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Smart robot: New OS a brain boost for collaborative robots – ZDNet

Can we get more out of collaborative robots? That's the question that drove a new universal AI operating system two years in the making designed to make existing robots smarter and self-learning.

Collaborative robots have been, in many ways, the poster child of the most recent wave of automation. Where industrial robots have long been hulking Goliaths necessitating cages and kept far from human workers, the new breed of automation is flexible, easy to program, and, crucially, collaborative. Robots are venturing out of cages in a variety of task agnostic platforms, often robotic arms with several degrees of freedom that are small enough to sit on a tabletop.

But as technology, and particularly AI and machine learning, advance, these platforms risk falling by the wayside. That's where an updated OS might come into play. A company calledQobotix has been working on just such an operating system designed to transform collaborative robots (cobots) into what the company calls "intelligent coworkers."

"During our many years involved in industrial manufacturing, we experienced robots that were meant to be collaborative and quickly concluded they were not like that at all - they couldn't see or hear, and they were very inflexible," says Avi Reichental, one of the founders.

Just as my kids have been ushered into a new era of self-guided learning during the pandemic, Qobotix's enables robots to learn independently through interactions with humans or other robots. This significantly reduces both the time and the complexity of programming. While gesture-based programming has caught on, programming complexity is still a major hurdle to adoption in automation.

The system relies on proprietary AI, machine vision, and kinematics, essentially the controls and sensing payload you'd expect on a cutting edge robot, to create a hardware agnostic plug and play OS, potentially breathing new life into aging tech.

"Our aim is to take robotics out of the late 1990s with the Qobotix operating system," explains Qobotix Co-founder and CEO Egor Korneev. "In the early 2000s, hardware companies dominated the mobile phone and device markets and the mobile applications ecosystem was weak with no common OS options. The advent of iOS and Android led to an explosion in mobile software applications based on open OS platforms. We are now in a similar place with cobots with Qobotix offering a universal operating system for industrial robots driven by AI as a platform for automation applications."

The timing for such a platform seems ideal. While the automation industry seems to have suffered during the pandemic, at least according to early numbers out of North America, the longterm outlook for automation is excellent as end users rethink their reliance on overseas supply chains and reevaluate their operations in a world where a pandemic can stop production cold. Automation is looked upon as a valuable bulwark against the risks laid bare in 2020, and the ability to squeeze more out of existing technology should help Qobotix heading into a post-pandemic world.

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Smart robot: New OS a brain boost for collaborative robots - ZDNet

Manifold Robotics Announces New Collaboration with NYPA – UASweekly.com

Manifold Robotics today announced an agreement with the New York Power Authority (NYPA), the nations largest state public power organization, to develop unmanned aircraft systems (UASs) capable of operating safely near power lines. With partial funding from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority (NYSERDA), under this project, new sensing technologies and algorithms will be developed and commercialized to enable UASs, more commonly known as drones, to detect, avoid, or autonomously track along transmission lines using the electromagnetic fields (EMF) that they emit. The EMF naturally produced by all energized transmission lines will enable UASs to safely traverse electric utility right-of-ways with improved locational awareness of power lines.

Utilities around the world have begun using UASs for such power line inspections as a replacement for helicopter-based methods. Helicopters can be noisy, expensive and potentially risky. However, operating in environments with transmission lines presents significant operational challenges as high electromagnetic fields tend to destabilize conventional UAS navigation systems. In addition, the low visibility of power lines impacts situational awareness of UAS operators thus greatly increasing the chances of collisions with lines and associated structures.

Manifold Robotics is developing a sensor-based detection method for identifying energized power lines in the vicinity of an unmanned aircraft. Based on technology originally developed by the U.S. Army that spun off from a Department of Defense-sponsored proof-of-concept project at New York University, the technology enables UASs to sense EMF from transmission lines at a distance. Through Manifold Robotics, the team is now working to continue developing and finetuning the technology for UAS-based commercial applications

The Power Authority and other utilities around the country can significantly benefit from being able to fully integrate unmanned aircraft systems into inspections of power lines and transmission towers, said Alan Ettlinger, NYPAs director of Research, Technology Development & Innovation. This technology will enable drone aircraft to track along and avoid hitting power lines, even when used beyond the visual line of sight. This will result in increased cost savings and improved reliability over conventional radar or laser-based systems.

NYPAs role in the project includes participation in various aspects of design, build and testing of the EMF sensing technology.

Were very excited to be collaborating with the team at the New York Power Authority on this important technology development. With this new power line sensing technology, we expect that the full potential of UASs will finally be realized for power line inspection and measurement, said Jeff Laut, CEO at Manifold Robotics.

With this new technology, Manifold intends to create a UAS-based system that removes major safety and cost issues for the utility industrys power line inspection effort. In addition, Manifold Robotics anticipates the technology to enable beyond visual line of sight (BVLOS) operations allowing power line inspection to be conducted autonomously.

NYSERDA is proud to invest in this novel solution to make aerial drones a safe, reliable, and ubiquitous tool for performing power line inspections for a 21st century electric grid. Congratulations to Manifold Robotics and NYPA on this collaborative opportunity to develop and demonstrate the value that innovative technology can bring to New Yorks electric system operators, said Doreen M. Harris, Acting President and CEO, NYSERDA.

Funding for this project is provided by NYPA and NYSERDA through its Electric Power Transmission and Distribution High Performing Grid Program, which makes investments in research and development that accelerate the realization of an advanced, digitally enhanced and dynamically managed electric grid. While the pandemic response delayed the initial start of the commercialization program, the Manifold Robotics team has now launched its product development effort, which is expected to last about 24 months.

Our intent is that the cost and reliability improvements of our technology will be a timely benefit for energy utilities, Laut projected.

About Manifold Robotics

Founded in 2016, Manifold Robotics Inc. was a spinoff from New York University Tandon School of Engineering with Jeffrey Laut as President and CEO. At that time, Manifold focused on robotics, human-machine interaction, and environmental science seeking to commercialize a small-scale autonomous robotic vehicle designed to collect data on water quality. The team was awarded a grant from PowerBridgeNY as well as an NSF SBIR Phase I award. The power line detection technology was first launched as a startup project funded by the National Security Innovation Network (NSIN), a Department of Defense innovation program office, to facilitate the transfer and transition of defense dual-use technology. The postdoctoral project, led by Jeffrey Laut and under the direction of Prof. Maurizio Porfiri, was incubated in the Dynamical Systems Lab at New York Universitys Tandon School of Engineering, where the objective was to validate the technology and create a viable commercialization strategy.

About NYPA

The New York Power Authority (NYPA) is the largest state public power organization in the nation, operating 16 generating facilities and more than 1,400 circuit-miles of transmission lines. More than 80 percent of the electricity NYPA produces is clean renewable hydropower. NYPA uses no tax money or state credit. It finances its operations through the sale of bonds and revenues earned in large part through sales of electricity. For more information visit http://www.nypa.gov .

About NYSERDA

Clean energy can power New York while protecting the environment. The New York State Energy Research and Development Authority, known as NYSERDA, promotes energy efficiency and the use of renewable energy sources. These efforts are key to developing a less polluting and more reliable and affordable energy system for all New Yorkers. Collectively, NYSERDAs efforts aim to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, accelerate economic growth, and reduce customer energy bills.

For more infomation visit http://www.manifoldrobotics.com

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Manifold Robotics Announces New Collaboration with NYPA - UASweekly.com

iotaMotion Awarded $1.65M NIH Grant To Further Development Of Its Robotics-assisted Surgical Technology For Cochlear Implantation – BioSpace

IOWA CITY, Iowa, Sept. 9, 2020 /PRNewswire/ --iotaMotion Inc., an early-stage medical technology startup spun out of the University of Iowa's Otolaryngology Department, announced today that the company has been awarded a $1.65M grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The Company is applying this grant towards the continued development of real time tissue trauma sensing capabilities in the iotaSOFT robotic surgical system, which is intended to assist surgeons with cochlear implantation surgery.

In recognition of the Company's continued success, iotaMotionhas additionally received the inaugural Iowa Biosciences Med-tech Award. The first award of its kind, iotaMotion received $20,000 in recognition for significant progress and investor support over the past year. These funds will be used to support the Company's continued regulatory and pre-commercialization efforts.

"This grant award is incredibly exciting as the Company makes significant progress developing truly novel robotic-assisted technologies," said iotaMotion Medical Director and Chair of the Department of Otolaryngology at University of Iowa Marlan Hansen, MD, FACS. "We expect the iotaSOFT system to deliver a marked clinical impact on how we perform cochlear implantation surgery upon commercialization."

The iotaSOFT system is a robotic-assisted insertion device, which will allow surgeons to advance cochlear implant electrodes with control and precision. iotaMotion anticipates that controlled insertion will allow for less surgical variability in outcomes and results. Given the growing development of hearing preservation implant solutions, assistive technologies like iotaSOFT become critical in achieving surgical goals while navigating the patient's retained residual hearing capacity.

"These NIH funds will be used to advance technology development to support real-time feedback and monitoring during cochlear implant electrode insertion," said co-founder and President of iotaMotion, Chris Kaufmann. "We appreciate the support of the NIH as well as the local investor community as we make meaningful progress towards commercialization of our first suite of solutions."

IOTAMOTION, INC.

A privately-held Iowa based company, iotaMotion is developing robotic technologies with the goal of focused, individualized, hearing loss treatment. The company's solutions aim to standardize cochlear implant insertion, and to provide unprecedented control in the surgical and post-surgical care settings with the goal of expanding access to cochlear interventions for both surgeons and patients. For more information, visit http://www.iotamotion.com or contact Christopher Kaufmann at pr@iotamotion.com.

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SOURCE iotaMotion, Inc.

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iotaMotion Awarded $1.65M NIH Grant To Further Development Of Its Robotics-assisted Surgical Technology For Cochlear Implantation - BioSpace

COVID-19 Impact & Recovery Analysis: Robotics Market in Middle East 2020-2024 | Evolving Opportunities with ABB Ltd. and DENSO Corp. | Technavio -…

LONDON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The robotics market in Middle East is expected to grow by USD 166.18 million as per Technavio. This marks a significant market slow down compared to the 2019 growth estimates due to the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic in the first half of 2020. However, healthy growth is expected to continue throughout the forecast period, and the market is expected to grow at a CAGR of about 2%.

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Read the 120-page report with TOC on "Robotics Market in Middle East Analysis Report by Application (Services and Industrial) and the Segment Forecasts, 2020-2024".

https://www.technavio.com/report/robotics-market-industry-analysis

The market is driven by the growing demand for robotic automation process. In addition, the increasing adoption of robotics in diverse fields of application is anticipated to boost the growth of the robotics market.

Business across sectors such as industrial, banking, hospitality, and healthcare are increasingly adopting automation to improve the efficiency and safety of their operations and increase revenues. For instance, firms in the BFSI sector in the Middle East have adopted robotic process automation to automate various processes such as loan application processing, KYC compliance, credit card limit checks, refinancing, and others. This is helping them to eliminate manual, repetitive, and time-consuming activities and improve the efficiency of operations. The increased adoption of robotic automation process in various sectors is fueling the growth of the robotics market in the Middle East.

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Major Five Robotics Companies:

ABB Ltd.

ABB Ltd. operates its business through segments such as Electrification, Industrial Automation, Motion, Robotics & Discrete Automation, and Corporate and Other. The company offers a line of products such as IRB 1100, IRB 120, IRB 1200, IRB 5350, and YuMi - IRB 14000 | Collaborative Robot among others.

DENSO Corp.

DENSO Corp. operates its business through segments such as Thermal Systems, Powertrain Systems, Electrification Systems, Mobility Systems, Electronic Systems, and Non-Automotive Businesses (Factory Automation and Agriculture). The company designs and manufactures industrial robot arms and small assembly robots, from four-axis SCARA robots to five and six axis articulated robots that are majorly used in manufacturing facilities.

KUKA AG

KUKA AG operates its business through segments such as Systems, Robotics, Swisslog, Swisslog Healthcare, and China. The company offers a range of products such as KR IONTEC, KR QUANTEC, KR 3 AGILUS, and LBR iiwa among others.

LG Electronics Inc.

LG Electronics Inc. operates its business through segments such as Home Appliance & Air Solution, Home Entertainment, Mobile Communications, Vehicle Components, Business-to-Business, LG Innotek, and Other segments. The company offers industrial robots that are used in a wide range of applications such as assembling, material handling, and painting among others.

Mitsubishi Electric Corp.

Mitsubishi Electric Corp. operates its business through segments such as Energy and Electric Systems, Industrial Automation Systems, Information and Communication Systems, Home Appliances, and Other. The company offers a line of products such as vertical type robot, horizontal type robot, collaborative robot, environment-resistant specifications type robot, and micro working robot among others.

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Related Reports on Industrials Include:

Global Robotics Market Global robotics market by application (industrial and services) and geography (APAC, Europe, North America, MEA, and South America).

Global Robotics as a Service Market Global robotics as a service market by application (intralogistics, medical applications, surveillance and security, field robotics, and others) and geography (APAC, Europe, MEA, North America, and South America).

About Technavio

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With over 500 specialized analysts, Technavios report library consists of more than 17,000 reports and counting, covering 800 technologies, spanning across 50 countries. Their client base consists of enterprises of all sizes, including more than 100 Fortune 500 companies. This growing client base relies on Technavios comprehensive coverage, extensive research, and actionable market insights to identify opportunities in existing and potential markets and assess their competitive positions within changing market scenarios.

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COVID-19 Impact & Recovery Analysis: Robotics Market in Middle East 2020-2024 | Evolving Opportunities with ABB Ltd. and DENSO Corp. | Technavio -...

Post Covid-19 Impact on Smart Home Robotics Market Outlook and Company Analysis Global Forecast to 2026 | Top key players SoftBank, iRobot, Hanson…

COVID-19 Impact on Global Smart Home Robotics Market Research Report 2020-2026

Market Overview

Our professional market growth survey report for the global Smart Home Robotics market assesses the global Smart Home Robotics market and the conditions that it will be subject to, through the years 2020-2026. It begins with a simple definition of the major product/service offering made by the global Smart Home Robotics market. It proceeds to evaluate the current market worth of the global Smart Home Robotics market. Next, it predicts a valuation which, the global Smart Home Robotics market will reach, according to our research. An approximate CAGR number for this growth is also guessed at.

The major vendors covered: SoftBank, iRobot, Hanson Robotics, Intuition Robotics, Blue Frog Robotics, Amazon, Asus, Worx, Maytronics, Five Elements Robotics, Aido Robot, iLife, RoboMow, etc.

Get sample copy of this report: https://www.reportsandmarkets.com/sample-request/impact-of-covid-19-outbreak-on-smart-home-robotics-global-market-research-report-2020?utm_source=thedailychronicle&utm_medium=6

Drivers & Constraints

The report pays utmost attention to the Smart Home Robotics market dynamics and the role they play in the growth of the market. It categorizes these factors into market drivers which positively contribute to the market growth and also discusses factors which could possibly hinder the market growth in the future. The report includes discusses on previously witnesses market drivers and constraints and the impact they had on the market in order to provide the user with a larger and more informative perspective on the growth of the overall market.

Market Segmentation and Regional Overview

The market segmentation section divides the global Smart Home Robotics market into product type, product application, distribution channel and region. The product type segment studies the different product variants made available by the global Smart Home Robotics market. The product application segment reviews the different end-users of the global Smart Home Robotics market. The distribution channel segment looks at the global Smart Home Robotics market in terms of the various channels of distribution and sales available for it. Lastly, the regional segment studies the popularity of the global Smart Home Robotics market in different parts of the world.

The regional segment primarily assesses the market penetration of the global Smart Home Robotics market in North and South America, the Middle East, Asia Pacific and Europe.Among all of these areas, the area with the dominant market share of the global Smart Home Robotics market is recognised. The reasons for this areas market dominance are listed. If research informs us that a certain area is slated to gropw faster than other regional markets of the global Smart Home Robotics market, we state all information pertaining to the area and its spike in popularity of Smart Home Robotics.

Latest industry related news

We conclude our market survey report on the global Smart Home Robotics market by outlining all important news pertaining to the global Smart Home Robotics market space, which may influence the global Smart Home Robotics market. So, if there have been any recent tech innovations which may have resulted in new product innocations in the global Smart Home Robotics market, we enlist it. If there have been important company mergers/acquistions, we inform the readers of this too.

Research objectives:

To study and analyze the global Smart Home Robotics consumption (value & volume) by key regions/countries, type and application, history data from 2016 to 2020, and forecast to 2026.

To understand the structure of Smart Home Robotics market by identifying its various sub segments.

Focuses on the key global Smart Home Robotics manufacturers, to define, describe and analyze the sales volume, value, market share, market competition landscape, SWOT analysis and development plans in next few years.

To analyze the Smart Home Robotics Industry with respect to individual growth trends, future prospects, and their contribution to the total market.

To share detailed information about the key factors influencing the growth of the market (growth potential, opportunities, drivers, industry-specific challenges and risks).

To project the consumption of Smart Home Robotics submarkets, with respect to key regions (along with their respective key countries).

To analyze competitive developments such as expansions, agreements, new product launches, and acquisitions in the market.

To strategically profile the key players and comprehensively analyse their growth

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Major Points from Table of Contents

Chapter 1 Smart Home Robotics Market Overview

Chapter 2 Global Smart Home Robotics Competition by Players/Suppliers, Type and Application

Chapter 3 United States Smart Home Robotics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)

Chapter 4 China Smart Home Robotics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)

Chapter 5- Europe Smart Home Robotics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)

Chapter 6 Japan Smart Home Robotics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)

Chapter 7 Southeast Asia Smart Home Robotics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)

Chapter 8 India Smart Home Robotics (Volume, Value and Sales Price)

Chapter 9 Global Smart Home Robotics Players/Suppliers Profiles and Sales Data

Chapter 10 Smart Home Robotics Maufacturing Cost Analysis

Chapter 11 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers

Chapter 12 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders

Chapter 13 Market Effect Factors Analysis

Chapter 14 Global Smart Home Robotics Market Forecast (2020-2026)

Chapter 15 Research Findings and Conclusion

Chapter 16 Appendix

List of Tables and Figures

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Post Covid-19 Impact on Smart Home Robotics Market Outlook and Company Analysis Global Forecast to 2026 | Top key players SoftBank, iRobot, Hanson...

The Robotics Education & Competition (REC) Foundation Receives a Nearly $750K Grant from Texas Workforce Commission to Expand Robotics Throughout…

GREENVILLE, Texas--(BUSINESS WIRE)--The Robotics Education & Competition (REC) Foundation announced today that it is partnering with the Texas Workforce Commissions Texas Youth Robotics Initiative to expand access of competitive robotics to traditionally underrepresented high school students for the 2020/2021 academic year.

The REC Foundation has been awarded a nearly $750,000 grant to bring competitive robotics to rural and Title 1 schools around the state which will impact up to 4,800 high school students who wouldnt otherwise have access to evidence-based STEM programming.

The grant will assist rural and Title 1 schools in the development of 150 new robotics teams, comprised of students who have not participated in competitive robotics previously, and to sustain 50 existing teams. Additionally, this grant will focus on inclusion for deaf and hard of hearing students across Texas. The REC Foundation is partnering with the Texas School for the Deaf to expand robotics by creating 25 new teams and holding a signature competition event for the deaf community, next spring in Austin.

Were thrilled to receive a grant from the Texas Workforce Commission to increase participation in competitive robotics in our home state of Texas, said Dan Mantz, CEO of the REC Foundation. This investment will offer the opportunity for thousands of students to access science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) skills. It will also help prepare the next generation of innovators to have a rewarding career which will ultimately help enhance Texass workforce.

Through the creative process of designing, building, and programming robots for competition, students gain a wealth of technical knowledge and develop communication and teamwork skills that will serve them well throughout their lives. To learn more about the REC Foundation and how your high school can apply for this grant, visit https://www.roboticseducation.org/grant/twc-grant/.

About the Robotics Education & Competition (REC) Foundation

The Robotics Education & Competition (REC) Foundations mission is to increase student interest and involvement in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) by engaging students in hands-on, affordable, and sustainable robotics engineering programs.

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The Robotics Education & Competition (REC) Foundation Receives a Nearly $750K Grant from Texas Workforce Commission to Expand Robotics Throughout...

Solving Airport Cleaning Challenges with Best Practices and Robotics – Airport Technology

Discover the best cleaning practices for airports to help improve sanitation and decrease the risk of disease transfer. Credit: Gerald Friedrich / Pixabay

The global Covid-19 pandemic has prioritised cleaning efficacy in airports and other high-traffic locations, but what is the new standard for cleanliness, and how can airport operations and facilities executives rise to meet one of the greatest challenges of their careers?

Join us for this webinar to learn about the latest airport cleaning best practices that decrease the risk of disease transfer and improve safety while maintaining the airport image that travellers expect. Learn how airports are increasingly utilising robotic floor scrubbers to enhance cleaning efficacy and expand workforce capacity.

Dave Frank, a nationally recognised expert in commercial cleaning process improvement, will be joined by experts from Brain Corp and Tennant Co, who have partnered together to deploy thousands of robotic scrubbers worldwide. To top off the discussion, Don Toole, of FlagShip Facility Services, will discuss his companys investment in autonomous cleaners, and the results they are seeing at several US airports.

The webinar takes place on 21 September at 10am PST / 1pm EST. To register for free, click here.

Dave Frank, president of the American Institute for Cleaning Science (AICS)

Dave Frank is the president of the American Institute for Cleaning Sciences (AICS), an independent third-party accreditation organisation that establishes standards to improve the professional performance of the cleaning industry.

With more than 41 years of experience, Frank is the leading authority in the commercial cleaning industry, serving facility service providers, distributors, buying groups, associations and manufacturers.

He is an active member and frequent speaker for ISSA, APPA, EPA and the US Green Building Council.

Don Toole, senior vice-president sales and marketing, FlagShip

Don Toole is an accomplished, innovative business development executive with an outstanding track record, which includes dramatic market share growth, reduced operations cost, optimised marketing initiatives, streamlined workflows, process improvement and fully engaged employees on high-performing teams.

Chris Wright, commercial cleaning expert and VP of sales, Brain Corp

Chris Wright has spent the majority of his career in the cleaning industry, gaining more than 30 years of experience. His positions include everything from front line custodian on a floor crew, to VP of sales for the robotic cleaning machine company, Brain Corp.

Wright has an extensive background in sales, training, lean systems, root cause analysis, time engineering, and creating processes and programs for janitorial operations. He holds numerous certifications and has subject matter expertise in equipment, robotics and cleaning.

Prior to Brain Corp, he spent 14 years in a variety of sales positions with Krcher North America, and before that, with Hillyard Inc. chemical company.

For more information about the webinar, click here.

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Solving Airport Cleaning Challenges with Best Practices and Robotics - Airport Technology

Robots Fighting COVID-19 – What Can They Do to Help Us? | IE – Interesting Engineering

A robot named Pepper is hard at work reminding mall-goers in Paris to wear a mask, in a pedestrian effort to help curb the spread of the COVID-19 coronavirus, according to a recent YouTube video from SoftBank Robotics Europe.

RELATED: TOKYO TRAINS SEE VIRUS-KILLING DISINFECTION ROBOTS TESTED

The child-sized robot is stationed in a mall in Paris, and gently reminds passersby to don their masks to reduce the chance of spreading the COVID-19 illness, reportsthe CBC. As of writing, COVID-19 cases in France have seen an upsurge in the last month, with a current tally of 27.6 million people infected, according to The New York Times.

"It's a reminder, a little reminder. You know, we are human, and sometimes I happen to remove my mask when I get off the bus because I forget the rules, and I put it on as I enter the office because the robot reminds me to," said Jonathan Boiria of SoftBank Robotics of Pepper the robot, according to the CBC report. "It's important. We all make mistakes. We all forget."

Upon encountering a human with a mask, the robot thanks them for bringing one. To navigate his local environment, Pepper makes a visual scan of the area. Users may create and set local points of interest, to maximize the robot's interaction with consumer foot-traffic.

Mall-goers can access a menu on a torso-attached flatscreen device that resembles an iPad. Pepper can even carry out guide duties, "walking" humans to the nearest restroom facilities or a specific business in the area which means it could serve as a waypoint for children who have become accidentally separated from parents, and alert mall authorities. However, this is not yet confirmed.

The robot even has manners: he automatically avoids human contact unless queried, and will even help consumers decide what kind of products like shoes they want to buy.

With a given range of 426 ft (130 m), the robot automatically uses a charging Pod when his battery runs low.Perhaps the most noteworthy feature is Pepper's ability to speak multiple languages. In a recent video from SoftBank Robotics Europe, we hear it speak Spanish, French, and English of course, additional languages may be available.

While Pepper isn't the first robot deployed to help curb the spread of the COVID-19 illness, it's definitely one of the useful ones. In February the early days of the pandemic a robot in Times Square called the Promobot tried and failed to lighten the public mood as it descended into the depths of coronavirus blues.

In sum it was a laggy iPad housed in a robot shell, its LED-lit face staring blankly up at passersby like a drugged puppy hoping to come by and impress the very ex-best-friend that left it there.

A later entrant into the robot-versus-coronavirus story from Boston Dynamics was more successful. In April, Spot the robot dog was equipped with an iPad and a two-way radio to help healthcare workers carry out video conferences with socially-distant patients. This allowed medics to analyze patients without risking exposure to the virus.

Earlier this month, a team of researchers from MIT and Brigham and Women's Hospital published a study on a pre-print website suggesting Spot the robot dog be adapted to take patients' vitals and transmit the results to the doctor at another location.

"In robotics, one of our goals is to use automation and robotic technology to remove people from dangerous jobs," said Henwei Huang, an MIT postdoc, according to an MIT blog post. "We thought it should be possible for us to use a robot to remove the health care worker from risk of directly exposing themselves to the patient."

The most advanced robot technology from Boston Dynamics, SoftBank Robotics Europe, and elsewhere continue to place robots into service in varying bids to help the collective fight to curb the spread of COVID-19 illness. While it may at times be an uncanny experience to see robots where humans or no one used to be, it's also a testament to the versatility of robotics. Little to nothing, it seems not even a global pandemic can slow their advance.

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Robots Fighting COVID-19 - What Can They Do to Help Us? | IE - Interesting Engineering

Robots with Common Sense and Cognitive Intelligence: Are We There Yet? – Analytics Insight

The debate about man vs robots is an evergreen and common thing now. While robots are viewed as an enabler of a dystopian future brought by digital disruption, the main question that has baffled minds is how smart are they. When it comes to human intelligence, there isnt any other living being or mechanical or AI mind that can draw parallel with us. Yet, robots powered by AI have been able to perform trivial, monotonous tasks with accuracy far better than us. It is important to note that this does not imply robots have acquired cognitive intelligence nor common sense which are intrinsic to humans, despite de facto of the recent marvels of robotics.

The main problem is that most of the algorithms that are written for robots are based on machine learning coding. These codes are collected from a particular type of data, and models are trained based on individual test conditions. Hence, when put in a situation that is not in their code nor algorithm, robots can fail terribly or draw a conclusion that can be catastrophic. This has highlighted in Stanley Kubricks landmark film2001: A Space Odyssey. The movie features a supercomputer, HAL-9000, who is informed by its creators of the purpose of the mission: to reach Jupiter and search for signs of extra-terrestrial intelligence. When HAL makes an error, it refuses to admit this and alleges that it was caused due to human error. Therefore, astronauts decide to shut HAL down, but unfortunately, the AI discovers their plot by lip-reading. Conclusively, HAL arrives at a new conclusion that wasnt part of its original programming, deciding to save itself by systematically killing off the people onboard.

Another illustration which experts often mention it that, while we can teach a robot on how to open a door by training it and feeding data on 500 different types of door, the robots will still fail when asked to open the 501st door. Also, this example is the best way to explain why robots dont share the typical thought process and intelligence of humans. Humans dont need to be trained they observe and learn, or they experiment thanks to curiosity. Further, every time someone knocks the door, we dont tend to open it, there is always an unfriendly neighbor we dislike. Again we dont need to be reminded to lock the door either, but robots need a clear set of instruction. Let us consider other aspects of our life, robots and AI are trained on a particular set of data; hence they will function effectively when the input is something they have been trained or programmed for, beyond it the observation is different. For instance, if one uses the expression Hit the road while driving a car, she means to say to herself or the driver to begin the journey emphatically. If a robot does not know the phrasal meaning of the same expression, it may believe that the person is asking to hit the road. This misunderstanding can lead to accidents. While researchers are working hard, devising algorithms, running codes, we are yet to see a robot that understands the way humans converse, all with accents, dialects, colloquy and jargons.

Michio Kaku, a futurist and theoretical physicist, once said that Our robots today, have the collective intelligence and wisdom of a cockroach. While robots of today can make salads on our command, or robots like Deep Blue or AlphaGo Zerocan defeat humans in chess, it does not necessarily qualify as common sense nor smartness. And let us not forget that Deep Blue and AlphaGo Zero were following instructions given by a team of smart human scientists.These robots were designed by people who were smart enough to solve a seemingly impossible task. So to sum up, while robots are becoming smarter that, they are now able to fold laundry, impersonate as a person looking for dating online, they still lag when it comes to cognitive intelligence and common sense. It is a long wait till we find a robot we see in sci-fi movies, i.e. C3P0, R2D2 or WALL-E.

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Robots with Common Sense and Cognitive Intelligence: Are We There Yet? - Analytics Insight

UK pledges GBP65 million for robots, batteries and advanced therapies : Nuclear Policies – World Nuclear News

10 September 2020

The UK government today announced GBP65 million (USD84 million) of investment in future technologies, including GBP15 million to enable universities, research organisations and businesses to build robots to inspect, maintain and repair nuclear power stations, satellites and wind turbines. The robotics will also be used to address new problems resulting from the pandemic, including ones that can operated remotely and make contact-free deliveries or move hospital beds.

The Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) said the funding will be available through the governments Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund, which has been extended to help develop solutions to some of the biggest global challenges, including climate change and tackling diseases such as cancer and Alzheimer's.

Nearly GBP44 million is to develop the next generation of high-performance batteries for electric vehicles and wind turbines, which could also be used for new technologies such as electric airplanes. The funding will also be used to complete a UK Battery Industrialisation Centre, in Coventry. AnotherGBP6.5 million will be allocated to the Advanced Therapy Treatment Centrenetwork to accelerate patient access to cell and gene based therapies.

Science Minister Amanda Solloway said: "We want to build back better by putting the UK at the forefront of new technologies to create high-skilled jobs, increase productivity and grow the economy as we recover from coronavirus. This new funding will strengthen the UKs global status in a range of areas, including battery technologies for electric vehicles and robotics, helping us develop innovative solutions to some of our biggest global challenges and creating jobs in rewarding careers right across the country."

Established in 2017, the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund is providing GBP2.6 billion of government investment with the aim of funding world-leading research and highly innovative businesses to address the biggest industrial and societal challenges.

BEIS said that today's announcement is part of the governments commitment through its R&D Roadmap"to put the UK at the forefront of transformational technologies" and is part of the government's wider commitment to increaseR&Dinvestment to 2.4% ofGDPby 2027.

Researched and written by World Nuclear News

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UK pledges GBP65 million for robots, batteries and advanced therapies : Nuclear Policies - World Nuclear News

Government investment to help build robots for nuclear plants and batteries for electric aeroplanes – GOV.UK

Future technologies that could transform peoples lives such as high-performance batteries for electric vehicles, advanced medical treatments and robotics will receive a 65 million government cash boost today (Thursday 10 September).

The funding will be available through the governments Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund, which has been extended today to help develop solutions to some of the biggest global challenges, including climate change and tackling diseases such as cancer and Alzheimers.

Of the investment announced today:

nearly 44 million to develop the next generation of high-performance batteries for electric vehicles and wind turbines, which could also be used for new technologies such as electric aeroplanes. The funding will also be used to complete a first-of-its-kind UK Battery Industrialisation Centre, in Coventry, West Midlands, creating 100 high-skilled jobs. Organisations across the automotive, rail and aerospace sectors will have access a unique battery production facility combining manufacturing, experimentation and innovation

15 million to enable universities, research organisations and businesses to build robots to inspect, maintain and repair nuclear power stations, satellites and wind turbines. The robotics will also be used to address new problems resulting from the pandemic, including ones that can operated remotely and make contact-free deliveries or move hospital beds.

6.5 million will be allocated to the Advanced Therapy Treatment Centre network to accelerate patient access to advanced therapies through the development of specialised infrastructure for the delivery of these products in the NHS. These cell and gene based therapies are aimed at the treatment of life-limiting and inherited diseases such as cancer, Duchenne muscular dystrophy or cystic fibrosis.

Science Minister Amanda Solloway said:

We want to build back better by putting the UK at the forefront of new technologies to create high-skilled jobs, increase productivity and grow the economy as we recover from coronavirus.

This new funding will strengthen the UKs global status in a range of areas, including battery technologies for electric vehicles and robotics, helping us develop innovative solutions to some of our biggest global challenges and creating jobs in rewarding careers right across the country.

Challenge Director for The Faraday Battery Challenge Tony Harper said:

In order for batteries to play their full environmental and economic role in achieving Net Zero we need to deploy at scale and build supply chains for todays technology, shift from strong potential to commercial dominance in a new generation of batteries and continue to build world-class scientific capability to sustain us into the future. The announcement today confirms our commitment and determination to build on the hard-won progress the UK has made in the last 3 years on all these fronts and to accelerate progress post COVID-19.

CEO of the Cell and Gene Therapy Catapult Matthew Durdy said:

The ATTC network is a fantastic example of effective government intervention and the international community recognises this as part of the UKs leadership in the field. Bringing together companies, the NHS and regulatory bodies to make the use of cell and gene therapies easier, more cost effective, and more widespread both boosts the industry and brings these life changing medicines to patients who need them.

The fact that 12% of global clinical trials in cell and gene therapy take place in the UK and half of those involve ATTCs is a testament to the success of this highly respected programme.

Andrew Tyrer, Challenge Director for Robotics for a Safer World said:

I am delighted that the government has provided an extra 15 million funding to help academics and businesses bridge the gap to: complete on-going deliverables set against the Robots for a Safer World Challenge, and also; utilise knowledge gained to the benefit of new sectors, ahead of this Autumns spending review.

Established in 2017, the Industrial Strategy Challenge Fund is delivering 2.6 billion of government investment with the aim of funding world-leading research and highly innovative businesses to address the biggest industrial and societal challenges.

Todays announcement furthers the governments commitment through its R&D Roadmap to put the UK at the forefront of transformational technologies and is part of the governments wider commitment to increase R&D investment to 2.4% of GDP by 2027.

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Government investment to help build robots for nuclear plants and batteries for electric aeroplanes - GOV.UK

Kraken Robotics of Newfoundland inks deals with Danish and Polish navies – Cape Breton Post

In a year thats been problematic for many businesses, Newfoundland-based Kraken Robotics stands apart, scoring major successes throughout.

The latest was announced Tuesday, a contract counted in millions with the Danish Ministry of Defence, Acquisition and Logistics Organization (DALO) to supply mine-hunting sonar equipment to the Royal Danish Navy.

The deal with the Danish Navy was first announced by the company in July.

At that time, Kraken said the total contract was valued between $35-million and $40-million, over a two-year equipment acquisition phase.

The contract will see Kraken deliver the KATFISH towed synthetic aperture sonar, the Tentacle winch and Autonomous Launch and Recovery System (ALARS), and provide ongoing service for the technology.

Kraken had actually been chosen as the successful bidder for the Danish navy contract in 2019, through a competitive bid process.

However, one of the losing bidders launched a complaint about the bid process. And a slowdown in government activity because of COVID caused some delays in finalizing the contract.

The contract also means the company will be establishing a presence in Denmark.

In a press release, company president and CEO Karl Kenny said Kraken will be establishing a new Danish Centre of Excellence in Mine Counter Measures, as part of its commitment to Denmark in this contract.

This new operation will not only conduct research and development to further improve the capabilities of Krakens world-class MCM solutions but will also be able to offer local technical support for Danish customers, said Kenny. Krakens new Danish operation will also engage with local Danish companies, universities and technical institutes, ensuring a long term benefit to Danish technical development.

Thats not the limit of Krakens ventures into Europe.

The company also announced Tuesday that on Sept. 1 it had signed a contract to supply minehunting systems to the Polish Navy.

This contract will see Kraken deliver its KATFISH towed Synthetic Aperture Sonar, Tentacle Winch and Autonomous Launch and Recovery System (ALARS) in the second half of 2021.

Krakens equipment will be integrated onboard the Polish Navys new KORMORAN II Mine CounterMeasure (MCMV) vessels in Gdansk, Poland.

The Newfoundland company could not offer details about the value of the contract.

Due to confidentiality reasons, Kraken cannot disclose specifics about the contract, other than to say that it is significant and that we expect it to be a strong enabler within other NATO nations.

Kenny did say that if the Polish Navy is successful in exporting its KORMORAN II MCMVs to other countries, it could lead to additional KATFISH and ALARS sales opportunities for Kraken.

Captain Piotr Sikora, Chief, Naval Warfare Systems Branch, Armament Division, Polish Navy Inspectorate, did sayin a news release that Krakens KATFISH, when put to tests at sea, proved able in shallow water and very shallow water zones.

The unique capabilities of this system will provide us with much greater efficiency and will allow us to build strength for the 21st century. We are convinced that with such an advanced Synthetic Aperture Sonar onboard, our new MCM Vessels under the Polish and NATO flag will make a huge contribution to build both national and international security at sea as we face the naval mine challenges of the 21st century.

Kraken Robotics is a publicly-traded company, listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (TSX-V: PNG, OTCQB: KRKNF)

They have offices in Mount Pearl and Halifax, and currently employ about 115 people.

Twitter: @BarbDeanSimmons

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Kraken Robotics of Newfoundland inks deals with Danish and Polish navies - Cape Breton Post

Robots that inspect, maintain and repair nuclear plants bag government funding – Energy Live News – Energy Made Easy

Projects that will build robots to inspect, maintain and repair nuclear power stations, satellites and wind turbines have been awarded 15 million of new funding.

These robotics will also be used to help address new problems resulting from the pandemic, such as machines that need to be controlled remotely and those to carry out contact-free deliveries.

The funding comes as part of a new 65 million government investment to support future technologies and help the UK build back by transitioning to low carbon economy.

Some 44 million will also be allocated to benefit the development of high-performance batteries for electric vehicles (EVs), wind turbines and electric jets.

The funding will also be used to complete a first-of-its-kind UK Battery Industrialisation Centre in Coventry.

Science Minister Amanda Solloway said: This new funding will strengthen the UKs global status in a range of areas, including battery technologies for EVs and robotics, helping us develop innovative solutions to some of our biggest global challenges and creating jobs in rewarding careers right across the country.

If you enjoyed this story you can sign up to our weekly email forEnergy Live News and if youre interested in hearing more about the journey to net zero by 2050, you can also sign up to thefuture Net Zeronewsletter.

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Robots that inspect, maintain and repair nuclear plants bag government funding - Energy Live News - Energy Made Easy

Global Food Robotic Market Report 2020: Trends, Forecast and Competitive Analysis 2013-2024 Featuring ABB, Rockwell Automation, & Fanuc -…

The "Food Robotic Market Report: Trends, Forecast and Competitive Analysis" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

The food robotics market is expected to grow with a CAGR of 12% from 2019 to 2024.

The future of the food robotic market looks promising with opportunities in the food and beverage industries. The major growth drivers for this market are increasing food safety regulations, and higher demand for packaged food.

Some of the features of 'Food Robotic Market 2019-2024: Trends, Forecast, and Opportunity Analysis' includes: -

This report answers the following 11 key questions:

Key Topics Covered:

1. Executive Summary

2. Market Background and Classifications

2.1: Introduction, Background, and Classifications

2.2: Supply Chain

2.3: Industry Drivers and Challenges

3. Market Trends and Forecast Analysis from 2013 to 2024

3.1: Macroeconomic Trends and Forecast

3.2: Global Food Robotic Market: Trends and Forecast

3.3: Global Food Robotic Market by End Use Industry

3.3.1: Beverages

3.3.2: Meat, Poultry, and Seafood

3.3.3: Dairy

3.3.4: Bakery

3.3.5: Fruits and Vegetables

3.3.6: Confectionery

3.3.7: Others

3.4: Global Food Robotic Market by Application

3.4.1: Palletizing

3.4.2: Pick and Place

3.4.3: Packaging

3.4.4: Repackaging

3.4.5: Processing

3.4.6: Others

3.5: Global Food Robotic Market by Robot Type

3.5.1: Articulated

3.5.2: Cartesian

3.5.3: SCARA

3.5.4: Parallel

3.5.5: Cylindrical

3.5.6: Collaborative

3.5.7: Others

3.6: Global Food Robotic Market by Payload

3.6.1: Low (&lessThan; 10 Kg)

3.6.2: Medium (>10 Kg to &lessThan; 100 Kg)

3.6.3: Heavy (>100 Kg)

4. Market Trends and Forecast Analysis by Region

5. Competitor Analysis

5.1: Product Portfolio Analysis

5.2: Market Share Analysis

5.3: Operational Integration

5.4: Geographical Reach

5.5: Porter's Five Forces Analysis

6. Growth Opportunities and Strategic Analysis

6.1: Growth Opportunity Analysis

6.1.1: Growth Opportunities for Global Food Robotic Market by End Use Industry

6.1.2: Growth Opportunities for Global Food Robotic Market by Application

6.1.3: Growth Opportunities for Global Food Robotic Market by Product Type

6.1.4: Growth Opportunities for Global Food Robotic Market by Payload

6.1.5: Growth Opportunities for Global Food Robotic Market by Region

6.2: Emerging Trends in Global Food Robotic Market

6.3: Strategic Analysis

6.3.1: New Product Development

6.3.2: Capacity Expansion of Global Food Robotic Market

6.3.3: Mergers, Acquisitions and Joint Ventures in the Global Market

7. Company Profiles of Leading Players

7.1: ABB Group

7.2: Kawasaki Heavy Industries

7.3: Rockwell Automation Incorporated

7.4: Fanuc Corporation

7.5: Kuka

7.6: Seiko Epson Corporation

7.7: Yaskawa Electric Corporation

7.8: Staubli International

7.9: Mayekawa

7.10: Universal Robotics

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/hx1r0f

View source version on businesswire.com: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20200909005617/en/

Contacts

ResearchAndMarkets.comLaura Wood, Senior Press Managerpress@researchandmarkets.com For E.S.T Office Hours Call 1-917-300-0470For U.S./CAN Toll Free Call 1-800-526-8630For GMT Office Hours Call +353-1-416-8900

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Global Food Robotic Market Report 2020: Trends, Forecast and Competitive Analysis 2013-2024 Featuring ABB, Rockwell Automation, & Fanuc -...

New Universal OS Transforms Robots into Intelligent Collaborators that Interact and Learn from Humans, Other Robots – Business Wire

VENTURA, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Qobotix announced today the introduction of its new universal AI operating system to transform collaborative robots (cobots) into intelligent coworkers on the manufacturing floor. After two years of R&D, including active installations of the OS industrial appliance at major auto manufacturers, Qobotix officially unveiled its technology to make existing robots smarter and self-learning.

Click to see the media kit including a video on how Qobotix works.

Just as Android OS and Apple iOS offer application platforms that run on smartphones, the Qobotix OS platform coordinates industrial automation between manufacturers robotic capabilities. Powered by proprietary AI, machine vision, and kinematics, the Qobotix OSs agnostic plug and play technology enables intelligent factory applications to perform complex tasks that were considered only possible by humans. The company also offers complete robot stations, which are ready for immediate deployment on manufacturing lines with the flexibility to be deployed rapidly for different tasks.

With Qobotix OS, manufacturers can boost their manufacturing productivity, reduce costs and simplify manufacturing processes, such as precision inspection, picking, packing and assembly tasks. Qobotix Cloud provides a factory management platform with a centralized repository of work intelligence that can be shared between machines to manage production analytics and provide managers with deep analysis of robotic performance. Qobotix already has active OS installations in major auto manufacturing operations. The company is seeking early adopters of their technology and aims to distribute 20-50 robot stations in the first year with deployment, training and testing that can be done on the same day.

One of Qobotixs central innovations is that it enables robots to learn independently - humans can train robots by interacting with them and robots can learn from other robots, unlike existing industrial robots that are pre-programmed to perform only one task. This capacity enables robots to be programmed in hours or days rather than weeks. Companies can deploy their robots faster with greater flexibility to perform functions with accelerated human-machine collaboration, enabling humans to take on other roles.

Qobotixs introduction comes right as the Covid-19 pandemic is shaking up supply chains to their core. Companies are re-examining their reliance on massive repetitive production offshore, and seeking more flexible, localized manufacturing options. Qobotix helps companies meet the challenge of becoming better equipped to meet these new conditions and move away from inflexible factory designs and manufacturing processes. With Qobotix, factories can use cobots to more easily switch between projects quickly, produce at a high volume for a shorter time, while keeping workers safe through social distancing.

Qobotix is the brainchild of Avi Reichental, a 3D printing pioneer and long-time industry veteran; Egor Korneev, a serial entrepreneur and a pioneer in the field of machine learning and vision systems; and George Votis, the Chairman, CEO and founder of Galt Industries, Inc.

During our many years involved in industrial manufacturing, we experienced robots that were meant to be collaborative and quickly concluded they were not like that at all - they couldnt see or hear, and they were very inflexible, said Reichental.

The team recognized a major gap in the market and decided to develop their own technology with the aim of bringing vision and intelligence to collaborative robots, freeing humans from repetitive tasks to enable them to achieve more complex and strategic roles.

Our aim is to take robotics out of the late 1990s with the Qobotix operating system, said Qobotix Co-founder and CEO Egor Korneev. In the early 2000s, hardware companies dominated the mobile phone and device markets and the mobile applications ecosystem was weak with no common OS options. The advent of iOS and Android led to an explosion in mobile software applications based on open OS platforms. We are now in a similar place with cobots with Qobotix offering a universal operating system for industrial robots driven by AI as a platform for automation applications.

Qobotix marks a milestone in the manufacturing and services industries, said Reichental. Qobotix changes the game for manufacturing and services by eliminating time-consuming processes such as programming to significantly lower costs and increase output. This presents a huge opportunity for all manufacturers in their everyday operations.

Qobotix offers a strong return on investment by freeing up people for higher level tasks, said Qobotics co-founder George Votis. With Qobotix, robots can more easily collaborate with each other, and allow manufacturers to deploy production stations within different production lines each day, saving time and costs while boosting productivity.

About QobotixQobotix delivers the most intuitive and cost effective industrial-grade factory automation solutions for manufacturers of all sizes. The companys integrated and collaborative robotics solutions are powered by a proprietary machine vision and intelligence technology and patented kinematics that together deliver manufacturing floor adaptability, utility and human and machine collaboration at a fraction of the cost and complexity of traditional factory automation. The companys solutions reduce the time and cost required to commission and run demanding multitasking manufacturing operations that include precision inspection, picking, packing and assembly tasks compressing the time, cost and complexity of manufactures final products. To learn more, visit http://www.qobotix.com.

About the Qobotix FoundersAvi Reichental, Co-founder and ChairmanReichental founded XponentialWorks in 2015, after serving as president and CEO of 3D Systems (NYSE:DDD) for 12 years. Under his leadership, 3D Systems became a global leader, ranking second in Fortune Magazines list of the fastest growing tech companies in 2013, and 13th on Forbes Worlds Most Innovative Growth Companies in 2014. Reichental is a recognized Additive Manufacturing pioneer and a leading authority on tech convergence. He also served on the board of Harman (NYSE:HAR) till its successful acquisition by Samsung.

Egor Korneev, Co-founder & CEOKorneev is a serial entrepreneur and a pioneer in the field of machine learning and vision systems. He works to merge applied Artificial Intelligence research with practical needs to deliver effective industrial solutions to customers around the world. Korneev brings two decades of proven track record in successfully commercializing technologies at the edge of innovation. He is also founder and CEO of Ordinal Science, a company that is focused on developing impactful AI solutions that advance the capabilities of the industry.

George Votis, Co-founder and Board MemberVotis is the Chairman and founder of Galt Industries, a private family office with expertise in the consolidation of fragmented industries and, through Galt Ventures, is an active technology investor, incubator and founder of businesses focused primarily on industrial transformation. Votis is also the founder and former owner of Techniplas, a global tier 1 supplier to the automotive industry which was exited in the first half of 2020. He is a Global Leader for Tomorrow as nominated by the World Economic Forum and was an Innovation Board member of the XPrize Foundation. He has an MBA from The Wharton School and a BA from Tufts University.

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New Universal OS Transforms Robots into Intelligent Collaborators that Interact and Learn from Humans, Other Robots - Business Wire

Industrial robots are dominating but are they safe from cyber-attacks? – TechHQ

The pandemic has repeatedly reaffirmed our needs for robots. The time has come for industrial robots to take over factory floors and showcase the suite of benefits they bring to manufacturing.

Robots are generally known to automate repetitive tasks and free up valuable time for their human colleagues to take on more complex and creative tasks; the current social distancing measures have built a stronger case as to why we need robots.

Industrial robots have a long legacy of assembling everything from heavy automobiles, airplanes, electrical appliances, and are now even bring developed for more domestic tasks such as sorting out your trash.

Globally, robots have demonstrated remarkable versatility and strength in taking over human labor with consistent speed and precision. This highly efficient employee has won over factory owners. The global industrial robot market size is predicted to hit US$66.48 billion by 2027, exhibiting a CAGR of 15.1% during the forecast period, statesFortune Business Insights.

Although there is a phenomenal growth in industrial robots, a new report titled Rogue Automation by Trend Micro Research found that some robots have existing flaws that make them susceptible to cyber-attacks.

Theresearch paperaims to reveal previously unknown design flaws that malicious actors could exploit to hide malicious functionalities in industrial robots and other automated, programmable manufacturing machines.

Since robots are generally connected to networks and programmed via software, they could potentially pose as entry points for bad actors. The report listed several real-life examples of flaws found in the software produced and distributed by Swiss-Swedish multinational corporation ABB, one of the worlds largest industrial robot producers. Researchers also spotted vulnerabilities in the popular open-source software named Robot Operating System Industrial or ROS-I.

Researchers discovered vulnerabilities in an app written in ABBs proprietary programming language and used to automate industrial machines. The discovered flaw is the very tool that hackers can leverage on and gain access to networks, exfiltrating valuable files, and sensitive data.

Industrial secrets are traded for very high prices in underground marketplaces and have become one of the main targets of cyberwarfare operations, the study noted.

The research also found a vulnerability that attackers can exploit to interfere with a robots movements via a network. By spoofing (an unknown source disguising as a known, trusted source to communicate) network packets, attackers can cause unintended movements or interrupt existing flows of set procedure, but adequately configured safety systems could make it challenging for hackers to succeed. This vulnerability found in a ROS-Is software component was written for Kuka and ABB robots.

The report clarified that appropriate measures were taken to deal with the discovered vulnerability. One was removed by the vendor (ABB) upon our responsible disclosure. The other vulnerabilities fostered a fruitful conversation with ROS-Industrial, which led to the development of some of the mitigation recommendations described, as written in the report.

Robotics are continuing to show their worth on the factory floors, and while theyve been a fixture in many industries such as car manufacturing for decades, they are becoming increasingly advanced and versatile. Artificial intelligence (AI), machine learning (ML), cloud, and 5G are fueling the evolution of highly automated and increasingly intelligent industrial robots.

The International Federation of Robotics estimates that by 2022, we will see close to 4 million industrial robots in factories worldwide. At the same time, the intricately connected networks between machines and systems are susceptible to the growing scale and robustness of cyberattacks.

Dr. Nicholas Patterson, a cybersecurity lecturer at Deakin University,commentedthat the security risks are not limited to industrial robots but also home-based robots such as robotic vacuum cleaners and drones.

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Industrial robots are dominating but are they safe from cyber-attacks? - TechHQ

High demand for robotics skills in post-Corona recovery – EPPM

By 2022, an operational stock of almost four million industrial robots are expected to work in factories worldwide. These robots will play a vital role in automating production to speed up the post-Corona economy.

Robots are driving demand for skilled workers, according to the International Federation of Robotics (IFR), and so educational systems must effectively adjust to this demand.

IFR President Milton Guerry said: Governments and companies around the globe now need to focus on providing the right skills necessary to work with robots and intelligent automation systems. This is important to take maximum advantage of the opportunities that these technologies offer. The post-Corona recovery will further accelerate the deployment of robotics. Policies and strategies are important to help workforces make the transition to a more automated economy.

Saadia Zahidi, Head of Education, Gender and Employment Initiatives at the World Economic Forum, agreed: Very few countries are taking the bull by the horns when it comes to adapting education systems for the age of automation. Those that are, have long had a clear focus on human capital development. Countries in northern Europe, as well as Singapore are probably running some of the most useful experiments for the future world of work.

Robot suppliers support the education of the workforce with practice-oriented training.

IFR General Secretary Dr Susanne Bieller concluded: Re-training the existing workforce is only a short-term measure. We must already start way earlier curricula for schools and undergraduate education need to match the demand of the industry for the workforce of the future. Demand for technical and digital skills is increasing, but equally important are cognitive skills like problem-solving and critical thinking. Economies must embrace automation and build the skills required to profit otherwise they will be at a competitive disadvantage.

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High demand for robotics skills in post-Corona recovery - EPPM

The Search for the Next Robotics Legend is on!!! – TechCity

TheNext Robotics Legendis an initiative designed by Edu360, Union Banks education platform, in collaboration with Awarri, a pan-African technology company, to infuse Robotics and Artificial Intelligence (AI) into the education of the Nigerian child. This stems from therealisationthat the solutions to some of our most complicated problems as a nation lie in the education of our children today.

Thisfirst-of-its-kind robotics training and competition for students aged 11 to 16will focus on identifying and nurturing young potential inventors and creators who will receive necessary training to solve some of the challenges facing the Nigerian society with the aid of robotics and AI.

To enter, take a 30 second video of your child telling us what they like about robots. Upload onwww.edu360.ngandfill the accompanying consent form. 25 of the most creative andpassionate entries will be selected to participate in the robotics training.

At the end of the free training programme, participants will be required to identify a need in their community, and apply the skills learnt to proffer a solution. The student with the best solution will be admitted for a mentorship program with Awarri, theadvanced AI and roboticscompany owned by Silas Adekunle top international robotics engineer renowned for creating the worlds first intelligent gaming robot.

Schools are not left out! To ensure the sustenance of the initiative, Edu360 will partner with four secondary schools by providing robotics toolkits and training for their teachers to enable them include robotics in their curriculum.

Entries will be received fromAugust 7th to 21st, 2020.Visitwww.edu360.ngfor more information.

Terms and conditions apply.

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The Search for the Next Robotics Legend is on!!! - TechCity

Robots to the rescue – UCI News

The pandemics restrictions on person-to-person interaction have upended the conventional means of helping people deal with a crisis. At the same time, the situation highlights the potential benefits of socially assistive robots, according to Jeffrey Krichmar, UCI professor of cognitive sciences.

In general, I dont think the public is very aware of what these robots can do to improve our lives, he says. Theres more education that needs to be done. I hope COVID-19 will be a wakeup call to our robotics community to spur new ideas.

Socially assistive robots interact with people and can perform household chores, accomplish healthcare tasks and offer emotional support. Mobile devices with multiple sensors and manipulators, they communicate through wireless internet connectivity and can function either autonomously or via remote control. The robots are employed in education, healthcare and business, as well as disaster relief operations.

Telepresence robots, for instance, allow children or adults homebound with a chronic illness or other medical condition to engage in school or workplace activities. The units are physically located in the classroom or office, giving users mobility and a sense of being on- site.

As we begin to reopen [society], I anticipate a hybrid situation where some people can attend school or go to work, but others must stay home, Krichmar says. Being able to participate remotely through a moving robot could make that transition smoother. I can also see this technology expanding to a wider population. For example, people could visit their relatives in nursing homes or hospitals this way.

Robotic dogs, cats and baby seals can provide emotional support to those who are lonely or anxious due to shelter-in-place restrictions, along with the elderly and children with neurodevelopmental disorders similar to the comfort that a pet offers but without the care, feeding and mess. These are not yet in widespread use, however, because theyre costly and limited in their capacity.

UCIs Cognitive Anteater Robotics Laboratory, led by Krichmar, is where cutting-edge robotic systems that mimic the mammalian brain are designed. A number of its projects involve the Toyota Human Support Robot. Called CARL SR, its been programmed to perform such basic tasks as serving meals, putting away groceries and taking out the trash, as well as functions requiring higher-level cognition skills. These include anticipating a persons needs and retrieving any associated objects, as well as learning where theyre located.

Krichmar is confident that assistive robots will, in the future, play a larger role during crises like the current one. He sees parallels to Japans Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster in 2011. That accident highlighted the fact that robots were not ready to help, which led to a number of advances in rescue robotics, Krichmar says. Im hopeful that this pandemic will prompt the socially assistive robotics community to make progress so that we can be prepared to help in future health crises.

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Robots to the rescue - UCI News

For Robots, Its a Time to Shine (and Maybe Disinfect) – The New York Times

The Neo is a four-foot-tall, 1,000-pound robot floor scrubber. The high-tech machine can cruise large commercial buildings on its own, with no human supervision required.

Since its introduction in 2016, Neos sales have roughly doubled each year, said Faizan Sheikh, the chief executive and a co-founder of Avidbots, the Canadian start-up that created the robot. This year, however, demand has shot up 100 percent just since the pandemic-induced shutdown in March. Suddenly, the need for thorough, reliable and frequent cleaning is front and center.

Before, a top executive at a big company would not really have known how their facilities got cleaned, Mr. Sheikh said. They would have outsourced it to a facilities management company, who might outsource it out again.

Now, company leaders are showing more interest, asking questions about the cleaning process and schedule, as well as safety and effectiveness. That can lead to interest in automation, he said.

Indeed, cleaning robots are having a moment in commercial real estate. Their creators are promoting the machines as cost-effective solutions to the cleaning challenges posed by the pandemic. They can be put to frequent use without requiring more paid labor hours, they are always compliant, and some can even provide the data to prove that they have scoured every inch assigned.

The autonomous robots available now are primarily for cleaning floors and carpets, but companies are busy developing other cleaning applications. Boston Dynamics, a robotics design company in Waltham, Mass., for example, is in a partnership to develop a disinfecting solution that can be mounted atop its four-legged Spot robot, a company spokeswoman said.

Robotics are also being used to relieve humans of repetitive back-office tasks like accounting, according to a 2018 report from Deloitte. As more buildings incorporate smart technology, data collection and conversion will become increasingly important.

Somatic, a start-up in New York, is working on a robot that can clean bathrooms using a spray technology, said Michael Levy, the chief executive. Removing a human cleaner from the bathroom makes the area safer because of the reduced risk of spreading germs, Mr. Levy said. And the robot will always do the job exactly as it is programmed to do.

You have to let the chemicals set to do their job, but compliance is tough in the industry, Mr. Levy said. If you tell a robot to leave the chemicals for 36 seconds, they leave the chemicals for 36 seconds every single time.

The idea of robotic cleaning is not new. The first attempts were in the 1970s, Mr. Sheikh said, but the technology was not up to the task, and the machines were extremely cost prohibitive.

The Neo is sophisticated enough to create its own maps of a facility after being walked through it a single time, he said. The customer then works with Avidbots to develop cleaning plans, which may vary depending on the day of the week.

After a human selects a cleaning plan, you press start and walk away, Mr. Sheikh said. The robot figures out its own path.

Designed for facilities of at least 80,000 square feet, Neos sell for $50,000, plus $300 a month for software that tracks cleaning performance. At that price, the break-even point for the buyer is 12 to 18 months, Mr. Sheikh said.

They can also be rented for $2,500 a month, including maintenance and software, on a minimum three-year contract.

Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport deploys its Neo three or four times a day to clean the hundreds of thousands of square feet of tiled floor, said Brian Cobb, the airports chief innovation officer.

Neo has the artificial intelligence capability where, as its moving along its original path, if it sees something in its way, it will go around it, Mr. Cobb said. If the obstacle is there the next day, Neo will incorporate it into its map.

Before Neos activation in January, the airport had three workers cleaning floors every night, amounting to an average 24 labor hours per day, Mr. Cobb said. The Neo has taken over a portion of that, though workers are still needed to do heavier floor maintenance, like burnishing and recoating. It also frees cleaning staff to focus on making sure that high-touch areas of the airport are cleaned more frequently during the pandemic, he said.

SoftBank, the Japanese multinational conglomerate, introduced the Whiz autonomous carpet cleaner through its robotics unit in November, said Kass Dawson, the vice president of brand strategy and brand communications at SoftBank Robotics. Already, more than 10,000 compact Whiz robots have been deployed around the globe

They caught the attention of Jeff Tingley, the president of Sparkle Services, a cleaning company in Enfield, Conn., that works in large commercial facilities throughout Connecticut, New Jersey and New York. He said he had long been interested in robotic cleaning but had not found the technology to be advanced enough or cost effective.

Vacuuming is one of the most time-consuming processes in cleaning. With Whiz, you can essentially wipe out 90 percent of the vac time required, Mr. Tingley said. You still need humans with backpack vacs for under desks and chairs, but weve gained a lot of hours.

The Whiz leases for $500 to $550 a month, which includes maintenance and data collection that provides clients with the confirmed clean, Mr. Dawson said.

The robots software was developed by Brain Corp, a San Diego company that teams up with outside manufacturers mainly in cleaning and warehousing industries. Brain Corps autonomous technology, BrainOS, is also in robots made by Tennant, Minuteman, Krcher and others.

In the second quarter this year, retailers use of BrainOS-powered robots climbed 24 percent from a year earlier, said Chris Wright, Brain Corps vice president of sales. Median daily use rose 20 percent, to 2.58 hours from 2.15, he said.

He noted that much of the increase was during daytime hours, signaling a major shift in cleaning schedules.

Cleaning is now coming to the first shift because its becoming important to companies image, Mr. Wright said. Everyones a little tentative when they walk into buildings now. One of the things that will immediately put people at ease is when they see cleaning happening.

Mr. Tingley has seen it when the Whiz is moving around an office floor. Its a friendly machine that stops if you walk in front of it and uses a blinker to signal when its turning, and people seem to like it, he said.

During this fearful period, the folks in buildings have blank looks or even unhappy frowns, he said. When the Whiz passes by, it brings a smile to their face. Its almost like a pet everybody wants to name it.

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For Robots, Its a Time to Shine (and Maybe Disinfect) - The New York Times


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