12345...


Gary K. Wolfe Reviews Trapped in the R.A.W., A Journal of My Experiences during the Great Invasion by Kaylee Bearovna by Kate Boyes – Locus Online

Trapped in the R.A.W., A Journal of My Experiences during the Great Invasion by Kaylee Bearovna, Kate Boyes (Aqueduct 978-1-61976-159-9, $20.00, 312pp, tp) July 2019.

Every once in a while, a novel seems to drop in from out of nowhere, with little to go on but a promo letter and in the case at hand the reputation of the publisher. Aqueduct Press has earned a reputation not only for promoting feminist speculative work, but for discovering distinctive new voices. Sarah Tolmie (The Little Animals) and Isaac R. Fellman (The Breath of the Sun) are are two fairly recent examples. So its not too surprising that Id never heard of Kate Boyes, whose biographical note in her first novel Trapped in the R.A.W. tells us that shes a playwright and writer of travel and nature essays, but mentions no prior published fiction at all. This is surprising, because, despite an unpromising title (the full iteration of which is Trapped in the R.A.W., A Journal of My Experiences during the Great Invasion by Kaylee Bearovna, With an Afterword by Pearl Larken and Appendices Compiled by the We Survived Series Group), the novel demonstrates a impressively assured voice, an ingenious, casebook-like structure in which the journal of the title is supplemented by several appendices written years later, and an equally creative use of illustrative material, drawn mostly from 19th-century books and the illustrations of Walter Crane. All of this creates the initial impression that this might be a sort of alternate-history period piece, like the variations on Wellss The War of the Worlds that have appeared more often than necessary, but in fact its a near-future alien invasion tale set mostly in a university special collections library and told mostly in the form of the journal of Kaylee Bearovna, who barricades herself inside during the first couple of months of an inexplicable invasion that nearly wipes out the global population. The R.A.W. of the title comes from the librarians nickname for the collection rare and wonderful.

Alien invasion apocalyptic dystopias, of which there are many, tend to align along a spectrum, with brutalist survivalism at one end (think of Cormac McCarthys The Road) and elegiac humanism at the other (one of the best examples remains George R. Stewarts Earth Abides). Boyes lands firmly in the latter camp, not only celebrating the value of libraries and the preservation of culture, but also focusing far more on character than spectacle. Kaylee hasnt had a particularly easy life she was horribly betrayed and abused by a professor some years earlier, and has lost touch with her beloved daughter but her quick-thinking response to the sudden invasion marks her as a classically competent SF hero. When she hears the screams of the dying and sees hundreds of odd figures in faceless brown outfits slaughtering people with a single touch, she barricades herself in the library and immediately begins sorting the details of her survival, from securing food and water, to such mundane details as toilet paper (which creates an almost comical dilemma in a rare-books library). Her journal makes for compelling reading, detailing her failure to save another survivor who makes it to the library door and eventually describing her tentative relationship with one of the invaders, whom she comes to call the Tall Man. When she decides to leave the library, she leaves the journal behind.

This leads to Boyess neatest touch: the journal is discovered decades later by an expeditionary team, resulting in a series of documents, mostly trying to discover what happened to Kaylee. Our new narrators include the editor of the published version of the journal, the leader of the expeditionary team, a contemporary friend of Kaylees who also survived, an academic cultural historian, and an anthropologist who presents interviews with other survivors who might have known Kaylee or her family. Boyes doesnt always fully differentiate these voices (several sound a lot like Kaylees original journal), but the effect is unarguably moving, as we watch Kaylee transformed from a desperate and lonely figure into a kind of librarian legend, whose story only becomes richer as we piece it together from these later documents. There are plenty of unanswered or inadequately answered questions about the invasion itself, the aliens, and their own motives and social structures (though Boyes does think up an ingenious explanation as to how they could mate with humans), but thats not really the point of a novel such as this. In a few pages you can wipe out most of a civilization with disease, war, alien invasion, or natural catastrophe, but it takes a deeply humane novel to convince us that continuity and community can be built from the ashes.

Gary K. Wolfe is Emeritus Professor of Humanities at Roosevelt University and a reviewer for Locus magazine since 1991. His reviews have been collected in Soundings (BSFA Award 2006; Hugo nominee), Bearings (Hugo nominee 2011), and Sightings (2011), and his Evaporating Genres: Essays on Fantastic Literature (Wesleyan) received the Locus Award in 2012. Earlier books include The Known and the Unknown: The Iconography of Science Fiction (Eaton Award, 1981), Harlan Ellison: The Edge of Forever (with Ellen Weil, 2002), and David Lindsay (1982). For the Library of America, he edited American Science Fiction: Nine Classic Novels of the 1950s in 2012, with a similar set for the 1960s forthcoming. He has received the Pilgrim Award from the Science Fiction Research Association, the Distinguished Scholarship Award from the International Association for the Fantastic in the Arts, and a Special World Fantasy Award for criticism. His 24-lecture series How Great Science Fiction Works appeared from The Great Courses in 2016. He has received six Hugo nominations, two for his reviews collections and four for The Coode Street Podcast, which he has co-hosted with Jonathan Strahan for more than 300 episodes. He lives in Chicago.

This review and more like it in theJuly 2019 issue of Locus.

While you are here, please take a moment to support Locus with a one-time or recurring donation. We rely on reader donations to keep the magazine and site going, and would like to keep the site paywall free, but WE NEED YOUR FINANCIAL SUPPORT to continue quality coverage of the science fiction and fantasy field.

Continue reading here:

Gary K. Wolfe Reviews Trapped in the R.A.W., A Journal of My Experiences during the Great Invasion by Kaylee Bearovna by Kate Boyes - Locus Online

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Read the rest here:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Read this article:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Surviving Survivalism | Commonweal Magazine

The book-blurb version of Educated ends here, a Hillbilly Elegy-meets-Pygmalion tale of an improbable intellectual coming-of-age. However, Westover digs deeper in this memoir. She wants to tell the story of her soul, not her accomplishments, and she writes surprisingly little of her life at Cambridge. Instead, like a tongue probing a sore tooth, her narrative returns to Bucks Peak, where her identity still lies. How can she break from her family without losing herself?

The answer does not come easily. Throughout her teens and into her graduate-school years, Westover suffers tremendous physical and psychological abuse at the hands of her older brother Shawn. He rages violently, and when Tara starts to wear makeup and date, she bears the brunt of his manic outbursts, which often leave her with broken bones and bruises. Westovers encounter, in college, with early feminist thinkers like John Stuart Mill and Mary Wollstonecraft, gives her a language to understand this experience. When she brings the abuse to her fathers attention, however, he refuses to acknowledge it, and eventually, the entire family, except for one brother, turns on her. Isolated and on the verge of psychological collapse while on a fellowship at Harvard, Westover begins to doubt her own memoryperhaps she imagined the abuse?

If we are made to mistrust our memories, how do we know who we are? Westovers entire memoir wrestles with this question. In doing so, she follows the lead of the Wests first autobiographer, St. Augustine. In Book 10 of the Confessions, he ties memory to identity and, specifically, to language:

[W]hen a true account is given of past events, what is brought forth from the memory is not the events themselves, which have passed away, but words formed from images of those events which as they happened and went on their way left some kind of traces in the mind.

It is fitting, then, that writing in her journal saves Tara Westover. After one particularly humiliating incident that involves Shawn dragging her through a parking lot, she decides, for the first time, to record the abuse in her journalnot just in the vague, shadowy language she usually uses to conceal the abuse from herself, but in terms of what actually happened. This action, she later writes, would change everything.

Even when it occurs in a private journal, writing is a communal activity, for the simple reason that language itself is. Putting her private experience into language enables Westovers subjectivity to become objectivity; she cannot erase its meaning, no matter how much she would like to. Writing the truth helps her realize that her voice might be as strong as the other ones that had narrated her life to that point.

Honesty defines Westovers voice, and redeems her book from occasional lapses into clich. When she recounts scrawling verses of Bob Marleys Redemption Song into her notebook for inspiration, readers are tempted to roll their eyes (attending a college party or two has a way of removing any illusions of Marley as a prophet). But to Westover, for whom the singer is an unknown until that point, Emancipate yourself from mental slavery is as fresh and charged with meaning as any line from Locke, Hume, or Rousseau. And though she has every reason to turn her family into villains, she tempers their faults with genuine affection, even for Shawn, whose violent paroxysms were often followed by moments of poignant tenderness.

For the ancient Greeks, education implied much more than our modern conception of receiving information or gaining experience. It meant entering into the patterns of the larger community, so that one becomes an individual only by learning from others and from the past. The Greeks called this process paideia, and it is precisely this concept that Homers Cyclopes lacked. Their caves may have granted them autonomy, but they were not individuals, because they lacked culture and community.

Educated is Tara Westovers account of becoming an individual through paideia. She ventures out into the world to discover her identity, and finds it only by making herself vulnerable to the truth, no matter where it lies or how painful it is. Her memoir provides a captivating account of her gradual discovery of an essentially Catholic truththat we exist in relation to others and to the world around us.

EducatedA MemoirTara WestoverRandom House, $28, 352 pp.

Read this article:

Surviving Survivalism | Commonweal Magazine

Apartheid In Black And White: Survivalism, Not Racism (2 …

2018 By ILANA MERCER Monomaniacal Westernersthey have one thing on their minds: it begins with an Rhave come to think and speak of apartheid as a theory of white supremacy. It was not. The policy of separate development, as it was admittedly euphemized, was not a theory of racial supremacy, but a strategy for survival.

More here:

Apartheid In Black And White: Survivalism, Not Racism (2 ...

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

See the original post here:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Read more:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Here is the original post:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Read the original:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Go here to read the rest:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

View original post here:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

View post:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Continue reading here:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

More:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Read more:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Read more from the original source:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

View post:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Original post:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Go here to see the original:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia

Survivalism in fiction – Wikipedia

Portrayals of survivalism, and survivalist themes and elements such as survival retreats have been fictionalised in print, film, and electronic media. This genre was especially influenced by the advent of nuclear weapons, and the potential for societal collapse in light of a Cold War nuclear conflagration.

Bear Grylls' Beck Granger Series: This series of books follows the events of a 13 year old survivalist who, against all odds. survives anything. However a dangerous organisation called Lumos are trying to destroy beautiful parts of the world. With Beck taking over from his deceased parents, he will do anything to take down Lumos.

Read more from the original source:

Survivalism in fiction - Wikipedia


12345...