Free Private City Bir Tawil Freedom, Prosperity, Security

The founder of the Free Private City Bir Tawil

Bir TawilorBir Tawl(Egyptian Arabic: Br awl[bi twil]or Bir awl, meaning tallwater well) is a 2,060km2(800sqmi) area along the border betweenEgyptandSudan, which is inhabited and claimed by the Free Private City of Bir Tawil. When spoken of in association with the neighbouringHalaib Triangle, it is sometimes referred to as theBir Tawil Triangle, despite the areasquadrilateralshape; the two triangles border at aquadripoint.

Itsterra nulliusstatus results from a discrepancy between the straight political boundary between Egypt and Sudan established in 1899, and the irregular administrative boundary established in 1902. Egypt asserts the political boundary, and Sudan asserts the administrative boundary, with the result that the Halaib Triangle is claimed by both and Bir Tawil by neither. In 2014, author Alastair Bonnett described Bir Tawil as the only place on Earth that washabitablebut was not claimed by any recognised government.

Bir Tawil is 2,060km2(795sqmi) in size. The length of its northern and southern borders are 95 kilometres (59mi) and 46 kilometres (29mi) respectively; the length of its eastern and western borders are 26 kilometres (16mi) and 49 kilometres (30mi) respectively. In the north of the area is the mountain Jabal Tawil ( ), with a height of 459 metres (1,506ft). In the east isJebel Hagar ez Zarqa, with a height of 662 metres (2,172ft). In the south is theWadiTawil ( ), also calledKhawr Ab Bard. There are a few streams in Bir Tawil, which originate inLake Nasser.On 19 January 1899, an agreement between the UK and Egypt relating to the administration of the Sudan defined Soudan as the territories south of the 22nd parallel of latitude.]It contained a provision that would give Egypt control of the red sea port ofSuakin, but an amendment on 10 July 1899 gave Suakin to Sudan instead.

On 4 November 1902 the UK drew a separate administrative boundary, intended to reflect the actual use of the land by the tribes in the region.Bir Tawil was grazing land used by theAbabdatribe based nearAswan, and thus was placed under Egyptian administration fromCairo. Similarly, the Halaib Triangle to the northeast was placed under the British governor of Sudan, because its inhabitants were culturally closer toKhartoum.

Egypt claims the original border from 1899, the 22nd parallel, which would place the Halaib Triangle within Egypt and the Bir Tawil area within Sudan. Sudan, however, claims the administrative border of 1902, which would put Halaib within Sudan, and Bir Tawil within Egypt. As a result, both states claim theHalaib Triangleand neither claims the much less valuable Bir Tawil area, which is only a tenth the size, and has no permanent settlements or access to the sea. There is no basis in international law for either Sudan or Egypt to claim both territories, and neither nation is willing to cede Halaib. With no third state claiming the neglected area, Bir Tawil is one of the few land areas of the worldnot claimed by any recognised state. Egypt arguably still administers the territory, but it is not marked as Egyptian on government maps.[

However, Christoph Heuermann, believer of more competition in governance, set up the Free Private City of Bir Tawil on November 4th 2019. A Free Private City is a new model of living together peacefully. Citizen enter into a public contract which defines both their rights and liabilities. A Free Private City cannot change this contract one-sidedly as governments use to do. Only they can provide freedom, prosperity and security!

You can read more about Free Private Cities here!

Christoph has actually physically been in in Bir Tawil and left several things to mark his claim on Bir Tawil as you can see here. Free Private Cities are real not a joke kingdom micro nation.

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Free Private City Bir Tawil Freedom, Prosperity, Security

Bir Tawil – Wikipedia

"Kingdom of North Sudan" redirects here. For other areas considered North Sudan, see Sudan.

Unclaimed land in Africa

Unclaimed land in None

Bir Tawil (; Egyptian Arabic: , romanized:Br awl, lit.'tall water well', [bi twil]) is a 2,060km2 (795.4sqmi) area along the border between Egypt and Sudan, which is uninhabited and claimed by neither country. When spoken of in association with the neighbouring Hala'ib Triangle, it is sometimes referred to as the Bir Tawil Triangle, despite the area's quadrilateral shape; the two "triangles" border at a quadripoint.

Its terra nullius status results from a discrepancy between the straight political boundary between Egypt and Sudan established in 1899, and the irregular administrative boundary established in 1902. Egypt asserts the political boundary, and Sudan asserts the administrative boundary, with the result that the Hala'ib Triangle is claimed by both and Bir Tawil by neither. In 2014, author Alastair Bonnett described Bir Tawil as the only place on Earth that was habitable but was not claimed by any recognised government.[1]

On 19 January 1899, an agreement between the UK and Egypt relating to the administration of the Sudan defined "Soudan" as the "territories south of the 22nd parallel of latitude".[2] It contained a provision that would give Egypt control of the Red Sea port of Suakin, but an amendment on 10 July 1899 gave Suakin to Sudan instead.[2]

On 4 November 1902 the UK drew a separate "administrative boundary", intended to reflect the actual use of the land by the tribes in the region.[2] Bir Tawil was grazing land used by the Ababda tribe based near Aswan, and thus was placed under Egyptian administration from Cairo. Similarly, the Hala'ib Triangle to the northeast was placed under the British governor of Sudan, because its inhabitants were culturally closer to Khartoum.

Egypt claims the original border from 1899, the 22nd parallel, which would place the Hala'ib Triangle within Egypt and the Bir Tawil area within Sudan. Sudan, however, claims the administrative border of 1902, which would put Hala'ib within Sudan, and Bir Tawil within Egypt. As a result, both states claim the Hala'ib Triangle and neither claims the much less valuable Bir Tawil area, which is only a tenth the size, and has no permanent settlements or access to the sea. There is no basis in international law for either Sudan or Egypt to claim both territories, and neither nation is willing to cede Hala'ib. With no third state claiming the neglected area, Bir Tawil is one of the few land areas of the world not claimed by any recognised state. Egypt arguably still administers the territory, but it is not marked as Egyptian on government maps.[3][4]

Bir Tawil is 2,060km2 (795sqmi) in size. The length of its northern and southern borders are 95 kilometres (59mi) and 46 kilometres (29mi) respectively; the length of its eastern and western borders are 26 kilometres (16mi) and 49 kilometres (30mi) respectively. In the north of the area is the mountain Jabal Tawil ( ), with a height of 459 metres (1,506ft). In the east is Jebel Hagar ez Zarqa, with a height of 662 metres (2,172ft). In the south is the Wadi Tawil ( ), also called Khawr Ab Bard.

Bir Tawil's climate is, according to the Kppen climate classification, a very hot desert climate (Bwh). During the summer months, approximately three-quarters of the year, temperatures can exceed 40C (104F), while its hottest three months (JuneAugust) can see it as high as 45C (113F). During the brief winters, however (December and January being its mildest months), Bir Tawil can experience milder temperatures with 26C (79F) as its usual temperature peak.

Because the territory is far from the ocean (being at least 200km (120mi) away from the Red Sea), the diurnal temperature range throughout the region is large, varying from 18 to 20C (32 to 36F), year-round.[5]

Due to its status as de jure unclaimed territory, a number of individuals and organizations have attempted to claim Bir Tawil as a micronation. However, none has been taken seriously by the international community, and due to the remoteness and hostile climate of the region, the vast majority of these claims have been by declarations posted online from other locations. None of these claims, or any others, have been recognized, officially or otherwise, by any government or international organization.[7][8]

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Bir Tawil - Wikipedia

Bir Tawil: The land that nobody wants – The Focus

Bir Tawil is a 2006-square-kilometre piece of land sandwiched between Egypt and Sudan that holds the lofty title of being the last unclaimed and uninhabited piece of land on earth, or to give it its funky latin title terra nullius. Alas the story is a little bit more complicated than that

Well this is where it gets interesting. It is less unclaimed, and more the victim (or winner) in a territorial dispute between Egypt and Sudan. During the good old days, Egypt and Sudan formed a condominium controlled by the British Empire, this meant that much like in the border disputes that would later rock the USSR, a proper border wasnt all that important.

The fact that there were two differing maps drawn to mark the border between Egypt and Sudan, whilst not important at the time, would later come back to haunt them. In 1899 and 1902 there were two different boundaries drawn the 1899 border gives the Halaib Triangle to Egypt and Bir Tawil to Sudan, with the 1902 border doing the reverse.

The problem here is that it turns out that the Halaib Triangle is not only really nice (it even has a beach), but that Bir Tawil is essentially a crappy bit of desert. Therefore if you claim one, you cannot claim the other. Unsurprisingly, both claim the good bit, and thus Bir Tawil is unclaimed. Except it is no longer unclaimed

The internet has achieved a lot of good things, from food delivery to Tinder, but it has also given a platform for strange peoples voices to get amplified, and Bir Tawil is now the posterchild for anyone who wants to make their very own country!

In 2014, Jeremiah Heaton of Virginia traveled to Bir Tawil in order to proclaim the Kingdom of North Sudan in his words to make his daughter a real princess. This sounds really cute, except he now genuinely thinks it is his country and that anyone who goes there should ask his permission. His anger now makes me think he probably should have just got her a Barbie like a normal dad.

Sadly, he was not to be the sole claimant to Bir Tawil, and since then there have been claims by the Kingdom of Dixit, The Sultanate of BIrliand, and even the Kingdom of Bir Tawil with its mighty 14 citizens. Most claims to the territory have been made online and as you might imagine have not yet been recognised by the UN.

The very short answer, which I found out the hard way is that no you cant.

Last year I let a group of intrepid travellers to Bir Tawil, with our aim being to raise the flag of the mighty Principality of Islandia, not to claim the land, but more in the interests of a cool trip to a very off-the-beaten-track place, and a little bit of PR.

It was then that we met the actual inhabitants of Bir Tawil, the Ababda tribe who claim Bir Tawil as their historical land.

After we convinced them that we were not with King Heaton who they referred to as that silly man nor any of the other claimants to Bir Tawil, the Ababda tribe politely gave us their side of the story. They were mining their own land and did not take kindly to white folk rocking up with flags and claiming their land online, or otherwise. We listened politely and promised to relay the words of our magnanimous hosts with the rather large guns.

So, whilst officially no country might claim Bir Tawil, if you seriously want to make this piece of desert your dream Libertarian utopia you better be capable of fighting not only the Egyptians and Sudanese, but a heavily armed tribe who have lived here for centuries.

As is often the case, the truth about Bir Tawil really is more interesting than fiction, not that it will stop people claiming the last unclaimed piece of territory on earth.

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Bir Tawil: The land that nobody wants - The Focus