glycogen. This is essential for you to retain your strength for the upcoming workout routines.

My husband has been doing the Body Spartan programs for over a year (with some breaks in between) Ive seen his progress and was excited when they came out with one for women!! Granted Im only in my first week of the program and have been taking more days off than required due to extreme soreness obviously Ill restart the program with the required off days but other than my slacking because of being sore I absolutely love the program so far and even though I know results cant be seen I can feel them – January 12, 2018

Read this article:

Revolution Women’s Fitness Program – Body Spartan

What is Neurohacking? – NEUROHACKER COLLECTIVE

The term hacker has its origins in computer programming subcultures from the 60s, and was used to describe people who wanted to take on hard problems in a spirit of playful exploration and a resistance to unearned authority. Although the methods, means and intentions of hackers varied widely, all seemed to share a unique ethos that mixed a deep commitment to individual autonomy and agency with an equally deep commitment to collaboration and co-creation.

Over time, the concept of hacking has traveled far from its origins, finding its way into a number of domains like Biohacking, Consciousness Hacking, Flow Hacking and Life Hacking. Each is a kind of hacking because each shares this hackers ethos and a commitment to using it to find the most effective ways to optimize the human experience.

We call the common thread that links these hacking communities together, empowered responsibility. This notion expresses the dual recognition that we are no longer able to rely on external authorities to take care of us (in any domain) but through a combination of ubiquitous information, individual experimentation and open collaboration, we are increasingly empowered to take responsibility for ourselves.

In the Biohacking community, the spirit of empowered responsibility drives the process of optimizing ones biological health and performance. Biohackers learn from each other how they can modify their nutrition, exercise, sleep, movement, and mindset to achieve the specific kind of well-being that they individually desire.

The Consciousness Hacking community takes empowered responsibility in using technology as a catalyst for psychological, emotional and spiritual flourishing. They utilize mindfulness techniques and biofeedback tools for self-exploration, taking personal responsibility for their conscious experience in this most individual of journeys.

Emerging from within and alongside these movements, we are observing the coalescence of a new and important domain: Neurohacking.

Whereas biohacking concentrates on the body, and consciousness hacking explores the inner experience, neurohacking is somewhere in the middle, focusing on the mind-brain interface – the intersection of neurology and consciousness. Specifically, neurohacking involves applying science and technology to influence the brain and body in order to optimize subjective experience.

The desired outcomes of neurohacking cover everything from focused productivity, to expanded creativity, more restful sleep, reduced anxiety, enhanced empathy, and anything else that contributes to the psychological well-being and emotional health of whole, thriving human beings.

The technologies of neurohacking run the gamut from chemical technologies like nootropics and entheogens, probiotics to support the gut-brain connection, bioelectrical technologies like neurofeedback and transcranial stimulation, photic therapies like low level laser therapy and all the way to embodied practices like somatics and meditation. So long as there is a scientifically accessible biological mechanism for effecting subjective experience, it belongs in the domain of neurohacking.

Of course, like all emergent phenomena, neurohacking didnt just come from nowhere. For years there have been many movements and communities out there, playing in and pioneering some aspect of the neurohacking space.

Some of these domains include:

We propose that it is now timely and useful to perceive the commonality among these different movements and communities as shared aspects of Neurohacking. And in an effort to make these commonalities more visible and legible to each other, in the upcoming weeks we will take a deeper dive into each, highlight some notable people and projects in each space and explore the frontiers of the community from the point of view of Neurohacking.

In our next post, we will begin this exploration with the domain of Nootropics.

Originally posted here:

What is Neurohacking? – NEUROHACKER COLLECTIVE

What is Neurohacking? – NEUROHACKER COLLECTIVE

The term hacker has its origins in computer programming subcultures from the 60s, and was used to describe people who wanted to take on hard problems in a spirit of playful exploration and a resistance to unearned authority. Although the methods, means and intentions of hackers varied widely, all seemed to share a unique ethos that mixed a deep commitment to individual autonomy and agency with an equally deep commitment to collaboration and co-creation.

Over time, the concept of hacking has traveled far from its origins, finding its way into a number of domains like Biohacking, Consciousness Hacking, Flow Hacking and Life Hacking. Each is a kind of hacking because each shares this hackers ethos and a commitment to using it to find the most effective ways to optimize the human experience.

We call the common thread that links these hacking communities together, empowered responsibility. This notion expresses the dual recognition that we are no longer able to rely on external authorities to take care of us (in any domain) but through a combination of ubiquitous information, individual experimentation and open collaboration, we are increasingly empowered to take responsibility for ourselves.

In the Biohacking community, the spirit of empowered responsibility drives the process of optimizing ones biological health and performance. Biohackers learn from each other how they can modify their nutrition, exercise, sleep, movement, and mindset to achieve the specific kind of well-being that they individually desire.

The Consciousness Hacking community takes empowered responsibility in using technology as a catalyst for psychological, emotional and spiritual flourishing. They utilize mindfulness techniques and biofeedback tools for self-exploration, taking personal responsibility for their conscious experience in this most individual of journeys.

Emerging from within and alongside these movements, we are observing the coalescence of a new and important domain: Neurohacking.

Whereas biohacking concentrates on the body, and consciousness hacking explores the inner experience, neurohacking is somewhere in the middle, focusing on the mind-brain interface – the intersection of neurology and consciousness. Specifically, neurohacking involves applying science and technology to influence the brain and body in order to optimize subjective experience.

The desired outcomes of neurohacking cover everything from focused productivity, to expanded creativity, more restful sleep, reduced anxiety, enhanced empathy, and anything else that contributes to the psychological well-being and emotional health of whole, thriving human beings.

The technologies of neurohacking run the gamut from chemical technologies like nootropics and entheogens, probiotics to support the gut-brain connection, bioelectrical technologies like neurofeedback and transcranial stimulation, photic therapies like low level laser therapy and all the way to embodied practices like somatics and meditation. So long as there is a scientifically accessible biological mechanism for effecting subjective experience, it belongs in the domain of neurohacking.

Of course, like all emergent phenomena, neurohacking didnt just come from nowhere. For years there have been many movements and communities out there, playing in and pioneering some aspect of the neurohacking space.

Some of these domains include:

We propose that it is now timely and useful to perceive the commonality among these different movements and communities as shared aspects of Neurohacking. And in an effort to make these commonalities more visible and legible to each other, in the upcoming weeks we will take a deeper dive into each, highlight some notable people and projects in each space and explore the frontiers of the community from the point of view of Neurohacking.

In our next post, we will begin this exploration with the domain of Nootropics.

More here:

What is Neurohacking? – NEUROHACKER COLLECTIVE

What is Neurohacking? – NEUROHACKER COLLECTIVE

The term hacker has its origins in computer programming subcultures from the 60s, and was used to describe people who wanted to take on hard problems in a spirit of playful exploration and a resistance to unearned authority. Although the methods, means and intentions of hackers varied widely, all seemed to share a unique ethos that mixed a deep commitment to individual autonomy and agency with an equally deep commitment to collaboration and co-creation.

Over time, the concept of hacking has traveled far from its origins, finding its way into a number of domains like Biohacking, Consciousness Hacking, Flow Hacking and Life Hacking. Each is a kind of hacking because each shares this hackers ethos and a commitment to using it to find the most effective ways to optimize the human experience.

We call the common thread that links these hacking communities together, empowered responsibility. This notion expresses the dual recognition that we are no longer able to rely on external authorities to take care of us (in any domain) but through a combination of ubiquitous information, individual experimentation and open collaboration, we are increasingly empowered to take responsibility for ourselves.

In the Biohacking community, the spirit of empowered responsibility drives the process of optimizing ones biological health and performance. Biohackers learn from each other how they can modify their nutrition, exercise, sleep, movement, and mindset to achieve the specific kind of well-being that they individually desire.

The Consciousness Hacking community takes empowered responsibility in using technology as a catalyst for psychological, emotional and spiritual flourishing. They utilize mindfulness techniques and biofeedback tools for self-exploration, taking personal responsibility for their conscious experience in this most individual of journeys.

Emerging from within and alongside these movements, we are observing the coalescence of a new and important domain: Neurohacking.

Whereas biohacking concentrates on the body, and consciousness hacking explores the inner experience, neurohacking is somewhere in the middle, focusing on the mind-brain interface – the intersection of neurology and consciousness. Specifically, neurohacking involves applying science and technology to influence the brain and body in order to optimize subjective experience.

The desired outcomes of neurohacking cover everything from focused productivity, to expanded creativity, more restful sleep, reduced anxiety, enhanced empathy, and anything else that contributes to the psychological well-being and emotional health of whole, thriving human beings.

The technologies of neurohacking run the gamut from chemical technologies like nootropics and entheogens, probiotics to support the gut-brain connection, bioelectrical technologies like neurofeedback and transcranial stimulation, photic therapies like low level laser therapy and all the way to embodied practices like somatics and meditation. So long as there is a scientifically accessible biological mechanism for effecting subjective experience, it belongs in the domain of neurohacking.

Of course, like all emergent phenomena, neurohacking didnt just come from nowhere. For years there have been many movements and communities out there, playing in and pioneering some aspect of the neurohacking space.

Some of these domains include:

We propose that it is now timely and useful to perceive the commonality among these different movements and communities as shared aspects of Neurohacking. And in an effort to make these commonalities more visible and legible to each other, in the upcoming weeks we will take a deeper dive into each, highlight some notable people and projects in each space and explore the frontiers of the community from the point of view of Neurohacking.

In our next post, we will begin this exploration with the domain of Nootropics.

Read the original:

What is Neurohacking? – NEUROHACKER COLLECTIVE

What is Neurohacking? – NEUROHACKER COLLECTIVE

The term hacker has its origins in computer programming subcultures from the 60s, and was used to describe people who wanted to take on hard problems in a spirit of playful exploration and a resistance to unearned authority. Although the methods, means and intentions of hackers varied widely, all seemed to share a unique ethos that mixed a deep commitment to individual autonomy and agency with an equally deep commitment to collaboration and co-creation.

Over time, the concept of hacking has traveled far from its origins, finding its way into a number of domains like Biohacking, Consciousness Hacking, Flow Hacking and Life Hacking. Each is a kind of hacking because each shares this hackers ethos and a commitment to using it to find the most effective ways to optimize the human experience.

We call the common thread that links these hacking communities together, empowered responsibility. This notion expresses the dual recognition that we are no longer able to rely on external authorities to take care of us (in any domain) but through a combination of ubiquitous information, individual experimentation and open collaboration, we are increasingly empowered to take responsibility for ourselves.

In the Biohacking community, the spirit of empowered responsibility drives the process of optimizing ones biological health and performance. Biohackers learn from each other how they can modify their nutrition, exercise, sleep, movement, and mindset to achieve the specific kind of well-being that they individually desire.

The Consciousness Hacking community takes empowered responsibility in using technology as a catalyst for psychological, emotional and spiritual flourishing. They utilize mindfulness techniques and biofeedback tools for self-exploration, taking personal responsibility for their conscious experience in this most individual of journeys.

Emerging from within and alongside these movements, we are observing the coalescence of a new and important domain: Neurohacking.

Whereas biohacking concentrates on the body, and consciousness hacking explores the inner experience, neurohacking is somewhere in the middle, focusing on the mind-brain interface – the intersection of neurology and consciousness. Specifically, neurohacking involves applying science and technology to influence the brain and body in order to optimize subjective experience.

The desired outcomes of neurohacking cover everything from focused productivity, to expanded creativity, more restful sleep, reduced anxiety, enhanced empathy, and anything else that contributes to the psychological well-being and emotional health of whole, thriving human beings.

The technologies of neurohacking run the gamut from chemical technologies like nootropics and entheogens, probiotics to support the gut-brain connection, bioelectrical technologies like neurofeedback and transcranial stimulation, photic therapies like low level laser therapy and all the way to embodied practices like somatics and meditation. So long as there is a scientifically accessible biological mechanism for effecting subjective experience, it belongs in the domain of neurohacking.

Of course, like all emergent phenomena, neurohacking didnt just come from nowhere. For years there have been many movements and communities out there, playing in and pioneering some aspect of the neurohacking space.

Some of these domains include:

We propose that it is now timely and useful to perceive the commonality among these different movements and communities as shared aspects of Neurohacking. And in an effort to make these commonalities more visible and legible to each other, in the upcoming weeks we will take a deeper dive into each, highlight some notable people and projects in each space and explore the frontiers of the community from the point of view of Neurohacking.

In our next post, we will begin this exploration with the domain of Nootropics.

See the original post:

What is Neurohacking? – NEUROHACKER COLLECTIVE

Revolution Women’s Fitness Program – Body Spartan

DescriptionCombining the mind, body, and the keto diet for ultimate results

Designed by Body Spartan Co-Founder, WNSO Pro Fitness Competitor, and Master Sports Nutritionist, Priscilla Tuft, Revolution Womens Fitness Program is unlike any other fitness program. It takes the most powerful element known to the human race, your mind, and combines it with a complete 12-week workout program, a custom keto diet, and cardio plan that will completely transform your body. This revolutionary fitness program uses cutting edge neurohacking techniques to amplify the effects of everything youre doing and exponentially increase your success rate!

Created by Body Spartan Co-Founder, Priscilla Tuft, a former WNSO Pro Fitness Competitor, Ms. Bikini America, and cover model for magazines such as MuscleMag. This workout program was designed to specifically address the emotional needs of females during their fitness journey. Success starts in the mind and Priscilla is an expert at mind reprogramming for fitness.

A keto diet will place your body into a state of ketosis. In ketosis, your body will burn fats for fuel instead of carbohydrates. On a regular diet that includes carbohydrates, your body will produce different hormones that store fat and also produce glucose.

In a carbohydrate rich diet, glucose will be used as a primary energy source and your fats are not needed and are then stored as body fat. By decreasing the carbohydrate intake with a keto diet, your body will be induced into a state of ketosis where it burns fat for fuel, instead of glucose.

The Revolution Program uses a cyclonic keto diet. With this type of keto diet, you will have five days of low carb intake each week, followed by one refeed day or Phase II day, as we call it, on the sixth day. The Phase II day is also your rest day and allows for your muscle cells to uptake the carbohydrates as glycogen. This is essential for you to retain your strength for the upcoming workout routines.

My husband has been doing the Body Spartan programs for over a year (with some breaks in between) Ive seen his progress and was excited when they came out with one for women!! Granted Im only in my first week of the program and have been taking more days off than required due to extreme soreness obviously Ill restart the program with the required off days but other than my slacking because of being sore I absolutely love the program so far and even though I know results cant be seen I can feel them – January 12, 2018

Read the original:

Revolution Women’s Fitness Program – Body Spartan

Talk:Neurohacking – Wikipedia

Merge proposal for Neurohacking and Biohacking?

Wiki already cover biohacking, and the methods, technology and ontology are identical. ARAlexramonsky (talk) 10:10, 27 April 2010 (UTC)

There three articles seem incredibly similar and they are also in need of clean-up / expansion. Why not combine them and explain all the specific techniques within one article. I did a popularity check via google on the three terms and their variants:

From this view of things, I would suggest that we merge everything into neurohacking. What does everyone else think? –Ben Houston 22:12, 27 February 2006 (UTC)

I respect your idea, especially after reviewing your user page. I hope that mine will reflect a similar contribution some day. Having said that, I would like to defend the wetware hacker article. It is more developed then neurohacking, and I think that it is interlinked with the definition of wetware that I revised recently. I would like to assit with your goal of Improving the Cybernetic End of Human-Computer Interaction. Bocaj 02:17, 1 March 2006 (UTC)

No, dont merge. there is a clear difference. Wetware hacking is modifying the existing brain. Neurohacking includes the hacking of a simulation of a brain (which exists after mind uploading). There is a difference. Also, wireheading only involves the hacking of the existing brain – and only in one specific way. Crippled Sloth 23:35, 30 March 2006 (UTC)

Rather than merging it might make more sense to further narrow and separate the definitions. Wetware hacking being more along the lines of social engineering based upon communicating via normal spoken, written, and imaging routes, done by individuals or groups, targeting individuals or groups. With nothing done to augment that, no drugs, no physical coercion, no devices, beyond devices used to transmit normal human communications, done in much the same manner as computer hacking but in a human communication sense. So humans seeking to alter the nature of humanity via the effective use of memory memes, would be a prime example of wetware hacking. So the logic follows, hardware hacking (computer hardware), software hacking(computer software running on computer hardware), wetware hacking(those things that use computer hardware and software). Preceding unsigned comment added by 2001:44B8:23C:6D00:F44B:E181:2429:15F0 (talk) 05:40, 20 August 2015 (UTC)

I believe that a merger would not necessarily be helpful and may actually confuse the issue further. Remember that ‘neurohacking’ is not just about the brain; it is about neurons. You can neurohack your leg or your finger if you want to. Interrupting the signal of a nerve in order to stop pain anywhere is neurohacking. There is also a problem that serious practitioners are finding that people relate N-hacking more to the sci-fi/horror movies than the real life therapy or research [there used to be a similar problem in cryonics], and if we are aiming to be clear and informative here it’s helpful to use terms such as DBS [deep brain stimulation] instead of ‘wireheading’. AJ Ramonsky

Here is the original post:

Talk:Neurohacking – Wikipedia

Neurohacking – Wikipedia

Neurohacking is the colloquial term for (usually personal or ‘DIY’) neuroengineering. It is a form of biohacking (qv) focusing on the brain and CNS. Strictly speaking it is any method of manipulating or interfering with the structure and/or function of neurons for improvement or repair.

The main goal of neurohacking is optimal mental health. Other goals include damage repair, simulated reality, prevention of disease and augmentation of abilities or of intelligence overall. It utilises information and technology mainly from the fields of epigenetics, bio/neurofeedback, psychopharmacology, biological psychology and functional analysis, but many practitioners also employ physical exercise, nutritional guidelines, vitamins & supplements, meditation and/or self-hypnosis. Some avoid all neuroactive substances including caffeine, alcohol, food additives and fast-release sugars. Current research focus on the nature and development of intelligence and how to increase or improve it. The works of Dr. Herman Epstein, Joseph LeDoux, Alex Ramonsky, Frederick Starr and David Barker are influential. The ethical basis of Neurohacking for health is that it should be practiced strictly with informed consent.

There are numerous examples of the use of neural implants for therapy, however the only experiments involving hacking into the nervous system for enhancement appear to be those conducted by Kevin Warwick. In a series of experiments at the University of Reading, Warwick became the first human recipient of a BrainGate electrode array implant on 14 March 2002, into the median nerve of his left arm. With this in place he was able to control a robot arm to copy his own hand movements.[1] Warwick’s nervous system was also connected with the internet in Columbia University, New York to enable him to control the robot arm in the University of Reading, also receiving feedback from sensors in the finger tips. A simpler array was implanted into the arm of Warwick’s wife. With this in place they were able to achieve the first direct electronic communication between the nervous systems of two humans.[2]

The term neurohacking is also used for a method of attempting to retrieve information from the brain (such as passwords, locations, etc..) without consent; presently no technology exists for such a tactic. The concept has been used much in science fiction (e.g. the film “The Matrix”). In data retrieval, some sort of braincomputer interface (BCI) is typically used, where the brains neuron synapses are somehow captured or recorded to be processed for information. Promoters of this concept generally refer to the MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) or MEG (magnetoencephalography) to support the plausibility of this concept. Although some sort of neuroimaging could someday be used, the accuracy of any present day method is not nearly close enough. For instance, it is assumed that neurohacking requires detection of the state of individual neurons (approximately 1 micrometer diameter) while the resolution of the MEG is several thousand neurons and other imaging systems may be even larger. It is estimated that usable neurohacking of this type is still many decades away.

Caffeine, alcohol, modafinil, over the counter medicine, and other drugs are all forms of neurohacking. Every one of these substances alters or “tricks” the brain into desirable conditions. When ingesting caffeine, the brain is fooled into thinking the body has energy and keeps the consumer awake. The brain’s neurons naturally produce adenosine as a byproduct which is monitored by the nervous system. Once the level of adenosine is at a certain point, the body will feel tired. Caffeine acts as fake adenosine and binds to the body’s receptors. However, instead of disappearing, it blocks the adenosine receptors so the brain’s stimulants, dopamine and glutamate, can work more freely. Since neurohacking is the interference with the structure and function of neurons, caffeine consumption is in fact a neurohack. Similarly, other substances that affect the brain and functions of neurons are also neurohacks.Alcohol is an example for a form of neurohacking which affects multiple neurotransmitters instead of just one. This is because alcohol is a fat soluble molecule. Since lipids are a major component of cell membranes, alcohol is able to enter the membranes of neurons and change their properties. Specifically, alcohol inhibits the glutamate receptor function, enhances GABA receptor function, as well as raises dopamine and endorphin levels. This causes all sorts of reactions, including liveliness and excitement. Alcohol also causes one to lose their anxieties, because of the effect of alcohol on GABA receptors. After alcohol affects the system, it causes the body to go through what is called neurotransmitter rebound. This is because when alcohol takes effect, it overuses the GABA system, so when it wears off, the GABA system makes the body feel restless, resulting in its severe withdrawal symptoms.

Excerpt from:

Neurohacking – Wikipedia

What is Neurohacking? – NEUROHACKER COLLECTIVE

The term hacker has its origins in computer programming subcultures from the 60s, and was used to describe people who wanted to take on hard problems in a spirit of playful exploration and a resistance to unearned authority. Although the methods, means and intentions of hackers varied widely, all seemed to share a unique ethos that mixed a deep commitment to individual autonomy and agency with an equally deep commitment to collaboration and co-creation.

Over time, the concept of hacking has traveled far from its origins, finding its way into a number of domains like Biohacking, Consciousness Hacking, Flow Hacking and Life Hacking. Each is a kind of hacking because each shares this hackers ethos and a commitment to using it to find the most effective ways to optimize the human experience.

We call the common thread that links these hacking communities together, empowered responsibility. This notion expresses the dual recognition that we are no longer able to rely on external authorities to take care of us (in any domain) but through a combination of ubiquitous information, individual experimentation and open collaboration, we are increasingly empowered to take responsibility for ourselves.

In the Biohacking community, the spirit of empowered responsibility drives the process of optimizing ones biological health and performance. Biohackers learn from each other how they can modify their nutrition, exercise, sleep, movement, and mindset to achieve the specific kind of well-being that they individually desire.

The Consciousness Hacking community takes empowered responsibility in using technology as a catalyst for psychological, emotional and spiritual flourishing. They utilize mindfulness techniques and biofeedback tools for self-exploration, taking personal responsibility for their conscious experience in this most individual of journeys.

Emerging from within and alongside these movements, we are observing the coalescence of a new and important domain: Neurohacking.

Whereas biohacking concentrates on the body, and consciousness hacking explores the inner experience, neurohacking is somewhere in the middle, focusing on the mind-brain interface – the intersection of neurology and consciousness. Specifically, neurohacking involves applying science and technology to influence the brain and body in order to optimize subjective experience.

The desired outcomes of neurohacking cover everything from focused productivity, to expanded creativity, more restful sleep, reduced anxiety, enhanced empathy, and anything else that contributes to the psychological well-being and emotional health of whole, thriving human beings.

The technologies of neurohacking run the gamut from chemical technologies like nootropics and entheogens, probiotics to support the gut-brain connection, bioelectrical technologies like neurofeedback and transcranial stimulation, photic therapies like low level laser therapy and all the way to embodied practices like somatics and meditation. So long as there is a scientifically accessible biological mechanism for effecting subjective experience, it belongs in the domain of neurohacking.

Of course, like all emergent phenomena, neurohacking didnt just come from nowhere. For years there have been many movements and communities out there, playing in and pioneering some aspect of the neurohacking space.

Some of these domains include:

We propose that it is now timely and useful to perceive the commonality among these different movements and communities as shared aspects of Neurohacking. And in an effort to make these commonalities more visible and legible to each other, in the upcoming weeks we will take a deeper dive into each, highlight some notable people and projects in each space and explore the frontiers of the community from the point of view of Neurohacking.

In our next post, we will begin this exploration with the domain of Nootropics.

Original post:

What is Neurohacking? – NEUROHACKER COLLECTIVE


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