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Posthuman Saga is the post apocalyptic board game youve been waiting for – Big Boss Battle

Designer Gordon Calleja and publisher Mighty Boards have doubled down on their radiation-soaked epic, Posthuman Saga which has recently hit the shelves following a successful Kickstarter. Can this gorgeous looking production capture the post-apocalyptic theme without outstaying its welcome?

Remember Fallout: The Board Game and its relatively dull expansion New California? No? Me neither, even though I reviewed them both. Unfortunately, despite their experience and the strength of the IP, even Fantasy Flight Games couldnt make the most of Bethesdas legendary series when it came to converting it into a tabletop experience.

Mighty Boards has taken a very different approach, thankfully, despite capturing most of the same mechanical features. Posthuman Saga is still a game in which the players explore a wasteland, forage for food, scavenge suppliers and equipment, whilst levelling up their skills by fighting increasingly challenging foes.

A number of story beats run through the structure of the game, dished out through any combination of objective cards, landmark markers, random events and specific missions, whilst a full complement of companions can also be recruited. All of this unfolds over about two hours usually, although Posthuman Saga is easily capable of lasting for more like three with a couple of inexperienced players involved.

There are also several modes to play in, including a standard competitive mode, a team versus and a solo mode the standard mode is where I spent most of my time. In this default state, Posthuman Saga wisely veers away from player versus player combat, instead allowing each of the four players to forge their own path on a segregated quadrant of the map.

It seemed odd to me at first that the players were effectively involved in their own separate adventures, but since the theme is based on each one being an explorer sent from the same enclave, it makes sense that each would forge out on their own. With this in mind and thanks to clever use of objective cards and landmark tokens as well as seeded event tokens across the sixteen rounds of play, each player will see completely unique events.

From a confrontational perspective, this means that the players will never face off in combat, but what Posthuman Saga does ingeniously well is introducing some very unexpected eurogame elements that drive competition for points. After all, what good game isnt won by the player who scores the most points?

This next bit will be hard to explain, but Im going to have to try. Simply put, each objective that players compete will convert to points (usually just one or two) and so will things like defeated bosses and reserved XP. So far, so simple. However, where Posthuman Saga differentiates is in the way that it asks players to compete in a race to complete their different objectives and how they actually do so.

Each main objective has a first and a second half that will be completed by exploring the board and placing down the relevant map tiles, then visiting them in sequence. With the first half complete, a side mission will be unlocked which, if completed, will score a further two points. As they explore their personal section of the board, players will also place down recon tokens that show resources of four kinds that have been located in that sector, chaining these together in an orthogonal sequence will unlock recon objectives, also worth points.

As I said, its hard to explain and no doubt hard to visualise, but because players have some control over which tiles and recon tokens they take, and where to put them, the usual randomness in exploration games is completely removed without losing any of the excitement. Chaining the recon tokens together feels thematically detached at first, but when you think about it and realise that each new tile is a full day of exploration, its equivalent to searching a whole area and marking resources on your map and then relaying back the coordinates.

As more and more objectives are concluded, not only are points scored but so too do the missions become more and more interesting. You may see the same actual base objectives from game to game as there are only about ten, but its unlikely youll see them combined with the same recon objectives and the same landmarks every time. Random events and combat introduce further variety, as does the simple need to stay alive to eat, to rest, to recuperate.

I now realise of course that I havent mentioned how the game flows and how some of these things happen. On a turn, a player simply has four actions to choose from and will do so by playing a card. Players can rest, forage, scour or trek, each of which is fairly straightforward conceptually, but with nuances that make the timing of when to do one or the other quite important to the overall gameplay.

Resting simply allows the player to place the camp token on the board, allowing them to refresh broadcast tokens (which Ill explain in a moment) and to recover fatigue, whilst not having to spend food on the next morning. Foraging allows the player to take the resource for the current tile they are on without question, whilst also allowing them to test their mindset skill in order to try and gain a bonus resource.

Scouting is where broadcast tokens come into play, with the player who calls a scout action being able to open the bidding on one of the four available location tiles. Trekking, fairly clearly, allows the player to move from one space to an adjacent one (orthogonally) which can result in any of a number of things, including both hostile and non-hostile encounters.

When combat occurs, which it inevitably will, or in fact when certain kinds of tests come about, the player will use a deck of challenge cards to try and overcome them. Some of these have ranged or melee attacks, whilst others show successes for non-combat situations. Depending on the enemy, the players may be shot at before reaching melee range, or if they end up in melee combat with a mutant enemy, they may even pick up mutations of their own that bestow (generally) negative effects.

It can be tempting to regard the whole experience as multiplayer solitaire at first and to a certain extent, that is undeniable. Each player lives out their own story and in doing so, the other players will occasionally just need to wait for them. Its a mistake to think that Posthuman Saga is not a competitive game however, and because the scoring is generally quite low, every extra point for being first to achieve one objective or another counts.

I dont know whether lessons were learned specifically from the Fallout games, but I can say that where the FFG game and its expansion could bog down and simply break because one player did a certain thing, Posthuman Saga simply cant do that. What is lost in exploring a shared wasteland is made up for by the reliability and competitiveness of the gameplay, which remains fair and balanced throughout, with each player able to compete on equal footing.

Even though the base game presents a relatively stiff challenge thanks to the dangerous enemies and progressive increase in difficulty, Ive also had the chance to play a couple of games of the day one expansion, The Resistance, which adds two new playable characters, a whole third tier of enemies and a new slave train mechanic for players to score.

The Resistance, frankly, is an expert-level expansion to an already challenging game and therefore its a nice to have rather than a must-buy for many players, but I really enjoyed the slave train mechanic because it gave the players a common target to go after that again doesnt break the game or damage the fundamental elements of the turn structure. The new enemies are hard as nails, however!

Overall, I find Posthuman Saga a very interesting and enjoyable experience that is as unique as anything I could name. Its a heady mix of combat, hand and resource management, tile placement and racing and I think its virtually impossible to classify alongside other games. It does have the issue of being overly long and complex for some players (especially during the first few games) but the gameplay itself isnt that heavy once the sheer number of things going on has been understood.

Id recommend Posthuman Saga to fans of post-apocalyptic games who enjoy smart combat, crunchy mechanics and who have the stomach for longer games. This isnt a dice chucker or a miniatures game, and its demanding enough of your time that you need to put aside an entire evening for a single game, more often than not. Because I cant think of another game like it, I think its a keeper for sure.

You can pre-order Posthuman Saga on Thirsty Meeples.

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Posthuman Saga is the post apocalyptic board game youve been waiting for - Big Boss Battle

WIRE Buzz: Stoned Kevin Smith weeps to Onward; The Willoughbys trailer; more – SYFY WIRE

A coronavirus quarantine has affected many in the entertainment business differently, with some making more of their isolated time than others. Kevin Smith, nerd extraordinaire and director of films like Dogma, decided it was the perfect time to catch up on the latest offering from Pixar: Onward. The only twist when it came to his consumption of the Chris Pratt and Tom Holland team-up? The accompanying consumption of marijuana.

Bad idea to wake and bake and watch ONWARD the filmmaker wrote on Facebook before livestreaming 14 minutes of solid tears during his rental of the animated film.

The Dan Scanlon-directed movie about two elf brothers on a quest to meet their late father was always going to be sad, but due to its theatrical absence in the wake of pandemic cancellations, its now available for home viewing much quicker than normal big-budget films distributions. Thats allowed those like Smith, who perhaps want a more intimate viewing experience, the ability to get some privacy for those ugly tears.

Take a look:

This is worse than every theater when it screened Up for the first time. Smith continued speaking during the video of his deep dives during his home stay, as well as what particularly affected him about Onward. Watch Onward...oh f***... Get a whole box of this s***, he said, waving some tissues.

Onward is out on Digital now.

Next, theres nothing like a bit of murder to start off your animated childrens movie, right? Thats the premise behind The Willoughbys...in so many words. The Netflix film from directors Kris Pearn and Cory Evans, based on Lois Lowrys book of the same name, is all about four siblings trying to rid themselves of their terrible parents - with one very dangerous plan.

The kids voiced by Will Forte, Alessia Cara, and Vincent Tong (voicing twins) want to send their mom (Jane Krakowski) and dad (Martin Short) on a vacation. A deadly vacation, as a matter of fact.

Check it out:

One candy factory, nanny, and encounter with sinister family services later, and the Willoughbys are on the run. But not because theyre wanted for attempted murder, somehow. Its too sweet a film for that, it seems. Maya Rudolph, Terry Crews, and Ricky Gervais also star.

The Willoughbys begin their plot on April 22.

Finally, the next iteration of an iconic manga finally has a premiere date. The final trailer for Netflixs CG animated Ghost in the Shell: SAC_2045 reveals that Major Motoko Kusanagi will bring her Public Security Section 9 crew back to fight crimes on April 23.

The show, from Shinji Aramaki and Kenji Kamiyama, takes place in 2045 and features the return of returning Ghost in the Shell SAC cast members Atsushi Nakanaka (the Major), Akio Takatsuka (Bato), and Hirota Takaji (Togusa).

Fans can learn a bit more in the latest tease for the show:

The sustainable war has brought about a new dominant species called posthuman, the shows intertitles read. This partially explains the man the Major has a fistfight with during the trailer and why her cybernetic body is struggling to defeat him.

Fans can find out more about this new threat, and see the rest of the new art style in action, when Ghost in the Shell: SAC_2045 hits Netflix on April 23.

Link:

WIRE Buzz: Stoned Kevin Smith weeps to Onward; The Willoughbys trailer; more - SYFY WIRE

Best of 2019: Harm’s Way Pick 5 Favorite Albums of Year – Revolver Magazine

2019 has been one of the biggest years in heavy music in recent memory, with heavyweights such as Tool, Slipknot and Rammstein dropping long-awaited new albums, while trailblazing up-and-comers pushed boundaries in their own right. For their part, industrialized hardcore outfitHarm's Wayreleased the remix EPPSTHMN, which reimagined cuts off their excellent2018 album, Posthuman, and toured relentlessly in support of both. When we we asked vocalist James Pligge to share some his favorite music from the year, he came back with a group effort."Because we are always in a van together we usually all consume music as a band, I decided to get a collaborative list of all Harm's Way's favorite albums of 2019," the vocalist responded."This list is in no particular order and is just some records we really enjoyed at home and on the road in 2019."

Probably one of the biggest records to come from the hardcore and metal world this year was A Different Shade of Blue. This record is very catchy and heavy and offers a combination of Nineties hardcore and modern metalcore. I think it has created a movement in which many people from different musical backgrounds can get behind. Its impact on heavy music and well-constructed metallic hardcore makes it one of the best heavy records of 2019.

I have always been a fan of Division of Mind from Richmond and this LP is no different. This record is just a perfect combination of truly angry music with d-beat and mosh parts. It reminds me of a heavier Left for Dead or the Swarm. One thing that always resonates with me is vocalists that are able to convey their hatred or anger through the vocals of a record, and I think this record is able to do that very well.

This record reminds me of some of the early 2000s Western Massachusetts bands like Think I Care. As a person who got really into hardcore in the early 2000s, this record is almost nostalgic-like to me. I just really enjoy the combination of well-done fast parts and heavily distorted breakdowns, and it was a pleasure to hear these songs live night in and night out on our tour together in August.

I came across this from a fellow Hate Force member. Finding death metal that is new and interesting can sometimes be a challenge, but Vomit Forth was able to keep my attention. In my opinion, this album sounds like a combination of old Dying Fetus, Suffocation and Devourment, but less technical. At times it also remind me of Internal Bleeding, especially with the heavier breakdowns mixed with the traditional death-metal parts. Lucky for them, that style of deathmetal is one of my favorites, and this record really stands apart from a lot of the monotony that is out there.

If you offered me a million dollars to pronounce this band's name correctly, I would most definitely fail. I really enjoy slow, Neanderthal-like deathmetal, and this band does this extremely well. Although this record is only four songs, I think it's truly one of the best death-metal records I have heard in a long time. If you like slower death metal with d-beat parts and sludgy breakdowns like Disma, you should most certainly check this record out on Bandcamp.

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Best of 2019: Harm's Way Pick 5 Favorite Albums of Year - Revolver Magazine

Moscows Garage Museum Starts Pioneering Online Art Venueand Its More Than a Museum on the Internet – ARTnews

As artists experiment with the internet and digital media with increasing frequency, museums of all kinds are aiming to crack the code of how to display such art online to a wide audience. Now the Garage Museum of Contemporary Art in Moscow is entering the field with an ambitious new effort.

Garage, which was founded by art collector Dasha Zhukova and her then-husband, billionaire Roman Abramovich, is starting a multi-pronged new initiative, Garage Digital, which will allow its curators to commission new digital artworks and offer historical context for old ones.

Part of the platforms role will be to support programming within the museums walls, and right now, in connection with The Coming World: Ecology as the New Politics 20302100, its survey exhibition about contemporary art and environmentalism, Garage Digital is hosting new works by artists Posthuman Studies Lab, Sascha Pohflepp with Matthew Lutz and Alessia Nigretti, Gints Gabrns, and James Ferraro and Ezra Miller.

Katya Inozemtseva, the senior curator of the Garage Museum and a member of Garage Digitals workgroup, said that the program is intended to shift the publics understanding of how art and technology interact. We arrived at the idea of sort of non-space, a digital limbo, where the new art could exist and be seen, she told ARTnews in an email. It lives on the logic of a feed and under the legislation of general experience of everyone who uses a smartphone with internet connection. Garage doesnt intend to create a digital ghetto or a museum on the internet. Were reacting to the transformed relationships between physical and digital realities.

The New Museums 2002 acquisition of the New York art-and-technology organization Rhizome serves as a precedent for Garages moves, but Garage Digital comes amid quick-moving changes in the field. Numerous shows about the internet have arrived at global art museums over the past few years, the Serpentine Galleries in London has started an augmented-reality program, and museum director Daniel Birnbaum left the Moderna Museet in Sweden to lead a company focused on virtual-reality works by artists.

Russia presents a particularly unique home for the project, given the countrys unique history with digital art. During the 1990s, many of the most important works from the net.art movement were being produced by Russian artists like Olia Lialina and Alexei Shulgin, who used digital interfaces to ponder the exchange of visual and political information online.

Inozemtseva said that Garage Digital will contextualize works by such pioneersand also aim to create new groundbreaking works through a grant program. Importantly, she said, the texts hosted on Garage Digitals site will appear in both English and Russian, in an attempt to stimulate researchers and scholars of younger generation to move forward, to use the optics and approaches of posthuman theory in order to invent/see/analyze various phenomena in our reality.

Among the initiatives Garage Digital has already started is one dedicated specifically to gaming. According to Inozemtseva, the divide between the digital sphere and everyday life is growing thinner, and games are offering new ways of immersing oneself in technological environments. With that in mind, the museum plans to commission works making use of video games and computer simulations.

But the political climate in Russia could be an obstacle for some of the programming Garage Digital has planned. In November, Russian politicians unveiled a plan to create a sovereign internet, effectively starting a network thats walled off from international countries. Experts have raised questions about whether the new plan could lead to increased censorship online in a way similar to Chinas Great Firewall. Inozemtseva did not seem worried, however.

We think that its more an ideological construct and political tool than a reality, she said of the sovereign internet plan. It definitely does not influence our programming and is not able to. Any regulation of this kind immediately appears absurd, and might be only used as a trigger for artistic production.

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Moscows Garage Museum Starts Pioneering Online Art Venueand Its More Than a Museum on the Internet - ARTnews

‘The Expanse’ Season 4 Review: Hard science, biological conflicts laced with emotions and action makes space d – MEAWW

This spoiler-free review is based on the six episodes provided to MEAWW

'The Expanse' has always prided itself on ensuring attention to detail and a thorough narrative. This explains why 'New Terra' takes its time in dedicating its entire runtime to get the audience up to speed after Syfy's cancellation last May. The major chunk of the series is a slow burner. It revolves around the character acclimatizing to a new environment. The crew of the Rocinante is back. Captain James Holden (Steven Strait), first officer Naomi Nagata (Dominique Tipper), engineer Amos Burton (Wes Chatham), and pilot Alex Kamal (Cas Anvar) take up ample screentime, and their latest work starts off when they touchdown on an alien planet, Ilus.

This season is an adaptation of Cibola Burn, book number four of the 'Expanse' series and continues exploring the themes it tried explaining in its pilot season - the acute knowledge of space, stellar elements and the concept of an intermediary form between human and posthuman. Ilus, aka New Terra, brings all these factors in one place. Also present are a group of Belters who try and make a living out of mining Lithium. There are enough encounters between them and the Royal Charter Energy (RCE).

And while there's enough story to go, the following episodes take its time to establish each layer. For 'The Expanse's staunch followers, this may be a delight. The face-off between the two parties is a thrilling showdown. It is also clear that the series has focused its energy on character development this time. Tipper as Naomi owns the screen in each of her appearances and is one of the bright spots of the latest installment. She also manages to translate the fact that she literally carries the burden of being Rocinante's only Belter.

The sentiments are out there and the series encapsulates some heartfelt moments, again, with Tipper playing a pivotal role in making these moments memorable. For a person who's spent a lifetime in the vastness of space, every little movement comes as an effort one that she manages to convey seamlessly. The laughs come in the form of Chatham's Amos and his sexual banter with Salgueiro's Wei (Murtrys second-in-command). The duo's relationship isn't exactly a smooth ride, but it does form a great plot point to go with.

For those familiar with Cibola Burn, the story has enough zing making it a worthwhile read, and the season makes an honest attempt in explaining the story. There are hard sciences and biological conflicts that are coupled with specks of emotions and actions. Eventually, it is shown that the atmospheric effects impact the RCE and the Belters forcing them to team up. And while there is a hint of predictability, the show justifies this by a lengthy, but a definitely-needed explanation. Ilus is a visual delight. And up until the massive blast that dents the planet's surface, there is breathtaking imagery.

'The Expanse' could have probably looked at giving more meaty roles to its cast. With the enormous focus on science, it's easy to notice the strength and story of these characters fade away at times. This edition of 'The Expanse' justifies the need for season 4 and is convincing enough for a watch after what could rightfully be called a zigzaggy start.

'The Expanse' Season 4 premieres on December 13 on Amazon Prime Video.

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'The Expanse' Season 4 Review: Hard science, biological conflicts laced with emotions and action makes space d - MEAWW

X-Men #1 is Already Better Than All of HoXPoX [X-ual Healing 10-16-19] – Bleeding Cool News

HoXPoX is over and the Dawn of X is upon us which means its time for the X-books to deliver on the promise of a bright new future. Did that happen in X-Men #1? Read on to find out.

Sworn to sell comics for Marvel executives who feared and hated the fact that Fox owned their movie rights, The Uncanny X-Men suffered great indignities, but thanks to a corporate merger and a line-wide relaunch, the X-Men can finally get back to doing what they do best: being objectively the best franchise in all of comics.

X-MEN #1 DXAUG190845(W) Jonathan Hickman (A/CA) Leinil Francis YuDAWN OF X!The X-Men find themselves in a whole new world of possibility and things have never been better! Jonathan Hickman (HOUSE OF X, POWERS OF X, SECRET WARS) and superstar artist Leinil Yu (NEW AVENGERS, CAPTAIN AMERICA) reveal the saga of Cyclops and his hand-picked squad of mutant powerhouses!Rated T+In Shops: Oct 16, 2019SRP: $4.99

X-Men #1 opens with s scene of Professor Xavier first giving Scott Summers his ruby quartz glasses before jumping right into the post-HoXPoX action, as Cyclops and Storm invade an O.R.C.H.I.S. facility to put a stop to their mutant-murdering ways. As the forces retreat into the compound, Magneto and Polaris arrive for backup. Base leader Dr. Mars declares that their research not go to waste, so they inject themselves with a serum that turns them into apes. Magneto takes care of them as the other three X-Men descend further into the compound and find a bunch of mutants held in stasis tubes, along with one posthuman subject. She teleports away though, and the X-Men bring the freed mutants back to Krakoa, delivering them to Dr. Cecelia Reyes.

Storm stays with Dr. Reyes to help keep an eye on the mutants in case anything goes wrong, while Magneto basks in the adulation of the local crowds, which Polaris finds embarrassing. After a conversation about what Krakoa means to him with Polaris, Cyclops heads back to his house on the moon, where the whole Summers clan lives, to meet his dad and the Starjammers for dinner.

We get an interlude at the ORCHIS Forge, where Director Devo and Omega Sentinal Karima Shapandar discuss the previous disaster when the X-Men invaded the Forge and tossed the Mother Mold into the sun. Devo takes responsibility for the failure.

At the Summer House, Scott chills with Corsair while Wolverine watches Vulcan grill some steaks, with Vulcan waxing poetic about the inferno inside himself as he cooks. Kid Cable asks his mom, Jean Grey, if he can trade guns with Raza of the Starjammers, while Rachel Grey bonds with Hepzibah over being badass women. Before dinner, Alex Summers gifts his dad with a Krokoa flower to plant on the Starjammer and form a portal to Krakoa. An infographic shows us the living quarters, including connecting doors between Wolverine, Jean, and Scotts rooms, which has been the subject of much salacious internet gossip. Scott and Corsair share another conversation after dinner where Corsair worries about how dangerous what Scott is doing is, though Scott assures him that he understands the danger but is focusing on enjoying the people he loves.

In a final scene at the ORCHIS Forge, Dr. Gregor tells Director Devo that she has a way to bring back her husband, who died in the X-Men attack during HoXPoX.

As HoXPoX ended last week, I weighed the pros and cons of the story and whether it justified relaunching the X-Men. Ultimately, while I found a lot of issues with the story itself, I felt that the interest the series sparked in the X-Men with existing comic fans was at least a good start in reinvigorating the franchise, though wed be relying on the Dawn of X books to capitalize on that momentum.

Interesting to learn, however, in an interview last week at AiPT with Cullen Bunn, that Marvel had been planning this relaunch since at least 2015, and even more interestingly, that the X-Books seemed to be in a purposeful holding pattern because of it, with Bunn saying the creative teams were very limited with where we could go with the story because the plans for House of Xthose were already in play. Hickman descended on the X-books like the savior that would lead them out of a dark time of mediocrity but was his coming the source of that alleged mediocrity in the first place?

All of that said, while HoXPoX offered big ideas, it suffered from a lack of personality, with hardly any insight into what was making the characters in the story tick beyond Moira and maybe Xavier, and many of the X-Men acting completely out of character. For the most part, X-Men #1 is the opposite of that, with a focus on families, mainly the Summers family, though some nice interactions between Polaris and Magneto as well. There was warmth here that was missing throughout the twelve issues of HoXPoX, and its a relief to see, because its the found family aspect of the X-Men that makes it special as much as stories about time travel and mutations and the epic war with humanity.

That being said, theres still some stuff to be explained. The Wolverine/Jean/Scott room thing is cheeky, but will it be explored, or serve as just an inside joke that distracts from the story rather than adding to it, like Vulcans cooking? Theres a lot to be explained about the motivations of various characters for going along with the Krakoa plan as well, though this issue did a lot for explaining it when it comes to Scott Summers, even if he was probably the mutant least in need of an explanation.

Either way, its nice to see a moment of personal downtime for the X-Men after HoXPoX, and Im looking forward to the launch of the rest of the books breaking up the monotony of Hickmanism, even though it looks like we can expect the damn infographics to remain pervasive throughout the line.

Now that HoXPoX is over and well be getting more X-books, its time to bring back the Wolverines Weiner X-Pick of the week, awarded to the comic that provides the most satisfying X-Men experience, like grilled meat on a hot summer day. It seems we may still get single-X-book weeks for the foreseeable future, and on those weeks, if the one X-book sucked, then no one will get the Wolverines Weiner X-Pick of the Week. This week, however, X-Men #1 was satisfying enough to earn the award.

Congratulations to the creative team.

Ill also be keeping track of Wolverines Weiner Winners, so

Next week, weve got Marauders #1. See you then!

Read moreX-ual Healinghere:

A prophecy says that in the comic book industry's darkest days, a hero will come to lead the people through a plague of overpriced floppies, incentive variant covers, #1 issue reboots, and super-mega-crossover events.

Scourge of Rich Johnston, maker of puns, and seeker of the Snyder Cut, Jude Terror, sadly, is not the hero comics needs right now... but he's the one the industry deserves.

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X-Men #1 is Already Better Than All of HoXPoX [X-ual Healing 10-16-19] - Bleeding Cool News

HiX-Men Moment of the Week: Mutants are finally treating Magneto like the god he (thinks he) is – Comics Beat

HOX/POX may be done, but Jonathan Hickmans time with the X-Men is just beginning. In X-Men #1, illustrated by Lenil Francis Yu and colored by Sunny Gho, Cyclops leads a team to combat the mutant-hating Orchis remaining presence on Earth. An adventure-filled issue, Hickmans premiere on the core X-Men title is significantly lighter than any of his mutant material so far, but that doesnt mean there arent some weighty topics to explore.

The Summers family and the Logan-Jean-Scott (polyamory-friendly) conjoined bedrooms certainly make up the meat of the issue, but the Master of Magnetism has a huge presence as the X-Men attach the Orchis base. As one of Krakoas co-founders and a heavy-hitter on the X-Men he volunteered to take on an army of PH.D. wielding gorillas single-handedly (comics are incredible, people) Magneto has an esteemed position in mutant society. More than just a valued member of the Quiet Council, his prominence has resulted in him being revered as an almost heavenly force, someone who is willing to fight and sacrifice himself for the wellbeing of all mutants.

Upon the teams return to Krakoa, Magneto is immediately greeted by hordes of young, adoring fans. Cyclops, Storm and the rest of the X-Men dont receive any cheers, but kids scream out MAGENTO or MAGNETOS BACK, signifying just how remarkable the villain-turned-mutant-protectors image is to Krakoan citizens. This level of reverence shown towards Magneto is in line with his comments way back in House of X #1, when he tells a United Nations delegation that they have new gods now, and his behavior as a benevolent yet vengeful protector of his fellow mutants certainly falls in line with that image. In response to a young mutant who wants to join Magneto on the field during their next mission, Magneto strongly asserts himself as a force of nature, something to be reckoned with a sentiment that only encourages more loyalty and attachment to the headstrong individual.

Even though Magneto is an Omega Level Mutant while Cyclops is not, its clear that the Master of Magnetism respects the team leader and has no problem following his directives on the field. On Scotts command, Magneto tears through the roof and strikes at Orchis gathered forces. Similarly, rather than mock Scott for his inability to blast through a Vibranium door, he reassuringly places his hand on his former enemys shoulder and makes himself useful to the team.

Instead of ensuring that its he who discovers the kidnapped Children of the Vault, or causing a fuss after Cyclops insists that the team finish their mission instead of following the escaped posthuman, Magneto is content to stand back and let the team operate as it must. Yes, it seems his ego is on the rise once again, as seen by his reiteration in this issue that mutants are the only gods on this planet, but that doesnt mean Magneto is back to valuing himself and his own abilities over those of others.

As Polaris the only one of Eriks children to be physically included in Hickmans narrative so far points out to Scott, Eriks new righteous goals and the admiration shown him from his fellow mutants has him acting like hes a young man again. Even his bold proclamation, Let man run from me, shows that he is reinvigorated and eager to take on anyone who may disagree with his new nation. Magneto has always been a proud individual, someone who puts stock in his own accomplishments, but this is the first time in a while readers have seen him act so courageously. The main difference is, while before he put faith in himself and his own raw power, now its clear that Magneto truly believes in Krakoas peaceful mission and wants to see it succeed for more than just as a complement to his ego.

In a lot of ways, Magnetos presence and symbolic positioning in this issue feels like the inevitable conclusion to his decades-long journey. Yes, hes still capable of instilling fear in his enemies during battle, but hes morphed into a caring, empathetic individual. As a young man, Erik was thrust into chaos during the Holocaust and has been fighting ever since. Now that hes older and still overcoming his personal traumas, Erik doesnt want the new youth to confront similar pain. All of his fighting the tough stances he took was always the name of creating some type of mutant paradise, and now its a reality.

Magneto is only present during X-Men #1s first act, but the emphasis placed on children and the Summers family throughout the remainder of the story makes it hard not to think about whats missing from Eriks life. Sure, he seems at peace with his new existence and enjoys his relationship with Lorna, but Pietro and Wanda still havent been fully integrated into the story. I imagine that Magneto has a big, personal conflict coming that will throw his newfound sense of peace and security into question.

How will he react when/if his (former) daughter Wanda shows up seeking refuge on Krakoa despite the fact that she is considered one of the species largest ever opponents after the events of House of M? Will his image as a sacred protector of his people be tarnished if he accepts her, or will he be able to convince others that she acted compulsively due to her poor mental health? Only time will tell, but its clear that Hickman is slowly developing a big, emotional storyline for Magneto that will examine and potentially challenge his symbolic role in this new mutant paradise.

What did you all think of X-Men #1 and are you excited to follow the Dawn of X into all of the other series starting next week? Sound off below and make sure to check out last weeks column about Moira MacTaggert and Powers of Xs closing chapter.

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HiX-Men Moment of the Week: Mutants are finally treating Magneto like the god he (thinks he) is - Comics Beat

How Far Away Is Immortality? – Science 2.0

It was quite unlike any other acceptance speech of the UEFA Presidents award. In a rather philosophical address before the Champions League draw in Monaco, former football player and actor Eric Cantona claimed: Soon the science will not only be able to slow down the ageing of the cells, soon the science will fix the cells to the state, and so we become eternal.

But what was he actually talking about and does it hold up? In the context, the statement seemed out of place, perhaps even slightly mad. Theres pathos in seeing aged sportsmen too once sublime athletes now reduced to a snails pace and going grey. And this gets to the heart of the human condition it is defined by limitations, most notably ageing and death. Cantona though, wears his age gracefully if unconventionally, much like he played the game.

But there was more than madness in Cantonas words. The point he is making is important. As a species, we are on the cusp of creating technologies that may fundamentally alter our capacities, promising radical potentialities and perhaps even immortality.

The emerging technologies that make this thinkable include nanotechnology, biotechnology, information technology and cognitive science (NBIC). Transhumanism is the faith in these converging technologies to give rise to human enhancement.

There is indeed work going on to reverse ageing with some believing we may be able to halt it altogether. And increasingly potent artificial intelligence (AI) may aid this process. In his book Superintelligence, philosopher Nick Bostrom suggests AI may soon exceed human-level intelligence resulting in an intelligence explosion. Such a scenario makes anything thinkable, and he believes it could happen in a few decades.

We have seen great strides in science and technology over the past century, some of which have resulted in increased global average life expectancies. At the same time, there are increasing numbers of existential threats, such as nuclear weapons and climate change. This points to a limitation of human reason that does not elude Cantona: Only accidents, crimes, wars, will still kill us. But unfortunately, crimes, wars, will multiply.

The problem is a duality to human reason. We can interrogate the world with the scientific method that enables us to create technologies which empower us instrumental reason. How to use these advances remains a problem, a question of moral reason.

Indeed Cantonas suggestion that wars and crimes will multiply emphasizes that instrumental reason can progress while moral reason regresses. Technical progress does not ensure moral progress, as was powerfully demonstrated by the two world wars of the 20th century and the many ensuing conflicts since. The climate crisis and our current political malaise also illustrate this.

Cantonas speech opened with a quote from Shakespeares King Lear: As flies to wanton boys are we to the gods,/ They kill us for their sport. The quote is also prescient. Much transhumanist literature is dedicated to the idea of humans becoming gods. But what kind of gods?

The current gods of transhumanist progress are defense agencies and tech giants. As AI guru Ben Goertzel points out: AI is currently used for selling, spying, killing and gambling. We may therefore be set to become inhuman, not posthuman gods.

A telling part of Cantonas speech is the reaction to it. The word most commonly used to describe it is bizarre. What makes it bizarre is not the content, as much as the context. In such a scenario ex-players are expected to offer up platitudes rather than philosophies of human existence.

So, as we are developing such powerful technologies, what is the context? It is advanced capitalism, and it does involve selling, spying, killing and gambling. Such is the all-encompassing nature of this system that we barely recognize it as a context at all it is a given.

Capitalism also embraces instrumental rationality it fulfills its demand for palpable progress and growth. It does not have much time for questions of morality. Markets bypass moral questions by asking is there a buyer, is there a seller and what is the price.

Mathematics and science are the formalized methodologies of instrumental rationality. It is no surprise then that humans themselves are increasingly subject to this process of quantification. Surveillance provides data, the new oil that boosts information capitalism. Humans are now the mines. This is the bizarre world of transhumanist development in the context of advanced capitalism.

In its most hubristic and unquestioning form, bolstered by unapologetic and brash advanced capitalist logics, transhumanism poses myriad threats: from automation unemployment to the end of democracy, to the risk that humans will branch into different species, making questions of inequality infinitely more urgent. Even if immortality arrives it will be accompanied by crimes, wars and accidents as Cantona states.

But there are alternative ways to think about the future. Posthumanism also deals with our uncertain future, but focuses especially on moral questions. It aims to think ethically beyond the human, emphasising a responsibility towards the wider nature of which we are a part. Posthumanists are bonded by the compassionate acknowledgement of their interdependence with multiple, human and non-human others.

It is time we asked ourselves what aspects of being human we most value. For me, compassion, kindness, appreciation of nature, art and humor are paramount those aspects most strongly connected with the moral aspect of human reason. Instrumental reason will continue at pace, and perhaps to the cost of these human idiosyncrasies imperfect, inexact, unquantifiable.

As a Liverpool fan (sorry Eric), I was happy with the Champions League draw and Van Dijks award, but in the grand scheme of things Cantonas speech was the most important moment of the event. It reminds us that a radically different future looks to be on the way, and our current social systems and cultural beliefs mean that we are in no position to take advantage of it.

Cantona finished with simply Thank you. I love football. To that, I can only say, thank you, Eric. I love football too.

By Alexander Thomas, PhD Candidate, University of East London. This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article.

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How Far Away Is Immortality? - Science 2.0

Producers are losing millions in royalties every year here’s what you can do about it – DJ Mag

WHAT CAN YOU DO?

Setlists and analogous data only tell a small part of the story, and can be easily gamed though PRS stress that this is fraud, and that they and other PROs do and will prosecute. MRT is only in a very small number of venues, or isnt used at all. Cloud DJing will go somewhat towards solving the issue, but its a long way off being widely adopted or adopted at all and when it is, it relies on accurate metadata. So, what can be done, right now, to make sure you and others get paid accurately? Established artists employ teams to ensure theyre being paid, especially if they crossover with mainstream radio play, but its in the underground clubs where the newest, unsigned music is played.

PROs may be right when they assume your provincial discotheque is playing the Top 40, but youre less likely to hear the same tracks every night in an underground club, something that PRS confirms. The takeaway from the data from those [underground] venues is that theres definitely less repetition, which means we need to monitor more of them. These new methods give us a highly accurate picture of the music played in those venues.

The number one thing any electronic music producer can do now is to register with a PRO. If youre not registered, or your tracks arent registered, you will get nothing thats the one constant here. As mentioned above, the most recent figures from AFEM suggest that, at any given time, 40% of the Beatport Top 100 is not eligible to get royalties. Another huge own goal. If youre a DJ, submit your setlists. If you dont get a form, you can do it retrospectively online, for free (go to prsformusic.com for more information) for up to 12 months after a gig. And if you dont remember everything, thats fine.

My advice to people is that you fill in a representative setlist of a period of time. The very minimum you should be doing is once a year, but ideally every three months. Just put the [tracks] youre playing most of the time, Howard explains. If you cant remember what you played or when you played it, your rekordbox histories are your friend. Plug in your USB, select histories from the dropdown menu, and you can revisit every setlist that USB was used for. You can also share it to your Public KUVO profile.

DJ, producer and label owner Posthuman whose recent tweets sparked an awareness drive around submitting setlists and DJ/producer royalties summed it up as so: Many small artists write tracks that are big in the clubs and festivals, but they sell so little copies that theres next to no profit for them. It could really make a difference, and it would cost DJs nothing to do except a little time and effort. Its a question of ethics and effort to get this cash to the artists [to whom] its due.

Whether you think the current system is broken or simply a product of a complex and somewhat dated necessity, the fact remains that, at a time when revenue streams for DIY and independent music producers are extremely narrow, the money theyre due is not making its way to their pockets. No one disputes that, but how much of it ends up in the wrong place is up to the industry as a whole.

No one body, group or organisation is to blame, and where theres money at stake, therell always be gatekeepers trying to retain the status quo that benefits them, or wholl point the finger to avoid culpability. PRS is trying to solve the problem, but without data, it cant take a case study to its board to change policy to help do so. That data comes from DJs, especially those playing the underground circuit.

If thats you, and youre jaded by PROs, or feel theyre weighted in favour of the majors, youre condemning the situation to remain stagnant. Not submitting a setlist because you feel PRS is stacked towards the majors, means PRS will continue to be stacked towards the majors, says Mark Lawrence. Thats the point that hurts the industry the most. Where Ill share some cynicism with cynics is, PRS are getting the money anyway, and [if] people choose not to report setlists and choose not to be accurate, that money will be distributed anyway. Its up to us to make it accurate.

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Producers are losing millions in royalties every year here's what you can do about it - DJ Mag

Ex Machina Now on Digital HD + Blu-Ray

A futuristic shocker.

Totally hot, bracingly cold,

powerfully sovereign and posthuman.

Necessary and unforgettable.

A visionary sci-fi

thriller is born

Sizzlingly smart,

gorgeous, and astute.

Skin-bristlingly intense.

This is bewitchingly smart

science fiction.

An intricate, enigmatic,

twisty tale.

An instant

classic.

Alex Garland upgrades

to full auteur status.

Erotically charged

and intensely involving

Alex Garland's

remarkable directorial debut

is easily one of the best

films of the year.

You've never seen anything like it.

A mesmerizing spellbinder

that will haunt you for a long time.

Alex Garland, writer of 28 Days Later and Sunshine, makes his directorial debut with the stylish and cerebral thriller, EX MACHINA.

Caleb Smith (Domhnall Gleeson), a programmer at an internet-search giant, wins a competition to spend a week at the private mountain estate of the company's brilliant and reclusive CEO, Nathan Bateman (Oscar Isaac).

Upon his arrival, Caleb learns that Nathan has chosen him to be the human component in a Turing Test-charging him with evaluating the capabilities, and ultimately the consciousness, of Nathan's latest experiment in artificial intelligence.

That experiment is Ava (Alicia Vikander), a breathtaking A.I. whose emotional intelligence proves more sophisticated and more deceptive than the two men could have imagined.

Alicia

Vikander

Domhnall

Gleeson

Oscar

Isaac

Produced by

Andrew Macdonald and Allon Reich

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Ex Machina Now on Digital HD + Blu-Ray

Posthuman – SCP Foundation

Clef didnt miss his face. Initially the loss had been painful. It wasnt just his physical face the creature had taken. For years hed wandered with a hole in his existence, one that could not be filled no matter how much achievement or memories or fellowship he built up. They all simply fell away, refusing to attach themselves to him. He may have acquired them, briefly, but they had never been his. Never been him.

So he weaved himself a mask. An idea, a facade that he could wear like clothing to cover the torn skin. One that thrived on its impermanence, its malleability, its ambiguity. That clutched at the questions like a babe to a teat and drunk itself fat. He could no longer have a self. So he became a story.

And of course, there were benefits to not having an identity. Like being able to walk into Site 2000 unquestioned. All you have to do is tweak the tale a bit. Yes, of course he should be here. No, it wasnt strange that a notoriously volatile researcher was strolling into the most heavily guarded object on the planet. Continue your workdays. Everything is going as intended.

He strolled down the sterile hallways of complex, whistling to himself and flipping his badge between his fingers. There were no guides on the wall to indicate direction. Everyone working here was expected to fully memorize their daily routes (and nothing else) before arriving at the station. It didnt bother Clef. He knew exactly where he was going.

Sir?

He stopped to look at the source of the voice. Cute. Blonde. A bit too scrawny for him. He smiled. Yes?

No ones scheduled to be in this hall at the moment. Where are you going?

His eyes moved from her stern expression, to the way she held her hands on her hips, to the gun at her waist. Ah. One of those, then. He smiled. Theres been a small malfunction in the 2Z-31 anchor. Trying to patch it up before it gets too serious.

There arent any repairs on the schedule.

It just popped up. Try not to let these things linger for too long, you know?

She glanced at a PDA. We update on a minute-to-minute schedule. Nothings showing up. Her hand rested on the gun at her waist. Clef was impressed. He hadnt even seen her switch position. Anyone else might have let her get the drop on him. So again, what are you doing here?

His arm shot forward, snatching her wrist. Before she could get a grip the gun, he jerked back. There was a crunching noise as her ulna cracked. She screamed, but he already had his hand over her mouth, covering the noise. He worked the rest of his arm around her neck. She slammed against him, jabbed her elbows toward his side, but he rotated his body. All her strikes bounced harmlessly at her side. Soon, she stilled. He lowered her unconscious body to the floor.

No alarms sounded. But now he had a time limit. He sprinted down the hallway, taking turns on instinct, trusting his memorization of the building to take him where he wanted to go. He darted up three flights of stairs, slammed open a door, breezed past the three researches chatting about takyon fields. He ran, unthinking, until he arrived at an unmarked, unassuming door.

The central hub.

Select few people had access to this. Most people wouldnt even notice it under the memetic defenses. Even the people who worked at the site didnt realize what the place was truly for. They thought a secret within a secret was all there was to it. But Clef knew. Hed known even before the Watchers told him. Hed known ever since they found the note on his dead corpse, when the pieces of every puzzle fell into place and showed him the true nature of the game. Even his comrades probably didnt realize the full magnitude of this place. He glanced around, saw that nobody was watching, and opened the door. And prayed for forgiveness.

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Posthuman - SCP Foundation

How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics …

The title of this scholarly yet remarkably accessible slice of contemporary cultural history has a whiff of paradox about it: what can it mean, exactly, to say that we humans have become something other than human? The answer, Katherine Hayles explains, lies not in ourselves but in our tools. Ever since the invention of electronic computers five decades ago, these powerful new machines have inspired a shift in how we define ourselves both as individuals and as a species.

Hayles tracks this shift across the history of avant-garde computer theory, starting with Norbert Weiner and other early "cyberneticists," who were the first to systematically explore the similarities between living and computing systems. Hayles's study ends with artificial-life specialists, many of whom no longer even bother to distinguish between life forms and computers. Along the way she shows these thinkers struggling to reconcile their traditional, Western notions of human identity with the unsettling, cyborg directions in which their own work seems to be leading humanity.

This is more than just the story of a geek elite, however. Hayles looks at cybernetically inspired science fiction by the likes of Philip K. Dick, William Gibson, and Neal Stephenson to show how the larger culture grapples with the same issues that dog the technologists. She also draws lucidly on her own broad grasp of contemporary philosophy both to contextualize those issues and to contend with them herself. The result is a fascinating introduction--and a valuable addition--to one of the most important currents in recent intellectual history. --Julian Dibbell

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How We Became Posthuman: Virtual Bodies in Cybernetics ...

Posthuman: Sanctuary on Steam

Only when she turns slowly to face you do you notice that her head is much too large, grotesquely misshapen. Your hand tightens on the pipe.

You need to decide what to do ... and the others are watching."

Posthuman: Sanctuary is a digital game set in the world of the successful Posthuman and Posthuman Saga board games. In Posthuman: Sanctuary you are a survivor in a near-future Europe that has collapsed under the weight of its own political errors, in the chilling wake of a bloody class war fueled by genetic modifications and radical technology. If you can only reach the sanctuary of the Fortress, you may learn more - and ensure your own survival. But to forge across a crumbled land where resources are spare and mutants roam the ruined mansions and markets alike, youll need a team behind you.

Carefully balancing risk and reward, you and your team quest into the unknown, gradually unveiling a map of terrain and encounters that you shape to your liking every time you play. In classic turn-based encounters, aggressors who have lost their humanity to mutations - or lost their good sense to the terror - will challenge you to make the most of your group's skills and to use your best judgment about their safety.

And you're in danger, too - some wounds might cause you to take on mutations of your own. If you mutate, your followers may begin to fear and distrust you, but the world of Posthuman: Sanctuary just might offer you paths and powers that just arent available to mere humans.

The game draws on elements from tabletop games and blends them into a unique single-player RPG with a strong narrative focus. It's about surviving the end of the world - and keeping your humanity. Posthuman: Sanctuary is part rogue-lite, with combat, team management and exploration elements, and part interactive fiction, where the choices you make will weigh on your chances and shape your experience.

With branching narrative encounters and a rich network of weather, health, location and other conditions affecting them, Posthuman: Sanctuary exists to be discovered and rediscovered. And just when you think you know it all, more mysteries rustle in the shadows at the world's edges.

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Posthuman: Sanctuary on Steam

Posthuman Ethics, Pain and Endurance | Utrecht Summer School

Closed

Organizing institution

Utrecht University - Faculty of Humanities

Period

20 August 2018 - 24 August 2018 ( 1 week )

Course location(s)

Utrecht, The Netherlands

Credits

2.0 ECTS credits

Course code

C30

Course fee (excl. housing)

300.00

Level

Advanced Master

Summer school application period is now closed

The intensive course Posthuman ethics, pain and endurance offers an overview of the contemporary debates about the ethical implications of posthumanism and the so-called posthuman turn as well as Rosi Braidottis brand of critical posthuman theory. The focus of the course this year will be on the relationship between the posthuman and the neo-materialist, vital ethics of affirmation, with special emphasis on how they deal with the cluster of issues around the lived experience of pain.

The intensive course Posthuman Ethics, Pain and Endurance offers an overview of the contemporary debates about the ethical implications of posthumanism and the so-called posthuman turn as well as Rosi Braidottis brand of critical feminist posthuman theory. The focus of the course this year will be on the relationship between the posthuman and the neo-materialist, vital ethics of affirmation, with special emphasis on how they deal with the complex issues around the lived experiences of pain, resistance, suffering and dying. Deleuze famously describes ethics as the aspiration to live an anti-fascist life. What does this mean for posthuman subjects situated between the Fourth Industrial Revolution and the Sixth Extinction? In the brutal context of the Anthropocene and climate change, of rising populism, growing poverty and inequality, how does posthuman ethics help us to deal affirmatively with these challenges?

These issues will be outlined, explored and assessed by addressing the following questions: How does a vision of the posthuman subject as a transversal an affirmative process of interaction between human, non-human and inhuman forces, help us cope with the complex and often painful challenges of the contemporary world? How does it affect the feminist quest for social justice, as well as environmental sustainability? How does it intersect with indigenous epistemologies and anti-racist politics? How does the neo-Spinozist notion of endurance foster the project of constructing an affirmative ethics for posthuman subjects? How does the idea of endurance connect to the philosophical tradition of neo-stoicism, and to Foucaults re-reading of it? How does a posthuman ethics of affirmation help us practically to confront the lived reality of pain, death and dying?

COMPULSORY READING:

The basic textbook for the course is The Posthuman Glossary (Bloomsbury Academic 2018), edited by Rosi Braidotti and Maria Hlavajova, which all participants are expected to buy.

BACKGROUND READING:

Please note that all participants are expected to have read Rosi Braidottis book The Posthuman (Polity Press 2013), and for an introduction to brutalism, the special issue of e-flux, co-edited by Rosi Braidotti, Timotheus Vermeulen et alia, which can be found here: http://www.e-flux.com/journal/83/

Prof. dr. Rosi Braidotti

Prof. Dr. Rosi Braidotti (Utrecht University)

Dr. Rick Dolphijn (Utrecht University)

Lucas van der Velden (Sonic Acts)

Simone Bignall (Flinders, University of South Australia)

This summer school course is meant for advanced MA students and up (so advanced MA students, PhD students, postdocs, professors, independent researchers, artists, ... are thus more than welcome).

300.00

Housing 200.00 , through Utrecht Summer School

For this course you are required to upload the following documents when applying:Motivation Letter, Reference Letter, C.V., Transcript of Grades

Application deadline: 16 July 2018

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Posthuman Ethics, Pain and Endurance | Utrecht Summer School

The Posthuman Project – yts.am

I really wanted this to be good. I had a long day and stayed up watching this on Amazon Prime. I was so dissatisfied that I had to say something.

I have no idea who wrote this script. They should have at least sat down and did a table read of the dialogue. Most of the lines had horrible delivery, the jokes (there were none), and most the dialogue was way too long or unnecessary. The first act of the film we are introduced to the protagonist but he doesn't carry the film. There's literally nothing of interest about him or the cast throughout a 100% of the film. His supporting cast has more uninteresting dialogue, background, and action than the lead. It took half of the movie to find out what happened to the lead characters legs, his father, and his relationship with his girlfriend.

Nothing holds your interest through the first 20 minutes of the movie. When they do get their powers the lead character isn't even noticeable anymore and he does nothing of interest accept lose his powers at the end of the film; which made absolutely no sense. Maybe it wasn't the intent of the writer or the director but if they were to go back and review the film; they basically took the main characters powers away. The protagonist at the end of the film (at graduation, states that the last blast fixed him, his uncle, father, and his uncles facilities have vanished.

So, he lost his lame healing powers, after recovering from a gunshot to the head, over powering his Uncle with the help of his brother, and getting blasted with the Zero power gun again. Everyone else apparently kept their abilities. I was like what a waste of time!

The other horrible thing, was that the camera kept floating (the jitters) back and forth. (smh)

It was hard to believe that they shot this movie with a RED Digitial Camera. I'm like haven't you ever heard of a Steady Cam, Post Production, Story boards, editing filters, or even lightning? This movie looked like they wrote something, shot something, added lame special effect, and that was it. They couldn't have gone over the script, they didn't re-shoot scenes, didn't work out any of the action or fight scenes, and they didn't work out the plot or the effects.

The production was just horrible. I've seen better filming on Youtube, with an iPhone / iPad, no budget, made with a lot of imagination and real planning. http://filmriot.squarespace.com

It is a great thing that they put something together but by no means is it any good. It is like making a beautiful and very poisonous chocolate cake. It looks good but it's just gonna kill you in the end.

The rest is here:

The Posthuman Project - yts.am

The Posthuman 1st Edition – amazon.com

"The Posthuman makes a vital contribution to feministscholarship across disciplines Braidottis reading ofcontemporary issues is out of the box: challenging, encouraging andinspiring."Feminist Review

"An important and generative step toward new theories andscholarship and a welcome addition to Braidottis alreadyformidable canon."H+ Magazine

"Shows remarkable clarity and concision even as it lays out highlytechnical, complexly theoretical, and deeply interdisciplinaryconcepts."Choice

''This is a rather startling work that requires heavyconcentration on the part of the reader to follow the brilliantthinking of the author. Rosi Braidotti, a contemporary philosopherand feminist theoretician, `makes a case for an alternative view onsubjectivity, ethics and emancipation and pitches diversity againstthe postmodernist risk of cultural relativism, while also standingagainst the tenets of liberal individualism.' Throughout her work,Braidotti asserts and demonstrates the importance of combiningtheoretical concerns with a serious commitment to producingsocially and politically relevant scholarship that contributes tomaking a difference in the world.''Grady Harp, Literary Aficionado

"This is an exciting and important text, full of intellectualbrilliance and insight. It will make a major mark."Henrietta L. Moore, University of Cambridge

"Braidotti's exhilarating survey of the constellation ofposthumanity is lucid, learned and provocative. It will be anessential point of reference in future debates about the centralphilosophical problem of our age."Paul Gilroy, Kings College London

"Debates over humanism and post-humanism have been fought overfrom feminist philosophy to literary theory and post-colonialstudies. This latest work by Rosi Braidotti presents us with aclear-headed glimpse of some of the hard choices we have before us.Braidotti knows the philosophy, cares about the politics, andempathizes with those who have been shoved aside in these brutallast hundred years. She shows us how feminism, technoscientificinfrastructure and political strands cross, sometimes withsparks."Peter Galison, Harvard University

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The Posthuman 1st Edition - amazon.com

Ancient Lies & Shiny New Tech: Transhumanists Posthuman Plan

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Ancient Lies & Shiny New Tech: Transhumanists Posthuman Plan

N. Katherine Hayles – Wikipedia

N. Katherine Hayles (born 16 December 1943) is a postmodern literary critic, most notable for her contribution to the fields of literature and science, electronic literature, and American literature.[1] She is professor and Director of Graduate Studies in the Program in Literature at Duke University.[2]

Hayles was born in Saint Louis, Missouri to Edward and Thelma Bruns. She received her B.S. in Chemistry from the Rochester Institute of Technology in 1966, and her M.S. in Chemistry from the California Institute of Technology in 1969. She worked as a research chemist in 1966 at Xerox Corporation and as a chemical research consultant Beckman Instrument Company from 1968-1970. Hayles then switched fields and received her M.A. in English Literature from Michigan State University in 1970, and her Ph.D. in English Literature from the University of Rochester in 1977.[3] She is a social and literary critic.

Her scholarship primarily focuses on the "relations between science, literature, and technology."[4][5] Hayles has taught at UCLA, University of Iowa, University of MissouriRolla, the California Institute of Technology, and Dartmouth College.[3] She was the faculty director of the Electronic Literature Organization from 2001-2006.[6]

Hayles understands "human" and "posthuman" as constructions that emerge from historically specific understandings of technology, culture and embodiment; "human and "posthuman" views each produce unique models of subjectivity.[7] Within this framework "human" is aligned with Enlightenment notions of liberal humanism, including its emphasis on the "natural self" and the freedom of the individual.[8] Conversely, posthuman does away with the notion of a "natural" self and emerges when human intelligence is conceptualized as being co-produced with intelligent machines. According to Hayles the posthuman view privileges information over materiality, considers consciousness as an epiphenomenon and imagines the body as a prosthesis for the mind .[9] Specifically Hayles suggests that in the posthuman view "there are no essential differences or absolute demarcations between bodily existence and computer simulation..."[8] The posthuman thus emerges as a deconstruction of the liberal humanist notion of "human."

Despite drawing out the differences between "human" and "posthuman", Hayles is careful to note that both perspectives engage in the erasure of embodiment from subjectivity.[10] In the liberal humanist view, cognition takes precedence over the body, which is narrated as an object to possess and master. Meanwhile, popular conceptions of the cybernetic posthuman imagine the body as merely a container for information and code. Noting the alignment between these two perspectives, Hayles uses How We Became Posthuman to investigate the social and cultural processes and practices that led to the conceptualization of information as separate from the material that instantiates it.[11] Drawing on diverse examples, such as Turing's Imitation Game, Gibson's Neuromancer and cybernetic theory, Hayles traces the history of what she calls "the cultural perception that information and materiality are conceptually distinct and that information is in some sense more essential, more important and more fundamental than materiality."[12] By tracing the emergence of such thinking, and by looking at the manner in which literary and scientific texts came to imagine, for example, the possibility of downloading human consciousness into a computer, Hayles attempts to trouble the information/material separation and in her words, "...put back into the picture the flesh that continues to be erased in contemporary discussions about cybernetic subjects.[13] In this regard, the posthuman subject under the condition of virtuality is an "amalgam, a collection of heterogeneous components, a material-informational entity whose boundaries undergo continuous construction and reconstruction."[14] Hayles differentiates "embodiment" from the concept of "the body" because "in contrast to the body, embodiment is contextual, enmeshed within the specifics of place, time, physiology, and culture, which together compose enactment."[15] Hayles specifically examines how various science fiction novels portray a shift in the conception of information, particularly in the dialectics of presence/absence toward pattern/randomness. She diagrams these shifts to show how ideas about abstraction and information actually have a "local habitation" and are "embodied" within the narratives. Although ideas about "information" taken out of context creates abstractions about the human "body", reading science fiction situates these same ideas in "embodied" narrative."

Within the field of Posthuman Studies, Hayles' How We Became Posthuman is considered "the key text which brought posthumanism to broad international attention".[16] In the years since this book was published, it has been both praised and critiqued by scholars who have viewed her work through a variety of lenses; including those of cybernetic history, feminism, postmodernism, cultural and literary criticism, and conversations in the popular press about humans' changing relationships to technology.

Reactions to Hayles' writing style, general organization, and scope of the book have been mixed. The book is generally praised for displaying depth and scope in its combining of scientific ideas and literary criticism. Linda Brigham of Kansas State University claims that Hayles manages to lead the text "across diverse, historically contentious terrain by means of a carefully crafted and deliberate organizational structure."[17] Some scholars found her prose difficult to read or over-complicated. Andrew Pickering describes the book as "hard going" and lacking of "straightforward presentation."[18] Dennis Weiss of York College of Pennsylvania accuses Hayles of "unnecessarily complicat[ing] her framework for thinking about the body", for example by using terms such as "body" and "embodiment" ambiguously. Weiss however acknowledges as convincing her use of science fiction in order to reveal how "the narrowly focused, abstract constellation of ideas" of cybernetics circulate through a broader cultural context.[19] Craig Keating of Langara College on the contrary argues that the obscurity of some texts questions their ability to function as the conduit for scientific ideas.[20]

Several scholars reviewing How We Became Posthuman highlighted the strengths and shortcomings of her book vis a vis its relationship to feminism. Amelia Jones of University of Southern California describes Hayles' work as reacting to the misogynistic discourse of the field of cybernetics.[21] As Pickering wrote, Hayles' promotion of an "embodied posthumanism" challenges cybernetics' "equation of human-ness with disembodied information" for being "another male trick to feminists tired of the devaluation of women's bodily labor."[18] Stephanie Turner of Purdue University also described Hayles' work as an opportunity to challenge prevailing concepts of the human subject which assumed the body was white, male, and European, but suggested Hayles' dialectic method may have taken too many interpretive risks, leaving some questions open about "which interventions promise the best directions to take."[22]

Reviewers were mixed about Hayles' construction of the posthuman subject. Weiss describes Hayles' work as challenging the simplistic dichotomy of human and post-human subjects in order to "rethink the relationship between human beings and intelligent machines," however suggests that in her attempt to set her vision of the posthuman apart from the "realist, objectivist epistemology characteristic of first-wave cybernetics", she too, falls back on universalist discourse, premised this time on how cognitive science is able to reveal the "true nature of the self."[19] Jones similarly described Hayles' work as reacting to cybernetics' disembodiment of the human subject by swinging too far towards an insistence on a "physical reality" of the body apart from discourse. Jones argued that reality is rather "determined in and through the way we view, articulate, and understand the world".[21]

In terms of the strength of Hayles' arguments regarding the return of materiality to information, several scholars expressed doubt on the validity of the provided grounds, notably evolutionary psychology. Keating claims that while Hayles is following evolutionary psychological arguments in order to argue for the overcoming of the disembodiment of knowledge, she provides "no good reason to support this proposition."[20] Brigham describes Hayles' attempt to connect autopoietic circularity to "an inadequacy in Maturana's attempt to account for evolutionary change" as unjustified.[17] Weiss suggests that she makes the mistake of "adhering too closely to the realist, objectivist discourse of the sciences," the same mistake she criticizes Weiner and Maturana for committing.[19]

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N. Katherine Hayles - Wikipedia

The Posthuman Project (2014) YIFY – yts.am

I really wanted this to be good. I had a long day and stayed up watching this on Amazon Prime. I was so dissatisfied that I had to say something.

I have no idea who wrote this script. They should have at least sat down and did a table read of the dialogue. Most of the lines had horrible delivery, the jokes (there were none), and most the dialogue was way too long or unnecessary. The first act of the film we are introduced to the protagonist but he doesn't carry the film. There's literally nothing of interest about him or the cast throughout a 100% of the film. His supporting cast has more uninteresting dialogue, background, and action than the lead. It took half of the movie to find out what happened to the lead characters legs, his father, and his relationship with his girlfriend.

Nothing holds your interest through the first 20 minutes of the movie. When they do get their powers the lead character isn't even noticeable anymore and he does nothing of interest accept lose his powers at the end of the film; which made absolutely no sense. Maybe it wasn't the intent of the writer or the director but if they were to go back and review the film; they basically took the main characters powers away. The protagonist at the end of the film (at graduation, states that the last blast fixed him, his uncle, father, and his uncles facilities have vanished.

So, he lost his lame healing powers, after recovering from a gunshot to the head, over powering his Uncle with the help of his brother, and getting blasted with the Zero power gun again. Everyone else apparently kept their abilities. I was like what a waste of time!

The other horrible thing, was that the camera kept floating (the jitters) back and forth. (smh)

It was hard to believe that they shot this movie with a RED Digitial Camera. I'm like haven't you ever heard of a Steady Cam, Post Production, Story boards, editing filters, or even lightning? This movie looked like they wrote something, shot something, added lame special effect, and that was it. They couldn't have gone over the script, they didn't re-shoot scenes, didn't work out any of the action or fight scenes, and they didn't work out the plot or the effects.

The production was just horrible. I've seen better filming on Youtube, with an iPhone / iPad, no budget, made with a lot of imagination and real planning. http://filmriot.squarespace.com

It is a great thing that they put something together but by no means is it any good. It is like making a beautiful and very poisonous chocolate cake. It looks good but it's just gonna kill you in the end.

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The Posthuman Project (2014) YIFY - yts.am

Design Diary 1 Posthuman Saga Intro Mighty Boards

From the arrogance of Mankind a new life is born.This new life shall pave the way.The future shall be pure.The old world shall be cleansed.The Evolved shall inherit the Earth.

-fromNo Human, by Edgar Hollow 2033

The beauty of the board game medium is that it relies so much on what is arguably the most private and personal aspect of our existence: our imagination.

No, thats not quite right.

Lets try again: the beauty of the board game medium is that it fuels our imagination and it does so in a social context. It is one of those prized activities that taps into the inner life of our minds and brings it to the fore, using cardboard, plastic, wood and language to make that inner experience shareable. That is truly a thing of beauty. This is particularly so in a world where portable, networked technology and social media platforms are carefully designed to hijack our attention in every waking moment, luring us into a hive-minded feedback loop of increasing velocity.

I have a confession. Im not a fan of learning new games. I love learning new systems, but that initial hump of wrestling with a rule-book is not on my top ten fun things to do. Yes, that is indeed shocking for a game designer, but there it is. But when those rules sink in and start interacting with the physical pieces in front of me, the effect is magical. I am truly fascinated by how vivid that mental image of a world, a scene or situation becomes through the calibrated confluence of rules, visuals and physical props and if at all possible, sound. When a group of friends is sharing that experience with me theres few things I enjoy more in the world. To have the possibility to create those experiences for others, or at least encourage them, is simply a privilege. This design diary is an attempt at sharing that privilege with players, designers and critics, in the hope of inspiring others or at least offer a window into the process.

The initial idea was to start off with a few entries about board game design in general, but after a few failed attempts I have to concede defeat to the monster thats occupying every ounce of creativity I have at the moment: Posthuman Saga. Every thing I tried to write in abstract simply got raided by Posthumans mutant tentacles beckoning me to talk about it. I give in. The creation wins.

Posthuman Saga is a tactical survival adventure set in the post-apocalyptic world of Posthuman infused with narrative. Lets break that down some and substantiate those descriptors.

The tactical in tactical survival refers to the fact that while there is an element of randomness in the game, the emphasis is on player choices and their outcome. Thus, every sub-system of the game requires meaningful choices from the player and often has an opportunity cost. If I play my best Combat card in this encounter, I have a good chance of winning it, but that card is going to be exhausted until I take a Camp action, which stalls me from progressing in the game. When I do Camp Ill have to spend a recovery point to gain the Combat card back, which comes at the cost of not gaining back a point of Health or Morale, or one of the crucial Stat Boosts that can determine the outcome of both narrative and combat encounters This is, of course, a basic aspect of most games, particularly euro-games, but tends to be less present in more theme-heavy, adventure games (with various notable exceptions) which use randomness to generate excitement and emergent story (see below). In the first board game set in the Posthuman world, Posthuman certain choices were in the hands of the players (such as which action to play, how to organize tiles etc), but major sub-systems in the game were more random (such as combat). In Fallout the combat is fun and quick, but determined by a die-roll with little agency afforded to the player in that particular sub-system. The choices there are primarily in which actions to take, where to move to etc. We see similar sub-systems dominate adventure games such as Merchants and Marauders and Descent. One is not inherently better or worse than the other, of course. There are pros and cons to each and it all depends on the desired experience and, especially when it comes to thematic heavy adventure games, how that sub-system fits with the feel and story the game is aiming to create. Ill be dedicating an entry to Posthuman Sagas combat system, comparing it to the first Posthumans combat system

The survival part of tactical survival refers to the fact that the mechanics of the game are designed to convey the feel of the setting: scarcity, danger and attrition. Most elements of the game can be seen as an inverse resource management game: you have a set of resources when you start which deplete continuously as you progress in your path to victory. The more you push for that victory, the more resources youll most likely lose in the process and a big part of the game is managing that attrition, while simultaneously growing your character through development cards, weapons, equipment and even positive, stable mutations (but watch out there, mutation is not something you have a lot of control over and will quickly get out of hand and see you hobbling around a tree your newly boosted senses blown away by the sound of leaves floating towards the ground). Im gonna be sassy and coin a term here: attrition management. Your health, morale, stat boosts and combat cards WILL deplete. You can recover them, but they will deplete. If you try to advance unblemished, you will most likely lose the game to the player who is teetering on the edge of exhaustion and depression but has just grabbed the story book and is reading off the final story of his mission objective Fatigue, on the other hand, is not easily recovered. Its a permanent hit you take when you go hungry, march on through the night or troop on through a nasty storm. But again, these will be your choices to make.

Ok, lets talk story now. What do I mean by infused with narrative?. While narrative is not the primary focus of the game, it features heavily in it both in scripted and emergent ways. By scripted narrative I here mean sections of story, sometimes with variable outcomes, others times fixed, that we have written into the game. Emergent narrative is the story that is generated from the interaction of game-play elements and other players. While not everyone interprets mechanical events in a narrative manner, the way mechanics and rules are implemented creates more or less likelihood for them to generate mental images in the mind of the player and interpret such actions and events narratively. I will dedicate a separate entry or ten to game narrative and theme specifically as its both a complex subject and one which I am fascinated by and have researched professionally in my day-job incarnation as a game researcher.

The aim was thus to create a hybrid that combines euro-style mechanics with the imagination-stimulating qualities of thematic story games. That implies that those two are different categories of games, which is not exactly right at all, but since its an established way of grouping board games, lets go with it (for now).

And finally, the question Ive been bombarded with since we announced Posthuman Saga: is this a second edition or on an expansion of the first Posthuman? No, this is an entirely different game set in the same world. It progresses the story of the first Posthuman and it features a journey with declared actions on a modular board, but thats about where the similarity ends. The two games systems are totally different and have completely different components. Familiar mutants will make an appearance, and some of the characters from the first Posthuman have survived (while others have turned mutant and been sent into exile out of the Fortress and beyond the Perimeter) and become hardened contributors to the Fortress society, all the art in the game has been re-done from scratch. So, this is a new game in a freshly visualized Posthuman world.

Thanks for reading and please feel free to ask questions or leave input in the comments below!

-Gordon

Gordon Calleja splits his time between game design and academic game research. He designed Posthuman, a post-apocalyptic survival board game that was a big hit on Kickstarter in 2015, and was published in 2016. He recently designed and published Vengeance, a board game adaptation of revenge movies that was also a success on Kickstarter and has been published by Mighty Boards and co-published in German, French and English in 2018 by Asmodee and Greenbrier Games. He is currently working on a new board game in the Posthuman world called Posthuman Saga.

Gordon also designs video games and is the designer of the critically acclaimed Will Love Tear Us Apart, a video game adaptation of Joy Divisions track that was nominated for several international awards. He is currently also working on Posthuman:Sanctuary, a video game adaptation of the Posthuman board gametogether with the team at Mighty Box.

His research is multi-disciplinary in nature but features mainly on: game narrative game ontology and player experience, with a particular focus on immersion and presence in game environments. The latter is the subject of his book In-Game: From Immersion to Incorporation, published by MIT Press. His current research and subject of his next book focuses on board game design and player experience.

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