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Nanotextiles Market Estimated size be driven size Innovation and Industrialization COVID-19 2024 – Chelanpress

The global market fornanotextilesshould grow from $5.1 billion in 2019 to $14.8 billion by 2024 at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 23.6% for the period of 2019-2024.

Report Scope:

This report provides an updated review of nanotextile technology, including materials and production processes, and identifies current and emerging applications for this technology.

BCC Research delineates the current market status for these products, defines trends, and presents growth forecasts for the next five years. The market is analyzed based on the following segments: nanotextile type, functionality, nanostructured material, application, and region. In addition, technological issues, including key events and the latest developments, are discussed.

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More specifically, the market analysis conducted by BCC Research for this report is divided into five sections.

In the first section, an introduction to the topic and a historical review of nanotextiles are provided, including an outline of recent events. In this section, current and emerging applications are also identified and grouped in segments (apparel, technical, household, and other consumer products).

The second section provides a technological review of nanotextiles. This section offers a detailed description of materials used for production of nanofabrics, properties of nanotextiles, and typical fabrication methods. This section concludes with an analysis of the most important technological developments since 2016, including examples of significant patents recently issued or applied for. The chapter ends with a highlight of the most active research organizations operating in this field and their activities.

The third section entails a global market analysis for nanotextiles. Global revenues (sales data in millions of dollars) are presented for each segment (nanotextile type, functionality, nanostructured material, application, and region), with actual data referring to the years 2017 and 2018 and estimates for 2019. Dollar figures refer to sales of these products at the manufacturing level.

The analysis of current revenues for nanotextiles is followed by a detailed presentation of market growth trends, based on industry growth, technological trends, and regional trends. The third section concludes by providing projected revenues for nanotextiles within each segment, together with forecast compound annual growth rates (CAGRs) for the period 2019 through 2024. Projected and forecast revenue values are in constant U.S. dollars, unadjusted for inflation.

In the fourth section of the study, which covers global industry structure, the report offers a list of the leading manufacturers of nanotextiles, together with a description of their products. The analysis includes a description of the geographical distribution of these firms and an evaluation of other key industry players. Detailed company profiles of the top players are also provided.

The fifth and final section includes an analysis of recently issued U.S. patents, with a summary of patents related to nanotextile materials, fabrication methods, and applications. Patent analysis is performed by region, country, assignee, patent category, application, and material type.

Report Includes:

55 data tables and 29 additional tables Detailed overview and industry analysis of nanotextiles and their global market Analyses of global market trends with data from 2017, 2018, estimates for 2019 and projections of compound annual growth rates (CAGRs) through 2024

Segmentation of the global nanotextiles market by product type, fabrication technology, application, end use industry and geographical region Identification of the fastest-growing applications and technologies, and a holistic overview of the current and future market trends which will lead to increasing demand for nanotextiles production An extensive U.S. analysis of recently issued patents, with a summary of patents related to various types of nanotextiles and their fabrication methods and applications Description of the geographical distribution of manufacturers and detailed company profiles of the top industry players including Donaldson, eSpin Technologies, Finetex EnE, Nano-Textile and Parker Hannifin

Summary

Nanotextiles are a class of textiles that utilize nanotechnology during their fabrication process. In particular, the term nanotextiles applies to four categories of products: nanocoated textiles, fabrics consisting of nanofiber webs, textiles obtained from composite fibers based on nanostructures, and nanoporous textiles.

Although the origin of nanotechnology can be traced back to the 4th century, the first nanotextiles were only introduced during the 1980s in the form of nanofiber-based membranes for filtration. During the past 40 years, sales of nanotextiles have expanded steadily and are currently experiencing very strong growth, due to their increasing use in the fabrication of mass-market products within a range of sectors. This study provides an updated, comprehensive description of nanotextiles and their characteristics, highlighting the latest developments in their fabrication technology and features. It also offers a detailed market analysis for these products by segment (nanotextile type, functionality, nanostructured material, application, and region), describing technical aspects and trends that will affect future growth of this market.

As shown in the Summary Table, the global market for nanotextiles increased from nearly REDACTED in 2017 to REDACTED in 2018 and is estimated to be valued at REDACTED in 2019.

BCC Research has divided all the applications where nanotextiles have current and potential use in two main groups: consumer products and technical products.

Consumer products, which include mainly apparel and household articles, currently account for the largest share of the market, at an estimated REDACTED of the total in 2019, corresponding to REDACTED in 2019. Within this segment, nanotextiles are being used primarily for the fabrication of high-performance outerwear and stocking. Sales of these products have risen at a very healthy CAGR of REDACTED during the 2017-2019 period.

By comparison, nanofabrics for technical products represent a share of REDACTED of the total, corresponding to estimated 2019 revenues of REDACTED. This segment has been expanding at a REDACTED CAGR since 2017, mainly driven by applications in the mechanical/chemical/environmental, life science, and energy sectors.

Sales of nanotextiles are projected to continue rising at a double-digit rate during the next five years. Relevant factors that will contribute to market expansion through 2024 are the following Increasing penetration in large industry sectors such as apparel, filtration and separation, catalysis, biomedical, energy, and automotive. Greater utilization in the fabrication of products characterized by strong demand, such as membranes, photocatalysts, and tissue engineering scaffolds. Growing market penetration of nanotextiles in developing countries. Increasing use of these products in wearable electronics and wearable medical devices. High levels of related R&D activities.

As a result, the total market for nanotextiles is forecast to rise at a CAGR of REDACTED from 2019 to 2024, reaching global revenues of REDACTED in 2024.

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Nanotextiles Market Estimated size be driven size Innovation and Industrialization COVID-19 2024 - Chelanpress

Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Internet of Things job with CRANFIELD UNIVERSITY | 218434 – Times Higher Education (THE)

School/Department School of Aerospace, Transport and ManufacturingBased at Cranfield Campus, Cranfield, BedfordshireHours of work 37 hours per week, normally worked Monday to Friday. Flexible working will be considered.Contract type PermanentSalary Lecturer: Salary level 6 43,351 to 48,323 per annum with additional performance related pay up to 60,403 per annum or Senior Lecturer: Salary level 7 53,205 to 59,302 per annum with additional performance related pay up to 74,126 per annumApply by 13/09/2020

Role Description

We welcome applications from people who can contribute to the state of the art in education and research. We are seeking expertise in Internet of Things, Industry 4.0, digital systems, virtual and augmented reality, visualisation, ISO55000.

As the UKs only exclusively postgraduate university, Cranfields world-class expertise, large-scale facilities and unrivalled industry partnerships is creating leaders in technology and management globally. Our distinctive expertise is in our deep understanding of technology and management and how these work together to benefit the world.

Our people are our most valuable resource and everyone has a role to play in shaping the future of our university, developing our learners, and transforming the businesses we work with. Learn more about Cranfield and our unique impact here. Our shared, stated values help to define who we are and underpin everything we do: Ambition; Impact; Respect; and Community. Find out more here.

Cranfield Manufacturing (which includes major activities in Materials) is following the ambitious strategy of developing a roadmap for a Sustainable Manufacturing Sector for 2050 by applying fundamental science and thought leadership via conceiving and maturing the concepts of Smart, Clean and Green manufacturing solutions agnostically across all sectors and through all tiers of the supply chain with SMEs as well as OEMs. This is to support the national aspiration of Net Zero UK by 2050. We offer world-class and niche post-graduate level research, education, training and consultancy. We are unique in our multi-disciplinary approach by bringing together design, materials technology and management expertise. We link fundamental materials research with manufacturing to develop novel technologies and improve the science base of the manufacturing research. Our capabilities are unique, with a focus on simulation and modelling, and sustainability. They also include work in composite manufacture, metallic glasses, nano-materials (graphene, coatings and sensors), low energy casting, thermal barrier coatings and Wire Arc Additive Manufacturing (WAAM). Our expertise in through-life engineering services offers solutions to defence, aerospace, transport and manufacturing customers.

This role will lead and support our programme of education and research in through-life support and manufacturing. The successful candidate will join the management and teaching team of MSc Through-life Systems Sustainment and MSc Manufacturing Information Systems. You will be expected to build an independent portfolio of research and PhD supervision.

You will be educated to doctoral level in a relevant subject and have relevant experience. With excellent communication skills, you will have expertise in one or more of:

Further information can be found by visiting https://www.cranfield.ac.uk/centres/throughlife-engineering-services-institute.

In return, the successful applicant will have exciting opportunities for career development in this key position, and to lead and supportworld leading research and education, joining a supportive team and environment.

At Cranfield we value Diversity and Inclusion, and aim to create and maintain a culture in which everyone can work and study together harmoniously with dignity and respect and realise their full potential. Our equal opportunities and diversity monitoring has shown that women are currently underrepresented within the university and so we actively encourage female applicants. To further demonstrate our commitment to progressing gender diversity in STEM, we are members of WES & Working Families, and sponsors of International Women in Engineering Day.

We actively consider flexible working options such as part-time, compressed or flexible hours and/or an element of homeworking, and commit to exploring the possibilities for each role. Find out more here.

For an informal discussion, please contact Professor Andrew Starr, Head of Through-life Engineering Services Institute, on (E) a.starr@cranfield.ac.uk

Interviews to be held: 28 to 30 September 2020

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Lecturer/Senior Lecturer in Internet of Things job with CRANFIELD UNIVERSITY | 218434 - Times Higher Education (THE)

The End of an Era as Tata Motors Prepare To Sell Their Passenger Car Business – Moneylife

Updated at 4.45pm on 5 August 2020 to add clarification from Tata Motors.

The 15th of January 1998was a red-letter day in Indias automotive history. On that day, at New Delhis Pragati Maidan expo grounds, several new cars were launched; but the, but the car that really grabbed the headlines was the Tata Indica, Indias first home-grown 'peoples car.' Even if all knew that the new Tata car that would be as big as a Maruti Zen, yet provide the space of an Ambassador, at a price of a Maruti 800, was going to be called the Indica (like in India+Car), they still hadnt seen the car.

Thus, the unveiling of the car was a much-awaited moment. Sure enough, expectations ran high and, at the unveiling, which had thousands of journalists, politicians and spectators crowding the huge Tata stand at Hall 11 of Pragati Maidan, the car did not disappoint. Here was a car that did deliver on the promise of space and size and in a package that was, indeed, good-looking.

The Indica was launched in the Indian marketplace by the end of 1998, as Tata had promised, and initial bookings (about 115,000) and expectations were huge for a car that, though priced more than the Maruti 800, was still markedly cheaper than the smaller Maruti Zen. Sadly, early quality problems blunted that enthusiasm for the Indica; and, over the years, the reputation of the car and the car making abilities of Tata Motors took a downward spiral.

Exactly 10 years later, almost to the day, on the 10 January 2008, Tata Motors regaled a thousand-odd spectators at Hall 11 of Pragati Maidan, once again, with the dramatic unveiling of the Tata Nano. The 'most expected' car in the history of the automobile in India had lakhs thronging to Hall 11 at Pragati Maidan, which remained crowded and jam-packed through the rest of the Expo. Outside, the eager crowds reminded you of a cricket stadium before a one-day match. Hundreds of security men formed uncompromising barricades with thick ropes.

By 16th January, the last day of Delhis ninth motor show, some 1.8 million people had thronged the Expo, comfortably beating the Paris motor shows record draw of a million-and-a-half, just to get a glimpse of the Tata Nano, the car which had grabbed headlines across the globe. They came in their thousands, from Delhi, Haryana and UP, riding cars, buses, even tractors and tongas, setting off traffic snarls that stopped Delhi at several places.

For what everybody had gathered to see at Hall No 11 in Pragati Maidan was not just another small car, but to see hope emerge on wheels. For this 'lakhtakia' car, in Hindi meaning 'the one-lakh rupee' car as the man on the street had already named it had enabled millions to dream of a life beyond the motorbike, of a life that would be safer and more comfortable for themselves and his (or her) dear ones.

Less than two years later, a few months after the Tata Nano went into production, that dream came to a fiery end, as a few of the Nanos self-ignited inexplicably, and as the image of the 'cheapest car in the world' hardly helped find it buyers who could be proud of the car.

In both cases, Ratan Tata had the right vision, the right idea, at the right time. And the Indian consumer and public were more than ready and happy to buy Indian and make the country proud. Yet design, engineering, and quality shortcomings each time had the consumer rethinking. These quality issues were eventually addressed, but years after the cars were launched. By then, the damage had been done.

Both the Indica and the Nano projects were developed at less than $400 million each peanuts in the international automotive development scale of things. But that was one of the main problems in chasing the objective of 'frugal engineering,' as well as making a car 'for Indians, by Indians,' quality was compromised every time. Also, the hubris of the engineers and designers once the Nano had grabbed headlines worldwide, knew no bounds.

The consumer wants the best product that their money can buy, and they do not care whether it was designed by Indians or by people from another part of the world. On the contrary, Indians would be more assured if the cars were, indeed, designed by Europeans.

Finally, it was the attitude of developing in a penny-wise-pound-foolish way, as well as the obsession to do things in India with Indians, that has brought Tata Motors down to its knees, whence it's up for grabs, and will, in all likelihood, be grabbed by the Chinese. Is this the end of Indias car making story?

UPDATE:

"In March 2020, Tata Motors had announced the intent to subsidiarise its PV business as the first step towards securing mutually beneficial strategic alliances that provide access to products, architectures, powertrains, new-age technologies and capital. Securing a mutually beneficial alliance is a priority. However, it is not an imperative for today but an opportunity to be secured for tomorrow," the company statement says.

We request all such people to refrain from posting such comments. After a while we will either block such attacks or file a cyber complaint after studying IPs through our tech team!

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The End of an Era as Tata Motors Prepare To Sell Their Passenger Car Business - Moneylife

OPINION: Carbon tax and its impact on India – ETEnergyworld.com

New Delhi: The effect of global warming and climate change are well emphasized in global narratives and India can neither remain unaffected nor be a mute spectator. Per capita carbon emissions between developed and developing countries like India is still unfavorably biased at 3.26:1 (world bank sample), however we are all are in this together now. Taxes, are fiscal tools to garner revenue and also direct public policy initiatives. Putting a price on carbon is widely seen as the most cost-effective and flexible way to achieve emission reduction. Globally there is consensus that Carbon Pricing, would facilitate compatible emission pathways, increase investment and innovation in clean technology, promote achievement of the Sustainable Development Goals through channelled financing, generate revenue for aiding vulnerable communities, managing the economic impacts of a low-carbon economy, create environmental, health, economic, and social co-benefits, ranging from public health benefits coming from reduced air pollution to green job creation.

Carbon taxes or pricing excessive usage of carbon, are a charge for non-conformity with accepted goals for de-carbonisation. This can be achieved through two main options. First, an Emission trading system (ETS) that fixes a ceiling on the total level of greenhouse gas emissions and allows those industries with low emissions to sell their extra allowances (Carbon credits) to larger emitters, thereby creating a marketplace for greenhouse gas emissions. Most of European Union member countries follow ETS while some members like Sweden impose a carbon tax. In 2020, emissions from sectors covered by the system is estimated to be 21 per cent lower than in 2005. Secondly, a Carbon Tax Charge (CTC) that sets a price on carbon by defining a tax rate on greenhouse gas emissions or more commonly on the carbon content of fossil fuels. Unlike the ETS system, Carbon Tax pre-defines the price of carbon pollution, thereby pushing businesses towards clean energy. Canada imposes a carbon tax at a rate of $20 per tonne of CO2 emissions in 2019 which is rising to $50 per tonne. This is estimated to significantly reduce greenhouse gas pollution by between 80 and 90 million tonnes by 2022.

In a country like India, the impact of introducing carbon taxes, can be viewed from multiple dimensions:

Impact on Revenue: Taxing fossil fuels is one of the larger contributors to exchequers globally and India is no exception. A shift to clean energy would mean significant loss of revenue for Governments. A report estimated that a carbon tax @ $ 35 per tonne of CO2 emissions levied by India in phases from 2017 to 2030 can yield more than 2% of GDP, thereby compensating the loss from taxing fossil fuels (Rs 5.5 lakh crore for FY20).

Impact on Innovation: Carbon taxes accelerate the development of innovative business models around clean energy like solar powered automobiles, solar drones, zero energy buildings, super grids, utility scale battery production etc. Multiple startups have already raised hundreds of millions of dollars in venture investments.

Impact on investment and employment: Given the scale and magnitude of change desired, the scale of investment needed is substantial. Successive Governments have consistently pursued a stable renewable energy policy with strong results. FDI inflow in the Indian non-conventional energy sector stood at US$ 9.22 billion between April 2000 and March 2020 (DPIIT). More than US$ 42 billion has been invested in Indias renewable energy sector since 2014 and India ranks 3 rd globally in the EY Renewable Energy Country Attractive Index 2019. Investments in excess of $500 billion are required over the next decade to meet our energy targets. Utility-scale renewables sector have already created 100,000 jobs (2020), and the current targets are likely to generate another 1.3 million direct jobs.

Impact on health care infrastructure: India is also exploring the case for ensuring universal rural healthcare through a sustainable energy path: a CEEW study (June, 2020) has shown that primary healthcare centres in Chhattisgarh with battery supported solar PV systems (costing just Rs 28/ person) have better outcomes, especially in maternal and neonatal cases, due to power supply for medical equipment and storage of drugs. Expanding the application across a fractured health care system can have far reaching benefits at affordable costs.

Impact on pollution: Pollution is bad for both health and economy. India losses a significant $150 bn pa owing to just air pollution (Green peace 2020). Studies by acclaimed institutions have established that the use of solar and wind energy reduce pollution levels by as much 80-97%. India's total renewable capacity was around 35.7% (Sep 19) of the total installed generation capacity consequent to which CO2 emissions fell by around 1% in FY 20. India aims to have 275 GW (by 2027) from renewable/clean energy, and has pledged a 33-35% reduction in the emissions intensity of its economy by 2030, compared to 2005 levels. This is expected to have far-reaching impact across sectors like health care, urbanisation, transportation, power etc.

Carbon tax is one of the potent options to nudge the adoption of green tech and, if used wisely, can generate significant results in a short span. A calibrated introduction of Carbon Tax with an effective market for ETS, would go a long way in making the transition financially viable and widen the participation of stakeholders. Policy makers are constantly challenged with the need to balance the push for renewables with economic practicality. India as a nation has been extremely responsible and committed in this initiative and the results are compelling. We wish and hope this thrust continues.

[This piece was authored by Divakar Vijayasarathy, Founder and Managing Partner, DVS Advisors LLP]

[Disclaimer: The views expressed are solely of the author and ETEnergyworld.com does not necessarily subscribe to it. ETEnergyworld.com shall not be responsible for any damage caused to any person/organisation directly or indirectly]

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OPINION: Carbon tax and its impact on India - ETEnergyworld.com

UNB professor working on a mask that would kill the coronavirus – CBC.ca

Amid growing evidence of airborne transmission of COVID-19, the work of one New Brunswick researcher could become an important tool to help prevent the spread of the virus.

Felipe Chibante, a professor of chemical engineering at the University of New Brunswick, is working on a face mask that would not only trap the coronavirus, it would kill it.

He says that same technology could eventually lead to air filters that would do the same thing on a larger scale for homes and office buildings.

The key is to use tiny particles of virus-killing material to make the masks.

Incorporating such metals into a face mask "at the nano-scale is very effective at killing airborne pathogens," he said.

Chibante is one of several New Brunswick researchers to receive money for COVID-19-related projects.

In March, the New Brunswick Innovation Foundation, in partnership with the New Brunswick Health Research Foundation (NBHRF), launched a COVID-19 Research Fund and invited researchers to apply which they did in droves.

They received 60 applications and requests for $2.3 million in funding, which was more money than they had available.

That's when the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) stepped in to provide more funding. In total, 27 projects across the province have been approved to the tune of $846,707.

As people and governments debate whether to make face masks mandatory, a growing body of scientific and anecdotal evidence suggests airborne transmission may be important in spreading the virus.

In an open letter published earlier this month, 239 scientists from 32 countries called on the World Health Organization to acknowledge that airborne transmission of the coronavirus is a potential driver of the pandemic.

The WHO had long maintained that the virus is spread by large droplets, but recently acknowledged the possibility of airborne transmission, saying it cannot be ruled out.

Those developments aren't lost on Chibante, who says airborne transmission makes the use of masks even more important.

Chibante, whose background includes working with nano-particles in the development of clean energy, says the first step in the project is to create nano-coatings capable of killing airborne pathogens, like the virus that causes COVID-19.

That material would then be incorporated into the mask itself and help filter out particles.

Chibante and his team will be working with several metals that have already proven their antibacterial and antiviral properties. Copper for example, has long been known to disrupt or kill pathogens, which include bacteria, viruses, or other microorganisms that can cause disease.

Silver is another possibility, although only when reduced to nano-size. Chibante explained that the properties of some metals, like silver, change when reduced and they become "the enemy of viruses."

Chibante's team will be working with the Sabian cymbal company of Meductic, which will provide some of the metal material that his team will "nano-ize" for the project.

Sabian offered to supply the raw material for the project, explained chief operating officer Mike Connell.

In fact, the company approached the New Brunswick Innovation Foundation early on in the pandemic to explore ways it could help in the global fight against COVID-19.

After all, company officials were already aware of the antiviral potential of copper, said Connell.

They had a lot of copper sitting around and business had dropped off as a result of the pandemic, he said.

"We thought there might be potential for high touch-point items made of copper alloys because of its disinfectant properties."

Connell said they wondered about whether copper could be incorporated into face masks. They were just tossing around ideas at the time, and he said they're pleased to leave the scientific part of the project to the experts.

He said they initially handed over a supply of the exact same material used for making cymbals a combination of copper and tin and will create different combinations of metals if asked to do so as the project progresses.

Once an effective coating is developed, it will be incorporated into the mask itself. That way, when viruses are trapped in the mask's filtration system, it doesn't continue to live there.

"We know that COVID can hang around for a long time," he explained. "So now you have a mask that's a biohazard, and you have to dispose of it, and there's hundreds of millions of masks in Canada that we're processing as biohazard. And so the idea was, can we do something that would actually kill the virus once it landed on the mask?"

Chibante said being able to destroy the virus eliminates the argument some people have made about masks being harmful to the wearer. A COVID-killing maskwill not only protect other people, but will protect the person wearing it, he said.

"So it's community hygiene as opposed to individual hygiene," said Chibante.

Eventually, he hopes toeliminate another complaint of mask-haters bymaking them see-through to allow for better communication.

As an added phase to the project, he's using his work in the energy sector to create a self-sanitizing feature for the masks. Since pathogens can usually be destroyed at temperatures above 60 Celsius, he envisions using tiny electrical systems to create enough heat in the mask to destroy anything that wasn't already killed on contact with the anti-viral coating. He says it could be as easy as plugging the mask into a USB port to activate what could be thought of as "nano-zappers."

"By engineering and controlling those electrical properties, we can actually be able to heat up the mask internally where all the action is. We don't want to just blow hot air into it. We want to have it, you know, almost like a little toaster element inside your mask."

Chibante says the technology could eventually be expanded for use in air-exchange systems in homes and commercial buildings.

"It's the same kind of principle where you have an airborne pathogen and you want to remove it, and you don't want to be just changing your filters every day. You want to reuse that filter for a period of time. So we see this being able to extend beyond just personal protection equipment but to, you know, commercial systems."

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UNB professor working on a mask that would kill the coronavirus - CBC.ca

From birds to burrs, here are four examples of biomimicry at work – create digital

According to the US-based Biomimicry Institute, biomimicry is a practice that learns from and mimics the strategies found in nature to solve human design challenges.

Put simply, its the innovation that arises from nature. And from Velcro to bullet trains, nature can be seen as the inspiration behind many of societys latest and greatest innovations.

The fastest train in the world was creating serious noise pollution until Japanese engineer, Eiji Nakatsu came across an innovative idea while birdwatching.

Noticing that kingfishers barely make a splash when diving into water to catch fish, Nakatsu designed a roughly 15-metre-long steel beak for the high-speed trains, to reduce the tunnel boom that occurred when the trains exited a tunnel. Not only did it solve the noise pollution issue, it also increased the efficiency of the Shinkansen by 10 to 15 per cent.

Nakatsu also redesigned the shape of the trains pantograph to mimic an owls wings, including feather-like noise-dampening serrations along the pantographs wing, to break up the rushing air turbulence.

At the University of South Australia (UniSA), researchers have also been looking to nature, studying the surfaces of plants and animal species that have been found to be highly resistant to microbial attack due to their unique structure at the nanoscale.

They used this research to develop innovative dental implants that are resistant to microbial infection.

Our work has focused on mimicking structures found on the wings of insects, which contain billions of nanopillars that operate as a nanomechanical barrier to bacterial colonisation, said lead UniSA researcher,Professor Krasi Vasilev.

The structure mechanically kills the same broad range of bacteria known to cause orthopaedic and dental implant infections, which can lead to the failure of the procedure.

The researchers recently teamed up with medical technology company, ANISOP Holdings, with the goal of translating the nanoengineering concepts into reality.

They say the new dental implants could prevent infections before they become serious or potentially life-threatening problems, with the potential to save millions of dollars globally.

Over in the UK, researchers at Durham University have engineered the first manufactured non-cuttable material, using abalone shells and grapefruit skins as inspiration.

The [abalone] shell is 2000 times harder to crack than the bricks that its made of, said Stefan Szyniszewski, a Durham University engineering professor who was part of the research team.

When you think of security doors or armoured steel, its very heavy. And if you look at protective structures in nature, like the peel of a grapefruit, theyre usually very light.

Inspired by these strong yet lightweight biological structures, researchers developed a metallic cellular structure composed of an internal grid of large ceramic segments. The resulting material was both highly deformable and ultraresistant to dynamic point loads; found to be non-cuttable by an angle grinder and a power drill.

Potential applications for the new material range from personal protective equipment, bike locks and lightweight armour to the doors of a vault in a bank.

While the term biomimicry was coined in 1997, using nature as inspiration can be seen in designs dating back much earlier.

For example, in 1941 Swiss engineer George de Mestral found small burrs covering his dogs fur after a hunting expedition, and was intrigued by the way the burrs were able to defy gravity.

Examining the tiny hooks under a microscope, de Mestral noticed the burrs interlocking mechanism, and was inspired to mimic the structure as a fastener for clothing.

He patented his idea in 1948, and Velcro has since become a household name.

The list goes on

From architecture inspired by termite mounds to sports cars modelled on sailfish, nature as design inspiration can be seen in many innovations.

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From birds to burrs, here are four examples of biomimicry at work - create digital

Lindsay McCormick of Bite Toothpaste Bits Named in Fast Company’s Annual List of the Most Creative People in Business – PR Web

MARINA DEL REY, Calif. (PRWEB) August 06, 2020

Fast Company announced its 11th annual list of the Most Creative People in Business, honoring Bite Toothpaste Bits CEO and Founder, Lindsay McCormick among an influential and diverse group of leaders from a vast range of global industries.

The Most Creative People in Business list recognizes individuals who used their innovative thinking to make an impact on the world beyond financial success. These engineers, executives, choreographers, activists, designers, journalists, and founders have created something new this year within their field thats never been done before in their industries. Many achieved these societal problem-solving accomplishments in one of the most contentious and erratic times in history.

Im honored to be included in such an inspiring group of people, all working to create meaningful and impactful change in our world, said McCormick. "There has never been a more important time for us to come together to find new and innovative solutions to our environmental problems. I never set out to create a business, but the success of what we've grown at Bite has give me the power to share my story and the urgency to save our planet. We've only just begun... said McCormick.

As Bites CEO and Founder, Lindsay McCormick started Bite in her living room after learning about the one billion plastic toothpaste tubes that end up in our landfills and oceans every year. Once a social media video went viral, sales skyrocketed overnight and McCormick quit her full-time job to launch Bite into a multimillion company. McCormicks love of the planet, urgency to make a difference, and personal mission to create sustainable solutions to products we use every day has now become Bites mission.

Since Bites inception in 2018, the company has become a trailblazer in the sustainability and personal care space with its innovative and plastic-free products made with the planet in mind. From creating the first-ever toothpaste tablet with nano-hydroxyapatite (nHAP) to Bites recent launch of 100% compostable and plant-based dental floss, McCormicks team is working to make conscious consumerism an unconscious decision.

Fast Company editors and writers spent a year researching candidates for the list, scouting every business sector: social good, medical, technology, engineering, marketing, entertainment, startups, and more. The people selected have all accomplished something truly innovative within the past 12 months or so that is having a measurable effect within their industries and beyond. Theyre also discoveriesnone has ever been profiled in Fast Company in print before. Together, they represent the future of business.

Each year, we recognize artists and conventionally creative people making their mark on business and corporate executives deploying creativity and innovation to address some of the biggest challenges facing businesses and society, says Stephanie Mehta, editor-in-chief of Fast Company. Individually and collectively, the Most Creative People are an inspiration.

To see the complete list, go to: https://www.fastcompany.com/most-creative-people/2020Introduced in 2009, the Most Creative People list was quickly established as one of Fast Companys most esteemed franchises. Each year, the magazines editors present an all-new list of people chosen according to a proprietary methodology.

Fast Companys Most Creative People in Business issue (September 2020) is available online now at https://www.fastcompany.com/most-creative-people/2020 and on newsstands beginning August 11, 2020. Join the Most Creative People conversation using #FCMostCreative.

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Lindsay McCormick of Bite Toothpaste Bits Named in Fast Company's Annual List of the Most Creative People in Business - PR Web

3D mapping reveals how wounds begin to heal – Futurity: Research News

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Researchers have figured out for the first time how the wound healing process begins.

The finding may provide new insight into fibrosis and cancer metastasis, according to a new study.

For the new study, published inACS Nano, the team discovered the way fibroblasts, or common cells in connective tissue, interact with the extracellular matrix, which provides structural support as well as biochemical and biomechanical cues to cells. The researchers uncovered a recursive process that goes on between the cells and their environment as well as structures in the cells that were previously unknown.

Clinical efforts to prevent the progression of fibrocontractile diseases, such as scarring and fibrosis, have been largely unsuccessful, in part because the mechanisms that cells use to interact with the protein fibers around them are unclear, says Delaram Shakiba, a postdoctoral fellow from the NSF Science and Technology Center for Engineering Mechanobiology (CEMB) at the McKelvey School of Engineering at Washington University in St. Louis.

We found that fibroblasts use completely different mechanisms in the earlyand I think the most treatablestages of these interactions, and that their responses to drugs can therefore be the opposite of what they would be in the later stages.

The process has stymied mechanobiology researchers for some time, says Guy Genin, professor of mechanical engineering and co-director of CEMB.

Researchers in the field of mechanobiology thought that cells pulled in collagen from the extracellular matrix by reaching out with long protrusions, grabbing it and pulling it back, Genin says.

We discovered that this wasnt the case. A cell has to push its way out through collagen first, then instead of grabbing on, it essentially shoots tiny hairs, or filopodia, out of the sides of its arms, pulls in collagen that way, then retracts.

Now that they understand this process, Genin says, they can control the shape that a cell takes.

With our colleagues at CEMB at the University of Pennsylvania, we were able to validate some mathematical models to go through the engineering process, and we now have the basic rules that cells follow, he says. We can now begin to design specific stimuli to direct a cell to behave in a certain way in building a tissue-engineered structure.

The researchers learned they could control the cell shape in two ways: First, by controlling the boundaries around it, and second, by inhibiting or upregulating particular proteins involved in the remodeling of the collagen.

Fibroblasts pull the edges of a wound together, causing it to contract or close up. Collagen in the cells then remodels the extracellular matrix to fully close the woundwhere mechanobiology comes into play.

Theres a balance between tension and compression inside a cell that is newly exposed to fibrous proteins, Genin says. There is tension in actin cables, and by playing with that balance, we can make these protrusions grow extremely long. We can stop the remodeling from occurring or we can increase it.

The team used a 3D-mapping techniquethe first time researchers have applied it to collagenalong with a computational model to calculate the 3D strain and stress fields created by the protrusions from the cells.

As cells accumulated collagen, tension-driven remodeling and alignment of collagen fibers led to the formation of collagen tracts. This requires cooperative interactions among cells, through which cells can interact mechanically.

New methods of microscopy, tissue engineering, and biomechanical modeling greatly enhance our understanding of the mechanisms by which cells modify and repair the tissues they populate, says Elliot Elson, professor emeritus of biochemistry and molecular biophysics.

Fibrous cellular structures generate and guide forces that compress and reorient their extracellular fibrous environment. This raises new questions about the molecular mechanisms of these functions and how cells regulate the forces they exert and how they govern the extent of matrix deformation.

Wound healing is a great example of how these processes are important in a physiologic way, Genin says. Well be able to come up with insight in how to train cells not to excessively compact the collagen around them.

The National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation Science and Technology Center for Engineering Mechanobiology, the National Cancer Institute, and the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering funded the work.

Source: Washington University in St. Louis

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3D mapping reveals how wounds begin to heal - Futurity: Research News

Production linked incentive scheme to be expanded to AC, furniture, leather sectors as MEIS wound up – Moneylife

Updated at 4.45pm on 5 August 2020 to add clarification from Tata Motors.

The 15th of January 1998was a red-letter day in Indias automotive history. On that day, at New Delhis Pragati Maidan expo grounds, several new cars were launched; but the, but the car that really grabbed the headlines was the Tata Indica, Indias first home-grown 'peoples car.' Even if all knew that the new Tata car that would be as big as a Maruti Zen, yet provide the space of an Ambassador, at a price of a Maruti 800, was going to be called the Indica (like in India+Car), they still hadnt seen the car.

Thus, the unveiling of the car was a much-awaited moment. Sure enough, expectations ran high and, at the unveiling, which had thousands of journalists, politicians and spectators crowding the huge Tata stand at Hall 11 of Pragati Maidan, the car did not disappoint. Here was a car that did deliver on the promise of space and size and in a package that was, indeed, good-looking.

The Indica was launched in the Indian marketplace by the end of 1998, as Tata had promised, and initial bookings (about 115,000) and expectations were huge for a car that, though priced more than the Maruti 800, was still markedly cheaper than the smaller Maruti Zen. Sadly, early quality problems blunted that enthusiasm for the Indica; and, over the years, the reputation of the car and the car making abilities of Tata Motors took a downward spiral.

Exactly 10 years later, almost to the day, on the 10 January 2008, Tata Motors regaled a thousand-odd spectators at Hall 11 of Pragati Maidan, once again, with the dramatic unveiling of the Tata Nano. The 'most expected' car in the history of the automobile in India had lakhs thronging to Hall 11 at Pragati Maidan, which remained crowded and jam-packed through the rest of the Expo. Outside, the eager crowds reminded you of a cricket stadium before a one-day match. Hundreds of security men formed uncompromising barricades with thick ropes.

By 16th January, the last day of Delhis ninth motor show, some 1.8 million people had thronged the Expo, comfortably beating the Paris motor shows record draw of a million-and-a-half, just to get a glimpse of the Tata Nano, the car which had grabbed headlines across the globe. They came in their thousands, from Delhi, Haryana and UP, riding cars, buses, even tractors and tongas, setting off traffic snarls that stopped Delhi at several places.

For what everybody had gathered to see at Hall No 11 in Pragati Maidan was not just another small car, but to see hope emerge on wheels. For this 'lakhtakia' car, in Hindi meaning 'the one-lakh rupee' car as the man on the street had already named it had enabled millions to dream of a life beyond the motorbike, of a life that would be safer and more comfortable for themselves and his (or her) dear ones.

Less than two years later, a few months after the Tata Nano went into production, that dream came to a fiery end, as a few of the Nanos self-ignited inexplicably, and as the image of the 'cheapest car in the world' hardly helped find it buyers who could be proud of the car.

In both cases, Ratan Tata had the right vision, the right idea, at the right time. And the Indian consumer and public were more than ready and happy to buy Indian and make the country proud. Yet design, engineering, and quality shortcomings each time had the consumer rethinking. These quality issues were eventually addressed, but years after the cars were launched. By then, the damage had been done.

Both the Indica and the Nano projects were developed at less than $400 million each peanuts in the international automotive development scale of things. But that was one of the main problems in chasing the objective of 'frugal engineering,' as well as making a car 'for Indians, by Indians,' quality was compromised every time. Also, the hubris of the engineers and designers once the Nano had grabbed headlines worldwide, knew no bounds.

The consumer wants the best product that their money can buy, and they do not care whether it was designed by Indians or by people from another part of the world. On the contrary, Indians would be more assured if the cars were, indeed, designed by Europeans.

Finally, it was the attitude of developing in a penny-wise-pound-foolish way, as well as the obsession to do things in India with Indians, that has brought Tata Motors down to its knees, whence it's up for grabs, and will, in all likelihood, be grabbed by the Chinese. Is this the end of Indias car making story?

UPDATE:

"In March 2020, Tata Motors had announced the intent to subsidiarise its PV business as the first step towards securing mutually beneficial strategic alliances that provide access to products, architectures, powertrains, new-age technologies and capital. Securing a mutually beneficial alliance is a priority. However, it is not an imperative for today but an opportunity to be secured for tomorrow," the company statement says.

We request all such people to refrain from posting such comments. After a while we will either block such attacks or file a cyber complaint after studying IPs through our tech team!

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Production linked incentive scheme to be expanded to AC, furniture, leather sectors as MEIS wound up - Moneylife

The UK’s Huawei ban risks crippling its ambitions in technology and science – Business Insider

Visiting China last year, I knew the country excelled at technology and innovation.

But it was a pleasant surprise to find that its science parks were not only world-leading R&D centers but also welcoming to UK startups and set up to add value for companies entering the market.

I also met investors with a significant appetite for UK innovation especially in medtech, AI, IoT, and other areas of deeptech.

The UK government's ban on the use of Huawei 5G equipment has, therefore, been hard to stomach. The decision has soured UK-China relations, endangering UK startups' access to Chinese growth funding and the world's largest market.

The government risks throwing the baby out with the bathwater, jeopardizing its own vision of building a prosperous future economy on the back of early-stage deeptech R&D.

It's not that we weren't warned.

Until the recent escalation of the ongoing trade war, the US had a secure position as the leading foreign recipient of Chinese venture capital.

Now, many Chinese funds both state-run and privately-held have become significantly less active in the US.

Rhodium Group, which tracks US-China investment trends, identified 236 rounds into US companies featuring at least one Chinese investor in 2018, amounting to $10.8 billion. In 2019 there were just 163, totalling $6.5 billion.

The UK had been well-positioned to capitalize on the cooling of the US-China relationship, with Chinese investment into the UK growing in recent years. Indeed, China has put more money into the UK economy over the past five years than in the previous 30.

During his 2015 state visit, President Xi Jinping called for more "mutually beneficial cooperation" on innovation; significant Chinese investment into UK funds and startups followed, with technology and media conglomerate Tencent a bellwether.

2019 was its most active year, including a $24 million round into Cambridge AI company Prowler, a $35 million investment in fintech firm Truelayer, a $20 million round for Everledger, a blockchain company, and a $10 million investment into spacetech startup SenSat.

It also launched an AI lab with medtech startup Medopad, and invested in Oxford Sciences Innovation , the University of Oxford's fund.

My conversations in China certainly reflected a preoccupation with the UK and deprioritization of the US.

Since the Huawei ban, however, some contacts have alluded to a hedging strategy, lining up operations in competing ecosystems such as France, Germany, Finland, and Poland alongside prior plans for the UK market.

By banning a company crucial to China's global brand as a tech pioneer, the government risks triggering a similar response to that which has hit the US, stunting the inflow of Chinese money to support the growth of innovative UK companies.

Recent UK government policy announcements from Chancellor Rishi Sunak's Budget speech in March to more recent statements from Boris Johnson have focused on "leveling up" investment in early-stage R&D to fuel high-tech innovation.

China has played a significant role in building the infrastructure to facilitate such a strategy, partly through the formation of academic joint ventures such as a 25 million Marine Research Centre with the University of Nottingham and, in deeptech, the York-Nanjing Joint Centre for Spintronics and Nano Engineering.

Such is the level of UK-China academic collaboration that China is one of the UK's most important partners for research, innovation, and education, according to the Russell Group, and its second-strongest research partner. The UK has also overtaken Japan to become China's second-most popular partner.

Huawei itself has led projects intended to contribute to the UK ecosystem including a 1 billion initial investment into a new chip R&D centre in Cambridge and surrounding infrastructure, and a 5 million investment into a new 5G-enabled tech hub at Imperial's West London campus.

It remains to be seen whether either project will go ahead following the government's decision and wider investment and collaboration on R&D must be in question, with the potential to put a significant dent in the government's "science superpower" plan.

The Huawei ban came with the concession that it would set back rollout of 5G by two to three years significantly delaying the windfall of 15.7 billion by 2025 forecast by Barclays Corporate Banking.

While major cities have already received considerable investment to make them 5G-ready, early coverage of the regions has been limited. This further delay will prove a significant barrier to increasing productivity as we enter a future in which workforces and therefore innovation become increasingly distributed.

"Industry 4.0" technologies that enable everything from remote patient assessment and monitoring (which O2 estimates could free up over a million hours of GPs' time) to autonomous vehicles and smart traffic management depend on 5G's faster, more reliable connectivity and lower latency.

The UK has world-leading expertise in many such technologies. But the impending delay might give founders pause could they commercialize and get to market quicker somewhere else, unencumbered by the fallout of political decisions?

It's too early to say for certain whether the Huawei ban will trigger an exodus of Chinese investors and home-grown innovators but on the first count the data from the US tells a cautionary tale, and the second could ultimately come down to a question of pragmatism and ambition.

At the very least, we should expect UK startups to start finding it much more difficult to sell and expand into China as the backlash to the Huawei ban becomes apparent. The repercussions of this decision could deal a major blow to the government's economic vision for the UK.

Stephen Page is the founder and CEO of SFC Capital.

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The UK's Huawei ban risks crippling its ambitions in technology and science - Business Insider

Stocks in the news: YES Bank, DMart, Infosys, BHEL, Tata Motors and Apollo Hospitals – Economic Times

Nifty futures on the Singapore Exchange traded 42points, or 0.38 per cent higher at 10,953.50, in signs that Dalal Street was headed for a positive start on Tuesday. Here are a few stocks which may buzz the most in today's trade:

YES Bank: Moody's Investors Service has upgraded YES Bank's long-term foreign-currency issuer rating to B3 from Caa1 after the banks equity capital raise of Rs 15,000 crore. The outlook on the private lenders ratings has been changed to stable from positive.

Avenue Supermarts: The company, which runs the DMart retail chain, saw its online sales more than double during FY20 to Rs 354 crore despite operating only in Mumbai. The country's most valuable retailer by market capitalisation, however, widened its net loss by 36 per cent to Rs80 crore in the four-year old e-commerce subsidiary - Avenue E-Commerce.

Infosys: The National Bank of Bahrain (NBB) has chosen Infosys Finacle to digitally transform its transaction banking business, the IT company said on Monday.

Tata Motors: Tata Motors Chairman N Chandrasekaran said to the company's shareholders that the automaker was charting out a disciplined growth path by focussing on generating positive cashflows, reducing inefficiencies and investing in future product development.

BHEL: State-run engineering major BHEL said it is still grappling with uncertainties with regard to resumption of normal business operations as rising COVID-19 infection cases have led to labour shortage and supply chain disruptions.

Apollo Hospitals: Munchener Ruckversicherungs-Gesellschaft Aktiengesellschaft In Munchen sold its entire 1.72 per cent stake or 2,397,380 shares in Apollo Hospitals at Rs 1,600.43 per share.

Gujarat Gas, PI Industries: Dixon Technologies, Godrej Consumer Products, Gujarat Gas, Marksans Pharma, Hikal, Neuland Laboratories, Tata Consumer Products, PI Industries: These companies are scheduled to announce their June quarter earnings on Tuesday.

JSW Energy: Sajjan Jindal led-JSW Energy, one of the only private power utilities in India which was looking to expand its thermal power capacity through acquisitions has pulled the plug on the plan and aims to focus on renewable energy only, after calling off the deal to buy an asset from GMR.

Bank of India: State-owned Bank of India is planning to raise Rs 7000-8000 crore in combination of equity and bonds to boost capital even as it steps up recovery to improve earnings.

Kirloskar Electric: Kirloskar Electric Company on Monday said uncertainty in its operations on account of COVID-19 pandemic continues due to lockdown in various places.

GMR Infrastructure: The infra firm is working on disinvestment of non-core assets including land and hopes to yield "significant value" even from 50 per cent of land monetization, PTI reported.

Century Plyboards: The company announced the use of nano technology in manufacturing of its plywood and laminate products. The highly activated and energized nanoparticles physically rupture and kill viruses coming in contact with it.

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Stocks in the news: YES Bank, DMart, Infosys, BHEL, Tata Motors and Apollo Hospitals - Economic Times

Global Nanosensors Market Huge Growth CAGR of 90.1% by 2026 | With Top Players- Linear Technologies, NXP Semiconductor, InvenSense, Knowles, Analog…

Global Nanosensors Market By Product Type (Mechanical, Biological and Chemical Nanosensors), By Application (Security, Surveillance and Military, Biomedical and Healthcare, Environmental Monitoring, Food Management and others) By End Users (Aerospace, Environmental Monitoring, Healthcare and others), By Geography (North America, South America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, Middle East and Africa) Industry Trends and Forecast to 2025

Global Nanosensors Market research report gives the most appropriate and specific information to the decision-makers in the industry which saves their time and result in excellent output. The report carefully analyses the potential of the market with respect to the current scenario and future prospects with respect to several industry aspects. This Global Nanosensors Market report explains several market factors such as market estimates and forecasts, entry strategies, opportunity analysis, market positioning, competitive landscape, product positioning, market assessment, and viability studies. The best solution is offered with the systematic study of all these parameters that are performed by the experts.

Nanosensors Marketis expected to reach USD 15,434.96 Million by 2025, from USD 90.5 Million in 2017 growing ata CAGR of 90.1%during the forecast period of 2018 to 2025. The upcoming market report contains data for historic years 2014 & 2015, the base year of calculation is 2016 and the forecast period is 2018 to 2025.

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Major Market Competitors/Players:Global Nanosensors Market

Some of the major players operating in the market are Linear Technologies, NXP Semiconductor, InvenSense, Knowles, Analog Devices, Texas Instruments, STMicroelectronics, Hitachi, Nanomix, Murata Manufacturing, Atmel, Banner Engineering, ams, Rockwell Automation, TOWA, and Panasonic among others.

Competitive Analysis:

The Global Nano Sensors market is highly fragmented and the major players have used various strategies such as new product launches, expansions, agreements, joint ventures, partnerships, acquisitions, and others to increase their footprints in this market. The report includes market shares of absorbable and non-absorbable sutures market for global, Europe, North America, Asia Pacific and South America.

The current trend pertaining to the demand supply and sales together with the recent developments have been given here to provide an exhaustive picture of this market. It also allows voluntarily accessible affordable reports of the research that is the end result of the personalized research carried by the internal team of professionals.

To comprehend Global Nanosensors market dynamics in the world mainly, the worldwide Nanosensors market is analyzed across major global regions.

Actual Numbers & In-Depth Analysis, Business opportunities, Market Size Estimation Available in Full Report.

Market Definition:

Nano sensors consist of nanomaterials or nano-chemicals used in monitoring moisture, temperature, and pressure. Nano sensors based devices are used in diagnostic machines. The main reason behind the use of nano-sensors in diagnostic kits is that nano-sensors even detect the minute change in the blood, urine sample or other samples. Nano-sensor devices detects the conditions in very early stage based on Nano sensors have wide mechanical, chemical and biological applications. Nanosensors have wide application in gas sensing technologies like RFID (Radio-frequency identification) systems have gas sensing capabilities. Zinc Oxide based nanosensors are used in modified electrodes and enzyme immobilization and biosensors performance. In Blood coagulation carbon nanotubes are used for detecting proteins, fibrinogen and coagulation factors.

Major Market Drivers and Restraints:

Table of Contents-Snapshot Executive SummaryChapter 1 Industry OverviewChapter 2 Industry Competition by ManufacturersChapter 3 Industry Production Market Share by RegionsChapter 4 Industry Consumption by RegionsChapter 5 Industry Production, Revenue, Price Trend by TypeChapter 6 Industry Analysis by ApplicationsChapter 7 Company Profiles and Key Figures in Industry BusinessChapter 8 Industry Manufacturing Cost AnalysisChapter 9 Marketing Channel, Distributors and CustomersChapter 10 Market DynamicsChapter 11 Industry ForecastChapter 12 Research Findings and ConclusionChapter 13 Methodology and Data Source

Key Developments in the Market:

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Global Nanosensors Market Huge Growth CAGR of 90.1% by 2026 | With Top Players- Linear Technologies, NXP Semiconductor, InvenSense, Knowles, Analog...

Shaft Measuring Machine Market Business Overview, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin, Product Specifications, Forecast 2025 – Owned

Analysis of the Global Shaft Measuring Machine Market

The presented global Shaft Measuring Machine market report provides reliable and credible insights related to the various segments and sub-segments of the market. The market study throws light on the various factors that are projected to impact the overall dynamics of the global Shaft Measuring Machine market over the forecast period (20XX-20XX).

According to the report, the value of the Shaft Measuring Machine market was estimated to reach ~US$ XX in 2019 and attain a market value of ~US$ XX by the end of 2029. Further, the study reveals that the market is set to grow at a CAGR of XX% during the forecast period owing to a plethora of factors.

Get PDF Sample Copy of this Report to understand the structure of the complete report: (Including Full TOC, List of Tables & Figures, Chart) @ https://www.marketresearchhub.com/enquiry.php?type=S&repid=2742768&source=atm

The market study aims to provide answers to the following questions related to the Shaft Measuring Machine market:

The report splits the global Shaft Measuring Machine market into different market segments such as:

The region-wise segmentation offers critical information such as the market share, size, revenue analysis, growth prospects, and market attractiveness of each region.

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Segment by Type, the Shaft Measuring Machine market is segmented intoMulti-SensorOpticalMechanical

Segment by Application, the Shaft Measuring Machine market is segmented intoAutomotiveElectric & ElectronicMechanicalOthers

Regional and Country-level AnalysisThe Shaft Measuring Machine market is analysed and market size information is provided by regions (countries).The key regions covered in the Shaft Measuring Machine market report are North America, Europe, China and Japan. It also covers key regions (countries), viz, the U.S., Canada, Germany, France, U.K., Italy, Russia, China, Japan, South Korea, India, Australia, Taiwan, Indonesia, Thailand, Malaysia, Philippines, Vietnam, Mexico, Brazil, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, U.A.E, etc.The report includes country-wise and region-wise market size for the period 2015-2026. It also includes market size and forecast by Type, and by Application segment in terms of production capacity, price and revenue for the period 2015-2026.Competitive Landscape and Shaft Measuring Machine Market Share Analysis

Shaft Measuring Machine market competitive landscape provides details and data information by manufacturers. The report offers comprehensive analysis and accurate statistics on production capacity, price, revenue of Shaft Measuring Machine by the player for the period 2015-2020. It also offers detailed analysis supported by reliable statistics on production, revenue (global and regional level) by players for the period 2015-2020. Details included are company description, major business, company total revenue, and the production capacity, price, revenue generated in Shaft Measuring Machine business, the date to enter into the Shaft Measuring Machine market, Shaft Measuring Machine product introduction, recent developments, etc.The major vendors covered:WenzelChien Wei Precise TechnologyRenishaw PlcCreaformHelmel Engineering ProductsWerth Messtechnik GmbHXian High-TechAeh Industrial MetrologyGroup,Nano (Xian) MetrologyAberlink LtdZeiss International (Subsidiary Of Carl-Zeiss-Stiftung)Faro TechnologiesHexagon ABMitutoyo CorporationNikon Metrology NVPerceptronDUKINInternational Metrology SystemsMetronorTRIMEK

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Shaft Measuring Machine Market Business Overview, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin, Product Specifications, Forecast 2025 - Owned

Not all face masks are created equal 7 things to consider to protect yourself – CNA

SINGAPORE: Surgical masks are one of the most sought-after items in the world now.

Even with ST Engineering producing surgical masks here since February after a foreign supplier could not fulfil its contractual obligations to Singapore these are available only to front-line healthcare workers.

But there are alternatives out there. In the past few months, many people, from scientists to tailors, have tried to develop face masks that are both comfortable and safe.

Not all masks, however, are created equal. There are disposable three-layer masks, carbon filter masks, silicone gill masks, and even masks made of copper or nano-silver, said to kill viruses and bacteria.

With so many masks on the market, ranging in price from about 40 cents to S$76, this raises the question of how effective they each are.

The programme Talking Point finds out what science says about various masks and seven things people should consider to protect themselves. (Watch the episode here.)

1. DISPOSABLE MASKS MAY NOT BE MEDICAL-GRADE

Although there are many disposable masks, and some are labelled surgical masks, not all conform to international standards, said Gareth Tang, senior vice-president of technology and head of Innosparks at ST Engineering.

Tang, who led the setting up of its surgical mask production line in just two weeks, said the company has stringent, end-to-end quality control to ensure that its surgical masks are medical-grade.

This includes testing how breathable the masks are and how efficient the layers of filtration are.

The bacterial filtration efficiency of a surgical mask must be above 95 per cent, and it must be resistant to the penetration of bodily fluids, according to the Health Sciences Authority.

So the efficiency reading of 98 per cent for ST Engineering's mask material marks a level that blocks 98 per cent of bacteria and viruses, and that includes the COVID-19 virus, through the mask, Tang noted.

The company is now working on making its masks more widely available, he said. We hope to bring this mask to the general public in the near term.

2. COPPER AND SILVER CAN KILL BACTERIA

The most expensive masks are those containing copper or silver.

In ancient times, the Egyptians used these metals to treat wounds, noted Lam Yeng Ming, professor and chair of materials science and engineering at Nanyang Technological University. So copper and silver have been shown to kill bacteria.

Theyre effective in some circumstances, she said. That includes viruses, provided the copper or silver ions interact with the virus. For example, when a virus lands on a copper surface, the metals ions attack and kill the cells.

But this process takes time, anywhere from 30 minutes to a day. Another problem is that some face masks with copper woven into the fabric have spaces between the copper fibres.

Between these lines, you can fit quite a lot of the virus, she said. If this spacing is hundreds of microns, essentially it cant filter out (viruses).

A nano-silver mask Talking Point sent to her to examine, however, was found to be fully coated with the metal, so the virus should come into contact with these silver surfaces.

While nano-silver and copper have shown to be effective against different viruses, she said tests specific to the virus that causes COVID-19 are key.

That has to be conclusive. There are some studies being done, but I think more studies need to be done, she added.

WATCH: Reusable or surgical which is the right mask for you? (22:25)

3. STUDIES LACKING ON CARBON FILTER MASKS TOO

Some manufacturers claim that masks with a carbon filter are effective in filtering out bacteria and viruses.

Carbon filters are widely used in air purifiers to absorb and capture smoke and other gaseous pollutants but they are not any more effective than other masks when it comes to the coronavirus.

A carbon filter mask is effective (against) air pollutants, but for bacteria and for viruses, there definitely havent been many studies to show its effectiveness, said Lam.

4. DO HOME-MADE MASKS WORK?

The second government-issued reusable mask has antibacterial properties. But like some people, Chrissandra Chong finds that it sticks too closely to my face for me to breathe easily.

The freelance branding consultant sews her own masks with adjustable ear loops to cater for different face shapes and designed to be more breathable.

She has made more than 200 masks since February, and volunteers for Masks Sewn with Love, a grassroots initiative that has provided over 100,000 masks for vulnerable groups.

But are do-it-yourself masks good enough?

According to the World Health Organisation, the ideal fabric mask shouldhave at least three layers: An innermost layer of absorbent material like cotton and two other layers made of water-resistant material such as polypropylene.

5. AIRTIGHT MASKS CAN CAUSE SKIN IRRITATION

The mask that resembles the N95 respirator is called a gill mask, made from soft silicone material. It creates a seal on ones face.

But because it can offer relatively airtight protection, using this mask can lead to skin irritation, said Eileen Tan, a dermatologist who runs her own practice, Eileen Tan Skin Clinic and Associates.

It may not be suitable for everyday use or for people with sensitive skin, she added.

6. HOW YOU CAN TAKE CARE OF YOUR SKIN

Tan has seen a 15 to 20 per cent increase in the number of patientsseeking help for mask-related skin problems.

One can get skin inflammation, for example, from the build-up of moisture, heat and increase in sebum production, which can lead to clogged pores, she said.

She recommends changing ones mask every four to six hours if you can afford to, and taking mask breaks of about 15 to 30 minutes to allow your skin to rest.

Consider things like a cloth mask, which is a more breathable kind of fabric (and) more comfortable, she added.

7. KEEP GOOD MASK-WEARING HABITS

Senior consultant Kalisvar Marimuthu from the National Centre for Infectious Diseases uses five reusable masks each week.

It is important, he said, to wash ones mask every day, as that removes not only viruses, but also saliva stains and dust particles on the mask.

He also advises against touching the front of the mask when removing it, as the chances are people would touch their nose or mouth after that.

Watch this episode of Talking Point here. New episodes on Channel 5 every Thursday at 9.30pm.

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Not all face masks are created equal 7 things to consider to protect yourself - CNA

Virtual field trips, digital labs and global colleagues: U of T students to explore the world this fall – News@UofT

To take one existing example: More than 2,000 students a year enrol in Planet Earth, an online introductory course in geology taught by ProfessorNicholas Eylesof the department of physical and environmental sciences at U of T Scarborough.

They can go back and re-watch if theres anything they dont understand, and I have a lot of anecdotal evidence that the whole family gets involved, says Eyles, who explores new field areas on an orange BMW motorbike that he nicknamed the Pumpkin.

Nicholas Eyles, a professor at U of T Scarborough, teaches a popularonline introductory course in geology, featuring 3D virtual tours, that draws some 2,000 students each year(photo by Ken Jones)

An example of Eyless online course material from a module that looks at the urbanization of southern Ontario(deck courtesy of Planet Earth Online)

Yet, even if online learning at U of T is far from new, the scale and variety of approaches being developed at U of T for this fall is without precedent. And the desire to keep everyone in the U of T community safe, while delivering an engaging educational experience of the high quality for which U of T is globally renowned, is fueling creativity and innovation across all three campuses.

In the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, for example,Dawn Kilkennywill adopt a hybrid model to teach a third-year biomedical engineering course this fall. That includes in-person office hours, bite-size online lectures and virtual labs.

The lab simulations, made by the Denmark-based startupLabster, allow students to move around a digital lab space and carry out experiments.

It reminds students of the background theory as they go along and thats one of the benefits of the virtual simulation, says Kilkenny, an associate professor, teaching stream, in the Institute of Biomedical Engineering. A lot of [the simulations] bring up the biology on the micro-scale or the nano-scale, so they will intermittently show students whats happening on that small level.

It allows you to visualize what you normally cant see.

Dawn Kilkenny, an associate professor in the Faculty of Applied Science & Engineering, says virtual labs offer students additional context and background about the experiments they are pursuing(photo by Luke Ng)

The digital labs are also in use at other universities around the world, including Stanford University, Harvard University and MIT.

While Kilkenny already used the virtual labs in her pre-pandemic courses, she says she plans to rely on them even more heavily next semester.This has given us a push to examine digital tools that can enhance our courses, she says.

ForJoseph Wong, a professor in the department of political science and the Munk School of Global Affairs & Public Policy in the Faculty of Arts & Science, the move to a digital space created an opportunity to foster closer ties between U of T students and university students in another country all while working together on projects related to COVID-19.

Students in his Munk One seminar, for example, will partner with students taking a public policy course at Mexicos Monterrey Institute of Technology and Higher Education to discuss COVID-19s impact on food security, inequality and trust in government, among other topics. The themes will be addressed through policy briefs, photo essays, videos or op-eds in English and Spanish.

Its tapping into inter-cultural teamwork, and its also tapping into contemporary issues that span different national settings and, finally, it taps into [students] creative side, Wong said.

They will be interacting with students in a different country that has had a vastly different experience with COVID. Its one thing to read about Mexicos response to COVID-19 in the news; its an entirely different kind of experience when you can learn about it and discuss it with students in Mexico who are in fact living through it.

Elsewhere at the university, some professors have already reached out to students well before classes even begin to ensure their first year at U of T gets off to a strong start.

Along with his colleagueMarioBadr,David Liu, a teaching stream professor in the department of computer science in the Faculty of Arts & Science, created a summer prep course on Quercus to help incoming first-year students enrolled in a Foundations of Computer Science course get up to speed and become acquainted with the department. That includes introducing them to student clubs and other resources that are designed to help them find their feet on campus.

When it comes to teaching online, Liu says he andBadrwill continue in the departments longstanding tradition of encouraging active learning, which goes well beyond delivering lectures.

Lecturing for a full hour or two is tough enough on a student in person, Liu says. Its even harder on Zoom.

Instead, Liu says his classes will typically be split into mini-lectures of under 10 minutes, with the rest of the time dedicated to activities like analyzing program code, writing code and working on mathematical proofs with a partner. If students get stuck on a concept or problem, they can have their questions answered quickly by entering their questions in an online chat monitored by a TA in real time.

David Liu,a teaching stream professor in the department of computer science, helped create a summer prep course for incoming students to get them up to speed on the subject and acquainted with the department.

Active learning is also critical for the Faculty of Kinesiology & Physical EducationsDavid Frost.Never one tolecture at length in front of a blackboard, the assistant professor bridges theory and practice in his courses by encouraging students to learn through hands-on activities such as designing workout programs for real-life clients.

Frost, who has recorded videos of himself completing student-designed workout sessions and uploaded them to YouTube for the class to critique, plans to take a similarly dynamic approach to teaching this fall.

I guess the way were viewing this is there are actually things you can do online that you cant do in person, says Frost. This is an opportunity to learn in different ways.

From his introductory kinesiology course to more advanced seminars, Frost says the shift to online will come with a number of extras for students. For example, Frost and his co-instructors plan to produce a podcast featuring guest experts who will discuss coaching philosophies and other topics relevant to the course. He has also set aside two hours per week for a group activity over Zoom that asks students to design an exercise session and put it into practice: No special gym equipment required.

Another activity may involve a group workout; still another will take students through conducting a physical assessment.

Every week is going to be different, Frost says.

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Virtual field trips, digital labs and global colleagues: U of T students to explore the world this fall - News@UofT

Interview and photos: Renowned inventor and artist Tom Shannon’s first Oklahoma exhibit is on view at Science Museum Oklahoma – Oklahoman.com

"This is a Nano Earth - a one-billionth size Earth - and it's the same size as the iris of your eye," Shannon said, holding up a tiny piece of the sculpture. "This is human-sized, so you can go a billion down and get to the molecules and a billion up to get to the Sun. So, we're right in the middle - this shows that we're right midway between molecules and the Sun."

Oklahoma exclusives

On view through Oct. 25, the New York City-based artist's first Oklahoma exhibit provides museum visitors a chance to view some exclusive offerings.

"I think they'll get a better understanding of our size and place in this universe, seeing how small we really are in the scheme of things and seeing how everything exists in the universe and how we relate to it," Henderson said.

"Universe in the Mind | Mind in the Universe" features a new 6-foot edition of one of Shannon's signature works - the "Synchronous World Clock" - created especially for Science Museum Oklahoma. One of his numerous patented inventions, he created the original "Synchronous World Clock" in 1984 as a sculptural way of depicting the rotation of the Earth. He used a world map projection by the legendary inventor, artist and visionary R. Buckminister Fuller in the original, and a version of his "Synchronous World Clock" is in the Smithsonian Institutions collection.

"It rotates counter-clockwise ... but just once per day in synchronicity with the actual Earth. So, it gives the time in a very natural way because it's moving at the same speed that Earth is rotating," Shannon said. "If this thing is moving freely, it really keeps time perfectly. ... I'm always refining things and thinking about a new way to do it."

For instance, Shannon created his first magnetic array, "Compass Moon Atom Room," in 1991 for an exhibit at the Moderna Museet in Stockholm, Sweden, where it is now part of the permanent collection. The "Atom Compass Array" in Science Museum Oklahoma's lobby is the first to be shown in the United States.

"Universe in the Mind | Mind in the Universe" also includes about 150 pages of sketches, notes and ideas he has jotted down from 1966 to present day. This display of "first drafts, ideas, dreams, observations, fleeting thoughts" ranges from drawings for a galactic mirror that would allow humans to get an outside view of our Milky Way galaxy to plans for a small, lightweight, electric "city car" that could collapse to the size of suitcase and be stowed in an apartment or office.

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Interview and photos: Renowned inventor and artist Tom Shannon's first Oklahoma exhibit is on view at Science Museum Oklahoma - Oklahoman.com

LaunchDarkly Hosting Trajectory Conference as a Live Streaming Interactive Event – PR Web

Leaders in the software space look forward to sharing how theyre working towards continuous delivery, and what can be done to continue that progress in the future. Were excited to bring together a growing community of software innovators to learn, belong and collaborate.

OAKLAND, Calif. (PRWEB) July 30, 2020

LaunchDarkly has announced the speaker lineup and agenda for Trajectory LIVE Conference 2020. This year the conference will be hosted on August 26-27, online as a live streaming event. Trajectory Conference focuses on how teams use modern development practices so they can continuously deliver the experiences their users have come to expect.

LaunchDarklys feature management platform currently has more than 1,300 customers globally, and serves more than three trillion feature flags each day. The company has seen that when development teams and business stakeholders collaborate effectively, they are ultimately able to make better software, faster.

Were thrilled to announce Trajectory once again! We want to provide a platform for the software community to explore how they can continue to improve software processes, said Edith Harbaugh, co-founder and CEO of LaunchDarkly. Its wonderful to see so many organizations share their own success stories.

TrajectoryLIVE will feature speakers who are pioneering modern development practices. Emily Freeman, Senior Cloud Advocate at Microsoft, will deliver a keynote focusing on DevOps, what it means as a concept and how teams can use people, process and tools to empower software delivery. And James Governor, Principal Analyst and Co-Founder of RedMonk, will share how the new term Progressive Delivery came to be.

In addition to talks and sessions with LaunchDarkly leadership including co-founders Edith Harbaugh and John Kodumal various sessions will be led by well-known software leaders including Michael McKay, Senior Development Manager at IBM; Liz Fong-Jones, Developer Advocate at Honeycomb; and Aaron Kraft, Director of DevOps and Test Engineering at H&R Block.

Attendees can expect to hear learnings and best practices, participate in open forum discussions, as well as network with peers. Community members familiar with LaunchDarklys Meetup, Test in Production, will appreciate the similarities in topics covered and engaging format. The agenda includes sessions on observability, release practices, hypothesis-driven development, chaos engineering, continuous deployment, and Progressive Delivery.

Leaders in the software space look forward to sharing how theyre working towards continuous delivery, and what can be done to continue that progress in the future, said John Kodumal, CTO & Co-Founder of LaunchDarkly. Were excited to bring together a growing community of software innovators to learn, belong and collaborate.

LaunchDarkly has decided to provide free access to this live streaming event. We were so excited to bring this rich content to our customers and community, we werent ready to cancel the event outright, said Zena Dav, Experiential Marketing Manager. We are pleased that we have been able to keep our original speaker lineup, and can now share these sessions with an even broader audience. People can tune in from where-ever they are, for free!

Trajectory Conference will kick off with our Trajectory Nano Series on July 29th. This will consist of 4 short coffee break-sized sessions, that will take place each Wednesday until the main event. On August 26-27, Trajectory LIVE will showcase 2 half days of talks and interactive sessions.

About LaunchDarkly Founded in 2014 by Edith Harbaugh and John Kodumal, LaunchDarkly is the feature management platform that software teams use to build better software, faster with less risk. Development teams use feature management as a best practice to separate code deployments from feature releases. With LaunchDarkly, teams control their entire feature lifecycles from concept to launch to value. Serving over 1300 customers, LaunchDarkly is used by teams at Atlassian, Microsoft, and CircleCI. LaunchDarkly is named on the Enterprise Tech 30 list, and on the Bay Area Best Places to Work list. Learn more at https://launchdarkly.com

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LaunchDarkly Hosting Trajectory Conference as a Live Streaming Interactive Event - PR Web

Nano Satellites Market Size, Share, Application Analysis, Regional Outlook, Growth Trends, Key Players, Competitive Strategies and Forecasts to 2026 -…

LOS ANGELES, United States: The report is an all-inclusive research study of the global Nano Satellites market taking into account the growth factors, recent trends, developments, opportunities, and competitive landscape. The market analysts and researchers have done extensive analysis of the global Nano Satellites market with the help of research methodologies such as PESTLE and Porters Five Forces analysis. They have provided accurate and reliable market data and useful recommendations with an aim to help the players gain an insight into the overall present and future market scenario. The Nano Satellites report comprises in-depth study of the potential segments including product type, application, and end user and their contribution to the overall market size.

Get Full PDF Sample Copy of Report: (Including Full TOC, List of Tables & Figures, Chart) https://www.qyresearch.com/sample-form/form/1970391/global-nano-satellites-market

In addition, market revenues based on region and country are provided in the Nano Satellites report. The authors of the report have also shed light on the common business tactics adopted by players. The leading players of the global Nano Satellites market and their complete profiles are included in the report. Besides that, investment opportunities, recommendations, and trends that are trending at present in the global Nano Satellites market are mapped by the report. With the help of this report, the key players of the global Nano Satellites market will be able to make sound decisions and plan their strategies accordingly to stay ahead of the curve.

Competitive landscape is a critical aspect every key player needs to be familiar with. The report throws light on the competitive scenario of the global Nano Satellites market to know the competition at both the domestic and global levels. Market experts have also offered the outline of every leading player of the global Nano Satellites market, considering the key aspects such as areas of operation, production, and product portfolio. Additionally, companies in the report are studied based on the key factors such as company size, market share, market growth, revenue, production volume, and profits.

Key Players Mentioned in the Global Nano Satellites Market Research Report: Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Planet Labs, Surrey Satellite Technologies, Spire Global, Dauria Aerospace, Tyvak, CubeSat, NANOSATELLITE COMPANIES, AEC-Able Engineering, AeroAstro L.L.C., Aeroflex, Aerojet, Airbus Defence and Space, Aitech, Alenia Spazio, APCO Technologies, Ard, ATK, Austrian Aerospace, Boeing Space Systems, CAEN Aerospace, Raytheon

Global Nano Satellites Market Segmentation by Product: Video Borescopes, Fiberscope, Rigid Borescopes

Global Nano Satellites Market Segmentation by Application: Government Departments, Army, Other

The Nano Satellites Market report has been segregated based on distinct categories, such as product type, application, end user, and region. Each and every segment is evaluated on the basis of CAGR, share, and growth potential. In the regional analysis, the report highlights the prospective region, which is estimated to generate opportunities in the global Nano Satellites market in the forthcoming years. This segmental analysis will surely turn out to be a useful tool for the readers, stakeholders, and market participants to get a complete picture of the global Nano Satellites market and its potential to grow in the years to come.

Key questions answered in the report:

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Table of Contents:

1 Study Coverage1.1 Nano Satellites Product Introduction1.2 Key Market Segments in This Study1.3 Key Manufacturers Covered: Ranking of Global Top Nano Satellites Manufacturers by Revenue in 20191.4 Market by Type1.4.1 Global Nano Satellites Market Size Growth Rate by Type1.4.2 Communications Satellite1.4.3 Positioning Satellite1.4.4 Others1.5 Market by Application1.5.1 Global Nano Satellites Market Size Growth Rate by Application1.5.2 Government Departments1.5.3 Army1.5.4 Other1.6 Study Objectives1.7 Years Considered

2 Executive Summary2.1 Global Nano Satellites Market Size, Estimates and Forecasts2.1.1 Global Nano Satellites Revenue Estimates and Forecasts 2015-20262.1.2 Global Nano Satellites Production Capacity Estimates and Forecasts 2015-20262.1.3 Global Nano Satellites Production Estimates and Forecasts 2015-20262.2 Global Nano Satellites, Market Size by Producing Regions: 2015 VS 2020 VS 20262.3 Analysis of Competitive Landscape2.3.1 Manufacturers Market Concentration Ratio (CR5 and HHI)2.3.2 Global Nano Satellites Market Share by Company Type (Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3)2.3.3 Global Nano Satellites Manufacturers Geographical Distribution2.4 Key Trends for Nano Satellites Markets & Products2.5 Primary Interviews with Key Nano Satellites Players (Opinion Leaders)

3 Market Size by Manufacturers3.1 Global Top Nano Satellites Manufacturers by Production Capacity3.1.1 Global Top Nano Satellites Manufacturers by Production Capacity (2015-2020)3.1.2 Global Top Nano Satellites Manufacturers by Production (2015-2020)3.1.3 Global Top Nano Satellites Manufacturers Market Share by Production3.2 Global Top Nano Satellites Manufacturers by Revenue3.2.1 Global Top Nano Satellites Manufacturers by Revenue (2015-2020)3.2.2 Global Top Nano Satellites Manufacturers Market Share by Revenue (2015-2020)3.2.3 Global Top 10 and Top 5 Companies by Nano Satellites Revenue in 20193.3 Global Nano Satellites Price by Manufacturers3.4 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion Plans

4 Nano Satellites Production by Regions4.1 Global Nano Satellites Historic Market Facts & Figures by Regions4.1.1 Global Top Nano Satellites Regions by Production (2015-2020)4.1.2 Global Top Nano Satellites Regions by Revenue (2015-2020)4.2 North America4.2.1 North America Nano Satellites Production (2015-2020)4.2.2 North America Nano Satellites Revenue (2015-2020)4.2.3 Key Players in North America4.2.4 North America Nano Satellites Import & Export (2015-2020)4.3 Europe4.3.1 Europe Nano Satellites Production (2015-2020)4.3.2 Europe Nano Satellites Revenue (2015-2020)4.3.3 Key Players in Europe4.3.4 Europe Nano Satellites Import & Export (2015-2020)4.4 China4.4.1 China Nano Satellites Production (2015-2020)4.4.2 China Nano Satellites Revenue (2015-2020)4.4.3 Key Players in China4.4.4 China Nano Satellites Import & Export (2015-2020)4.5 Japan4.5.1 Japan Nano Satellites Production (2015-2020)4.5.2 Japan Nano Satellites Revenue (2015-2020)4.5.3 Key Players in Japan4.5.4 Japan Nano Satellites Import & Export (2015-2020)

5 Nano Satellites Consumption by Region5.1 Global Top Nano Satellites Regions by Consumption5.1.1 Global Top Nano Satellites Regions by Consumption (2015-2020)5.1.2 Global Top Nano Satellites Regions Market Share by Consumption (2015-2020)5.2 North America5.2.1 North America Nano Satellites Consumption by Application5.2.2 North America Nano Satellites Consumption by Countries5.2.3 U.S.5.2.4 Canada5.3 Europe5.3.1 Europe Nano Satellites Consumption by Application5.3.2 Europe Nano Satellites Consumption by Countries5.3.3 Germany5.3.4 France5.3.5 U.K.5.3.6 Italy5.3.7 Russia5.4 Asia Pacific5.4.1 Asia Pacific Nano Satellites Consumption by Application5.4.2 Asia Pacific Nano Satellites Consumption by Regions5.4.3 China5.4.4 Japan5.4.5 South Korea5.4.6 India5.4.7 Australia5.4.8 Taiwan5.4.9 Indonesia5.4.10 Thailand5.4.11 Malaysia5.4.12 Philippines5.4.13 Vietnam5.5 Central & South America5.5.1 Central & South America Nano Satellites Consumption by Application5.5.2 Central & South America Nano Satellites Consumption by Country5.5.3 Mexico5.5.3 Brazil5.5.3 Argentina5.6 Middle East and Africa5.6.1 Middle East and Africa Nano Satellites Consumption by Application5.6.2 Middle East and Africa Nano Satellites Consumption by Countries5.6.3 Turkey5.6.4 Saudi Arabia5.6.5 U.A.E

6 Market Size by Type (2015-2026)6.1 Global Nano Satellites Market Size by Type (2015-2020)6.1.1 Global Nano Satellites Production by Type (2015-2020)6.1.2 Global Nano Satellites Revenue by Type (2015-2020)6.1.3 Nano Satellites Price by Type (2015-2020)6.2 Global Nano Satellites Market Forecast by Type (2021-2026)6.2.1 Global Nano Satellites Production Forecast by Type (2021-2026)6.2.2 Global Nano Satellites Revenue Forecast by Type (2021-2026)6.2.3 Global Nano Satellites Price Forecast by Type (2021-2026)6.3 Global Nano Satellites Market Share by Price Tier (2015-2020): Low-End, Mid-Range and High-End

7 Market Size by Application (2015-2026)7.2.1 Global Nano Satellites Consumption Historic Breakdown by Application (2015-2020)7.2.2 Global Nano Satellites Consumption Forecast by Application (2021-2026)

8 Corporate Profiles8.1 Lockheed Martin8.1.1 Lockheed Martin Corporation Information8.1.2 Lockheed Martin Overview8.1.3 Lockheed Martin Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.1.4 Lockheed Martin Product Description8.1.5 Lockheed Martin Related Developments8.2 Northrop Grumman8.2.1 Northrop Grumman Corporation Information8.2.2 Northrop Grumman Overview8.2.3 Northrop Grumman Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.2.4 Northrop Grumman Product Description8.2.5 Northrop Grumman Related Developments8.3 Planet Labs8.3.1 Planet Labs Corporation Information8.3.2 Planet Labs Overview8.3.3 Planet Labs Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.3.4 Planet Labs Product Description8.3.5 Planet Labs Related Developments8.4 Surrey Satellite Technologies8.4.1 Surrey Satellite Technologies Corporation Information8.4.2 Surrey Satellite Technologies Overview8.4.3 Surrey Satellite Technologies Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.4.4 Surrey Satellite Technologies Product Description8.4.5 Surrey Satellite Technologies Related Developments8.5 Spire Global8.5.1 Spire Global Corporation Information8.5.2 Spire Global Overview8.5.3 Spire Global Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.5.4 Spire Global Product Description8.5.5 Spire Global Related Developments8.6 Dauria Aerospace8.6.1 Dauria Aerospace Corporation Information8.6.2 Dauria Aerospace Overview8.6.3 Dauria Aerospace Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.6.4 Dauria Aerospace Product Description8.6.5 Dauria Aerospace Related Developments8.7 Tyvak8.7.1 Tyvak Corporation Information8.7.2 Tyvak Overview8.7.3 Tyvak Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.7.4 Tyvak Product Description8.7.5 Tyvak Related Developments8.8 CubeSat8.8.1 CubeSat Corporation Information8.8.2 CubeSat Overview8.8.3 CubeSat Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.8.4 CubeSat Product Description8.8.5 CubeSat Related Developments8.9 NANOSATELLITE COMPANIES8.9.1 NANOSATELLITE COMPANIES Corporation Information8.9.2 NANOSATELLITE COMPANIES Overview8.9.3 NANOSATELLITE COMPANIES Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.9.4 NANOSATELLITE COMPANIES Product Description8.9.5 NANOSATELLITE COMPANIES Related Developments8.10 AEC-Able Engineering8.10.1 AEC-Able Engineering Corporation Information8.10.2 AEC-Able Engineering Overview8.10.3 AEC-Able Engineering Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.10.4 AEC-Able Engineering Product Description8.10.5 AEC-Able Engineering Related Developments8.11 AeroAstro L.L.C.8.11.1 AeroAstro L.L.C. Corporation Information8.11.2 AeroAstro L.L.C. Overview8.11.3 AeroAstro L.L.C. Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.11.4 AeroAstro L.L.C. Product Description8.11.5 AeroAstro L.L.C. Related Developments8.12 Aeroflex8.12.1 Aeroflex Corporation Information8.12.2 Aeroflex Overview8.12.3 Aeroflex Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.12.4 Aeroflex Product Description8.12.5 Aeroflex Related Developments8.13 Aerojet8.13.1 Aerojet Corporation Information8.13.2 Aerojet Overview8.13.3 Aerojet Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.13.4 Aerojet Product Description8.13.5 Aerojet Related Developments8.14 Airbus Defence and Space8.14.1 Airbus Defence and Space Corporation Information8.14.2 Airbus Defence and Space Overview8.14.3 Airbus Defence and Space Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.14.4 Airbus Defence and Space Product Description8.14.5 Airbus Defence and Space Related Developments8.15 Aitech8.15.1 Aitech Corporation Information8.15.2 Aitech Overview8.15.3 Aitech Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.15.4 Aitech Product Description8.15.5 Aitech Related Developments8.16 Alenia Spazio8.16.1 Alenia Spazio Corporation Information8.16.2 Alenia Spazio Overview8.16.3 Alenia Spazio Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.16.4 Alenia Spazio Product Description8.16.5 Alenia Spazio Related Developments8.17 APCO Technologies8.17.1 APCO Technologies Corporation Information8.17.2 APCO Technologies Overview8.17.3 APCO Technologies Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.17.4 APCO Technologies Product Description8.17.5 APCO Technologies Related Developments8.18 Ard8.18.1 Ard Corporation Information8.18.2 Ard Overview8.18.3 Ard Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.18.4 Ard Product Description8.18.5 Ard Related Developments8.19 ATK8.19.1 ATK Corporation Information8.19.2 ATK Overview8.19.3 ATK Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.19.4 ATK Product Description8.19.5 ATK Related Developments8.20 Austrian Aerospace8.20.1 Austrian Aerospace Corporation Information8.20.2 Austrian Aerospace Overview8.20.3 Austrian Aerospace Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.20.4 Austrian Aerospace Product Description8.20.5 Austrian Aerospace Related Developments8.21 Boeing Space Systems8.21.1 Boeing Space Systems Corporation Information8.21.2 Boeing Space Systems Overview8.21.3 Boeing Space Systems Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.21.4 Boeing Space Systems Product Description8.21.5 Boeing Space Systems Related Developments8.22 CAEN Aerospace8.22.1 CAEN Aerospace Corporation Information8.22.2 CAEN Aerospace Overview8.22.3 CAEN Aerospace Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.22.4 CAEN Aerospace Product Description8.22.5 CAEN Aerospace Related Developments8.23 Raytheon8.23.1 Raytheon Corporation Information8.23.2 Raytheon Overview8.23.3 Raytheon Production Capacity and Supply, Price, Revenue and Gross Margin (2015-2020)8.23.4 Raytheon Product Description8.23.5 Raytheon Related Developments

9 Nano Satellites Production Forecast by Regions9.1 Global Top Nano Satellites Regions Forecast by Revenue (2021-2026)9.2 Global Top Nano Satellites Regions Forecast by Production (2021-2026)9.3 Key Nano Satellites Production Regions Forecast9.3.1 North America9.3.2 Europe9.3.3 China9.3.4 Japan

10 Nano Satellites Consumption Forecast by Region10.1 Global Nano Satellites Consumption Forecast by Region (2021-2026)10.2 North America Nano Satellites Consumption Forecast by Region (2021-2026)10.3 Europe Nano Satellites Consumption Forecast by Region (2021-2026)10.4 Asia Pacific Nano Satellites Consumption Forecast by Region (2021-2026)10.5 Latin America Nano Satellites Consumption Forecast by Region (2021-2026)10.6 Middle East and Africa Nano Satellites Consumption Forecast by Region (2021-2026)

11 Value Chain and Sales Channels Analysis11.1 Value Chain Analysis11.2 Sales Channels Analysis11.2.1 Nano Satellites Sales Channels11.2.2 Nano Satellites Distributors11.3 Nano Satellites Customers

12 Market Opportunities & Challenges, Risks and Influences Factors Analysis12.1 Nano Satellites Industry12.2 Market Trends12.3 Market Opportunities and Drivers12.4 Market Challenges12.5 Nano Satellites Market Risks/Restraints12.6 Porters Five Forces Analysis13 Key Finding in The Global Nano Satellites Study14 Appendix14.1 Research Methodology14.1.1 Methodology/Research Approach14.1.2 Data Source14.2 Author Details14.3 Disclaimer

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QY Research established in 2007, focus on custom research, management consulting, IPO consulting, industry chain research, data base and seminar services. The company owned a large basic data base (such as National Bureau of statistics database, Customs import and export database, Industry Association Database etc), experts resources (included energy automotive chemical medical ICT consumer goods etc.

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Nano Satellites Market Size, Share, Application Analysis, Regional Outlook, Growth Trends, Key Players, Competitive Strategies and Forecasts to 2026 -...

Kanazawa University research: Diverse amyloid structures and dynamics revealed by high-speed atomic force microscopy – PRNewswire

KANAZAWA, Japan, July 28, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- Researchers at Kanazawa University report in ACS Nano a high-speed atomic-force microscopy study of the formation of protein fibrils (amyloids) associated with pathologies in collaborated research with Showa University.Mixing different variants of a single protein and changing the acidity of its environment is shown to result in significant variations in amyloid structure and elongation rates.

In the human body, proteins sometimes occur in fibrillar aggregates called amyloids. Although certain amyloids are known to have a biological function, amyloid formation is often associated with pathologies, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Understanding how exactly amyloid fibrils form is crucial for gaining insights into the development of such diseases and for advancing with treatment approaches.Now, Takahiro Watanabe-Nakayama from Kanazawa University, Kenjiro Ono from Showa University, and colleagues have investigated the formation process of particular amyloid fibrils using a technique enabling visualization of growth over time. The scientists specifically looked at the effect of cross-seeding ('mixing') different proteins forming aggregates, and found variations in elongation rates and the structures of the fibrils.

The researchers studied alpha-synuclein, a protein abundant in the human brain.They looked at what happened when letting wild-type alpha-synuclein molecules the natural, most abundant variant form aggregates, and also how aggregation is different when introducing (cross-seeding) mutant variants associated with Parkinson's disease. In addition, the scientists examined the influence of the pH level of the microenvironment in which fibril growth takes place.

By means of high-speed atomic-force microscopy (HS-AFM), Watanabe-Nakayama, Kenjiro Ono, and colleagues could record fibril aggregation at nanometer resolution and high video rate for various cases.First, the scientists looked at the growth of single variant types (self-seeding).They found that mutants produced more aggregates, or that they aggregated faster at neutral pH than the wild-type variants. Another observation was that elongation was faster at lower pH (5.8, i.e. acidic) than at higher pH (7.4, i.e. basic).

For cross-seeding, different scenarios can occur. Fibril growth can be accelerated or slowed down, or even stopped. The morphology of the original seed can be preserved, but it also happens that the structure of the resulting fibril is different typical structural forms are 'straight' or 'spiral'. The researchers checked that fibril structure and dynamics as observed with HS-AFM correspond to the processes in solution by means of fluorescence experiments; similar conclusions were obtained.

The findings of Watanabe-Nakayama, Kenjiro Ono, and colleagues are relevant for better understanding amyloid-related diseases. Quoting the researchers: "Cross-seeding combined with variations in elongation rates has the effect of increasing the structural diversity of the resulting assemblies.This diversity may be reflected in distinct neurotoxic effects for various [protein] assemblies."

Background

Amyloids

Amyloids are fibrillar aggregates of protein molecules.Although some amyloids are known to have a biological function (for example the release of hormones), they are associated with diseases collectively called amyloidoses.These include neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases.Many different proteins can form amyloids; Takahiro Watanabe-Nakayama from Kanazawa University and colleagues studied fibril formation of alpha-synuclein molecules by means of high-speed atomic force microscopy.

Atomic force microscopy

Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an imaging technique in which the image is formed by scanning a surface with a very small tip.Horizontal scanning motion of the tip is controlled via piezoelectric elements, while vertical motion is converted into a height profile, resulting in a height distribution of the sample's surface.As the technique does not involve lenses, its resolution is not restricted by the so-called diffraction limit. In a high-speed setup (HS-AFM), the method can be used to produce movies of a sample's structural evolution in real time.Watanabe-Nakayama and colleagues have successfully used HS-AFM to study the formation and structural dynamics of amyloids obtained by self- and cross-seeding alpha-synuclein protein variants.

Reference

Takahiro Watanabe-Nakayama*, Maika Nawa, Hiroki Konno, Noriyuki Kodera, Toshio Ando,

David B. Teplow, and Kenjiro Ono*.Self- and Cross-Seeding on alpha-Synuclein Fibril Growth Kinetics and Structure Observed by High-Speed Atomic Force Microscopy, ACS Nano Published online 17 July 2020.

* Correspinding authors

Takahiro Watanabe-Nakayama, PhD: [emailprotected]

Kenjiro Ono, MD, PhD: [emailprotected]

DOI: 10.1021/acsnano.0c03074

URL: https://pubs.acs.org/doi/10.1021/acsnano.0c03074

About Nano Life Science Institute (WPI-NanoLSI)

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Nano Life Science Institute (NanoLSI), Kanazawa University is a research center established in 2017 as part of the World Premier International Research Center Initiative of the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The objective of this initiative is to form world-tier research centers. NanoLSI combines the foremost knowledge of bio-scanning probe microscopy to establish 'nano-endoscopic techniques' to directly image, analyze, and manipulate biomolecules for insights into mechanisms governing life phenomena such as diseases.

About Institute for Frontier Science Initiative (InFiniti)

https://infiniti.adm.kanazawa-u.ac.jp/en/

Institute for Frontier Science Initiative (InFiniti) was established in April 2015 for the purpose of creating innovative research results and opening new fields of scientific inquiry. The Institute enhances the academic advantages of Kanazawa University, promotes interdisciplinary research, and accelerates international circulation of talented researchers. It also cultivates young researchers' interdisciplinarity, comprehensiveness, and internationality on the basis of its research results.

About Kanazawa University

http://www.kanazawa-u.ac.jp/e/

As the leading comprehensive university on the Sea of Japan coast, Kanazawa University has contributed greatly to higher education and academic research in Japan since it was founded in 1949. The University has three colleges and 17 schools offering courses in subjects that include medicine, computer engineering, and humanities.

The University is located on the coast of the Sea of Japan in Kanazawa a city rich in history and culture. The city of Kanazawa has a highly respected intellectual profile since the time of the fiefdom (1598-1867). Kanazawa University is divided into two main campuses: Kakuma and Takaramachi for its approximately 10,200 students including 600 from overseas.

About WPI nanoLSI Kanazawa University

Hiroe YonedaVice Director of Public AffairsWPI Nano Life Science Institute (WPI-NanoLSI)Kanazawa UniversityKakuma-machi, Kanazawa 920-1192, JapanEmail: [emailprotected] Tel: +81-(76)-234-4550

SOURCE Kanazawa University

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Kanazawa University research: Diverse amyloid structures and dynamics revealed by high-speed atomic force microscopy - PRNewswire

Researchers Uncover How Cells Interact With Supporting Proteins To Heal Wounds – Technology Networks

When we get a wound on our skin, the cells in our bodies quickly mobilize to repair it. While it has been known how cells heal wounds and how scars form, a team led by researchers from Washington University in St. Louis has determined for the first time how the process begins, which may provide new insight into wound healing, fibrosis and cancer metastasis.

The team, led by Delaram Shakiba, a postdoctoral fellow from the NSF Science and Technology Center for Engineering Mechanobiology (CEMB) at the McKelvey School of Engineering, discovered the way fibroblasts, or common cells in connective tissue, interact with the extracellular matrix, which provides structural support as well as biochemical and biomechanical cues to cells. The team uncovered a recursive process that goes on between the cells and their environment as well as structures in the cells that were previously unknown.

Results of the research were published in ACS Nano on July 28. Senior authors on the paper are Guy Genin, the Harold and Kathleen Faught Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the McKelvey School of Engineering, and Elliot Elson, professor emeritus of biochemistry and molecular biophysics at the School of Medicine.

"Clinical efforts to prevent the progression of fibrocontractile diseases, such as scarring and fibrosis, have been largely unsuccessful, in part because the mechanisms that cells use to interact with the protein fibers around them are unclear," Shakiba said. "We found that fibroblasts use completely different mechanisms in the early -- and I think the most treatable -- stages of these interactions, and that their responses to drugs can therefore be the opposite of what they would be in the later stages."

Genin, who is the co-director of the CEMB, said the process has stymied mechanobiology researchers for some time.

"Researchers in the field of mechanobiology thought that cells pulled in collagen from the extracellular matrix by reaching out with long protrusions, grabbing it and pulling it back," Genin said. "We discovered that this wasn't the case. A cell has to push its way out through collagen first, then instead of grabbing on, it essentially shoots tiny hairs, or filopodia, out of the sides of its arms, pulls in collagen that way, then retracts."

Now that they understand this process, Genin said, they can control the shape that a cell takes.

"With our colleagues at CEMB at the University of Pennsylvania, we were able to validate some mathematical models to go through the engineering process, and we now have the basic rules that cells follow," he said. "We can now begin to design specific stimuli to direct a cell to behave in a certain way in building a tissue-engineered structure."

The researchers learned they could control the cell shape in two ways: First, by controlling the boundaries around it, and second, by inhibiting or upregulating particular proteins involved in the remodeling of the collagen.

Fibroblasts pull the edges of a wound together, causing it to contract or close up. Collagen in the cells then remodels the extracellular matrix to fully close the wound. This is where mechanobiology comes into play.

"There's a balance between tension and compression inside a cell that is newly exposed to fibrous proteins," Genin said. "There is tension in actin cables, and by playing with that balance, we can make these protrusions grow extremely long," Genin said. "We can stop the remodeling from occurring or we can increase it."

The team used a 3D-mapping technique -- the first time it has been applied to collagen -- along with a computational model to calculate the 3D strain and stress fields created by the protrusions from the cells. As cells accumulated collagen, tension-driven remodeling and alignment of collagen fibers led to the formation of collagen tracts. This requires cooperative interactions among cells, through which cells can interact mechanically.

"New methods of microscopy, tissue engineering and biomechanical modeling greatly enhance our understanding of the mechanisms by which cells modify and repair the tissues they populate," Elson said. "Fibrous cellular structures generate and guide forces that compress and reorient their extracellular fibrous environment. This raises new questions about the molecular mechanisms of these functions and how cells regulate the forces they exert and how they govern the extent of matrix deformation."

"Wound healing is a great example of how these processes are important in a physiologic way," Genin said. "We'll be able to come up with insight in how to train cells not to excessively compact the collagen around them."

Reference:Shakiba, D., Alisafaei, F., Savadipour, A., Rowe, R. A., Liu, Z., Pryse, K. M., . . . Genin, G. M. (2020). The Balance between Actomyosin Contractility and Microtubule Polymerization Regulates Hierarchical Protrusions That Govern Efficient FibroblastCollagen Interactions. ACS Nano, 14(7), 7868-7879. doi:10.1021/acsnano.9b09941

This article has been republished from the following materials. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

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Researchers Uncover How Cells Interact With Supporting Proteins To Heal Wounds - Technology Networks


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