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Tor Browser – Download

Preserving your privacy on the net is no easy task nowadays with so many security risks and potential prowlers out there.

Tor Browser is a toolset that’s designed for anyone who wants to improve their safety and security on the Internet. It can help you anonymize web browsing and publishing, instant messaging, and other applications that use the TCP protocol. For business users, it means that confidential exchanges of information can be kept from prying eyes and for more general users, it means that ISPs, keyloggers and other types of malware can’t track your activities easily.

It works by bouncing traffic around a distributed network of servers which it calls “onion routers” (hence the logo). The Tor Browser interface allows you to easily toggle it on and off based on when you need to go online anonymously – there’s no need to restart your computer when you’ve done so. If you want, you can also choose from various proxy tunnels based on a world map which displays exactly where each one is located.

To check it’s working, you can use the online Tor detector to see if you’re surfing anonymously or not. Connection can take some time depending on how many users are logged onto the network at any one time but usually its very quick. The Tor onion logo turns from yellow to green in your taskbar when a successful connection has been made.

Tor is simple, well organized and effective tool for anyone worried about security or invasions of privacy online.

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Tor Browser – Download

If you’re really concerned about browser security, Incognito isn’t … – TechRepublic

Quick question: What do you do when you want to browse the internet securely? Do you click on your browser menu and select your browser’s privacy mode and go about your merry way, assuming your data is safe and your history not saved. I’ve got news for you; chances are that private or incognito mode isn’t exactly what it’s cracked up to be.

I’ve tested both Chrome and Firefox and have witnessed both of them retaining browser history. What does this mean for you, the user? It means if you need serious privacy for your web browsing, or if you need to safeguard data while working on company sites, you might have to turn to a speciality browser, such as Tor Browser or Epic Browser. Tor Browser is available for all platforms, and Epic Browser is only available for Mac and Windows. Both browsers not only ensure your history will not be retained, but they also work with the help of a proxy system to keep your browsing encrypted and private.

So, if you’re looking for the highest level of security in a browser, look away from the the likes of Edge, Chrome, and Firefox and turn your sites on Tor and Epic. Both of these browsers are surprisingly easy to use and will go a long way to keep your data safe. Are they perfect? Are the superior than what you’re using now? Chances are, the answer to that question is a resounding yes.

Image: Jack Wallen

View post:

If you’re really concerned about browser security, Incognito isn’t … – TechRepublic

Tor Browser Review & Rating | PCMag.com

Michael Muchmore Tor Browser The Tor Browser makes the tricky work of surfing the Web anonymously as easy as using any other browser, but with a significant performance hit.

Editors’ Rating:

Easily connects to the Tor anonymizing network. Simple interface for complex security tools. Easy to set up. Compatible, feature-rich browser. Integrated privacy tools.

Slows down browsing. Finding localized websites can be difficult. NoScript plug-in and other privacy features may be confusing to novice users.

The Tor Browser makes the tricky work of surfing the Web anonymously as easy as using any other browser, but with a significant performance hit.

Need to hire an assassin, buy some contraband, view illegal porn, or just bypass government, corporate, or identity thief snooping? Tor is your answer. Tor, which stands for “The Onion Router” is not a product, but a protocol that lets you hide your Web browsing as though it were obscured by the many layers of an onion. The most common way to view the so-called Dark Web that comprises Tor sites is by using the Tor Browser, a modded version of Mozilla Firefox. Using this Web browser also hides your location, IP address, and other identifying data from regular websites. Accessing Tor has long been beyond the ability of the average user. Tor Browser manages to simplify the process of protecting your identity onlinebut at the price of performance.

What Is Tor? If you’re thinking that Tor comes from a sketchy group of hackers, know that its core technology was developed by the U.S. Naval Research Lab and D.A.R.P.A.. The Tor Project non-profit receives sizeable donations from various federal entities such as The National Science Foundation. The Tor Project has a page listing many examples of legitimate types of Tor users, such as political dissidents in countries with tight control over the Internet and individuals concerned about personal privacy.

Tor won’t encrypt your datafor that, you’ll need a Virtual Private Network (VPN). Instead, Tor routes your Internet traffic through a series of intermediary nodes. This makes it very difficult for government snoops or aggressive advertisers to track you online. Using Tor affords far more privacy than other browsers’ private (or Incognito) modes, since it obscures your IP address so that you can’t be tracked with it. Standard browsers’ private browsing modes discard your cached pages and browsing history after your browsing session. Even Firefox’s new, enhanced private browsing mode doesn’t hide your identifiable IP address from the sites you visit, though it does prevent them tracking you based on cookies.

Starting Up Connecting to the Tor network entails more than just installing a browser and firing up websites. You need to install support code, but luckily, the free Tor Browser bundle streamlines the process. Installers are available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Tor Project recommends installing the browser on a USB drive for more anonymity and portability; the drive needs to have 80MB free space.

We tested a standard Windows installer, with choices to create desktop icons and run the browser immediately. The browser itself is a heavily modified version of Firefox 38.5 (as of this writing), and includes several security plug-ins as well as security tweaks such as not caching any website data. For a full rundown of the PCMag Editors’ Choice browser’s many features, read our full review of Firefox.

Before merrily browsing along anonymously, you need to inform Tor about your Web connection. If your Internet connection is censored, you configure one way, if not, you can connect directly to the network. Since we live in a free society and work for benevolent corporate overlords, we connected directly for testing. After connecting to the Tor relay system (a dialog with a progress bar appears at this stage), the browser launches, and you see the Tor project’s page.

Interface The browser’s home page includes a plea for financial support to the project, a search box using the anonymized Disconnect.me search, and a Test Tor Network Settings link. Hitting the latter loads a page that indicates whether you’re successfully anonymized. We recommend taking this step. The page even shows your apparent IP addressapparent because it’s by no means your actual IP address. We verified this by opening Microsoft Edge and checking our actual IP address on Web search sites. The two addresses couldn’t have been more different, because the Tor Browser reports the IP address of a Tor node.

The browser interface is identical with Firefox, except with some necessary add-ons installed. NoScript, a commonly used Firefox add-on, is preinstalled and can be used to block most non-HTML content on the Web. The green onion button to the left of the address bar is the Torbutton add-on. It lets you see your Tor network settings, but also the circuit you’re using: Our circuit started in Germany and passed through two different addresses in the Netherlands before reaching the good old Internet. If that doesn’t suit you, you can request a new circuit, either for the current session or for the current site. This was one of our favorite features.

One thing we really like about the Tor Browser is how it makes existing security and privacy tools easier to use. NoScript, for example, can be a harsh mistress, who can be difficult to configure, and can break websites. But a security panel in the Torbutton presents you with a simple security slide. At the lowest, default setting, all browser features are enabled. At the highest setting, all JavaScript and even some image types are blocked, among other settings. This makes it easy to raise or lower the level of protection you need, without having to muck around in multiple settings windows.

Everything you do in the browser is tested for anonymity: When we tried full-screening the browser window, a message told us that that could provide sites a way to track us, and recommended leaving the window at the default size. And the project’s site specifically states that using Tor alone doesn’t guarantee anonymity, but rather that you have to abide by safe browsing guidelines: don’t use BitTorrent, don’t install additional browser add-ons, don’t open documents or media while online. The recommendation to only visit secure HTTPS sites is optionally enforced by a plug-in called HTTPS Everywhere.

Even if you follow these recommendations, though, someone could detect the simple fact that you’re using Tor, unless you set it up to use a Tor bridge relay. Those are not listed in the Tor directory, so hackers (and governments) would have more trouble finding them.

One thing we noticed while browsing the standard Web through Tor was the need to enter a CAPTCHA to access many sites. This is because your cloaked URL looks suspicious to website security services such as CloudFlare, used by millions of sites to protect themselves. It’s just one more price you pay for anonymity.

We also had trouble finding the correct version of websites we wished to visit. Directing the Tor Browser to PCMag.com, for example, took us to the Netherlands localization of our website. We could not find any way to direct us back to the main URL, which lets you access the U.S. site.

The Dark Web You can use Tor to anonymize browsing to standard websites, of course, but there’s a whole hidden network of sites that don’t appear on the standard Web at all, and are only visible if you’re using a Tor connection. You can read all about it in our feature, Inside the Dark Web. If you use a standard search engine, even one anonymized by Disconnect.me, you just see standard websites. By the way, you may improve your privacy by switching to an anonymous search provider such as DuckDuckGo or Startpage.com. DuckDuckGo even offers a hidden search version, and Sinbad Search is only available through Tor. Ahmia is another search engine, on the open Web, for finding hidden Tor sites, with the twist of only showing sites that are on the up-and-up.

Tor hidden sites have URLs that end in .onion, preceded by 16 alphanumeric characters. You can find directories of these hidden sites with categories resembling the good old days of Yahoo. There’s even a Tor Links Directory page (on the regular Web) that’s a directory of these directories. There are many chat and message boards, but you even find directories of things like lossless audio files, video game hacks, and financial services such as anonymous bitcoin, and even a Tor version of Facebook. Many onion sites are very slow or completely downkeep in mind that they’re not run by deep-pocketed Web companies. Very often we clicked an onion link only to be greeted with an “Unable to Connect” error. Sinbad helpfully displays a red “Offline on last crawl” bullet to let you know that a site is probably nonfunctional.

Speed and Compatibility Webpage loading time under Tor is typically far slower than browsing with a standard Internet connection. It’s really not possible to state definitively by how much your browsing will be slowed down if you use Tor, because it depends on the particular relay servers your traffic is being routed through. And this can change every time for every browsing session. As a very rough rule of thumb, however, PCMag.com took 11.3 seconds to load in Firefox and 28.7 seconds in the Tor Browser, at the same time, over the same FiOS connection on the open Web. Your mileage, of course, will vary.

As for browser benchmarks, the results hew to Firefox’s own performance, with near-leading performance on all the major JavaScript tests, JetStream and Octane, for example. On our test laptop, the Tor Browser scored 20,195 on Octane, compared with 22,297 for standard Firefoxnot a huge difference. The Tor network routing is a far more significant factor in browsing performance than browser JavaScript speed. That is, unless you’ve blocked all JavaScript.

Keep in mind, though, that the Tor Browser is based on the Firefox Extended Support Release versions, which updates less frequently so that large organizations have time to maintain their custom code. That means you don’t get quite the latest in Firefox performance and features, but security updates are delivered at the same time as new main versions.

There’s a similar story when it comes to standards compatibility: On the HTML5Test.com site, which quantifies the number of new Web standards supported by a browser, the Tor Browser gets a score of 412, compared with 468 for the latest Firefox version. You may run into incompatible sites, though. For example, none of the Internet speed connection test sites performed correctly in the Tor Browser.

Tor, Browser of Thunder With the near complete lack of privacy on today’s Web, Tor is becoming more and more necessary. It lets you browse the Web knowing that all those tracking services aren’t watching your every move. Most of us have experienced how an ad follows you from site to site, just because you clicked on, or searched for a product or service once. All that goes away.

Of course, you pay a price of extra setup and slower performance with the Tor Browser, but it’s less onerous than you may think. And the included support for fine-grain privacy and security protection is excellent. If you take your online privacy seriously, you owe it to yourself to check out the Tor Browser. For standard, full-speed Web browsing, however, check out PCMag Editors’ Choice Web browser, Firefox.

Michael Muchmore is PC Magazines lead analyst for software and Web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazines coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of Web Services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazines Solutions section, which covered programming techniques as well as tips on using popular office software. Most recently he covered services and software for ExtremeTech.com. More

Max Eddy is a Software Analyst, taking a critical eye to Android apps and security services. He’s also PCMag’s foremost authority on weather stations and digital scrapbooking software. When not polishing his tinfoil hat or plumbing the depths of the Dark Web, he can be found working to discern the 100 Best Android Apps. Prior to PCMag, Max wrote for the International Digital Times, The International Science Times, and The Mary Sue. He has also been known to write for Geek.com. You can follow him on… More

More here:

Tor Browser Review & Rating | PCMag.com

If you’re really concerned about browser security, Incognito isn’t … – TechRepublic

Quick question: What do you do when you want to browse the internet securely? Do you click on your browser menu and select your browser’s privacy mode and go about your merry way, assuming your data is safe and your history not saved. I’ve got news for you; chances are that private or incognito mode isn’t exactly what it’s cracked up to be.

I’ve tested both Chrome and Firefox and have witnessed both of them retaining browser history. What does this mean for you, the user? It means if you need serious privacy for your web browsing, or if you need to safeguard data while working on company sites, you might have to turn to a speciality browser, such as Tor Browser or Epic Browser. Tor Browser is available for all platforms, and Epic Browser is only available for Mac and Windows. Both browsers not only ensure your history will not be retained, but they also work with the help of a proxy system to keep your browsing encrypted and private.

So, if you’re looking for the highest level of security in a browser, look away from the the likes of Edge, Chrome, and Firefox and turn your sites on Tor and Epic. Both of these browsers are surprisingly easy to use and will go a long way to keep your data safe. Are they perfect? Are the superior than what you’re using now? Chances are, the answer to that question is a resounding yes.

Image: Jack Wallen

Follow this link:

If you’re really concerned about browser security, Incognito isn’t … – TechRepublic

Tor Browser 7.0.4 Download – TechSpot

Tor is free software and an open network that helps you defend against a form of network surveillance that threatens personal freedom and privacy, confidential business activities and relationships, and state security known as traffic analysis.

Tor is a network of virtual tunnels that allows people and groups to improve their privacy and security on the Internet. It also enables software developers to create new communication tools with built-in privacy features. Tor provides the foundation for a range of applications that allow organizations and individuals to share information over public networks without compromising their privacy.

Individuals use Tor to keep websites from tracking them and their family members, or to connect to news sites, instant messaging services, or the like when these are blocked by their local Internet providers. Tor’s hidden services let users publish web sites and other services without needing to reveal the location of the site. Individuals also use Tor for socially sensitive communication: chat rooms and web forums for rape and abuse survivors, or people with illnesses.

Journalists use Tor to communicate more safely with whistleblowers and dissidents. Non-governmental organizations (NGOs) use Tor to allow their workers to connect to their home website while they’re in a foreign country, without notifying everybody nearby that they’re working with that organization.

Groups such as Indymedia recommend Tor for safeguarding their members’ online privacy and security. Activist groups like the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) recommend Tor as a mechanism for maintaining civil liberties online. Corporations use Tor as a safe way to conduct competitive analysis, and to protect sensitive procurement patterns from eavesdroppers. They also use it to replace traditional VPNs, which reveal the exact amount and timing of communication. Which locations have employees working late? Which locations have employees consulting job-hunting websites? Which research divisions are communicating with the company’s patent lawyers?

A branch of the U.S. Navy uses Tor for open source intelligence gathering, and one of its teams used Tor while deployed in the Middle East recently. Law enforcement uses Tor for visiting or surveilling web sites without leaving government IP addresses in their web logs, and for security during sting operations.

What’s New:

This release features an important security update to Tor.

All Platforms

Previous versions:

View original post here:

Tor Browser 7.0.4 Download – TechSpot

Tor Browser Review & Rating | PCMag.com

Michael Muchmore Tor Browser The Tor Browser makes the tricky work of surfing the Web anonymously as easy as using any other browser, but with a significant performance hit.

Editors’ Rating:

Easily connects to the Tor anonymizing network. Simple interface for complex security tools. Easy to set up. Compatible, feature-rich browser. Integrated privacy tools.

Slows down browsing. Finding localized websites can be difficult. NoScript plug-in and other privacy features may be confusing to novice users.

The Tor Browser makes the tricky work of surfing the Web anonymously as easy as using any other browser, but with a significant performance hit.

Need to hire an assassin, buy some contraband, view illegal porn, or just bypass government, corporate, or identity thief snooping? Tor is your answer. Tor, which stands for “The Onion Router” is not a product, but a protocol that lets you hide your Web browsing as though it were obscured by the many layers of an onion. The most common way to view the so-called Dark Web that comprises Tor sites is by using the Tor Browser, a modded version of Mozilla Firefox. Using this Web browser also hides your location, IP address, and other identifying data from regular websites. Accessing Tor has long been beyond the ability of the average user. Tor Browser manages to simplify the process of protecting your identity onlinebut at the price of performance.

What Is Tor? If you’re thinking that Tor comes from a sketchy group of hackers, know that its core technology was developed by the U.S. Naval Research Lab and D.A.R.P.A.. The Tor Project non-profit receives sizeable donations from various federal entities such as The National Science Foundation. The Tor Project has a page listing many examples of legitimate types of Tor users, such as political dissidents in countries with tight control over the Internet and individuals concerned about personal privacy.

Tor won’t encrypt your datafor that, you’ll need a Virtual Private Network (VPN). Instead, Tor routes your Internet traffic through a series of intermediary nodes. This makes it very difficult for government snoops or aggressive advertisers to track you online. Using Tor affords far more privacy than other browsers’ private (or Incognito) modes, since it obscures your IP address so that you can’t be tracked with it. Standard browsers’ private browsing modes discard your cached pages and browsing history after your browsing session. Even Firefox’s new, enhanced private browsing mode doesn’t hide your identifiable IP address from the sites you visit, though it does prevent them tracking you based on cookies.

Starting Up Connecting to the Tor network entails more than just installing a browser and firing up websites. You need to install support code, but luckily, the free Tor Browser bundle streamlines the process. Installers are available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Tor Project recommends installing the browser on a USB drive for more anonymity and portability; the drive needs to have 80MB free space.

We tested a standard Windows installer, with choices to create desktop icons and run the browser immediately. The browser itself is a heavily modified version of Firefox 38.5 (as of this writing), and includes several security plug-ins as well as security tweaks such as not caching any website data. For a full rundown of the PCMag Editors’ Choice browser’s many features, read our full review of Firefox.

Before merrily browsing along anonymously, you need to inform Tor about your Web connection. If your Internet connection is censored, you configure one way, if not, you can connect directly to the network. Since we live in a free society and work for benevolent corporate overlords, we connected directly for testing. After connecting to the Tor relay system (a dialog with a progress bar appears at this stage), the browser launches, and you see the Tor project’s page.

Interface The browser’s home page includes a plea for financial support to the project, a search box using the anonymized Disconnect.me search, and a Test Tor Network Settings link. Hitting the latter loads a page that indicates whether you’re successfully anonymized. We recommend taking this step. The page even shows your apparent IP addressapparent because it’s by no means your actual IP address. We verified this by opening Microsoft Edge and checking our actual IP address on Web search sites. The two addresses couldn’t have been more different, because the Tor Browser reports the IP address of a Tor node.

The browser interface is identical with Firefox, except with some necessary add-ons installed. NoScript, a commonly used Firefox add-on, is preinstalled and can be used to block most non-HTML content on the Web. The green onion button to the left of the address bar is the Torbutton add-on. It lets you see your Tor network settings, but also the circuit you’re using: Our circuit started in Germany and passed through two different addresses in the Netherlands before reaching the good old Internet. If that doesn’t suit you, you can request a new circuit, either for the current session or for the current site. This was one of our favorite features.

One thing we really like about the Tor Browser is how it makes existing security and privacy tools easier to use. NoScript, for example, can be a harsh mistress, who can be difficult to configure, and can break websites. But a security panel in the Torbutton presents you with a simple security slide. At the lowest, default setting, all browser features are enabled. At the highest setting, all JavaScript and even some image types are blocked, among other settings. This makes it easy to raise or lower the level of protection you need, without having to muck around in multiple settings windows.

Everything you do in the browser is tested for anonymity: When we tried full-screening the browser window, a message told us that that could provide sites a way to track us, and recommended leaving the window at the default size. And the project’s site specifically states that using Tor alone doesn’t guarantee anonymity, but rather that you have to abide by safe browsing guidelines: don’t use BitTorrent, don’t install additional browser add-ons, don’t open documents or media while online. The recommendation to only visit secure HTTPS sites is optionally enforced by a plug-in called HTTPS Everywhere.

Even if you follow these recommendations, though, someone could detect the simple fact that you’re using Tor, unless you set it up to use a Tor bridge relay. Those are not listed in the Tor directory, so hackers (and governments) would have more trouble finding them.

One thing we noticed while browsing the standard Web through Tor was the need to enter a CAPTCHA to access many sites. This is because your cloaked URL looks suspicious to website security services such as CloudFlare, used by millions of sites to protect themselves. It’s just one more price you pay for anonymity.

We also had trouble finding the correct version of websites we wished to visit. Directing the Tor Browser to PCMag.com, for example, took us to the Netherlands localization of our website. We could not find any way to direct us back to the main URL, which lets you access the U.S. site.

The Dark Web You can use Tor to anonymize browsing to standard websites, of course, but there’s a whole hidden network of sites that don’t appear on the standard Web at all, and are only visible if you’re using a Tor connection. You can read all about it in our feature, Inside the Dark Web. If you use a standard search engine, even one anonymized by Disconnect.me, you just see standard websites. By the way, you may improve your privacy by switching to an anonymous search provider such as DuckDuckGo or Startpage.com. DuckDuckGo even offers a hidden search version, and Sinbad Search is only available through Tor. Ahmia is another search engine, on the open Web, for finding hidden Tor sites, with the twist of only showing sites that are on the up-and-up.

Tor hidden sites have URLs that end in .onion, preceded by 16 alphanumeric characters. You can find directories of these hidden sites with categories resembling the good old days of Yahoo. There’s even a Tor Links Directory page (on the regular Web) that’s a directory of these directories. There are many chat and message boards, but you even find directories of things like lossless audio files, video game hacks, and financial services such as anonymous bitcoin, and even a Tor version of Facebook. Many onion sites are very slow or completely downkeep in mind that they’re not run by deep-pocketed Web companies. Very often we clicked an onion link only to be greeted with an “Unable to Connect” error. Sinbad helpfully displays a red “Offline on last crawl” bullet to let you know that a site is probably nonfunctional.

Speed and Compatibility Webpage loading time under Tor is typically far slower than browsing with a standard Internet connection. It’s really not possible to state definitively by how much your browsing will be slowed down if you use Tor, because it depends on the particular relay servers your traffic is being routed through. And this can change every time for every browsing session. As a very rough rule of thumb, however, PCMag.com took 11.3 seconds to load in Firefox and 28.7 seconds in the Tor Browser, at the same time, over the same FiOS connection on the open Web. Your mileage, of course, will vary.

As for browser benchmarks, the results hew to Firefox’s own performance, with near-leading performance on all the major JavaScript tests, JetStream and Octane, for example. On our test laptop, the Tor Browser scored 20,195 on Octane, compared with 22,297 for standard Firefoxnot a huge difference. The Tor network routing is a far more significant factor in browsing performance than browser JavaScript speed. That is, unless you’ve blocked all JavaScript.

Keep in mind, though, that the Tor Browser is based on the Firefox Extended Support Release versions, which updates less frequently so that large organizations have time to maintain their custom code. That means you don’t get quite the latest in Firefox performance and features, but security updates are delivered at the same time as new main versions.

There’s a similar story when it comes to standards compatibility: On the HTML5Test.com site, which quantifies the number of new Web standards supported by a browser, the Tor Browser gets a score of 412, compared with 468 for the latest Firefox version. You may run into incompatible sites, though. For example, none of the Internet speed connection test sites performed correctly in the Tor Browser.

Tor, Browser of Thunder With the near complete lack of privacy on today’s Web, Tor is becoming more and more necessary. It lets you browse the Web knowing that all those tracking services aren’t watching your every move. Most of us have experienced how an ad follows you from site to site, just because you clicked on, or searched for a product or service once. All that goes away.

Of course, you pay a price of extra setup and slower performance with the Tor Browser, but it’s less onerous than you may think. And the included support for fine-grain privacy and security protection is excellent. If you take your online privacy seriously, you owe it to yourself to check out the Tor Browser. For standard, full-speed Web browsing, however, check out PCMag Editors’ Choice Web browser, Firefox.

Michael Muchmore is PC Magazines lead analyst for software and Web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazines coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of Web Services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazines Solutions section, which covered programming techniques as well as tips on using popular office software. Most recently he covered services and software for ExtremeTech.com. More

Max Eddy is a Software Analyst, taking a critical eye to Android apps and security services. He’s also PCMag’s foremost authority on weather stations and digital scrapbooking software. When not polishing his tinfoil hat or plumbing the depths of the Dark Web, he can be found working to discern the 100 Best Android Apps. Prior to PCMag, Max wrote for the International Digital Times, The International Science Times, and The Mary Sue. He has also been known to write for Geek.com. You can follow him on… More

Read more:

Tor Browser Review & Rating | PCMag.com

If you’re really concerned about browser security, Incognito isn’t … – TechRepublic

Quick question: What do you do when you want to browse the internet securely? Do you click on your browser menu and select your browser’s privacy mode and go about your merry way, assuming your data is safe and your history not saved. I’ve got news for you; chances are that private or incognito mode isn’t exactly what it’s cracked up to be.

I’ve tested both Chrome and Firefox and have witnessed both of them retaining browser history. What does this mean for you, the user? It means if you need serious privacy for your web browsing, or if you need to safeguard data while working on company sites, you might have to turn to a speciality browser, such as Tor Browser or Epic Browser. Tor Browser is available for all platforms, and Epic Browser is only available for Mac and Windows. Both browsers not only ensure your history will not be retained, but they also work with the help of a proxy system to keep your browsing encrypted and private.

So, if you’re looking for the highest level of security in a browser, look away from the the likes of Edge, Chrome, and Firefox and turn your sites on Tor and Epic. Both of these browsers are surprisingly easy to use and will go a long way to keep your data safe. Are they perfect? Are the superior than what you’re using now? Chances are, the answer to that question is a resounding yes.

Image: Jack Wallen

See original here:

If you’re really concerned about browser security, Incognito isn’t … – TechRepublic

Neo-Nazi site Daily Stormer resurfaces with Russian domain following Google and GoDaddy bans – Vox

After being refused service by two domain registrars and a hosting provider, a notorious neo-Nazi site has apparently fled to a Russian domain and a new server host, with a backup on the dark web.

The Daily Stormer came under fire following the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. The neo-Nazi website had its account terminated with domain registrar GoDaddy on Sunday after Twitter users complained about a post lobbing insults and slurs at Heather Heyer, the anti-racism demonstrator who was killed in Charlottesville. The website also quietly had its server hosting disabled by hosting company Scaleway. And even though the website quickly moved to another domain registration company, Google, Google promptly terminated its account.

Thus, heading into Tuesday, the site founded by prominent neo-Nazi Andrew Anglin in 2013 was essentially bouncing around looking for places to land. It briefly attempted to gain hosting through a Chinese service provider at the URL DailyStormer.wang, only to quickly be taken offline.

Next, the site attempted to set up shop on the dark web, using a .onion domain. Websites on the dark web are hidden from search engines and can only be accessed by special browsers such as a Tor browser. But the sites move underground didnt last long. Currently its home on the dark web is a parked announcement that it has relocated to DailyStormer.Ru:

The .ru domain in the URL isnt exactly proof that the website is now hosted in Russia, because anyone can register a .ru domain. A Whois lookup for the .ru site reveals that the controversial hosting proxy CloudFlare, which has refused to terminate its business relationship with the neo-Nazi forum, continues to mask the identity of the sites true server host.

On the website, Anglin celebrated the sites return with a litany of anti-Semitism and criticism of GoDaddy and Google, calling the latter an anti-speech site. He also took the opportunity to deliver more insults against Heyer, whose memorial is today.

Update: The Dailystormer.ru domain now appears to be offline as well; the .onion domain accessible via Tor browser has not updated. We are following developments and will update this article as new iterations of the site appear.

Follow this link:

Neo-Nazi site Daily Stormer resurfaces with Russian domain following Google and GoDaddy bans – Vox

Download Tor Browser – free – latest version

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Read the original here:

Download Tor Browser – free – latest version

Tor Browser Review & Rating | PCMag.com

Michael Muchmore Tor Browser The Tor Browser makes the tricky work of surfing the Web anonymously as easy as using any other browser, but with a significant performance hit.

Editors’ Rating:

Easily connects to the Tor anonymizing network. Simple interface for complex security tools. Easy to set up. Compatible, feature-rich browser. Integrated privacy tools.

Slows down browsing. Finding localized websites can be difficult. NoScript plug-in and other privacy features may be confusing to novice users.

The Tor Browser makes the tricky work of surfing the Web anonymously as easy as using any other browser, but with a significant performance hit.

Need to hire an assassin, buy some contraband, view illegal porn, or just bypass government, corporate, or identity thief snooping? Tor is your answer. Tor, which stands for “The Onion Router” is not a product, but a protocol that lets you hide your Web browsing as though it were obscured by the many layers of an onion. The most common way to view the so-called Dark Web that comprises Tor sites is by using the Tor Browser, a modded version of Mozilla Firefox. Using this Web browser also hides your location, IP address, and other identifying data from regular websites. Accessing Tor has long been beyond the ability of the average user. Tor Browser manages to simplify the process of protecting your identity onlinebut at the price of performance.

What Is Tor? If you’re thinking that Tor comes from a sketchy group of hackers, know that its core technology was developed by the U.S. Naval Research Lab and D.A.R.P.A.. The Tor Project non-profit receives sizeable donations from various federal entities such as The National Science Foundation. The Tor Project has a page listing many examples of legitimate types of Tor users, such as political dissidents in countries with tight control over the Internet and individuals concerned about personal privacy.

Tor won’t encrypt your datafor that, you’ll need a Virtual Private Network (VPN). Instead, Tor routes your Internet traffic through a series of intermediary nodes. This makes it very difficult for government snoops or aggressive advertisers to track you online. Using Tor affords far more privacy than other browsers’ private (or Incognito) modes, since it obscures your IP address so that you can’t be tracked with it. Standard browsers’ private browsing modes discard your cached pages and browsing history after your browsing session. Even Firefox’s new, enhanced private browsing mode doesn’t hide your identifiable IP address from the sites you visit, though it does prevent them tracking you based on cookies.

Starting Up Connecting to the Tor network entails more than just installing a browser and firing up websites. You need to install support code, but luckily, the free Tor Browser bundle streamlines the process. Installers are available for Windows, Mac, and Linux. Tor Project recommends installing the browser on a USB drive for more anonymity and portability; the drive needs to have 80MB free space.

We tested a standard Windows installer, with choices to create desktop icons and run the browser immediately. The browser itself is a heavily modified version of Firefox 38.5 (as of this writing), and includes several security plug-ins as well as security tweaks such as not caching any website data. For a full rundown of the PCMag Editors’ Choice browser’s many features, read our full review of Firefox.

Before merrily browsing along anonymously, you need to inform Tor about your Web connection. If your Internet connection is censored, you configure one way, if not, you can connect directly to the network. Since we live in a free society and work for benevolent corporate overlords, we connected directly for testing. After connecting to the Tor relay system (a dialog with a progress bar appears at this stage), the browser launches, and you see the Tor project’s page.

Interface The browser’s home page includes a plea for financial support to the project, a search box using the anonymized Disconnect.me search, and a Test Tor Network Settings link. Hitting the latter loads a page that indicates whether you’re successfully anonymized. We recommend taking this step. The page even shows your apparent IP addressapparent because it’s by no means your actual IP address. We verified this by opening Microsoft Edge and checking our actual IP address on Web search sites. The two addresses couldn’t have been more different, because the Tor Browser reports the IP address of a Tor node.

The browser interface is identical with Firefox, except with some necessary add-ons installed. NoScript, a commonly used Firefox add-on, is preinstalled and can be used to block most non-HTML content on the Web. The green onion button to the left of the address bar is the Torbutton add-on. It lets you see your Tor network settings, but also the circuit you’re using: Our circuit started in Germany and passed through two different addresses in the Netherlands before reaching the good old Internet. If that doesn’t suit you, you can request a new circuit, either for the current session or for the current site. This was one of our favorite features.

One thing we really like about the Tor Browser is how it makes existing security and privacy tools easier to use. NoScript, for example, can be a harsh mistress, who can be difficult to configure, and can break websites. But a security panel in the Torbutton presents you with a simple security slide. At the lowest, default setting, all browser features are enabled. At the highest setting, all JavaScript and even some image types are blocked, among other settings. This makes it easy to raise or lower the level of protection you need, without having to muck around in multiple settings windows.

Everything you do in the browser is tested for anonymity: When we tried full-screening the browser window, a message told us that that could provide sites a way to track us, and recommended leaving the window at the default size. And the project’s site specifically states that using Tor alone doesn’t guarantee anonymity, but rather that you have to abide by safe browsing guidelines: don’t use BitTorrent, don’t install additional browser add-ons, don’t open documents or media while online. The recommendation to only visit secure HTTPS sites is optionally enforced by a plug-in called HTTPS Everywhere.

Even if you follow these recommendations, though, someone could detect the simple fact that you’re using Tor, unless you set it up to use a Tor bridge relay. Those are not listed in the Tor directory, so hackers (and governments) would have more trouble finding them.

One thing we noticed while browsing the standard Web through Tor was the need to enter a CAPTCHA to access many sites. This is because your cloaked URL looks suspicious to website security services such as CloudFlare, used by millions of sites to protect themselves. It’s just one more price you pay for anonymity.

We also had trouble finding the correct version of websites we wished to visit. Directing the Tor Browser to PCMag.com, for example, took us to the Netherlands localization of our website. We could not find any way to direct us back to the main URL, which lets you access the U.S. site.

The Dark Web You can use Tor to anonymize browsing to standard websites, of course, but there’s a whole hidden network of sites that don’t appear on the standard Web at all, and are only visible if you’re using a Tor connection. You can read all about it in our feature, Inside the Dark Web. If you use a standard search engine, even one anonymized by Disconnect.me, you just see standard websites. By the way, you may improve your privacy by switching to an anonymous search provider such as DuckDuckGo or Startpage.com. DuckDuckGo even offers a hidden search version, and Sinbad Search is only available through Tor. Ahmia is another search engine, on the open Web, for finding hidden Tor sites, with the twist of only showing sites that are on the up-and-up.

Tor hidden sites have URLs that end in .onion, preceded by 16 alphanumeric characters. You can find directories of these hidden sites with categories resembling the good old days of Yahoo. There’s even a Tor Links Directory page (on the regular Web) that’s a directory of these directories. There are many chat and message boards, but you even find directories of things like lossless audio files, video game hacks, and financial services such as anonymous bitcoin, and even a Tor version of Facebook. Many onion sites are very slow or completely downkeep in mind that they’re not run by deep-pocketed Web companies. Very often we clicked an onion link only to be greeted with an “Unable to Connect” error. Sinbad helpfully displays a red “Offline on last crawl” bullet to let you know that a site is probably nonfunctional.

Speed and Compatibility Webpage loading time under Tor is typically far slower than browsing with a standard Internet connection. It’s really not possible to state definitively by how much your browsing will be slowed down if you use Tor, because it depends on the particular relay servers your traffic is being routed through. And this can change every time for every browsing session. As a very rough rule of thumb, however, PCMag.com took 11.3 seconds to load in Firefox and 28.7 seconds in the Tor Browser, at the same time, over the same FiOS connection on the open Web. Your mileage, of course, will vary.

As for browser benchmarks, the results hew to Firefox’s own performance, with near-leading performance on all the major JavaScript tests, JetStream and Octane, for example. On our test laptop, the Tor Browser scored 20,195 on Octane, compared with 22,297 for standard Firefoxnot a huge difference. The Tor network routing is a far more significant factor in browsing performance than browser JavaScript speed. That is, unless you’ve blocked all JavaScript.

Keep in mind, though, that the Tor Browser is based on the Firefox Extended Support Release versions, which updates less frequently so that large organizations have time to maintain their custom code. That means you don’t get quite the latest in Firefox performance and features, but security updates are delivered at the same time as new main versions.

There’s a similar story when it comes to standards compatibility: On the HTML5Test.com site, which quantifies the number of new Web standards supported by a browser, the Tor Browser gets a score of 412, compared with 468 for the latest Firefox version. You may run into incompatible sites, though. For example, none of the Internet speed connection test sites performed correctly in the Tor Browser.

Tor, Browser of Thunder With the near complete lack of privacy on today’s Web, Tor is becoming more and more necessary. It lets you browse the Web knowing that all those tracking services aren’t watching your every move. Most of us have experienced how an ad follows you from site to site, just because you clicked on, or searched for a product or service once. All that goes away.

Of course, you pay a price of extra setup and slower performance with the Tor Browser, but it’s less onerous than you may think. And the included support for fine-grain privacy and security protection is excellent. If you take your online privacy seriously, you owe it to yourself to check out the Tor Browser. For standard, full-speed Web browsing, however, check out PCMag Editors’ Choice Web browser, Firefox.

Michael Muchmore is PC Magazines lead analyst for software and Web applications. A native New Yorker, he has at various times headed up PC Magazines coverage of Web development, enterprise software, and display technologies. Michael cowrote one of the first overviews of Web Services for a general audience. Before that he worked on PC Magazines Solutions section, which covered programming techniques as well as tips on using popular office software. Most recently he covered services and software for ExtremeTech.com. More

Max Eddy is a Software Analyst, taking a critical eye to Android apps and security services. He’s also PCMag’s foremost authority on weather stations and digital scrapbooking software. When not polishing his tinfoil hat or plumbing the depths of the Dark Web, he can be found working to discern the 100 Best Android Apps. Prior to PCMag, Max wrote for the International Digital Times, The International Science Times, and The Mary Sue. He has also been known to write for Geek.com. You can follow him on… More

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Tor Browser Review & Rating | PCMag.com

Tor Browser – Download

Preserving your privacy on the net is no easy task nowadays with so many security risks and potential prowlers out there.

Tor Browser is a toolset that’s designed for anyone who wants to improve their safety and security on the Internet. It can help you anonymize web browsing and publishing, instant messaging, and other applications that use the TCP protocol. For business users, it means that confidential exchanges of information can be kept from prying eyes and for more general users, it means that ISPs, keyloggers and other types of malware can’t track your activities easily.

It works by bouncing traffic around a distributed network of servers which it calls “onion routers” (hence the logo). The Tor Browser interface allows you to easily toggle it on and off based on when you need to go online anonymously – there’s no need to restart your computer when you’ve done so. If you want, you can also choose from various proxy tunnels based on a world map which displays exactly where each one is located.

To check it’s working, you can use the online Tor detector to see if you’re surfing anonymously or not. Connection can take some time depending on how many users are logged onto the network at any one time but usually its very quick. The Tor onion logo turns from yellow to green in your taskbar when a successful connection has been made.

Tor is simple, well organized and effective tool for anyone worried about security or invasions of privacy online.

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Tor Browser – Download

If you’re really concerned about browser security, Incognito isn’t … – TechRepublic

Quick question: What do you do when you want to browse the internet securely? Do you click on your browser menu and select your browser’s privacy mode and go about your merry way, assuming your data is safe and your history not saved. I’ve got news for you; chances are that private or incognito mode isn’t exactly what it’s cracked up to be.

I’ve tested both Chrome and Firefox and have witnessed both of them retaining browser history. What does this mean for you, the user? It means if you need serious privacy for your web browsing, or if you need to safeguard data while working on company sites, you might have to turn to a speciality browser, such as Tor Browser or Epic Browser. Tor Browser is available for all platforms, and Epic Browser is only available for Mac and Windows. Both browsers not only ensure your history will not be retained, but they also work with the help of a proxy system to keep your browsing encrypted and private.

So, if you’re looking for the highest level of security in a browser, look away from the the likes of Edge, Chrome, and Firefox and turn your sites on Tor and Epic. Both of these browsers are surprisingly easy to use and will go a long way to keep your data safe. Are they perfect? Are the superior than what you’re using now? Chances are, the answer to that question is a resounding yes.

Image: Jack Wallen

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If you’re really concerned about browser security, Incognito isn’t … – TechRepublic

Neo-Nazi site Daily Stormer resurfaces with Russian domain following Google and GoDaddy bans – Vox

After being refused service by two domain registrars and a hosting provider, a notorious neo-Nazi site has apparently fled to a Russian domain and a new server host, with a backup on the dark web.

The Daily Stormer came under fire following the events in Charlottesville, Virginia, over the weekend. The neo-Nazi website had its account terminated with domain registrar GoDaddy on Sunday after Twitter users complained about a post lobbing insults and slurs at Heather Heyer, the anti-racism demonstrator who was killed in Charlottesville. The website also quietly had its server hosting disabled by hosting company Scaleway. And even though the website quickly moved to another domain registration company, Google, Google promptly terminated its account.

Thus, heading into Tuesday, the site founded by prominent neo-Nazi Andrew Anglin in 2013 was essentially bouncing around looking for places to land. It briefly attempted to gain hosting through a Chinese service provider at the URL DailyStormer.wang, only to quickly be taken offline.

Next, the site attempted to set up shop on the dark web, using a .onion domain. Websites on the dark web are hidden from search engines and can only be accessed by special browsers such as a Tor browser. But the sites move underground didnt last long. Currently its home on the dark web is a parked announcement that it has relocated to DailyStormer.Ru:

The .ru domain in the URL isnt exactly proof that the website is now hosted in Russia, because anyone can register a .ru domain. A Whois lookup for the .ru site reveals that the controversial hosting proxy CloudFlare, which has refused to terminate its business relationship with the neo-Nazi forum, continues to mask the identity of the sites true server host.

On the website, Anglin celebrated the sites return with a litany of anti-Semitism and criticism of GoDaddy and Google, calling the latter an anti-speech site. He also took the opportunity to deliver more insults against Heyer, whose memorial is today.

Update: The Dailystormer.ru domain now appears to be offline as well; the .onion domain accessible via Tor browser has not updated. We are following developments and will update this article as new iterations of the site appear.

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Neo-Nazi site Daily Stormer resurfaces with Russian domain following Google and GoDaddy bans – Vox

If you’re really concerned about browser security, Incognito isn’t … – TechRepublic

Quick question: What do you do when you want to browse the internet securely? Do you click on your browser menu and select your browser’s privacy mode and go about your merry way, assuming your data is safe and your history not saved. I’ve got news for you; chances are that private or incognito mode isn’t exactly what it’s cracked up to be.

I’ve tested both Chrome and Firefox and have witnessed both of them retaining browser history. What does this mean for you, the user? It means if you need serious privacy for your web browsing, or if you need to safeguard data while working on company sites, you might have to turn to a speciality browser, such as Tor Browser or Epic Browser. Tor Browser is available for all platforms, and Epic Browser is only available for Mac and Windows. Both browsers not only ensure your history will not be retained, but they also work with the help of a proxy system to keep your browsing encrypted and private.

So, if you’re looking for the highest level of security in a browser, look away from the the likes of Edge, Chrome, and Firefox and turn your sites on Tor and Epic. Both of these browsers are surprisingly easy to use and will go a long way to keep your data safe. Are they perfect? Are the superior than what you’re using now? Chances are, the answer to that question is a resounding yes.

Image: Jack Wallen

Go here to see the original:

If you’re really concerned about browser security, Incognito isn’t … – TechRepublic

How The Daily Stormer Went From GoDaddy To The Shadows Of The Dark Web – The Daily Caller

The infamous neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer has been removed from several separate platforms in the past week, but its operators will still likely be able to lurk in the shadows of the dark web.

Several tech companies either shut down or blocked the anti-Semitic blog after it wrote a malicious article mocking the death of Elizabeth Heyer. James Fields, a white supremacist, is charged with second-degree murder for allegedly killing Heyer with a sports car August 12 during a violent rallyin Charlottesville, Va.

After receiving public pressure, GoDaddy, the popular domain registrar company, threatened to remove the hateful site late Sunday night if it did not find a new domain. The onus was then put on Google to also purge it from its platform, an action it took in less than 24 hours.

We are cancelling Daily Stormers registration with Google Domains for violating our terms of service, a representative for Google told The Daily Caller News Foundation.

Google also removed Gab, a more obscure social networking site used as an alternative to Twitter, from its app store, saying it violates the hate speech policy. Andrew Auernheimer, a somewhat prominent neo-Nazi who contributes to The Daily Stormer, uses the platform to coordinate with other followers of The Daily Stormer.

In a Gab post, he even provided a link to a Tor browser, free software that enables anonymous networks by concealing a users location and general usage. Using Tor, people with similar interests can continue to communicate in the shadows of the virtual abyss colloquially known as the dark web.

Despite Googles removal, Gab is still available to download on its own website and mobile devices, just not through the app store.

Cloudflare another company that manages domain names and offers hacking protection alsoended The Daily Stormers patronage, rendering it susceptible to distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. Such cyber assaults are when a perpetratordirects several internet-connected devices and the respective unique Internet Protocol (IP) addresses (the numerical label assigned to every device) to targeted online systems, which inundates them. (Imagine a tsunami, rather than the typical waves, hitting a beachfront).

Cloudflare CEO Matthew Prince said despite finding the website vile, the decision to remove The Daily Stormer makes him deeply uncomfortable, according to Business Insider.

The tipping point for us making this decision was that the team behind Daily Stormer made the claim that we were secretly supporters of their ideology, Prince said in an official blog post. Like a lot of people, weve felt angry at these hateful people for a long time but we have followed the law and remained content neutral as a network. We could not remain neutral after these claims of secret support by Cloudflare.

Its apparently the first time the company has dropped a customer based on political pressure.

YouTube, Twitter, and several crowdfunding platforms all followed suit at some point, either removing profiles and content related to The Daily Stormer orblocking pages trying to raise money for the legal defense of Fields. Facebook also removed several posts that link to the specific Daily Stormer article, and the chat app Discord barredany servers that promote Nazi ideology, according to The Verge. Using its software algorithms, Facebook, however, tried to maintain posts sharing the article only if condemnation of it was overt.

The managers and supporters of the bigoted blog, however, are still finding ways to communicate and operate in the dark web. (RELATED: Dark Web Mastermind Would Have Eluded Cops If Not For His Interest In Rubber Gloves)

Since a domain registrar connects domain names (essentially web addresses) to IP addresses, when a domain name like The Daily Stormer is removed, its IP address continues to function. So The Daily Stormers web address then falls outside of the respective domain name system (DNS), (the yellow pages of web addresses) meaning it merely becomes unlisted, thus away, for the most part, from the general publics view.

Fans of the site will just share the IP address among themselves to continue accessing the site until the website can find a shady registrar willing to take on the name, Richard Bennett, an experienced tech consultant and one of the original creators of the WiFi system, told TheDCNF.

In this case, that could be a registrar in the Middle East or South America, he conjectured prior to reports that The Daily Stormer was found using .ru, Russias top-level domain. A Russian web-hosting provider suspended The Daily Stormer Thursday, according to Radio Free Europe, after the countrys government launched an inquiry.

Most of the dark web uses very odd-looking domain names that are shared among users because theyre as hard to remember as IP addresses, Bennett explained. Crooks are very community-minded where their common interests intersect.

He says that along with their like-minded collaboration, its very hard to completely remove a site from the internet because the requirements and prerequisites for operating a website isnt possessing a domain name, but merely having a computer, an IP address, and a physical internet connection.

Domain names are nice, but theyre more a convenience than a technical necessity, said Bennett.

William Rinehart,director of technology and innovation policy at theAmerican Action Forum, agrees with Bennett, saying going to the dark web for communication and promulgation of content is not really difficult, but will require coordination.

Moving to the dark web isnt illegal, but it does add a lot of complications because your site needs to be accessed via [The Onion Router] TOR Browser and few people use the browser, Rinehart told TheDCNF.

He also adds a further distinction between the dark web and the deep web.

The deep web is simply the term for those places that Google and other public systems cannot index. So, the deep web includes content shared on Slack channels, Rinehart explained. The dark web, however, is generally a term for those places that need to be accessed via TOR Browser suite, which adds anonymity, and is thus a subset of the deep web.

The developers of the Tor web browser said theyre disgusted, angered and appalled by The Daily Stormer and what those racists stand for and do.

We feel this way any time the Tor network and software are used for vile purposes, Tor Project contributor Steph said in an official blog post. But we cant build free and open source tools that protect journalists, human rights activists, and ordinary people around the world if we also control who uses those tools. Tor is designed to defend human rights and privacy by preventing anyone from censoring things, even us. (RELATED: Feds Bust 18-Year-Old Hitman Who Offered Lethal Services On Dark Web)

So while The Daily Stormer has been removed from the respective platforms of a multitude of tech companies, it and other white supremacist, neo-Nazi contingencies may always be able to survive in the shadows of the dark web.

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How The Daily Stormer Went From GoDaddy To The Shadows Of The Dark Web – The Daily Caller

The Daily Stormer has lost its lease, accessible only via Tor browser – The Moderate Voice

Infamous neo-Nazi website The Daily Stormer is no longer accessible online via a conventional web browser. But a Monday essay seems to have caught the eye of President Trump.

Instead, site visitors need to download the Tor browser and use that to access the notorious neo-Nazi website at dstormer6em3i4km.onion. The Tor browser facilitates anonymous browsing.

On Sunday 13 August, the site published a crude and highly criticized article attacking Heather Heyer, the woman killed in the Charlottesville melee.

Monday Daily Stormer publisher Andrew Anglin authored an essay (pdf) condemning protestors who topped a Confederate statue in Durham, NC.

And I guarantee you, [the protesters] are going to go to Washington, and they are going to demand that the Washington Monument be torn down. They might even try to pull it down. Because George Washington owned slaves. More importantly, he was a white man who built something.

Also on Monday, former Congressman Newt Gingrich (whose wife is in the Administration) and Fox host Martha MacCallum were discussing the announcement that the Lexington, KY, mayor intends to remove two Confederate statues from a public building.

Where are you going to stop it? Gingrich said. What if you werent sensitive enough to the Holocaust we should take down all the statues of Franklin Delano Roosevelt? You could make an argument for that.

You could make an argument for Thomas Jefferson or George Washington, MacCallum interjected. Are you going to change the name of the Washington Monument?

Gingrich then noted that both were slave owners.

Absolutely, thats my point, MacCallum responds.

Its not a surprise that these points from FOX and The Daily Stormer were reprised in President Trumps press conference on Tuesday:

many of those people were there to protest the taking down of the statue of Robert E. Lee. So this week, it is Robert E. Lee. I noticed that Stonewall Jackson is coming down. I wonder, is it George Washington next week? And is it Thomas Jefferson the week after? You know, you really do have to ask yourself, where does it stop?

Was George Washington a slave owner? So will George Washington now lose his status? Are we going to take down excuse me are we going to take down statues to George Washington? How about Thomas Jefferson?

Trumps comments were widely criticized:

That wasnt the only eyebrow-raising act of the day:

Trump RT’d this pic showing a CNN journalist hit by a train days after a white nationalist ran his car into activists, killed Heather Heyer. pic.twitter.com/tWjdoE70AS

Kyle Griffin (@kylegriffin1) August 15, 2017

Aug 16, 2017KATHY GILL, Technology Policy Analyst

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The Daily Stormer has lost its lease, accessible only via Tor browser – The Moderate Voice

Tor Project ‘disgusted’ by Daily Stormer, defends software ethos – CNET

The Tor Project says it can’t build open source tools for circumventing censorship if it also controls who uses those tools.

A day after The Daily Stormer retreated to the darknet, the organization that helped make that move possible is condemning the neo-Nazi site while grudgingly acknowledging its technology allows the site to continue to spew messages of hate.

A version of the site, dubbed the “top hate site in America,” appeared Wednesday on a part of the web that can only be accessed through the Tor Project’s browser, which hides users’ online identities. The Daily Stormer moved to a Tor onion service after GoDaddy and then Googlepulled its domain following an offensive story it published about Heather Heyer, who was killed on Saturday while counter-protesting against white supremacist protesters in Charlottesville, Virginia.

“We are disgusted, angered, and appalled by everything these racists stand for and do,” Tor member Steph wrote in a blog post Thursday. “Ironically, the Tor software has been designed and written by a diverse team including people of many religions, races, gender identities, sexual orientations, and points on the (legitimate, non-Nazi) political spectrum.

“We are everything they claim to despise,” Steph wrote. “And we work every day to defend the human rights they oppose.”

With the move, the Tor Project joins a slew of companies and organizations seeking to distance themselves from white supremacist activity on the web. Apple and PayPal have disabled support of their services at websites that sell merchandise glorifying white nationalists and support hate groups, while Reddit and Facebook have each banned entire hate groups.

Click to see our in-depth coverage of online hatred.

On Wednesday, internet security provider Cloudflare dropped its support for the website, essentially allowing it to be taken down with a denial-of-service attack. Twitter also joined the campaign by suspending the accounts linked to the the website.

Steph pointed out the Tor browser is designed to defeat censorship, and the organization can’t and shouldn’t decide who benefits from that freedom.

“We can’t build free and open source tools that protect journalists, human rights activists, and ordinary people around the world if we also control who uses those tools,” Steph wrote. “Tor is designed to defend human rights and privacy by preventing anyone from censoring things, even us.”

Solving for XX: The industry seeks to overcome outdated ideas about “women in tech.”

Special Reports: All of CNET’s most in-depth features in one easy spot.

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Tor Project ‘disgusted’ by Daily Stormer, defends software ethos – CNET

Nasty Locky ransomware is back, and now it’s worse than ever – Komando

Ransomware has been the largest cybersecurity threat in the world for over a year now. Over that time we’ve seen a number of massive attacks. The WannaCry variant that occurred earlier this year in May was extremely nasty, locking up hundreds of thousands of computers in over 150 countries.

One of the first known ransomware attacks to hit the scene was dubbed Locky, but it hasn’t been prevalent in a while. Until now. A new Locky ransomware variant is spreading and you need to know what to watch for.

Researchers at Comodo Threat Intelligence Lab recently discovered a new Locky variant dubbed IKARUSdilapidated. It is being distributed through phishing emails that contain little to no content. The email does, however, have a malicious file attached to it.

The attachment is either a Word document, PDF, archive zip file, or image file. If the recipient executes the attachment, it infects their gadget with IKARUSdilapidated ransomware.

A Comodo spokesperson said, “When the user opens the attached document, it appears to be full of garbage, and it includes the phrase ‘Enable macro if data encoding is incorrect’ – a social engineering technique used in this type of phishing attack. If the user does as instructed, the macros then save and run a binary file that downloads the actual encryption Trojan.”

Here is an example of what the email looks like:

Once the victim’s gadget is infected with the ransomware, a message appears instructing them to download the Tor browser. Then, a ransom of up to $1,200 is demanded that the victim is told to pay using bitcoin.

So far, there have been tens of thousands of these phishing emails delivered. The cybercriminals are using botnets to send the malicious emails.

(Note:A botnet is a group of gadgetsthat hackers have taken over without the owner’s knowledge. The hackers seize control of unwitting gadgetswith a virus, and then use the network of infected computersto perform large-scale hacks or scams.)

As you can see, this is a very elaborate scam. Phishing emails, botnets, and ransomware are all used in this attack to scam people out of money. That’s why you really need to know how to avoid falling victim to this attack.

The best way to defeat a ransomware attack is to takeprecautionary steps. Here are suggestions that will help:

Backing up your critical data is an important safety precaution in the fight against ransomware. It’s the best way to recover your files without paying a ransom.

We recommend using our sponsorIDrive. You can backup all your PCs, Macs and mobile devices into ONE account for one low cost! Be sureand use promo codeKimto receive an exclusive offer.

Click here to receive a special discount from IDrive using promo code Kim.

How to spot disguised malicious files before they infect your computer

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Scammers targeting job hunters with new phishing attack

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Nasty Locky ransomware is back, and now it’s worse than ever – Komando


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