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8 Signs You’re a Slave Instead of an Employee

Literal slavery is a horrible practice that still persists into the modern age. But, I want to talk about another form of human exploitationemployment slavery, which can also ruin a persons life. Generally, I consider this a self-inflicted slavery because its ultimately a persons choice to work under such conditionsbut I also understand that brainwashing can occur, creating the illusion that theres no way out.

Slavery (in general) exists because of the inclination among people to obtain the benefits of human resources, while providing little (or nothing) in return. Human work is the most intelligent, efficient way to create a system of wealth and power. For the morally bankrupt, such benefits are sought for free.

Employment, in the best case scenario, is a business deal of mutual benefit. But in other instances, the company is expending such minimal resources that they are taking advantage of you. In the worst case scenario, through a combination of slave-driving principles and psychological techniques to break you down, such a job can morph into something very similar to actual slavery.

If you dont know any better, its easy to fall into slavery conditions. Here are signs that your sense of freedom in life is totally gone:

Because of the way employers conveniently ignore yearly inflation, todays minimal wage is not enough to maintain any semblance of a normal lifestyle. Minimal wage makes some sense in small businesses just starting out. But, In America, $8.25 an hour, or less, from a large, billion-dollar corporation is inexcusable. In this case, your annual wages cost a second of the companys hourly profits. In other words, your hard work is a very bad deal for you, and a killer opportunity for the suits upstairs.

Youre lucky you even have a job! is a psychological taunt that bad employers use to try and keep their wage-slaves from believing they can do any better. Such statements are made to maintain a sense of control. Understand, voluntary slavery is not a rare phenomenon. It happens when a person is brainwashed into the belief that they have nowhere else they can go.

If your manager uses psychological put-downs like this to denigrate your professional abilitiesunderstand that its being done for a reason.

The idea of getting a raise and a promotion may be dangled in-front of you, but youve seen no evidence to suggest that it really happens. In fact, only a very small percentage of your co-workers ever obtain this goal, and they tend to be the cronies of upper-management. If this is the case, then what exactly is your reason for working at this company?

Inconvenient hours are inevitable in jobs, but some companies will abuse the system. This ranges from illegally denying overtime pay, to scheduling month-long bouts of cloping (working until closing hours late at night, then opening hours the next morning) that leaves the employee physically and emotionally drained.

An employee in this system may feel the intense pressure by the bosses to conform to abusive hours, under the threat of being denied promotions or even getting fired for seeking better treatment.

Americas two-week annual vacation time is one of the weakest in the Western world, and American workers tend to not even use it. This is because many employers will hint that vacationers are likely to end up on the shit-list of not getting promoted. They may even hint that unruly vacation-seekers will be the first to get laid-off or fired at the earliest opportunity.

A system of slavery does not allow free-time for individuals to maintain their own lives outside of their work. This could cause dissent and break the system of total control. An unspoken methodology among abusive managers is to destroy the lifestyles of employees so, instead of tending to family or hobbies, they work at full capacity.

Feeling motivated based on high-standards and being scared to go below those standards is one thing, but being genuinely scared of the people youre working for is another.

Slave-masters maintain systems of fear, to break down their subjects and perhapsin timebuild them back up. For the best example of thisplease see Theon Greyjoy in Game of Thrones.

Psychological and verbal abuse is usually what occurs. An abusive employer understands exactly what strings to pull to generate feelings of shame or guilt, and theyll use the professional context to destroy a subjects sense of self-worth, perhaps by implying worthlessness at the vocation theyve devoted their life to.

In other instances, the abuse is very overt and could include yelling, tantrums and even physical assaults. But the outcome is the same: the employee living in a constant state of paranoia, fear, and subservience.

Read carefully the ten warning-signs youre in a cult by the Cult Education Institute. Some of these that could be very applicable to a workplace include: absolute authoritarianism without meaningful accountability, no tolerance for questions or critical inquiry, the leader (boss) is always right, and former followers (employees) are vilified as evil for leaving.

If the job feels less about, you know, getting the job doneand is more about the influence, charisma and infallibility of the bossthen get the heck out of there. This means the person in charge is getting a side-benefit to running or managing the workplace: power and dominance.

The number one sign youre a slave and not an employee is that youre working an unpaid internship, and its not for college credit. You may be promised great benefits and valuable connections, at what amounts to harsh workplace conditions, long hours, and zero pay.

A huge mistake I see young professionals make, and it really irks me, is naivety about peoples intentions. I went to film school for my bachelors, and many students I knew lusted after top internships at film studios or with big names in the entertainment industry. Such internships are often offered regardless of college credit.

When a person is blindsided by their desire to make it and get in with big names, they are likely to make bad decisionsand unscrupulous employers will prey on this desire.

Internships are great IF its part of a students actual curriculum. It means hands-on work and real experience versus useless classrooms. But, the questionable non-credit internships I warn about also exist to lure young people into systems of slavery. Its gotten so bad these types of arrangements are quickly becoming illegal in California.

The reality of such internships is that the slave-drivers only desire one thing: unpaid work. There is NO promise that you will move up or land any type of a paid job. When your internship finishes, they will discard you and find the next victim.

The biggest reason to avoid internships is the mentality behind the deal. Imagine a law firm or a film studio that is a multi-billion dollar operation. How hard would it be to throw their new recruit at LEAST minimum wage? The fact such a company would, despite their huge profits, still desire unpaid labor is indicative of a slave-driving mentality that funnels wealth to the top at the expense of the people on the bottom making it possible.

As a professional, it would be best for you to avoid doing any type of business with any individual or company that possesses a philosophy like this.

Employment-slavery situations are common. Very common. But ultimately, the biggest factor in determining how bad it is, is a single question: are you happy?

If you are happy at $8.25 an hour with no benefits, because you like the people you work with, you like the nature of the work, and you feel its moving you somewhere you want to bethen its not slavery. Youre making an investment thatll either pay off, or it wontbut at least you enjoy what youre doing.

However, if you are miserable in your current conditions, its quite possible that the uneasy feeling in your gut is your intuition telling you that someone is taking advantage of you.

Employment is supposed to be a business contract, and an exchange of services. Never a system of control. Sometimes, just the willingness to walk away is your strongest defense against a terrible job situation.

For more about avoiding systems of employment-slavery, please see my short books: Freedom: How to Make Money From Your Dreams and Ambitions, and How to Quit Your Job: Escape Soul Crushing Work, Create the Life You Want, and Live Happy.

(For more books, also check out the Developed Life bookstore, http://www.developedlife.com/bookstore).

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8 Signs You’re a Slave Instead of an Employee

Wage slavery – Wikipedia

Wage slavery is a pejorative term used to draw an analogy between slavery and wage labor by focusing on similarities between owning and renting a person. It is usually used to refer to a situation where a person’s livelihood depends on wages or a salary, especially when the dependence is total and immediate.[1][2]

The term “wage slavery” has been used to criticize exploitation of labour and social stratification, with the former seen primarily as unequal bargaining power between labor and capital (particularly when workers are paid comparatively low wages, e.g. in sweatshops)[3] and the latter as a lack of workers’ self-management, fulfilling job choices and leisure in an economy.[4][5][6] The criticism of social stratification covers a wider range of employment choices bound by the pressures of a hierarchical society to perform otherwise unfulfilling work that deprives humans of their “species character”[7] not only under threat of starvation or poverty, but also of social stigma and status diminution.[8][9][10]

Similarities between wage labor and slavery were noted as early as Cicero in Ancient Rome.[11] With the advent of the industrial revolution, thinkers such as Pierre-Joseph Proudhon and Karl Marx elaborated the comparison between wage labor and slavery,[12][13] while Luddites emphasized the dehumanization brought about by machines. Before the American Civil War, Southern defenders of African American slavery invoked the concept of wage slavery to favorably compare the condition of their slaves to workers in the North.[14][15] The United States abolished slavery after the Civil War, but labor union activists found the metaphor useful. According to Lawrence Glickman, in the Gilded Age “[r]eferences abounded in the labor press, and it is hard to find a speech by a labor leader without the phrase”.[16]

The introduction of wage labor in 18th century Britain was met with resistance, giving rise to the principles of syndicalism.[17][18][19][20] Historically, some labor organizations and individual social activists have espoused workers’ self-management or worker cooperatives as possible alternatives to wage labor.[5][19]

The view that working for wages is akin to slavery dates back to the ancient world.[22] In ancient Rome, Cicero wrote that “whoever gives his labor for money sells himself and puts himself in the rank of slaves”.[23]

In 1763, the French journalist Simon Linguet published an influential description of wage slavery:[13]

The slave was precious to his master because of the money he had cost him… They were worth at least as much as they could be sold for in the market… It is the impossibility of living by any other means that compels our farm labourers to till the soil whose fruits they will not eat and our masons to construct buildings in which they will not live… It is want that compels them to go down on their knees to the rich man in order to get from him permission to enrich him… what effective gain [has] the suppression of slavery brought [him?] He is free, you say. Ah! That is his misfortune… These men… [have] the most terrible, the most imperious of masters, that is, need…. They must therefore find someone to hire them, or die of hunger. Is that to be free?

The view that wage work has substantial similarities with chattel slavery was actively put forward in the late 18th and 19th centuries by defenders of chattel slavery (most notably in the Southern states of the United States) and by opponents of capitalism (who were also critics of chattel slavery).[9][24] Some defenders of slavery, mainly from the Southern slave states, argued that Northern workers were “free but in name the slaves of endless toil” and that their slaves were better off.[25][26] This contention has been partly corroborated by some modern studies that indicate slaves’ material conditions in the 19th century were “better than what was typically available to free urban laborers at the time”.[27][28] In this period, Henry David Thoreau wrote that “[i]t is hard to have a Southern overseer; it is worse to have a Northern one; but worst of all when you are the slave-driver of yourself”.[29]

Some abolitionists in the United States regarded the analogy as spurious.[30] They believed that wage workers were “neither wronged nor oppressed”.[31] Abraham Lincoln and the Republicans argued that the condition of wage workers was different from slavery as laborers were likely to have the opportunity to work for themselves in the future, achieving self-employment.[32] The abolitionist and former slave Frederick Douglass initially declared “now I am my own master”, upon taking a paying job.[33] However, later in life he concluded to the contrary, saying “experience demonstrates that there may be a slavery of wages only a little less galling and crushing in its effects than chattel slavery, and that this slavery of wages must go down with the other”.[34][35] Douglass went on to speak about these conditions as arising from the unequal bargaining power between the ownership/capitalist class and the non-ownership/laborer class within a compulsory monetary market: “No more crafty and effective devise for defrauding the southern laborers could be adopted than the one that substitutes orders upon shopkeepers for currency in payment of wages. It has the merit of a show of honesty, while it puts the laborer completely at the mercy of the land-owner and the shopkeeper”.[36]

Self-employment became less common as the artisan tradition slowly disappeared in the later part of the 19th century.[5] In 1869, The New York Times described the system of wage labor as “a system of slavery as absolute if not as degrading as that which lately prevailed at the South”.[32] E. P. Thompson notes that for British workers at the end of the 18th and beginning of the 19th centuries, the “gap in status between a ‘servant,’ a hired wage-laborer subject to the orders and discipline of the master, and an artisan, who might ‘come and go’ as he pleased, was wide enough for men to shed blood rather than allow themselves to be pushed from one side to the other. And, in the value system of the community, those who resisted degradation were in the right”.[17] A “Member of the Builders’ Union” in the 1830s argued that the trade unions “will not only strike for less work, and more wages, but will ultimately abolish wages, become their own masters and work for each other; labor and capital will no longer be separate but will be indissolubly joined together in the hands of workmen and work-women”.[18] This perspective inspired the Grand National Consolidated Trades Union of 1834 which had the “two-fold purpose of syndicalist unions the protection of the workers under the existing system and the formation of the nuclei of the future society” when the unions “take over the whole industry of the country”.[19] “Research has shown”, summarises William Lazonick, “that the ‘free-born Englishman’ of the eighteenth century even those who, by force of circumstance, had to submit to agricultural wage labour tenaciously resisted entry into the capitalist workshop”.[20]

The use of the term “wage slave” by labor organizations may originate from the labor protests of the Lowell Mill Girls in 1836.[37] The imagery of wage slavery was widely used by labor organizations during the mid-19th century to object to the lack of workers’ self-management. However, it was gradually replaced by the more neutral term “wage work” towards the end of the 19th century as labor organizations shifted their focus to raising wages.[5]

Karl Marx described capitalist society as infringing on individual autonomy because it is based on a materialistic and commodified concept of the body and its liberty (i.e. as something that is sold, rented, or alienated in a class society). According to Friedrich Engels:[38][39]

The slave is sold once and for all; the proletarian must sell himself daily and hourly. The individual slave, property of one master, is assured an existence, however miserable it may be, because of the master’s interest. The individual proletarian, property as it were of the entire bourgeois class which buys his labor only when someone has need of it, has no secure existence.

Critics of wage work have drawn several similarities between wage work and slavery:

According to American anarcho-syndicalist philosopher Noam Chomsky, the similarities between chattel and wage slavery were noticed by the workers themselves. He noted that the 19th century Lowell Mill Girls, who without any reported knowledge of European Marxism or anarchism condemned the “degradation and subordination” of the newly emerging industrial system and the “new spirit of the age: gain wealth, forgetting all but self”, maintaining that “those who work in the mills should own them”.[45][46] They expressed their concerns in a protest song during their 1836 strike:

Oh! isn’t it a pity, such a pretty girl as IShould be sent to the factory to pine away and die?Oh! I cannot be a slave, I will not be a slave,For I’m so fond of liberty,That I cannot be a slave.[47]

Defenses of wage labor and chattel slavery in the literature have linked the subjection of man to man with the subjection of man to naturearguing that hierarchy and a social system’s particular relations of production represent human nature and are no more coercive than the reality of life itself. According to this narrative, any well-intentioned attempt to fundamentally change the status quo is naively utopian and will result in more oppressive conditions.[48] Bosses in both of these long-lasting systems argued that their system created a lot of wealth and prosperity. In some sense, both did create jobs and their investment entailed risk. For example, slave owners risked losing money by buying chattel slaves who later became ill or died; while bosses risked losing money by hiring workers (wage slaves) to make products that didn’t sell well on the market. Marginally, both chattel and wage slaves may become bosses; sometimes by working hard. It may be the “rags to riches” story which occasionally occurs in capitalism, or the “slave to master” story that occurred in places like colonial Brazil, where slaves could buy their own freedom and become business owners, self-employed, or slave owners themselves.[49] Social mobility, or the hard work and risk that it may entail, are thus not considered to be a redeeming factor by critics of the concept of wage slavery.[50]

Anthropologist David Graeber has noted that historically the first wage labor contracts we know about whether in ancient Greece or Rome, or in the Malay or Swahili city states in the Indian Ocean were in fact contracts for the rental of chattel slaves (usually the owner would receive a share of the money and the slave another, with which to maintain his or her living expenses). According to Graeber, such arrangements were quite common in New World slavery as well, whether in the United States or Brazil. C. L. R. James argued that most of the techniques of human organization employed on factory workers during the Industrial Revolution were first developed on slave plantations.[51]

The usage of the term “wage slavery” shifted to “wage work” at the end of the 19th century as groups like the Knights of Labor and American Federation of Labor shifted to a more reformist, trade union ideology instead of worker’s self-management. Much of the decline was caused by the rapid increase in manufacturing after the industrial revolution and the subsequent dominance of wage labor as a result. Another factor was immigration and demographic changes that led to ethnic tension between the workers.[5]

As Hallgrimsdottir and Benoit point out:

[I]ncreased centralization of production… declining wages… [an] expanding… labor pool… intensifying competition, and… [t]he loss of competence and independence experienced by skilled labor” meant that “a critique that referred to all [wage] work as slavery and avoided demands for wage concessions in favor of supporting the creation of the producerist republic (by diverting strike funds towards funding… co-operatives, for example) was far less compelling than one that identified the specific conditions of slavery as low wages.[5]

Some anti-capitalist thinkers claim that the elite maintain wage slavery and a divided working class through their influence over the media and entertainment industry,[52][53] educational institutions, unjust laws, nationalist and corporate propaganda, pressures and incentives to internalize values serviceable to the power structure, state violence, fear of unemployment[54] and a historical legacy of exploitation and profit accumulation/transfer under prior systems, which shaped the development of economic theory. Adam Smith noted that employers often conspire together to keep wages low and have the upper hand in conflicts between workers and employers:[55]

The interest of the dealers… in any particular branch of trade or manufactures, is always in some respects different from, and even opposite to, that of the public… [They] have generally an interest to deceive and even to oppress the public… We rarely hear, it has been said, of the combinations of masters, though frequently of those of workmen. But whoever imagines, upon this account, that masters rarely combine, is as ignorant of the world as of the subject. Masters are always and everywhere in a sort of tacit, but constant and uniform combination, not to raise the wages of labor above their actual rate… It is not, however, difficult to foresee which of the two parties must, upon all ordinary occasions, have the advantage in the dispute, and force the other into a compliance with their terms.

The concept of wage slavery could conceivably be traced back to pre-capitalist figures like Gerrard Winstanley from the radical Christian Diggers movement in England, who wrote in his 1649 pamphlet, The New Law of Righteousness, that there “shall be no buying or selling, no fairs nor markets, but the whole earth shall be a common treasury for every man” and “there shall be none Lord over others, but every one shall be a Lord of himself”.[56]

Aristotle stated that “the citizens must not live a mechanic or a mercantile life (for such a life is ignoble and inimical to virtue), nor yet must those who are to be citizens in the best state be tillers of the soil (for leisure is needed both for the development of virtue and for active participation in politics)”,[57] often paraphrased as “all paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind”.[58] Cicero wrote in 44 BC that “vulgar are the means of livelihood of all hired workmen whom we pay for mere manual labour, not for artistic skill; for in their case the very wage they receive is a pledge of their slavery”.[59] Somewhat similar criticisms have also been expressed by some proponents of liberalism, like Silvio Gesell and Thomas Paine;[60] Henry George, who inspired the economic philosophy known as Georgism;[9] and the Distributist school of thought within the Catholic Church.

To Karl Marx and anarchist thinkers like Mikhail Bakunin and Peter Kropotkin, wage slavery was a class condition in place due to the existence of private property and the state. This class situation rested primarily on:

And secondarily on:

Fascism was more hostile against independent trade unions than modern economies in Europe or the United States.[62] Fascist economic policies were widely accepted in the 1920s and 1930s and foreign (especially the United States) corporate investment in Italy and Germany increased after the fascist take over.[63][64]

Fascism has been perceived by some notable critics, like Buenaventura Durruti, to be a last resort weapon of the privileged to ensure the maintenance of wage slavery:

No government fights fascism to destroy it. When the bourgeoisie sees that power is slipping out of its hands, it brings up fascism to hold onto their privileges.[65]

According to Noam Chomsky, analysis of the psychological implications of wage slavery goes back to the Enlightenment era. In his 1791 book The Limits of State Action, classical liberal thinker Wilhelm von Humboldt explained how “whatever does not spring from a man’s free choice, or is only the result of instruction and guidance, does not enter into his very nature; he does not perform it with truly human energies, but merely with mechanical exactness” and so when the laborer works under external control, “we may admire what he does, but we despise what he is”.[66] Both the Milgram and Stanford experiments have been found useful in the psychological study of wage-based workplace relations.[67]

According to research, modern work provides people with a sense of personal and social identity that is tied to:

Thus job loss entails the loss of this identity.[68]

Erich Fromm argued that if a person perceives himself as being what he owns, then when that person loses (or even thinks of losing) what he “owns” (e.g. the good looks or sharp mind that allow him to sell his labor for high wages) a fear of loss may create anxiety and authoritarian tendencies because that person’s sense of identity is threatened. In contrast, when a person’s sense of self is based on what he experiences in a state of being (creativity, love, sadness, taste, sight and the like) with a less materialistic regard for what he once had and lost, or may lose, then less authoritarian tendencies prevail. In his view, the state of being flourishes under a worker-managed workplace and economy, whereas self-ownership entails a materialistic notion of self, created to rationalize the lack of worker control that would allow for a state of being.[69]

Investigative journalist Robert Kuttner analyzed the work of public-health scholars Jeffrey Johnson and Ellen Hall about modern conditions of work and concludes that “to be in a life situation where one experiences relentless demands by others, over which one has relatively little control, is to be at risk of poor health, physically as well as mentally”. Under wage labor, “a relatively small elite demands and gets empowerment, self-actualization, autonomy, and other work satisfaction that partially compensate for long hours” while “epidemiological data confirm that lower-paid, lower-status workers are more likely to experience the most clinically damaging forms of stress, in part because they have less control over their work”.[70]

Wage slavery and the educational system that precedes it “implies power held by the leader. Without power the leader is inept. The possession of power inevitably leads to corruption… in spite of… good intentions… [Leadership means] power of initiative, this sense of responsibility, the self-respect which comes from expressed manhood, is taken from the men, and consolidated in the leader. The sum of their initiative, their responsibility, their self-respect becomes his… [and the] order and system he maintains is based upon the suppression of the men, from being independent thinkers into being ‘the men’… In a word, he is compelled to become an autocrat and a foe to democracy”. For the “leader”, such marginalisation can be beneficial, for a leader “sees no need for any high level of intelligence in the rank and file, except to applaud his actions. Indeed such intelligence from his point of view, by breeding criticism and opposition, is an obstacle and causes confusion”.[71] Wage slavery “implies erosion of the human personality… [because] some men submit to the will of others, arousing in these instincts which predispose them to cruelty and indifference in the face of the suffering of their fellows”.[72]

In 19th-century discussions of labor relations, it was normally assumed that the threat of starvation forced those without property to work for wages. Proponents of the view that modern forms of employment constitute wage slavery, even when workers appear to have a range of available alternatives, have attributed its perpetuation to a variety of social factors that maintain the hegemony of the employer class.[44][73]

In an account of the Lowell Mill Girls, Harriet Hanson Robinson wrote that generously high wages were offered to overcome the degrading nature of the work:

At the time the Lowell cotton mills were started the caste of the factory girl was the lowest among the employments of women…. She was represented as subjected to influences that must destroy her purity and selfrespect. In the eyes of her overseer she was but a brute, a slave, to be beaten, pinched and pushed about. It was to overcome this prejudice that such high wages had been offered to women that they might be induced to become millgirls, in spite of the opprobrium that still clung to this degrading occupation.[74]

In his book Disciplined Minds, Jeff Schmidt points out that professionals are trusted to run organizations in the interests of their employers. Because employers cannot be on hand to manage every decision, professionals are trained to “ensure that each and every detail of their work favors the right interestsor skewers the disfavored ones” in the absence of overt control:

The resulting professional is an obedient thinker, an intellectual property whom employers can trust to experiment, theorize, innovate and create safely within the confines of an assigned ideology.[75]

Parecon (participatory economics) theory posits a social class “between labor and capital” of higher paid professionals such as “doctors, lawyers, engineers, managers and others” who monopolize empowering labor and constitute a class above wage laborers who do mostly “obedient, rote work”.[76]

The terms “employee” or “worker” have often been replaced by “associate”. This plays up the allegedly voluntary nature of the interaction while playing down the subordinate status of the wage laborer as well as the worker-boss class distinction emphasized by labor movements. Billboards as well as television, Internet and newspaper advertisements consistently show low-wage workers with smiles on their faces, appearing happy.[77]

Job interviews and other data on requirements for lower skilled workers in developed countries particularly in the growing service sector indicate that the more workers depend on low wages and the less skilled or desirable their job is, the more employers screen for workers without better employment options and expect them to feign unremunerative motivation.[78] Such screening and feigning may not only contribute to the positive self-image of the employer as someone granting desirable employment, but also signal wage-dependence by indicating the employee’s willingness to feign, which in turn may discourage the dissatisfaction normally associated with job-switching or union activity.[78]

At the same time, employers in the service industry have justified unstable, part-time employment and low wages by playing down the importance of service jobs for the lives of the wage laborers (e.g. just temporary before finding something better, student summer jobs and the like).[79][80]

In the early 20th century, “scientific methods of strikebreaking”[81] were devised employing a variety of tactics that emphasized how strikes undermined “harmony” and “Americanism”.[82]

Some social activists objecting to the market system or price system of wage working historically have considered syndicalism, worker cooperatives, workers’ self-management and workers’ control as possible alternatives to the current wage system.[4][5][6][19]

The American philosopher John Dewey believed that until “industrial feudalism” is replaced by “industrial democracy”, politics will be “the shadow cast on society by big business”.[83] Thomas Ferguson has postulated in his investment theory of party competition that the undemocratic nature of economic institutions under capitalism causes elections to become occasions when blocs of investors coalesce and compete to control the state.[84]

Noam Chomsky has argued that political theory tends to blur the ‘elite’ function of government:

Modern political theory stresses Madison’s belief that “in a just and a free government the rights both of property and of persons ought to be effectually guarded.” But in this case too it is useful to look at the doctrine more carefully. There are no rights of property, only rights to property that is, rights of persons with property,…

[In] representative democracy, as in, say, the United States or Great Britain [] there is a monopoly of power centralized in the state, and secondly and critically [] the representative democracy is limited to the political sphere and in no serious way encroaches on the economic sphere [] That is, as long as individuals are compelled to rent themselves on the market to those who are willing to hire them, as long as their role in production is simply that of ancillary tools, then there are striking elements of coercion and oppression that make talk of democracy very limited, if even meaningful.[85]

In this regard, Chomsky has used Bakunin’s theories about an “instinct for freedom”,[86] the militant history of labor movements, Kropotkin’s mutual aid evolutionary principle of survival and Marc Hauser’s theories supporting an innate and universal moral faculty,[87] to explain the incompatibility of oppression with certain aspects of human nature.[88][89]

Loyola University philosophy professor John Clark and libertarian socialist philosopher Murray Bookchin have criticized the system of wage labor for encouraging environmental destruction, arguing that a self-managed industrial society would better manage the environment. Like other anarchists,[90] they attribute much of the industrial revolution’s pollution to the “hierarchical” and “competitive” economic relations accompanying it.[91]

Some criticize wage slavery on strictly contractual grounds, e.g. David Ellerman and Carole Pateman, arguing that the employment contract is a legal fiction in that it treats human beings juridically as mere tools or inputs by abdicating responsibility and self-determination, which the critics argue are inalienable. As Ellerman points out, “[t]he employee is legally transformed from being a co-responsible partner to being only an input supplier sharing no legal responsibility for either the input liabilities [costs] or the produced outputs [revenue, profits] of the employer’s business”.[92] Such contracts are inherently invalid “since the person remain[s] a de facto fully capacitated adult person with only the contractual role of a non-person” as it is impossible to physically transfer self-determination.[93] As Pateman argues:

The contractarian argument is unassailable all the time it is accepted that abilities can ‘acquire’ an external relation to an individual, and can be treated as if they were property. To treat abilities in this manner is also implicitly to accept that the ‘exchange’ between employer and worker is like any other exchange of material property … The answer to the question of how property in the person can be contracted out is that no such procedure is possible. Labour power, capacities or services, cannot be separated from the person of the worker like pieces of property.[94]

In a modern liberal capitalist society, the employment contract is enforced while the enslavement contract is not; the former being considered valid because of its consensual/non-coercive nature and the latter being considered inherently invalid, consensual or not. The noted economist Paul Samuelson described this discrepancy:

Since slavery was abolished, human earning power is forbidden by law to be capitalized. A man is not even free to sell himself; he must rent himself at a wage.[95]

Some advocates of right-libertarianism, among them philosopher Robert Nozick, address this inconsistency in modern societies arguing that a consistently libertarian society would allow and regard as valid consensual/non-coercive enslavement contracts, rejecting the notion of inalienable rights:

The comparable question about an individual is whether a free system will allow him to sell himself into slavery. I believe that it would.[96]

Others like Murray Rothbard allow for the possibility of debt slavery, asserting that a lifetime labour contract can be broken so long as the slave pays appropriate damages:

[I]f A has agreed to work for life for B in exchange for 10,000 grams of gold, he will have to return the proportionate amount of property if he terminates the arrangement and ceases to work.[97]

In the philosophy of mainstream, neoclassical economics, wage labor is seen as the voluntary sale of one’s own time and efforts, just like a carpenter would sell a chair, or a farmer would sell wheat. It is considered neither an antagonistic nor abusive relationship and carries no particular moral implications.[98]

Austrian economics argues that a person is not “free” unless they can sell their labor because otherwise that person has no self-ownership and will be owned by a “third party” of individuals.[99]

Post-Keynesian economics perceives wage slavery as resulting from inequality of bargaining power between labor and capital, which exists when the economy does not “allow labor to organize and form a strong countervailing force”.[100]

The two main forms of socialist economics perceive wage slavery differently:

Original post:

Wage slavery – Wikipedia

Wage Slavery – The Illusion of Freedom (and how to end it …

Although we’ve come a long way from slavery and the 100 hour work weeks of the Industrial Revolution, we’ve still got a long way to go. Most of us are wage slaves and don’t even realize it.

We need to start exploring solutions, and universal basic income is the most sensible first step.

https://medium.com/@wageslave/end-wag… (article I wrote 6 months ago)

0:44 I start talking here

https://www.facebook.com/JDiculous/

The rest is here:

Wage Slavery – The Illusion of Freedom (and how to end it …

Abraham Lincoln on Freedom, Wage labour and Slavery

The liberal tradition is employed by the left and the right to justify their positions concerning contemporary capitalist society. An issue often raised concerns US slavery, whether it made life better for slaves, whether it was better or worse than wage slavery in the north. While weve all heard Noam Chomsky talk about this, its probably a good idea to look for other sources on what 19th century liberals actually thought about freedom. Micheal Sandel has written about Lincolns conception of freedom and how it relates to wage labour and slavery in a book called Democracys Discontent: America in a search for Public Policy. The following quotations are taken from a chapter called Free Labour versus Wage Labour:

Although he shared the abolitionist moral condemnation of slavery, Lincoln did not share their voluntarist conception of freedom. Lincolns main argument against the expansion of slavery rested on the free labour ideal, and unlike the abolitionists, he did not equate free labour with wage labour. The superiority of free labour to slave labour did not consist in the fact that free labourers consent to exchange their work for a wage whereas slaves do not consent. The differences was rather that the northern wage labourer could hope one day to escape from his condition, whereas the slave could not. It was not consent that distinguished free labour from slavery, but rather the prospect of independence, the chance to rise to own productive property and to work for oneself. According to Lincolm, it was this feature of the free labour system that the southern critics of wage labour overlooked: They insist that their slaves are far better off than Northern freemen. What a mistaken view do these men have of Northern labourers! They think that men are always to remain labourers here but there is no such class. The man who laboured for another last year, this year labours for himself. And next year he will hire others to labour for him. (181)

Lincoln did not challenge the notion that those who spend their entire lives as wage labourers are comparable to slaves. He held that both forms of work wrongly subordinate labour to capital. Those who debated whether it is best that capital shall hire labourers, and thus induce them to work by their own consent, or buy them, and drive them ot it without consent, considered too narrow a range of possibilities. Free labour is labour carried out under conditions of independence from employers and masters alike. Lincolm insisted that, at least in the North, most Americans were independent in this sense: Men, with their families wives, sons and daughters work for themselves, on their farms, in their houses and in their shops, taking the whole product to themselves, and asking no favours of capital on the one hand, nor of hirelings or slaves on the other.

In Lincolns hands, the conception of freedom deriving from the artisan republican tradition became the rallying point for the northern cause in the Civil War. In the 1830s and 1840s, labour leaders had invoked this conception in criticizing northern society; wage labour, they feared, was supplanting free labour. In the late 1850s, Lincoln and the Republicans invoked the same conception in defending northern society; they superiority of the North to the slaveholding South consisted in the independence the free labour system made possible. (183)

The Union victory in the Civil War put to rest the threat of free labour posed by the slave power, only to revive and intensify the threat posed by the wage system and industrial capitalism. Lincoln had led the North to war in the name of free labour and the small, independent producer, but the war itself accelerated the growth of capitalist enterprise and factory production. (183)

In 1869 the New York Times reported on the decline of the free labour system and the advance of wage labour. Small workshops had become far less common than they were before the war, and the small manufactures thus swallowed up have become workmen on wages in the greater establishments, whose larger purses, labour-saving machines, etc., refused to allow the small manufacturers a separate existence. THe article criticized the trend it described in terms reminiscent of the labour movement of the 1830s and 1840s. THe fall of the independent mechanic to wage earner status amounted to a system of slavery as absolute if not as degrading as that which lately prevailed in the South.

The 1870 census, the first to record detailed information about Americans occupations, confirmed what many workers already knew. Not withstanding a free labour ideology that tied liberty to ownership of productive property, American had become a nation of employees. (183)

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Abraham Lincoln on Freedom, Wage labour and Slavery

My Journey to Escape Wage Slavery | Just another WordPress …

Forward, ho!

Deep in the forest a call was sounding, and as often as he heard this call, mysteriously thrilling and luring, he felt compelled to turn his back upon the fire and beaten earth around it, and to plunge into the forest, and on and on, he knew not where or why; nor did he wonder where or why, the call sounded imperiously deep in the forest.- Jack London- Call of the Wild

I have this quote stuck up at my desk at eye level and I read it several times during my work day. Call of the Wild is one of my favourite books and when things seem not quite right in life, I can pick it up and read it to soothe whatever angst I am feeling. I love the style of Londons writing as much as the content and themes of the book- his colourful characters and perfectly abbreviated descriptions of nature can lead me to a land of daydreams and lustful desire for wilderness and wildness. The books central theme of heeding the call within reminds me of what I love and why I do it. I dont believe in fate, pre-destined paths and soul mates but I do think each of us has something, or even several things, that feel like home to us. The thing that when we do it or perhaps even think about it, brings us a sense of calmness, completeness and dispels that gnawing feeling in the gut that accompanies those tasks, thoughts and people that are not innately right for us. The best (and probably least imaginative) explanation I have is that it comes from the big formative years of our lives- our childhood and youth. I think that finding what this call is within ourselves is one of the first steps to reclaiming our happiness and taking responsibility for it.

My call that is sounding is of the soil, seeds and leaves which makes my horticulture course feels right. One by one all of the aspects of my life are shifting into place and I truly believe that it is because I am doing what I am meant to be. The happiness and confidence that is coming from doing what nourishes me is overflowing into other areas. The biggest difference by far is that I feel awake. And being awake means feeling alive. Being alive means not being another loser going through the motions on autopilot, thinking about, but never acting on those niggling thoughts that something is out of place and there must be more to life.

Its only been about eight months since the inception of this blog and the main themes of escaping wage slavery and living a more deliberate and meaningful life are already coming to fruition. I use the word fruition in a loose sense, as I am coming to learn my major goals are ongoing and unlikely to ever cease in my life. I currently dont need to earn a full time income to support my needs (although saving money is not an easy task) and virtually all of my time is spent on activities that I find meaningful and add value to my life and hopefully others. Im busy but my days and nights are not loaded with useless busyness, tasks to fill in gaps, doing things to kill time.

Killing time. The thought inspires a horrible sense of dread in me. We all have the same number of hours in the day and life is way too open handed with opportunities to comfortably entertain the idea of killing time. Wasted time, money and food used to be my top personal criticisms and it is the economy and salvation of those in between and once passive moments of time that have been the biggest beast to conquer. If you finding you are killing time waiting for someone or something find ways to use that time. Creatively daydream, write, read, listen to a podcast- please, please, please dont kill your time.

The main problem with this great obsession for saving time is very simple: you cant save time. You can only spend it. But you can spend it wisely or foolishly. Benjamin Hoff- The Tao of Pooh

My 40 Before 40 list feels like it is going slowly, but this is only because so many of the items on the list are really, really big and require a long term commitment (something I have never excelled at). In the last week alone I have worked on the following items:

I have also adjusted the list to better fit me by changing Run a half marathon (I actually dont enjoy running at all) to Hitchhike 10,000kms and Visit Every Continent (this is implicit in the other items) to Attend Burning Man. I figure a couple of changes as I grow is not only permissible but something to be encouraged. Having strict goals and ideals often puts blinkers on life and prevents us from seeing the other opportunities that arise.

Be flexible and spend your time wisely.

More:

My Journey to Escape Wage Slavery | Just another WordPress …

Abraham Lincoln on Freedom, Wage labour and Slavery

The liberal tradition is employed by the left and the right to justify their positions concerning contemporary capitalist society. An issue often raised concerns US slavery, whether it made life better for slaves, whether it was better or worse than wage slavery in the north. While weve all heard Noam Chomsky talk about this, its probably a good idea to look for other sources on what 19th century liberals actually thought about freedom. Micheal Sandel has written about Lincolns conception of freedom and how it relates to wage labour and slavery in a book called Democracys Discontent: America in a search for Public Policy. The following quotations are taken from a chapter called Free Labour versus Wage Labour:

Although he shared the abolitionist moral condemnation of slavery, Lincoln did not share their voluntarist conception of freedom. Lincolns main argument against the expansion of slavery rested on the free labour ideal, and unlike the abolitionists, he did not equate free labour with wage labour. The superiority of free labour to slave labour did not consist in the fact that free labourers consent to exchange their work for a wage whereas slaves do not consent. The differences was rather that the northern wage labourer could hope one day to escape from his condition, whereas the slave could not. It was not consent that distinguished free labour from slavery, but rather the prospect of independence, the chance to rise to own productive property and to work for oneself. According to Lincolm, it was this feature of the free labour system that the southern critics of wage labour overlooked: They insist that their slaves are far better off than Northern freemen. What a mistaken view do these men have of Northern labourers! They think that men are always to remain labourers here but there is no such class. The man who laboured for another last year, this year labours for himself. And next year he will hire others to labour for him. (181)

Lincoln did not challenge the notion that those who spend their entire lives as wage labourers are comparable to slaves. He held that both forms of work wrongly subordinate labour to capital. Those who debated whether it is best that capital shall hire labourers, and thus induce them to work by their own consent, or buy them, and drive them ot it without consent, considered too narrow a range of possibilities. Free labour is labour carried out under conditions of independence from employers and masters alike. Lincolm insisted that, at least in the North, most Americans were independent in this sense: Men, with their families wives, sons and daughters work for themselves, on their farms, in their houses and in their shops, taking the whole product to themselves, and asking no favours of capital on the one hand, nor of hirelings or slaves on the other.

In Lincolns hands, the conception of freedom deriving from the artisan republican tradition became the rallying point for the northern cause in the Civil War. In the 1830s and 1840s, labour leaders had invoked this conception in criticizing northern society; wage labour, they feared, was supplanting free labour. In the late 1850s, Lincoln and the Republicans invoked the same conception in defending northern society; they superiority of the North to the slaveholding South consisted in the independence the free labour system made possible. (183)

The Union victory in the Civil War put to rest the threat of free labour posed by the slave power, only to revive and intensify the threat posed by the wage system and industrial capitalism. Lincoln had led the North to war in the name of free labour and the small, independent producer, but the war itself accelerated the growth of capitalist enterprise and factory production. (183)

In 1869 the New York Times reported on the decline of the free labour system and the advance of wage labour. Small workshops had become far less common than they were before the war, and the small manufactures thus swallowed up have become workmen on wages in the greater establishments, whose larger purses, labour-saving machines, etc., refused to allow the small manufacturers a separate existence. THe article criticized the trend it described in terms reminiscent of the labour movement of the 1830s and 1840s. THe fall of the independent mechanic to wage earner status amounted to a system of slavery as absolute if not as degrading as that which lately prevailed in the South.

The 1870 census, the first to record detailed information about Americans occupations, confirmed what many workers already knew. Not withstanding a free labour ideology that tied liberty to ownership of productive property, American had become a nation of employees. (183)

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Read this article:

Abraham Lincoln on Freedom, Wage labour and Slavery

My Journey to Escape Wage Slavery | Just another WordPress …

Forward, ho!

Deep in the forest a call was sounding, and as often as he heard this call, mysteriously thrilling and luring, he felt compelled to turn his back upon the fire and beaten earth around it, and to plunge into the forest, and on and on, he knew not where or why; nor did he wonder where or why, the call sounded imperiously deep in the forest.- Jack London- Call of the Wild

I have this quote stuck up at my desk at eye level and I read it several times during my work day. Call of the Wild is one of my favourite books and when things seem not quite right in life, I can pick it up and read it to soothe whatever angst I am feeling. I love the style of Londons writing as much as the content and themes of the book- his colourful characters and perfectly abbreviated descriptions of nature can lead me to a land of daydreams and lustful desire for wilderness and wildness. The books central theme of heeding the call within reminds me of what I love and why I do it. I dont believe in fate, pre-destined paths and soul mates but I do think each of us has something, or even several things, that feel like home to us. The thing that when we do it or perhaps even think about it, brings us a sense of calmness, completeness and dispels that gnawing feeling in the gut that accompanies those tasks, thoughts and people that are not innately right for us. The best (and probably least imaginative) explanation I have is that it comes from the big formative years of our lives- our childhood and youth. I think that finding what this call is within ourselves is one of the first steps to reclaiming our happiness and taking responsibility for it.

My call that is sounding is of the soil, seeds and leaves which makes my horticulture course feels right. One by one all of the aspects of my life are shifting into place and I truly believe that it is because I am doing what I am meant to be. The happiness and confidence that is coming from doing what nourishes me is overflowing into other areas. The biggest difference by far is that I feel awake. And being awake means feeling alive. Being alive means not being another loser going through the motions on autopilot, thinking about, but never acting on those niggling thoughts that something is out of place and there must be more to life.

Its only been about eight months since the inception of this blog and the main themes of escaping wage slavery and living a more deliberate and meaningful life are already coming to fruition. I use the word fruition in a loose sense, as I am coming to learn my major goals are ongoing and unlikely to ever cease in my life. I currently dont need to earn a full time income to support my needs (although saving money is not an easy task) and virtually all of my time is spent on activities that I find meaningful and add value to my life and hopefully others. Im busy but my days and nights are not loaded with useless busyness, tasks to fill in gaps, doing things to kill time.

Killing time. The thought inspires a horrible sense of dread in me. We all have the same number of hours in the day and life is way too open handed with opportunities to comfortably entertain the idea of killing time. Wasted time, money and food used to be my top personal criticisms and it is the economy and salvation of those in between and once passive moments of time that have been the biggest beast to conquer. If you finding you are killing time waiting for someone or something find ways to use that time. Creatively daydream, write, read, listen to a podcast- please, please, please dont kill your time.

The main problem with this great obsession for saving time is very simple: you cant save time. You can only spend it. But you can spend it wisely or foolishly. Benjamin Hoff- The Tao of Pooh

My 40 Before 40 list feels like it is going slowly, but this is only because so many of the items on the list are really, really big and require a long term commitment (something I have never excelled at). In the last week alone I have worked on the following items:

I have also adjusted the list to better fit me by changing Run a half marathon (I actually dont enjoy running at all) to Hitchhike 10,000kms and Visit Every Continent (this is implicit in the other items) to Attend Burning Man. I figure a couple of changes as I grow is not only permissible but something to be encouraged. Having strict goals and ideals often puts blinkers on life and prevents us from seeing the other opportunities that arise.

Be flexible and spend your time wisely.

Continued here:

My Journey to Escape Wage Slavery | Just another WordPress …

Wage slavery – Wikipedia

Wage slavery is a pejorative term used to draw an analogy between slavery and wage labor by focusing on similarities between owning and renting a person. It is usually used to refer to a situation where a person’s livelihood depends on wages or a salary, especially when the dependence is total and immediate.[1][2]

The term “wage slavery” has been used to criticize exploitation of labour and social stratification, with the former seen primarily as unequal bargaining power between labor and capital (particularly when workers are paid comparatively low wages, e.g. in sweatshops)[3] and the latter as a lack of workers’ self-management, fulfilling job choices and leisure in an economy.[4][5][6] The criticism of social stratification covers a wider range of employment choices bound by the pressures of a hierarchical society to perform otherwise unfulfilling work that deprives humans of their “species character”[7] not only under threat of starvation or poverty, but also of social stigma and status diminution.[8][9][10]

Similarities between wage labor and slavery were noted as early as Cicero in Ancient Rome.[11] With the advent of the industrial revolution, thinkers such as Pierre-Joseph Proudhon and Karl Marx elaborated the comparison between wage labor and slavery,[12][13] while Luddites emphasized the dehumanization brought about by machines. Before the American Civil War, Southern defenders of African American slavery invoked the concept of wage slavery to favorably compare the condition of their slaves to workers in the North.[14][15] The United States abolished slavery after the Civil War, but labor union activists found the metaphor useful. According to Lawrence Glickman, in the Gilded Age “[r]eferences abounded in the labor press, and it is hard to find a speech by a labor leader without the phrase”.[16]

The introduction of wage labor in 18th century Britain was met with resistance, giving rise to the principles of syndicalism.[17][18][19][20] Historically, some labor organizations and individual social activists have espoused workers’ self-management or worker cooperatives as possible alternatives to wage labor.[5][19]

The view that working for wages is akin to slavery dates back to the ancient world.[22] In ancient Rome, Cicero wrote that “whoever gives his labor for money sells himself and puts himself in the rank of slaves”.[23]

In 1763, the French journalist Simon Linguet published an influential description of wage slavery:[13]

The slave was precious to his master because of the money he had cost him… They were worth at least as much as they could be sold for in the market… It is the impossibility of living by any other means that compels our farm labourers to till the soil whose fruits they will not eat and our masons to construct buildings in which they will not live… It is want that compels them to go down on their knees to the rich man in order to get from him permission to enrich him… what effective gain [has] the suppression of slavery brought [him?] He is free, you say. Ah! That is his misfortune… These men… [have] the most terrible, the most imperious of masters, that is, need…. They must therefore find someone to hire them, or die of hunger. Is that to be free?

The view that wage work has substantial similarities with chattel slavery was actively put forward in the late 18th and 19th centuries by defenders of chattel slavery (most notably in the Southern states of the United States) and by opponents of capitalism (who were also critics of chattel slavery).[9][24] Some defenders of slavery, mainly from the Southern slave states, argued that Northern workers were “free but in name the slaves of endless toil” and that their slaves were better off.[25][26] This contention has been partly corroborated by some modern studies that indicate slaves’ material conditions in the 19th century were “better than what was typically available to free urban laborers at the time”.[27][28] In this period, Henry David Thoreau wrote that “[i]t is hard to have a Southern overseer; it is worse to have a Northern one; but worst of all when you are the slave-driver of yourself”.[29]

Some abolitionists in the United States regarded the analogy as spurious.[30] They believed that wage workers were “neither wronged nor oppressed”.[31] Abraham Lincoln and the Republicans argued that the condition of wage workers was different from slavery as laborers were likely to have the opportunity to work for themselves in the future, achieving self-employment.[32] The abolitionist and former slave Frederick Douglass initially declared “now I am my own master”, upon taking a paying job.[33] However, later in life he concluded to the contrary, saying “experience demonstrates that there may be a slavery of wages only a little less galling and crushing in its effects than chattel slavery, and that this slavery of wages must go down with the other”.[34][35] Douglass went on to speak about these conditions as arising from the unequal bargaining power between the ownership/capitalist class and the non-ownership/laborer class within a compulsory monetary market: “No more crafty and effective devise for defrauding the southern laborers could be adopted than the one that substitutes orders upon shopkeepers for currency in payment of wages. It has the merit of a show of honesty, while it puts the laborer completely at the mercy of the land-owner and the shopkeeper”.[36]

Self-employment became less common as the artisan tradition slowly disappeared in the later part of the 19th century.[5] In 1869, The New York Times described the system of wage labor as “a system of slavery as absolute if not as degrading as that which lately prevailed at the South”.[32] E. P. Thompson notes that for British workers at the end of the 18th and beginning of the 19th centuries, the “gap in status between a ‘servant,’ a hired wage-laborer subject to the orders and discipline of the master, and an artisan, who might ‘come and go’ as he pleased, was wide enough for men to shed blood rather than allow themselves to be pushed from one side to the other. And, in the value system of the community, those who resisted degradation were in the right”.[17] A “Member of the Builders’ Union” in the 1830s argued that the trade unions “will not only strike for less work, and more wages, but will ultimately abolish wages, become their own masters and work for each other; labor and capital will no longer be separate but will be indissolubly joined together in the hands of workmen and work-women”.[18] This perspective inspired the Grand National Consolidated Trades Union of 1834 which had the “two-fold purpose of syndicalist unions the protection of the workers under the existing system and the formation of the nuclei of the future society” when the unions “take over the whole industry of the country”.[19] “Research has shown”, summarises William Lazonick, “that the ‘free-born Englishman’ of the eighteenth century even those who, by force of circumstance, had to submit to agricultural wage labour tenaciously resisted entry into the capitalist workshop”.[20]

The use of the term “wage slave” by labor organizations may originate from the labor protests of the Lowell Mill Girls in 1836.[37] The imagery of wage slavery was widely used by labor organizations during the mid-19th century to object to the lack of workers’ self-management. However, it was gradually replaced by the more neutral term “wage work” towards the end of the 19th century as labor organizations shifted their focus to raising wages.[5]

Karl Marx described capitalist society as infringing on individual autonomy because it is based on a materialistic and commodified concept of the body and its liberty (i.e. as something that is sold, rented, or alienated in a class society). According to Friedrich Engels:[38][39]

The slave is sold once and for all; the proletarian must sell himself daily and hourly. The individual slave, property of one master, is assured an existence, however miserable it may be, because of the master’s interest. The individual proletarian, property as it were of the entire bourgeois class which buys his labor only when someone has need of it, has no secure existence.

Critics of wage work have drawn several similarities between wage work and slavery:

According to American anarcho-syndicalist philosopher Noam Chomsky, the similarities between chattel and wage slavery were noticed by the workers themselves. He noted that the 19th century Lowell Mill Girls, who without any reported knowledge of European Marxism or anarchism condemned the “degradation and subordination” of the newly emerging industrial system and the “new spirit of the age: gain wealth, forgetting all but self”, maintaining that “those who work in the mills should own them”.[45][46] They expressed their concerns in a protest song during their 1836 strike:

Oh! isn’t it a pity, such a pretty girl as IShould be sent to the factory to pine away and die?Oh! I cannot be a slave, I will not be a slave,For I’m so fond of liberty,That I cannot be a slave.[47]

Defenses of wage labor and chattel slavery in the literature have linked the subjection of man to man with the subjection of man to naturearguing that hierarchy and a social system’s particular relations of production represent human nature and are no more coercive than the reality of life itself. According to this narrative, any well-intentioned attempt to fundamentally change the status quo is naively utopian and will result in more oppressive conditions.[48] Bosses in both of these long-lasting systems argued that their system created a lot of wealth and prosperity. In some sense, both did create jobs and their investment entailed risk. For example, slave owners risked losing money by buying chattel slaves who later became ill or died; while bosses risked losing money by hiring workers (wage slaves) to make products that didn’t sell well on the market. Marginally, both chattel and wage slaves may become bosses; sometimes by working hard. It may be the “rags to riches” story which occasionally occurs in capitalism, or the “slave to master” story that occurred in places like colonial Brazil, where slaves could buy their own freedom and become business owners, self-employed, or slave owners themselves.[49] Social mobility, or the hard work and risk that it may entail, are thus not considered to be a redeeming factor by critics of the concept of wage slavery.[50]

Anthropologist David Graeber has noted that historically the first wage labor contracts we know about whether in ancient Greece or Rome, or in the Malay or Swahili city states in the Indian Ocean were in fact contracts for the rental of chattel slaves (usually the owner would receive a share of the money and the slave another, with which to maintain his or her living expenses). According to Graeber, such arrangements were quite common in New World slavery as well, whether in the United States or Brazil. C. L. R. James argued that most of the techniques of human organization employed on factory workers during the Industrial Revolution were first developed on slave plantations.[51]

The usage of the term “wage slavery” shifted to “wage work” at the end of the 19th century as groups like the Knights of Labor and American Federation of Labor shifted to a more reformist, trade union ideology instead of worker’s self-management. Much of the decline was caused by the rapid increase in manufacturing after the industrial revolution and the subsequent dominance of wage labor as a result. Another factor was immigration and demographic changes that led to ethnic tension between the workers.[5]

As Hallgrimsdottir and Benoit point out:

[I]ncreased centralization of production… declining wages… [an] expanding… labor pool… intensifying competition, and… [t]he loss of competence and independence experienced by skilled labor” meant that “a critique that referred to all [wage] work as slavery and avoided demands for wage concessions in favor of supporting the creation of the producerist republic (by diverting strike funds towards funding… co-operatives, for example) was far less compelling than one that identified the specific conditions of slavery as low wages.[5]

Some anti-capitalist thinkers claim that the elite maintain wage slavery and a divided working class through their influence over the media and entertainment industry,[52][53] educational institutions, unjust laws, nationalist and corporate propaganda, pressures and incentives to internalize values serviceable to the power structure, state violence, fear of unemployment[54] and a historical legacy of exploitation and profit accumulation/transfer under prior systems, which shaped the development of economic theory. Adam Smith noted that employers often conspire together to keep wages low and have the upper hand in conflicts between workers and employers:[55]

The interest of the dealers… in any particular branch of trade or manufactures, is always in some respects different from, and even opposite to, that of the public… [They] have generally an interest to deceive and even to oppress the public… We rarely hear, it has been said, of the combinations of masters, though frequently of those of workmen. But whoever imagines, upon this account, that masters rarely combine, is as ignorant of the world as of the subject. Masters are always and everywhere in a sort of tacit, but constant and uniform combination, not to raise the wages of labor above their actual rate… It is not, however, difficult to foresee which of the two parties must, upon all ordinary occasions, have the advantage in the dispute, and force the other into a compliance with their terms.

The concept of wage slavery could conceivably be traced back to pre-capitalist figures like Gerrard Winstanley from the radical Christian Diggers movement in England, who wrote in his 1649 pamphlet, The New Law of Righteousness, that there “shall be no buying or selling, no fairs nor markets, but the whole earth shall be a common treasury for every man” and “there shall be none Lord over others, but every one shall be a Lord of himself”.[56]

Aristotle stated that “the citizens must not live a mechanic or a mercantile life (for such a life is ignoble and inimical to virtue), nor yet must those who are to be citizens in the best state be tillers of the soil (for leisure is needed both for the development of virtue and for active participation in politics)”,[57] often paraphrased as “all paid jobs absorb and degrade the mind”.[58] Cicero wrote in 44 BC that “vulgar are the means of livelihood of all hired workmen whom we pay for mere manual labour, not for artistic skill; for in their case the very wage they receive is a pledge of their slavery”.[59] Somewhat similar criticisms have also been expressed by some proponents of liberalism, like Silvio Gesell and Thomas Paine;[60] Henry George, who inspired the economic philosophy known as Georgism;[9] and the Distributist school of thought within the Catholic Church.

To Karl Marx and anarchist thinkers like Mikhail Bakunin and Peter Kropotkin, wage slavery was a class condition in place due to the existence of private property and the state. This class situation rested primarily on:

And secondarily on:

Fascism was more hostile against independent trade unions than modern economies in Europe or the United States.[62] Fascist economic policies were widely accepted in the 1920s and 1930s and foreign (especially the United States) corporate investment in Italy and Germany increased after the fascist take over.[63][64]

Fascism has been perceived by some notable critics, like Buenaventura Durruti, to be a last resort weapon of the privileged to ensure the maintenance of wage slavery:

No government fights fascism to destroy it. When the bourgeoisie sees that power is slipping out of its hands, it brings up fascism to hold onto their privileges.[65]

According to Noam Chomsky, analysis of the psychological implications of wage slavery goes back to the Enlightenment era. In his 1791 book The Limits of State Action, classical liberal thinker Wilhelm von Humboldt explained how “whatever does not spring from a man’s free choice, or is only the result of instruction and guidance, does not enter into his very nature; he does not perform it with truly human energies, but merely with mechanical exactness” and so when the laborer works under external control, “we may admire what he does, but we despise what he is”.[66] Both the Milgram and Stanford experiments have been found useful in the psychological study of wage-based workplace relations.[67]

According to research, modern work provides people with a sense of personal and social identity that is tied to:

Thus job loss entails the loss of this identity.[68]

Erich Fromm argued that if a person perceives himself as being what he owns, then when that person loses (or even thinks of losing) what he “owns” (e.g. the good looks or sharp mind that allow him to sell his labor for high wages) a fear of loss may create anxiety and authoritarian tendencies because that person’s sense of identity is threatened. In contrast, when a person’s sense of self is based on what he experiences in a state of being (creativity, love, sadness, taste, sight and the like) with a less materialistic regard for what he once had and lost, or may lose, then less authoritarian tendencies prevail. In his view, the state of being flourishes under a worker-managed workplace and economy, whereas self-ownership entails a materialistic notion of self, created to rationalize the lack of worker control that would allow for a state of being.[69]

Investigative journalist Robert Kuttner analyzed the work of public-health scholars Jeffrey Johnson and Ellen Hall about modern conditions of work and concludes that “to be in a life situation where one experiences relentless demands by others, over which one has relatively little control, is to be at risk of poor health, physically as well as mentally”. Under wage labor, “a relatively small elite demands and gets empowerment, self-actualization, autonomy, and other work satisfaction that partially compensate for long hours” while “epidemiological data confirm that lower-paid, lower-status workers are more likely to experience the most clinically damaging forms of stress, in part because they have less control over their work”.[70]

Wage slavery and the educational system that precedes it “implies power held by the leader. Without power the leader is inept. The possession of power inevitably leads to corruption… in spite of… good intentions… [Leadership means] power of initiative, this sense of responsibility, the self-respect which comes from expressed manhood, is taken from the men, and consolidated in the leader. The sum of their initiative, their responsibility, their self-respect becomes his… [and the] order and system he maintains is based upon the suppression of the men, from being independent thinkers into being ‘the men’… In a word, he is compelled to become an autocrat and a foe to democracy”. For the “leader”, such marginalisation can be beneficial, for a leader “sees no need for any high level of intelligence in the rank and file, except to applaud his actions. Indeed such intelligence from his point of view, by breeding criticism and opposition, is an obstacle and causes confusion”.[71] Wage slavery “implies erosion of the human personality… [because] some men submit to the will of others, arousing in these instincts which predispose them to cruelty and indifference in the face of the suffering of their fellows”.[72]

In 19th-century discussions of labor relations, it was normally assumed that the threat of starvation forced those without property to work for wages. Proponents of the view that modern forms of employment constitute wage slavery, even when workers appear to have a range of available alternatives, have attributed its perpetuation to a variety of social factors that maintain the hegemony of the employer class.[44][73]

In an account of the Lowell Mill Girls, Harriet Hanson Robinson wrote that generously high wages were offered to overcome the degrading nature of the work:

At the time the Lowell cotton mills were started the caste of the factory girl was the lowest among the employments of women…. She was represented as subjected to influences that must destroy her purity and selfrespect. In the eyes of her overseer she was but a brute, a slave, to be beaten, pinched and pushed about. It was to overcome this prejudice that such high wages had been offered to women that they might be induced to become millgirls, in spite of the opprobrium that still clung to this degrading occupation.[74]

In his book Disciplined Minds, Jeff Schmidt points out that professionals are trusted to run organizations in the interests of their employers. Because employers cannot be on hand to manage every decision, professionals are trained to “ensure that each and every detail of their work favors the right interestsor skewers the disfavored ones” in the absence of overt control:

The resulting professional is an obedient thinker, an intellectual property whom employers can trust to experiment, theorize, innovate and create safely within the confines of an assigned ideology.[75]

Parecon (participatory economics) theory posits a social class “between labor and capital” of higher paid professionals such as “doctors, lawyers, engineers, managers and others” who monopolize empowering labor and constitute a class above wage laborers who do mostly “obedient, rote work”.[76]

The terms “employee” or “worker” have often been replaced by “associate”. This plays up the allegedly voluntary nature of the interaction while playing down the subordinate status of the wage laborer as well as the worker-boss class distinction emphasized by labor movements. Billboards as well as television, Internet and newspaper advertisements consistently show low-wage workers with smiles on their faces, appearing happy.[77]

Job interviews and other data on requirements for lower skilled workers in developed countries particularly in the growing service sector indicate that the more workers depend on low wages and the less skilled or desirable their job is, the more employers screen for workers without better employment options and expect them to feign unremunerative motivation.[78] Such screening and feigning may not only contribute to the positive self-image of the employer as someone granting desirable employment, but also signal wage-dependence by indicating the employee’s willingness to feign, which in turn may discourage the dissatisfaction normally associated with job-switching or union activity.[78]

At the same time, employers in the service industry have justified unstable, part-time employment and low wages by playing down the importance of service jobs for the lives of the wage laborers (e.g. just temporary before finding something better, student summer jobs and the like).[79][80]

In the early 20th century, “scientific methods of strikebreaking”[81] were devised employing a variety of tactics that emphasized how strikes undermined “harmony” and “Americanism”.[82]

Some social activists objecting to the market system or price system of wage working historically have considered syndicalism, worker cooperatives, workers’ self-management and workers’ control as possible alternatives to the current wage system.[4][5][6][19]

The American philosopher John Dewey believed that until “industrial feudalism” is replaced by “industrial democracy”, politics will be “the shadow cast on society by big business”.[83] Thomas Ferguson has postulated in his investment theory of party competition that the undemocratic nature of economic institutions under capitalism causes elections to become occasions when blocs of investors coalesce and compete to control the state.[84]

Noam Chomsky has argued that political theory tends to blur the ‘elite’ function of government:

Modern political theory stresses Madison’s belief that “in a just and a free government the rights both of property and of persons ought to be effectually guarded.” But in this case too it is useful to look at the doctrine more carefully. There are no rights of property, only rights to property that is, rights of persons with property,…

[In] representative democracy, as in, say, the United States or Great Britain [] there is a monopoly of power centralized in the state, and secondly and critically [] the representative democracy is limited to the political sphere and in no serious way encroaches on the economic sphere [] That is, as long as individuals are compelled to rent themselves on the market to those who are willing to hire them, as long as their role in production is simply that of ancillary tools, then there are striking elements of coercion and oppression that make talk of democracy very limited, if even meaningful.[85]

In this regard, Chomsky has used Bakunin’s theories about an “instinct for freedom”,[86] the militant history of labor movements, Kropotkin’s mutual aid evolutionary principle of survival and Marc Hauser’s theories supporting an innate and universal moral faculty,[87] to explain the incompatibility of oppression with certain aspects of human nature.[88][89]

Loyola University philosophy professor John Clark and libertarian socialist philosopher Murray Bookchin have criticized the system of wage labor for encouraging environmental destruction, arguing that a self-managed industrial society would better manage the environment. Like other anarchists,[90] they attribute much of the industrial revolution’s pollution to the “hierarchical” and “competitive” economic relations accompanying it.[91]

Some criticize wage slavery on strictly contractual grounds, e.g. David Ellerman and Carole Pateman, arguing that the employment contract is a legal fiction in that it treats human beings juridically as mere tools or inputs by abdicating responsibility and self-determination, which the critics argue are inalienable. As Ellerman points out, “[t]he employee is legally transformed from being a co-responsible partner to being only an input supplier sharing no legal responsibility for either the input liabilities [costs] or the produced outputs [revenue, profits] of the employer’s business”.[92] Such contracts are inherently invalid “since the person remain[s] a de facto fully capacitated adult person with only the contractual role of a non-person” as it is impossible to physically transfer self-determination.[93] As Pateman argues:

The contractarian argument is unassailable all the time it is accepted that abilities can ‘acquire’ an external relation to an individual, and can be treated as if they were property. To treat abilities in this manner is also implicitly to accept that the ‘exchange’ between employer and worker is like any other exchange of material property … The answer to the question of how property in the person can be contracted out is that no such procedure is possible. Labour power, capacities or services, cannot be separated from the person of the worker like pieces of property.[94]

In a modern liberal capitalist society, the employment contract is enforced while the enslavement contract is not; the former being considered valid because of its consensual/non-coercive nature and the latter being considered inherently invalid, consensual or not. The noted economist Paul Samuelson described this discrepancy:

Since slavery was abolished, human earning power is forbidden by law to be capitalized. A man is not even free to sell himself; he must rent himself at a wage.[95]

Some advocates of right-libertarianism, among them philosopher Robert Nozick, address this inconsistency in modern societies arguing that a consistently libertarian society would allow and regard as valid consensual/non-coercive enslavement contracts, rejecting the notion of inalienable rights:

The comparable question about an individual is whether a free system will allow him to sell himself into slavery. I believe that it would.[96]

Others like Murray Rothbard allow for the possibility of debt slavery, asserting that a lifetime labour contract can be broken so long as the slave pays appropriate damages:

[I]f A has agreed to work for life for B in exchange for 10,000 grams of gold, he will have to return the proportionate amount of property if he terminates the arrangement and ceases to work.[97]

In the philosophy of mainstream, neoclassical economics, wage labor is seen as the voluntary sale of one’s own time and efforts, just like a carpenter would sell a chair, or a farmer would sell wheat. It is considered neither an antagonistic nor abusive relationship and carries no particular moral implications.[98]

Austrian economics argues that a person is not “free” unless they can sell their labor because otherwise that person has no self-ownership and will be owned by a “third party” of individuals.[99]

Post-Keynesian economics perceives wage slavery as resulting from inequality of bargaining power between labor and capital, which exists when the economy does not “allow labor to organize and form a strong countervailing force”.[100]

The two main forms of socialist economics perceive wage slavery differently:

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Wage slavery – Wikipedia

Abraham Lincoln on Freedom, Wage labour and Slavery

The liberal tradition is employed by the left and the right to justify their positions concerning contemporary capitalist society. An issue often raised concerns US slavery, whether it made life better for slaves, whether it was better or worse than wage slavery in the north. While weve all heard Noam Chomsky talk about this, its probably a good idea to look for other sources on what 19th century liberals actually thought about freedom. Micheal Sandel has written about Lincolns conception of freedom and how it relates to wage labour and slavery in a book called Democracys Discontent: America in a search for Public Policy. The following quotations are taken from a chapter called Free Labour versus Wage Labour:

Although he shared the abolitionist moral condemnation of slavery, Lincoln did not share their voluntarist conception of freedom. Lincolns main argument against the expansion of slavery rested on the free labour ideal, and unlike the abolitionists, he did not equate free labour with wage labour. The superiority of free labour to slave labour did not consist in the fact that free labourers consent to exchange their work for a wage whereas slaves do not consent. The differences was rather that the northern wage labourer could hope one day to escape from his condition, whereas the slave could not. It was not consent that distinguished free labour from slavery, but rather the prospect of independence, the chance to rise to own productive property and to work for oneself. According to Lincolm, it was this feature of the free labour system that the southern critics of wage labour overlooked: They insist that their slaves are far better off than Northern freemen. What a mistaken view do these men have of Northern labourers! They think that men are always to remain labourers here but there is no such class. The man who laboured for another last year, this year labours for himself. And next year he will hire others to labour for him. (181)

Lincoln did not challenge the notion that those who spend their entire lives as wage labourers are comparable to slaves. He held that both forms of work wrongly subordinate labour to capital. Those who debated whether it is best that capital shall hire labourers, and thus induce them to work by their own consent, or buy them, and drive them ot it without consent, considered too narrow a range of possibilities. Free labour is labour carried out under conditions of independence from employers and masters alike. Lincolm insisted that, at least in the North, most Americans were independent in this sense: Men, with their families wives, sons and daughters work for themselves, on their farms, in their houses and in their shops, taking the whole product to themselves, and asking no favours of capital on the one hand, nor of hirelings or slaves on the other.

In Lincolns hands, the conception of freedom deriving from the artisan republican tradition became the rallying point for the northern cause in the Civil War. In the 1830s and 1840s, labour leaders had invoked this conception in criticizing northern society; wage labour, they feared, was supplanting free labour. In the late 1850s, Lincoln and the Republicans invoked the same conception in defending northern society; they superiority of the North to the slaveholding South consisted in the independence the free labour system made possible. (183)

The Union victory in the Civil War put to rest the threat of free labour posed by the slave power, only to revive and intensify the threat posed by the wage system and industrial capitalism. Lincoln had led the North to war in the name of free labour and the small, independent producer, but the war itself accelerated the growth of capitalist enterprise and factory production. (183)

In 1869 the New York Times reported on the decline of the free labour system and the advance of wage labour. Small workshops had become far less common than they were before the war, and the small manufactures thus swallowed up have become workmen on wages in the greater establishments, whose larger purses, labour-saving machines, etc., refused to allow the small manufacturers a separate existence. THe article criticized the trend it described in terms reminiscent of the labour movement of the 1830s and 1840s. THe fall of the independent mechanic to wage earner status amounted to a system of slavery as absolute if not as degrading as that which lately prevailed in the South.

The 1870 census, the first to record detailed information about Americans occupations, confirmed what many workers already knew. Not withstanding a free labour ideology that tied liberty to ownership of productive property, American had become a nation of employees. (183)

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Abraham Lincoln on Freedom, Wage labour and Slavery

8 Signs You’re a Slave Instead of an Employee

Literal slavery is a horrible practice that still persists into the modern age. But, I want to talk about another form of human exploitationemployment slavery, which can also ruin a persons life. Generally, I consider this a self-inflicted slavery because its ultimately a persons choice to work under such conditionsbut I also understand that brainwashing can occur, creating the illusion that theres no way out.

Slavery (in general) exists because of the inclination among people to obtain the benefits of human resources, while providing little (or nothing) in return. Human work is the most intelligent, efficient way to create a system of wealth and power. For the morally bankrupt, such benefits are sought for free.

Employment, in the best case scenario, is a business deal of mutual benefit. But in other instances, the company is expending such minimal resources that they are taking advantage of you. In the worst case scenario, through a combination of slave-driving principles and psychological techniques to break you down, such a job can morph into something very similar to actual slavery.

If you dont know any better, its easy to fall into slavery conditions. Here are signs that your sense of freedom in life is totally gone:

Because of the way employers conveniently ignore yearly inflation, todays minimal wage is not enough to maintain any semblance of a normal lifestyle. Minimal wage makes some sense in small businesses just starting out. But, In America, $8.25 an hour, or less, from a large, billion-dollar corporation is inexcusable. In this case, your annual wages cost a second of the companys hourly profits. In other words, your hard work is a very bad deal for you, and a killer opportunity for the suits upstairs.

Youre lucky you even have a job! is a psychological taunt that bad employers use to try and keep their wage-slaves from believing they can do any better. Such statements are made to maintain a sense of control. Understand, voluntary slavery is not a rare phenomenon. It happens when a person is brainwashed into the belief that they have nowhere else they can go.

If your manager uses psychological put-downs like this to denigrate your professional abilitiesunderstand that its being done for a reason.

The idea of getting a raise and a promotion may be dangled in-front of you, but youve seen no evidence to suggest that it really happens. In fact, only a very small percentage of your co-workers ever obtain this goal, and they tend to be the cronies of upper-management. If this is the case, then what exactly is your reason for working at this company?

Inconvenient hours are inevitable in jobs, but some companies will abuse the system. This ranges from illegally denying overtime pay, to scheduling month-long bouts of cloping (working until closing hours late at night, then opening hours the next morning) that leaves the employee physically and emotionally drained.

An employee in this system may feel the intense pressure by the bosses to conform to abusive hours, under the threat of being denied promotions or even getting fired for seeking better treatment.

Americas two-week annual vacation time is one of the weakest in the Western world, and American workers tend to not even use it. This is because many employers will hint that vacationers are likely to end up on the shit-list of not getting promoted. They may even hint that unruly vacation-seekers will be the first to get laid-off or fired at the earliest opportunity.

A system of slavery does not allow free-time for individuals to maintain their own lives outside of their work. This could cause dissent and break the system of total control. An unspoken methodology among abusive managers is to destroy the lifestyles of employees so, instead of tending to family or hobbies, they work at full capacity.

Feeling motivated based on high-standards and being scared to go below those standards is one thing, but being genuinely scared of the people youre working for is another.

Slave-masters maintain systems of fear, to break down their subjects and perhapsin timebuild them back up. For the best example of thisplease see Theon Greyjoy in Game of Thrones.

Psychological and verbal abuse is usually what occurs. An abusive employer understands exactly what strings to pull to generate feelings of shame or guilt, and theyll use the professional context to destroy a subjects sense of self-worth, perhaps by implying worthlessness at the vocation theyve devoted their life to.

In other instances, the abuse is very overt and could include yelling, tantrums and even physical assaults. But the outcome is the same: the employee living in a constant state of paranoia, fear, and subservience.

Read carefully the ten warning-signs youre in a cult by the Cult Education Institute. Some of these that could be very applicable to a workplace include: absolute authoritarianism without meaningful accountability, no tolerance for questions or critical inquiry, the leader (boss) is always right, and former followers (employees) are vilified as evil for leaving.

If the job feels less about, you know, getting the job doneand is more about the influence, charisma and infallibility of the bossthen get the heck out of there. This means the person in charge is getting a side-benefit to running or managing the workplace: power and dominance.

The number one sign youre a slave and not an employee is that youre working an unpaid internship, and its not for college credit. You may be promised great benefits and valuable connections, at what amounts to harsh workplace conditions, long hours, and zero pay.

A huge mistake I see young professionals make, and it really irks me, is naivety about peoples intentions. I went to film school for my bachelors, and many students I knew lusted after top internships at film studios or with big names in the entertainment industry. Such internships are often offered regardless of college credit.

When a person is blindsided by their desire to make it and get in with big names, they are likely to make bad decisionsand unscrupulous employers will prey on this desire.

Internships are great IF its part of a students actual curriculum. It means hands-on work and real experience versus useless classrooms. But, the questionable non-credit internships I warn about also exist to lure young people into systems of slavery. Its gotten so bad these types of arrangements are quickly becoming illegal in California.

The reality of such internships is that the slave-drivers only desire one thing: unpaid work. There is NO promise that you will move up or land any type of a paid job. When your internship finishes, they will discard you and find the next victim.

The biggest reason to avoid internships is the mentality behind the deal. Imagine a law firm or a film studio that is a multi-billion dollar operation. How hard would it be to throw their new recruit at LEAST minimum wage? The fact such a company would, despite their huge profits, still desire unpaid labor is indicative of a slave-driving mentality that funnels wealth to the top at the expense of the people on the bottom making it possible.

As a professional, it would be best for you to avoid doing any type of business with any individual or company that possesses a philosophy like this.

Employment-slavery situations are common. Very common. But ultimately, the biggest factor in determining how bad it is, is a single question: are you happy?

If you are happy at $8.25 an hour with no benefits, because you like the people you work with, you like the nature of the work, and you feel its moving you somewhere you want to bethen its not slavery. Youre making an investment thatll either pay off, or it wontbut at least you enjoy what youre doing.

However, if you are miserable in your current conditions, its quite possible that the uneasy feeling in your gut is your intuition telling you that someone is taking advantage of you.

Employment is supposed to be a business contract, and an exchange of services. Never a system of control. Sometimes, just the willingness to walk away is your strongest defense against a terrible job situation.

For more about avoiding systems of employment-slavery, please see my short books: Freedom: How to Make Money From Your Dreams and Ambitions, and How to Quit Your Job: Escape Soul Crushing Work, Create the Life You Want, and Live Happy.

(For more books, also check out the Developed Life bookstore, http://www.developedlife.com/bookstore).

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8 Signs You’re a Slave Instead of an Employee

My Journey to Escape Wage Slavery | Just another WordPress …

Forward, ho!

Deep in the forest a call was sounding, and as often as he heard this call, mysteriously thrilling and luring, he felt compelled to turn his back upon the fire and beaten earth around it, and to plunge into the forest, and on and on, he knew not where or why; nor did he wonder where or why, the call sounded imperiously deep in the forest.- Jack London- Call of the Wild

I have this quote stuck up at my desk at eye level and I read it several times during my work day. Call of the Wild is one of my favourite books and when things seem not quite right in life, I can pick it up and read it to soothe whatever angst I am feeling. I love the style of Londons writing as much as the content and themes of the book- his colourful characters and perfectly abbreviated descriptions of nature can lead me to a land of daydreams and lustful desire for wilderness and wildness. The books central theme of heeding the call within reminds me of what I love and why I do it. I dont believe in fate, pre-destined paths and soul mates but I do think each of us has something, or even several things, that feel like home to us. The thing that when we do it or perhaps even think about it, brings us a sense of calmness, completeness and dispels that gnawing feeling in the gut that accompanies those tasks, thoughts and people that are not innately right for us. The best (and probably least imaginative) explanation I have is that it comes from the big formative years of our lives- our childhood and youth. I think that finding what this call is within ourselves is one of the first steps to reclaiming our happiness and taking responsibility for it.

My call that is sounding is of the soil, seeds and leaves which makes my horticulture course feels right. One by one all of the aspects of my life are shifting into place and I truly believe that it is because I am doing what I am meant to be. The happiness and confidence that is coming from doing what nourishes me is overflowing into other areas. The biggest difference by far is that I feel awake. And being awake means feeling alive. Being alive means not being another loser going through the motions on autopilot, thinking about, but never acting on those niggling thoughts that something is out of place and there must be more to life.

Its only been about eight months since the inception of this blog and the main themes of escaping wage slavery and living a more deliberate and meaningful life are already coming to fruition. I use the word fruition in a loose sense, as I am coming to learn my major goals are ongoing and unlikely to ever cease in my life. I currently dont need to earn a full time income to support my needs (although saving money is not an easy task) and virtually all of my time is spent on activities that I find meaningful and add value to my life and hopefully others. Im busy but my days and nights are not loaded with useless busyness, tasks to fill in gaps, doing things to kill time.

Killing time. The thought inspires a horrible sense of dread in me. We all have the same number of hours in the day and life is way too open handed with opportunities to comfortably entertain the idea of killing time. Wasted time, money and food used to be my top personal criticisms and it is the economy and salvation of those in between and once passive moments of time that have been the biggest beast to conquer. If you finding you are killing time waiting for someone or something find ways to use that time. Creatively daydream, write, read, listen to a podcast- please, please, please dont kill your time.

The main problem with this great obsession for saving time is very simple: you cant save time. You can only spend it. But you can spend it wisely or foolishly. Benjamin Hoff- The Tao of Pooh

My 40 Before 40 list feels like it is going slowly, but this is only because so many of the items on the list are really, really big and require a long term commitment (something I have never excelled at). In the last week alone I have worked on the following items:

I have also adjusted the list to better fit me by changing Run a half marathon (I actually dont enjoy running at all) to Hitchhike 10,000kms and Visit Every Continent (this is implicit in the other items) to Attend Burning Man. I figure a couple of changes as I grow is not only permissible but something to be encouraged. Having strict goals and ideals often puts blinkers on life and prevents us from seeing the other opportunities that arise.

Be flexible and spend your time wisely.

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My Journey to Escape Wage Slavery | Just another WordPress …

8 Signs You’re a Slave Instead of an Employee

Literal slavery is a horrible practice that still persists into the modern age. But, I want to talk about another form of human exploitationemployment slavery, which can also ruin a persons life. Generally, I consider this a self-inflicted slavery because its ultimately a persons choice to work under such conditionsbut I also understand that brainwashing can occur, creating the illusion that theres no way out.

Slavery (in general) exists because of the inclination among people to obtain the benefits of human resources, while providing little (or nothing) in return. Human work is the most intelligent, efficient way to create a system of wealth and power. For the morally bankrupt, such benefits are sought for free.

Employment, in the best case scenario, is a business deal of mutual benefit. But in other instances, the company is expending such minimal resources that they are taking advantage of you. In the worst case scenario, through a combination of slave-driving principles and psychological techniques to break you down, such a job can morph into something very similar to actual slavery.

If you dont know any better, its easy to fall into slavery conditions. Here are signs that your sense of freedom in life is totally gone:

Because of the way employers conveniently ignore yearly inflation, todays minimal wage is not enough to maintain any semblance of a normal lifestyle. Minimal wage makes some sense in small businesses just starting out. But, In America, $8.25 an hour, or less, from a large, billion-dollar corporation is inexcusable. In this case, your annual wages cost a second of the companys hourly profits. In other words, your hard work is a very bad deal for you, and a killer opportunity for the suits upstairs.

Youre lucky you even have a job! is a psychological taunt that bad employers use to try and keep their wage-slaves from believing they can do any better. Such statements are made to maintain a sense of control. Understand, voluntary slavery is not a rare phenomenon. It happens when a person is brainwashed into the belief that they have nowhere else they can go.

If your manager uses psychological put-downs like this to denigrate your professional abilitiesunderstand that its being done for a reason.

The idea of getting a raise and a promotion may be dangled in-front of you, but youve seen no evidence to suggest that it really happens. In fact, only a very small percentage of your co-workers ever obtain this goal, and they tend to be the cronies of upper-management. If this is the case, then what exactly is your reason for working at this company?

Inconvenient hours are inevitable in jobs, but some companies will abuse the system. This ranges from illegally denying overtime pay, to scheduling month-long bouts of cloping (working until closing hours late at night, then opening hours the next morning) that leaves the employee physically and emotionally drained.

An employee in this system may feel the intense pressure by the bosses to conform to abusive hours, under the threat of being denied promotions or even getting fired for seeking better treatment.

Americas two-week annual vacation time is one of the weakest in the Western world, and American workers tend to not even use it. This is because many employers will hint that vacationers are likely to end up on the shit-list of not getting promoted. They may even hint that unruly vacation-seekers will be the first to get laid-off or fired at the earliest opportunity.

A system of slavery does not allow free-time for individuals to maintain their own lives outside of their work. This could cause dissent and break the system of total control. An unspoken methodology among abusive managers is to destroy the lifestyles of employees so, instead of tending to family or hobbies, they work at full capacity.

Feeling motivated based on high-standards and being scared to go below those standards is one thing, but being genuinely scared of the people youre working for is another.

Slave-masters maintain systems of fear, to break down their subjects and perhapsin timebuild them back up. For the best example of thisplease see Theon Greyjoy in Game of Thrones.

Psychological and verbal abuse is usually what occurs. An abusive employer understands exactly what strings to pull to generate feelings of shame or guilt, and theyll use the professional context to destroy a subjects sense of self-worth, perhaps by implying worthlessness at the vocation theyve devoted their life to.

In other instances, the abuse is very overt and could include yelling, tantrums and even physical assaults. But the outcome is the same: the employee living in a constant state of paranoia, fear, and subservience.

Read carefully the ten warning-signs youre in a cult by the Cult Education Institute. Some of these that could be very applicable to a workplace include: absolute authoritarianism without meaningful accountability, no tolerance for questions or critical inquiry, the leader (boss) is always right, and former followers (employees) are vilified as evil for leaving.

If the job feels less about, you know, getting the job doneand is more about the influence, charisma and infallibility of the bossthen get the heck out of there. This means the person in charge is getting a side-benefit to running or managing the workplace: power and dominance.

The number one sign youre a slave and not an employee is that youre working an unpaid internship, and its not for college credit. You may be promised great benefits and valuable connections, at what amounts to harsh workplace conditions, long hours, and zero pay.

A huge mistake I see young professionals make, and it really irks me, is naivety about peoples intentions. I went to film school for my bachelors, and many students I knew lusted after top internships at film studios or with big names in the entertainment industry. Such internships are often offered regardless of college credit.

When a person is blindsided by their desire to make it and get in with big names, they are likely to make bad decisionsand unscrupulous employers will prey on this desire.

Internships are great IF its part of a students actual curriculum. It means hands-on work and real experience versus useless classrooms. But, the questionable non-credit internships I warn about also exist to lure young people into systems of slavery. Its gotten so bad these types of arrangements are quickly becoming illegal in California.

The reality of such internships is that the slave-drivers only desire one thing: unpaid work. There is NO promise that you will move up or land any type of a paid job. When your internship finishes, they will discard you and find the next victim.

The biggest reason to avoid internships is the mentality behind the deal. Imagine a law firm or a film studio that is a multi-billion dollar operation. How hard would it be to throw their new recruit at LEAST minimum wage? The fact such a company would, despite their huge profits, still desire unpaid labor is indicative of a slave-driving mentality that funnels wealth to the top at the expense of the people on the bottom making it possible.

As a professional, it would be best for you to avoid doing any type of business with any individual or company that possesses a philosophy like this.

Employment-slavery situations are common. Very common. But ultimately, the biggest factor in determining how bad it is, is a single question: are you happy?

If you are happy at $8.25 an hour with no benefits, because you like the people you work with, you like the nature of the work, and you feel its moving you somewhere you want to bethen its not slavery. Youre making an investment thatll either pay off, or it wontbut at least you enjoy what youre doing.

However, if you are miserable in your current conditions, its quite possible that the uneasy feeling in your gut is your intuition telling you that someone is taking advantage of you.

Employment is supposed to be a business contract, and an exchange of services. Never a system of control. Sometimes, just the willingness to walk away is your strongest defense against a terrible job situation.

For more about avoiding systems of employment-slavery, please see my short books: Freedom: How to Make Money From Your Dreams and Ambitions, and How to Quit Your Job: Escape Soul Crushing Work, Create the Life You Want, and Live Happy.

(For more books, also check out the Developed Life bookstore, http://www.developedlife.com/bookstore).

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8 Signs You’re a Slave Instead of an Employee

Free Slavery Essays and Papers – 123HelpMe

Title Length Color Rating Slavery and the Anti-slavery Movement – Anytime we hear the word slavery, we tend to think of the Southern United States during the Pre-Civil War era. What many people dont know, is that this horrible act has occurred worldwide. The term slavery has many different definitions, and has occurred all throughout our world history. It wasnt until the early 18th century that the thought of anti-slavery came about. Many economic, social, and technological forces have played a part in the decline of slavery around the globe. The first definition that comes to mind when we hear this term, is the act of being a slave or a person who does not own their own labor…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 11 Works Cited 1030 words(2.9 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Analysis of Arguments for the Slavery Institution – Analysis of Arguments for the Slavery Institution The foundation of this paper will highlight the following questions: How might southern apologists for slavery have used the northern wage slave discussed in the last chapter to justify slavery. To what extent do you agree with this argument. How did slaves use religious belief and kinship to temper their plight. Did this strategy play into the hands of slaveholders. How were non-slaveholding whites and free people of color affected by the institution of slavery…. [tags: Slavery]513 words(1.5 pages)Good Essays[preview] Enormity of Slavery – In the 1800s, many slave owners thought it fair for Africans to work without pay, because they believed that this particular group of people were made by God for this sort of work, and that slave owners were ever caring and conscientious of their slaves anyway, making slavery an easy life; truthfully, however, as both Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs experienced in being slaves most of their lives, and then showed in their narratives, this cruel and unusual practice was the epitome of iniquity- notwithstanding the fact that they were created equal to their malefactors…. [tags: Slavery]1612 words(4.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] 18th Centry Slavery In North America – People crying for freedom and liberty from tyranny built a nation out of greed and unethical acts. The rapacious desires of a nation to gain wealth and possessions lead to the emotional and psychological trauma of West Africans and African Americans. In spite of being taken from Africa, the sweat and blood of these Africans contributed to the birth of the beautiful nation that would eventually recognize their descendants as equals. The Exploration Age commenced in the fifteenth century when European nations decided to expand their power for technological, demographic, and economic reasons…. [tags: Slavery]:: 5 Works Cited 917 words(2.6 pages)Good Essays[preview] An End To Slavery – The society that became known as the United States had its beginnings when the first English settlers set foot on North American soil. Whether that settler landed in Massachusetts or Virginia, their beginnings on this continent were all influenced by the society that they had left behind. These included many aspects of England’s society, culture, economy, and politics. Those societal, cultural, economic and political beginnings can be traced throughout our history in the mindset that both the North and South represented…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1394 words(4 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Origins of Chattel Slavery in Colonial North America – The Origins of Chattel Slavery in Colonial North America There have been many illuminating studies in the field of the origins of chattel slavery in Colonial North America. Alpert, 1970; Edmondson, 1976; Jordan, 1962: Ruchames, 1967; Starr, 1973, wrote seminal studies that did much to bring insight to the subject. Goetz, 2009; Mason, 2006; Smaje, 2002; Neeganagwedgin, 2012, presented evidence that have either reexamined old questions or used new methods and approaches to ask news questions to add insight to this topic…. [tags: Slavery]:: 13 Works Cited 1586 words(4.5 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Consequences of Slavery – Abstract Slavery, like many ill-fated and evil inventions reached epidemic levels in early Europe and the American colonies. The history of slavery is documented most acutely during the period when slaves first arrived to the new land and when the colonies had first developed into the fledging United States of America. This would lead us to believe that slavery had not existed before this period or that the consequences and relevance of it had little historical, social, or economical importance…. [tags: Slavery, history, informative]:: 6 Works Cited 2031 words(5.8 pages)Better Essays[preview] Slavery and Abolition – The term slave is defined as a person held in servitude as the chattel of another, or one that is completely passive to a dominating influence. The most well known cases of slavery occurred during the settling of the United States of America. From 1619 until July 1st 1928 slavery was allowed within our country. Slavery abolitionists attempted to end slavery, which at some point; they were successful at doing so. This paper will take the reader a lot of different directions, it will look at slavery in a legal aspect along the lines of the constitution and the thirteenth amendment, and it will also discuss how abolitionists tried to end slavery…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 4 Works Cited 1581 words(4.5 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Colors of Slavery – When Americans think about slavery, they tend to think about “Africans” being brought to the New World against their will. Which upon their arrival were sold, the same as livestock, as permanent property to the white landowners. They may visualize in their minds a person of color shackled, chained, beaten, and forced to labor under the control of their white master. Their picture is that of chattel slavery; black and white. Americans have come to the assumption that slavery was imposed on people of one color or race…. [tags: History Slavery]:: 3 Works Cited 1795 words(5.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Evolution of Slavery – A person who is the property of and wholly subject to another; this is the definition of a slave. Over a span of 400 years 12 million Africans were captured, brought to the New World by approximately 40,000 ships and then enslaved. Thats 80 or more slaves per day. The perspective of white Southerners, Northerners and persons of color has evolved and are different. The slave trade into the United States began in 1620 with the sale of nineteen Africans to a colony called Virginia. These slaves were brought to America on a Dutch ship and were sold as indentured slaves…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 4 Works Cited 1044 words(3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] The History of Slavery in the United States – Following the success of Christopher Columbus voyage to the Americas in the early16th century, the Spaniards, French and Europeans alike made it their number one priority to sail the open seas of the Atlantic with hopes of catching a glimpse of the new territory. Once there, they immediately fell in love the land, the Americas would be the one place in the world where a poor man would be able to come and create a wealthy living for himself despite his upbringing. Its rich grounds were perfect for farming popular crops such as tobacco, sugarcane, and cotton…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 3 Works Cited 1435 words(4.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery in the American South – Slavery is a form of forced free labor in which one human being is the property of another. Close to two million slaves were brought to the American South from African and the West Indies during the Atlantic slave trade. The American South accounted for over 20% African Americans. As late as 1900, 9 out of every 10 African Americans lived in the South. Slavery supported the economic structure for the planter aristocracy. In 1850 only 1,773 families owned more than 100 slaves each, and this group provided the political and social leadership of the section and nation…. [tags: Slavery Essays]612 words(1.7 pages)Better Essays[preview] The Cotton Gin and Slavery – The Cotton Gin was an invention that allowed the mass production of cotton. Cotton was previously a very difficult crop to profit from, because of the long hours required to separate cotton seeds from the actual cotton fibers. This all changed when Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin in 1793, a machine that sped up the process, thereby making cotton farming a profitable industry for the Southern States. With large areas of prime land ready for crops the Southern states bought and transported slaves in record numbers in order to work on their cotton farms…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1160 words(3.3 pages)Good Essays[preview] Slavery in the English Colonies – Although, Slavery had existed for centuries as a lowest social status in different parts of the world like Africa, Roman Empire, Middle East and etc., in English colonies slavery gained an importance, because of increasing demand for labor force and becoming relationship legitimated by law. Therefore, Englishmen were the reason of slavery in the colonies and its consequences. In the beginning of 17 century a group of merchants established first permanent English colonies in North America at Jamestown, Virginia…. [tags: slavery, USA, ]829 words(2.4 pages)Better Essays[preview] History of Slavery in America – Working long hours, whipped to death, starved, and broken spirits all describe a slave. Its not something you hear every day. Its not something anyone ever wants to hear. Just because we dont hear it every day doesnt mean it doesnt exist. I decided to do Slave Rights to remind people that there is still slavery in the world today. If people are educated about the past then they may not make the same mistakes in the future. It has been postulated that ancient civilizations would not have developed had it not been for slavery…. [tags: American Slavery]:: 15 Works Cited 1738 words(5 pages)Better Essays[preview] Slavery in the American Colonies – 1.In the American colonies, Virginians switched from indentured servants to slaves for their labor needs for many reasons. A major reason was the shift in the relative supply of indentured servants and slaves. While the colonial demand for labor was increasing, a sharp decrease occurred in the number of English migrants arriving in America under indenture. Slaves were permanent property and female slaves passed their status on to their children. Slaves also seemed to be a better investment than indentured servants…. [tags: Slavery Essays]954 words(2.7 pages)Better Essays[preview] Abraham Lincoln Supported Slavery – The Presidents Day holiday is celebrated in the cold month of February; children in classrooms across the United States are given a litany of the Presidents and their most famous accomplishments: George Washington, who could not tell a lie is the father of our country; John Kennedy, the dashing young man who asked, not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country, was assassinated in a mystery that still remains unsolved, and Honest Abe Lincoln, the Great Emancipator who authored the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed the slaves, is credited with beginning the long road in the fight for equality for blacks…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 10 Works Cited 1620 words(4.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Religion’s Influence on the Slavery Debates – Slavery was a dominant part of the political and social arenas of 1800s America. However, it was not homogenous as it divided America into two distinct groups: those who supported it and those who did not. Traditionally, the states in the north had been anti-slavery while the states in the south had been pro-slavery. Southern life and economy depended on slavery and therefore staunchly supported the continued legal status of slavery. The northern states on the other hand recognized the inhumane nature of slavery and campaigned to establish equality for all citizens…. [tags: anti-slavery, pro-slavery, theology, equality]:: 1 Works Cited 1362 words(3.9 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Political Debate of Slavery – During the Antebellum period, the issue of slavery affected many religious and political debates. This was seen in the Lincoln Douglass debates, legislation, and the evolution of political parties. The political debates that fueled the slavery controversy were derived from legislation. The first legislation passed was the three-fifths compromise. Naturally, southern states wanted slaves to be counted as a whole person because the slave population in the south was larger. The northern states opposed this…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 2 Works Cited 1195 words(3.4 pages)Better Essays[preview] Thomas Jefferson and Slavery – Thomas Jefferson is a man who really needs no introduction. He was recognized as a luminous writer who was appointed to draft the Declaration of Independence. Congress formally approved the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. Jefferson owned many slaves that worked for him. He would often even sell his slaves to buy others. Why then would he write in the Declaration of Independence, all men are created equal. Is it possible that Thomas Jefferson was a hypocrite and only wrote what the population wanted to see…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 4 Works Cited 991 words(2.8 pages)Strong Essays[preview] The Abolition of Slavery and the American Constitution – In 1688 the first American movement was the one to abolish slavery when the German and Quakers decent in Pennsylvania. The Quakers establishment had no immediate action for the Quaker Petition against slavery. The first American abolition society was the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully by the Quakers that had strong religious objections of slavery. In 1756 John Woolman gave up his business to campaign against slavery along with other Quakers. Thomas Paine was the first to write an article about the United States abolition of slavery and it was titled African Slavery in America…. [tags: american history, slavery]726 words(2.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] Lincoln’s view on Slavery and How it Evolved – Lincolns View on Slavery.And How It Evolved Abraham Lincoln spent most of his political career as a member of the Whig party endorsing policies that aided economic development, supported free soil and opposed the expansion of slavery. Lincoln was instrumental in creating the voice of the Republican Party and during that process his own views on slavery were shaped. He played the middle ground and therefore appealed to both former conservative northern Whigs, and radical Republicans. The Civil War proved to be a turning point in Lincolns view of slavery and the extent he would go to abolish it…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 2 Works Cited 1675 words(4.8 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Sex Trade: Slavery and Prostitution – Individuals around the world are faced with inhumane treatments and conditions daily. Traffickers use force, fraud or coercion, including techniques such as containment, beatings, rape, confiscation of documents, debt bondage, false owners of employment, and threats of harm in order to maintain control over their slaves (Potocky, 2010). Sex trade is a global problem presently and will increase throughout the world if nothing is done to prevent and eliminate it. Sex slavery is a type of prostitution in which the traffickers make an increased profit through the solicitation of slaves…. [tags: legal issues, slavery, prostitution]:: 8 Works Cited 1384 words(4 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Comparing Slavery of the South and North – Introduction2 Initiation of slavery in America2 Preferences of African (black) slaves3 Similarities between the states towards slavery…..3 Differences.4 Northern states position..4 Southern states position…5 Conclusion…6 Comparing Slavery of the South and North Introduction: The Americas (north and south) was referred to as the new world since they had recently been discovered by the Europeans…. [tags: slavery, african slaves]1600 words(4.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery: The Dividing of a Country – Slavery caused a rift in the American society. The issue of slavery in America divided citizens into two groups, pro-slavery and abolitionists. Unlike other countries America could not decide this issue peacefully. The two groups fought constantly, the issue would not be settled peacefully but would end in a violent war. The pro slavery group accepted and approved of slavery, while the abolitionists viewed slavery in a different light. The abolitionist disagreed with slavery and all it stood for…. [tags: abolitionists, pro-slavery, society]:: 3 Works Cited 528 words(1.5 pages)Good Essays[preview] The Evolution of Slavery in Colonial America – In my essay, The Evolution of Slavery in Colonial America author Jon Butler explains the reasons of the traces of the evolution of slavery. Butler describes the differences of the African experience in America and the European experience in America in detail. The African experience are focus on themes of capture, enslavement, and coercion but the history of Europeans in America concentrated on themes of choice, profit, and considerable freedom. The African and European experiences were never duplicated and paralleled they were powerfully intersecting the decline of the Indian population to become the American future thats what they want, but the Africans wants to end the evolution of s… [tags: slavery, john butler, africans]594 words(1.7 pages)Good Essays[preview] Slavery in American Society: Impact and Evolution – Slavery in American Society: Impact and evolution Slavery in American Society The controversies surrounding slavery have been established in many societies worldwide for centuries. In past generations, although slavery did exists and was tolerated, it was certainly very questionable, ethically. Today, the morality of such an act would not only be unimaginable, but would also be morally wrong. As things change over the course of history we seek to not only explain why things happen, but as well to understand why they do…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 8 Works Cited 1631 words(4.7 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Bible in Relation to Slavery – The Bible is the best-selling book of all time, and with good reason. For the stories written in it have changed the way many think and even believe when it comes to the power greater than this world. The Bible holds very specific opinions on things such as slavery, who humans should treat each other, and ultimately social justice. It has been one of the most important foundations for allowing social reform to occur in modern day history as well as the history of the whole world. However, it is forgotten in history class how prominent the ancient texts have changed the people…. [tags: Religion, History, Slavery]:: 3 Works Cited 1787 words(5.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] If Slavery were Considered Moral – Describe the differences of this time period if slavery was considered “right”. ISSUES TO UNDERSTAND CH. 14 1)The Compromise of 1850 was a dispute on whether or not Mexico (gained by US) would become a slave or free state. The northerners didn’t want the 36’30’ line to be moved to the Pacific and the southerners didn’t want “free soilism” which would make Mexico a free state. Northerners gained from the Compromise California as a free state, New Mexico and Utah as likely future slave states, a favorable settlement of the New Mexico-Texas boundary, and the abolition of the slave trade in the District of Colombia…. [tags: Slavery]1110 words(3.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] The Real Heroes of Slavery in the United States – As a child in elementary and high school, I was taught that President Abraham Lincoln was the reason that African slaves were freed from slavery. My teachers did not provide much more information than that. For an African American student, I should have received further historical information than that about my ancestors. Unfortunately, I did not have the opportunity or desire to research slavery on my own until college. And with my eagerness and thirst for more answers concerning my African American history, I set out to console my spirit, knowledge, and self-awareness of my ancestors history…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1983 words(5.7 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The U.S. Constitution and Slavery – The US constitution was written with great vision to create strong nation. The bill of right were written, it provide all humans with rights. The writers of the constitution we hypocrites, they didnt abide by what they preached. Thomas Jefferson wrote himself all men are created equal but he owned slaves. The founding father didnt look or even think about slavery when they wrote the constitution. They were pre-occupied in getting the southern state to join the union and sign the new constitution…. [tags: USA, constitution, slavery, history, ]408 words(1.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] From Slavery to Presidential Power – When people look at a persons appearance, no two people will ever look alike. When people look at a persons character, no two people will ever look alike. Color, being the only thing that was similar, caused people of white race to see themselves as superior to those of African-American race. Slavery, which first arrived in Virginia in 1619, was followed by a number of events; many laws and amendments were passed, like the Fugitive Slave Law. Slavery resulted in Civil War, later gaining rights for African-Americans…. [tags: Slavery / Civil Rights]:: 6 Works Cited 1274 words(3.6 pages)Strong Essays[preview] History of Slavery in America – Slavery in the United States Slavery in general term consist in the state of a person being a property of another person. It has appeared for thousands of years. From the old Roman emperor to nineteenth century. Regardless, it increased by the development of societies to make profit by cheap human labor. Slavery appeared in the United States in late of seventeen centuries as a result of the trade market. These slaves came from Africa to work in large plantations for free labor in America. Historians believe that the first ship of slaves to arrive in America was Dutch to the Virginia colony of Jamestown in 1619 with around 20 slaves…. [tags: American History, Africans, Slavery]:: 8 Works Cited 909 words(2.6 pages)Better Essays[preview] George Washington’s Feelings About Slavery – An abundance of scholars and general public regard George Washington as a prime example of leadership, citizenship, and overall individual achievement, and with good reason. When first learning of about George Washington in grade school, I was only told of his great accomplishments. The following composition will challenge the readers perception of our Nations first President as well enlighten the reader to debatable evidence of a more selfish racist. Thus forth, the following will show several of his accomplishments and how they not only overshadow his more deplorable actions but place his character and honesty into question…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 5 Works Cited 1319 words(3.8 pages)Strong Essays[preview] American Slavery Vs. Russian Serfdom – American slavery and Russian serfdom were similar in that the laborers were pushed down to the bottom of the social classes, slaves did not have any social mobility, and slaves were tied to the land they worked. In the Americas the Native American slaves were at the very bottom of the social classes. Different mixes of races also caused further denomination of classes between slaves. Similarly, in Russian serfdom, serfs were the lowest of classes and had very limited rights which made them almost like slaves to their landlords…. [tags: Serfs, Slavery]1876 words(5.4 pages)Better Essays[preview] Colonial American Slavery – The study of slavery in the development of early America is an extremely complex, yet vitally important part of American History. There are hundreds of thousands of documents, debates, and historical studies available today. According to Ms. Goetz, the assistant professor of history at Rice University, who states, in The Southern Journal of History, that in addition to geographic and chronological diversity in the Americas, assessment of experiences of colonial slaves is extremely complex, especially in the context of three European colonial powers, vigorous Indian groups, and free and enslaved blacks(Goetz, 599)…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 13 Works Cited 1467 words(4.2 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery is in the Past – Imagine being out in the fields hunting with your father. It has been a long day and a spitted warthog hangs between you. All of a sudden you are ambushed. An enemy tribe attacks you and your father. You fight using your makeshift spear but are overwhelmed by the number of tribesmen. You are hit in the head with a rock and fall unconscious. When you wake you are being loaded into a great wooden monster. You cringe in fear as you and your fellow captives are herded into this great wooden beast. You scream in protest at the white men who have chained you but they just beat you on the head with their rifles…. [tags: Slavery Argumentative]1953 words(5.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Abolishment of Slavery – The Abolishment of Slavery Slavery was a disgraceful and disturbing phenomenon. It was abolished, as people gradually became aware of the conditions of the lives of the slaves. There were many courageous men and women who helped put an end to slavery, both black and white, and the large number of people in Britain in Britain and all over the world that opposed slavery were very important abolishment of slavery. Middle class whites had an important role in the abolishment of slavery…. [tags: Slavery Essays]366 words(1 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in the South – Slavery in the South A large majority of whites in the South supported slavery even though fewer of a quarter of them owned slaves because they felt that it was a necessary evil and that it was an important Southern institution. In 1800 the population of the United States included 893,602 slaves, of which only 36,505 were in the northern states. Vermont, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey provided for the emancipation of their slaves before 1804, most of them by gradual measures…. [tags: Slavery Essays]683 words(2 pages)Good Essays[preview] The Cases Against Slavery – The two addresses by Abraham Lincoln Address at the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery and Second Inaugural address reflect the issues with slavery. The story, as framed by Abraham Lincoln, tells how colored soldiers and non colored soldiers have come together to fight the civil war to abolish slavery and preserve their rights their fore fathers have set up for them and how slavery goes against being a Christian. While the story line follows that of Harriet Beecher Stowe in her book Uncle Toms Cabin, where through a series of sketches she tells the stories of the human cruelty of slavery and enlightens the reader on how being a Christian and being for slavery is wrong…. [tags: Abraham Lincoln, slavery, Civil War]1110 words(3.2 pages)Better Essays[preview] What is Wrong with Slavery?: Utilitarian Thought – In Philosophical Ethics, Utilitarianism is the doctrine that our actions are right if the outcome of our actions generate the greatest happiness amongst the majority. However, in What is Wrong with Slavery? some objectors of utilitarianism have tried to dismiss this moral reasoning as to having any importance by blaming the awful actions of slave traders and slave owners on utilitarianism. They attack this doctrine by saying that utilitarianism is a belief system that can either praise or condemn slavery, and utilitarianism easily commend slavery if a majority of the people visualize a slave-owning society as the most beneficial and generate greatest happiness…. [tags: utilitarianism, slavery, slave trade]733 words(2.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] The Effect of the Industrial Revolution on Slavery – Slavery has always been a part of human history. Therefore on cannot talk about when slavery began in North America. Soon after the American colonies were established in North America, slaves were brought in to meet the growing labor need on plantations. Although the importation of slaves continued to grow as new plantations were developed, it was the industrial revolution that would have the most profound impact on the slave industry. The purpose of this essay is to analyze the effect of slavery in the 13 colonies due to the industrial revolution…. [tags: Slavery, North America, Industrial Revolution, his]1161 words(3.3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in the South – Slavery in the South Slavery of the Black man in America was the cruelest ever known to man. Europeans transported slaves from Africa as early as 1505. The African Slaves were first exploited on an island named Hispaniola, in the Caribbean by the Europeans to do labor work, before they were sent to the Americas. The women usually worked the interior cooking and cleaning while the men were sent out into the plantation fields to farm. These Africans were stripped of their homes, cultures, and languages…. [tags: Slavery Essays]865 words(2.5 pages)Good Essays[preview] Slavery in the Caribbean – Slavery in the Caribbean Caribbean Slavery gave planters and elite in the Caribbean the right to abuse a human by requiring ridiculously long hours of work on the fields and not providing enough nutrition. The article by Kiple and Kiple reviews the state of malnutrition among the slaves and the findings are atrocious. Slaves were lacking basic nutrients such as calcium, fats, and various vitamins. Kiple and Kiple, regardless of these facts, state that according to 18 and 19th century standards, these diets were not poor…. [tags: Slavery Essays]870 words(2.5 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in the United States – A historian once wrote that the rise of liberty and equality in America was accompanied by slavery. There is truth in that statement to great effect. The rise of America in general was accompanied by slavery and the settlers learned early on that slavery would be an effective way to build a country and create free labor. There was a definite accompaniment of slavery with the rising of liberty and equality in America. In 1787, in Philadelphia at the Constitutional Convention, the structure of government wasnt the only thing being discussed…. [tags: Slavery, racial issues, equal rights, civil rights]:: 3 Works Cited 1042 words(3 pages)Better Essays[preview] The South and Slavery – The South and Slavery The Societies of the North and South were very different. They were two regions of the country that depended very heavily on each other but yet seemed so far apart. Disagreeing on almost every aspect of how to reside and especially on very specific issues like slavery and emancipation. The North was an industrious, moneymaking, region. They respected blacks and gave them more rights than in the South where they had none. They still were not given the same rights as whites…. [tags: Slavery Essays]527 words(1.5 pages)Strong Essays[preview] The Longstanding Institution of Slavery in the United States – Slavery, as an institution, has existed since the dawn of civilization. However, by the fifteenth century, slavery in Northern Europe was almost nonexistent. Nevertheless, with the discovery of the New World, the English experienced a shortage of laborers to work the lands they claimed. The English tried to enslave the natives, but they resisted and were usually successful in escaping. Furthermore, with the decline of indentured servants, the Europeans looked elsewhere for laborers. It is then, within the British colonies, do the colonists turn to the enslavement of Africans…. [tags: USA, slavery, history]658 words(1.9 pages)Better Essays[preview] Slavery and the Caribbean – Slavery and the Caribbean Europeans came into contact with the Caribbean after Columbus’s momentous journeys in 1492, 1496 and 1498. The desire for expansion and trade led to the settlement of the colonies. The indigenous peoples, according to our sources mostly peaceful Tainos and warlike Caribs, proved to be unsuitable for slave labour in the newly formed plantations, and they were quickly and brutally decimated. The descendants of this once thriving community can now only be found in Guiana and Trinidad…. [tags: Slavery Essays]767 words(2.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Chapter 19 Outline: Perceptions on Slavery – … Yet again the citizens would vote to make Kansas either pro or free slave state. The Lecompton Constitution is made to control free-soilers and appeal to the pro-slavery southerners. The constitution caused problems because obviously northerners didnt agree with it. In the end the constitution was thrown off by free-soil voters. Kansas never becomes a state until southern states seceded from the Union. IV. Bully Brooks and His Bludgeon: a.Charles Sumner Senator of Massachusetts gives a speech and is afterward beaten by Preston Brook…. [tags: kansas, slavery, debate, union]1219 words(3.5 pages)Strong Essays[preview] African American Issues: Slavery and Continuing Racism – There are many issues that African Americans face in todays society, many of which I had not realized until after taking Africana Studies. Some issues dwell on the horrific past of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, which not only is history, but also is part of African American heritage (Karenga, 2010). African Americans frequently experience many perilous problems, such as dire economic situations and feelings of hostility from the cultural mainstream in America (Kaufman, 1971). The cultural collision between African Americans and whites continues to create several problems in society…. [tags: Race, Slavery]:: 9 Works Cited 894 words(2.6 pages)Better Essays[preview] The Hypocrisy of American Slavery, Through the Eyes of Frederick Douglass – The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself is a powerful book in many respects. Douglass invites you to vicariously witness the monstrous atrocities he experienced during the antebellum period; a time when said atrocities were not only encouraged, but looked highly upon. Throughout his narrative, Douglass expresses his exponentially growing anger and fortitude. When the reader arrives at The Appendix, it soon becomes that much more apparent that the vice of slavery that is most troublesome to him, is the curtain of pseudo-Christianity surrounding it…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 3 Works Cited 1599 words(4.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] slavery and the plantation – slavery and the plantation During the era of slavery in the United States, not all blacks were slaves. There were a many number of free blacks, consisting of those had been freed or those in fact that were never slave. Nor did all slave work on plantations. There were nearly five hundred thousand that worked in the cities as domestic, skilled artisans and factory hands (Green, 13). But they were exceptions to the general rule. Most blacks in America were slaves on plantation-sized units in the seven states of the South…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 6 Works Cited 2101 words(6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery in the Bible – Slavery in the Bible The first mention of slavery in the Bible is found in Noah’s declaration, “Cursed be Canaan. The lowest of slaves will he be to his brothers” (Gen. 9:25). He said this after waking up from a naked, drunken stupor and learning that his son Ham had mocked him. Although Ham was the guilty party, Noah’s statement was directed at Ham’s youngest son Canaan. If he was involved with his father in this act of disrespect, the statement can be taken as the pronouncement of a curse, “Cursed be Canaan.” It is possible, however, that Canaan did not join his father in making fun of Noah…. [tags: Slavery Essays]780 words(2.2 pages)Good Essays[preview] Slavery Around the World – Throughout this course we have learned about slavery in many parts of the world. I have learned some new things about slavery that I had never been taught before. Slavery has been a major stab wound to the heart of the world ever since it first existed. Slavery has caused years of turmoil and depression to large ethnic groups of people who have done nothing to deserve what came to them. The sad part about the whole slavery situation is that, it was never completely abolished from the world. Maybe on paper slavery may have been abolished, but there are still forms of slavery that exists in the world today…. [tags: Slave, Mende Nazer, child slavery, Sudan]:: 3 Works Cited 1588 words(4.5 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The abolition of slavery in Africa and the Middle East – … The Western civilizatory mission can not accept slave work in a world in which the progress and the ‘humanity’ it was characterized by freedom and wage labor.9 Actually, the end of slavery in Africa was one of the ‘motivations’ of the ‘scramble of Africa’. Colonialism was a way to overcome the savagery and bring natives to progress and civilization through wage labor and production for the market.10 Once the colonial rule was established and slavery legally abolished, images of ‘benign’ slavery were a way to keep good relations with the local rulers…. [tags: British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society]1001 words(2.9 pages)Better Essays[preview] Slavery, A World History – A labor system that had previously existed throughout history, in many instances and most countries is known as slavery. So what exactly is it. How did slavery begin. And what does it mean in our world today. These are complex questions that are often asked and, possibly, by understanding the forms it takes and the roles such slaves perform. What daily life is like for those enchained and what can be done to end this demeaning practice may help in answering those questions. It is known that slavery is a system under which people are treated as property to be bought, sold and are forced to work…. [tags: labor systems, laws don’t abolish slavery ]:: 2 Works Cited 1098 words(3.1 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Racial Slavery and the Development of Our Nation – … Confrontation between the Native Americans and settlers in western Virginia spearheaded an uprising that demanded Governor Berkeley to provide more land to the poor whites. Berkeley stood by his decision to maintain peaceful relations with the local Native American population, which sparked a series of uprisings and massacres that grew into full rebellion against Berkeley and his men. Berkeley fled when Nathaniel Bacon and his ranks burned Jamestown to the ground, which led to Bacons rule over Virginia for a short while until England sent warships to regain control…. [tags: united states, freedom, liberty, slavery]:: 1 Works Cited 1436 words(4.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] Interpretations of Slavery – Interpretations of Slavery INTRODUCTION Slavery is known to have existed as early as the 18th century B.C. during the Shang Dynasty of China. Slavery was widely practiced in many other countries, including, Korea, India, Greece, Mexico and Africa. (Britannica 288-89). When most people consider slavery, however, they think of Western slavery in North America because it is well documented and it was such a horrible institution. Even though there is no one definition of slavery, the people who study it (historians, anthropologists and sociologists) agree that certain characteristics are present in all forms of slavery…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 8 Works Cited 3740 words(10.7 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery in America – Slavery in America By 1850, ninety-two percent of all American blacks were concentrated in the South, and about 95 percent were slaves. Pre-civil war slaves in America went through a great deal of turmoil and discontent in the South. Slavery has had a huge effect on our country. Many slaves were beaten to death and some did not survive the ruff life of slavery. Slavery then went on to cause the War between the North and the South known as the Civil War. In 1916, a Dutch ship brought twenty enslaved Africans to a Virginia Colony at Jamestown…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 2 Works Cited 410 words(1.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery In 19c – Slavery in 19th Century A justified institution as the 19th century emerged; the infamous institution of slavery grew rapidly and produced some surprising controversy and rash justification. Proslavery, Southern whites used social, political, and economical justification in their arguments defining the institution as a source of positive good, a legal definition, and as an economic stabilizer. The proslavery supporters often used moral and biblical rationalization through a religious foundation in Christianity and supported philosophic ideals in Manifest Destiny to vindicated slavery as a profitable investment…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1159 words(3.3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery In America – Slavery in America Introduction There has been much debate on the topic of slavery in the early times, although most of the countries considered slavery as a criminal activity. Some countries such as Myanmar and Sudan do not abolish it. They even expedite the slavery system. It is no doubt that slavery violent the human rights. However, it was commonly spread in the early times from 17th to 19th century. In this research, I will talk about the origin of the slavery, the reasons for people to becoming slave and the life of the slave…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1493 words(4.3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery In Illinois – Slavery in Illinois This essay talks about the dated events that happened in Illinois, focusing on slavery, from the time it begun, whether it should be implemented or not, its abolishment, and up to the time it ended. The paper also contains a well-opinionated reaction about slavery, how it is different from today. The Civil War Period has always been the primary hub of teaching in any American History classes. The era between the American Revolution and the Civil War was of a great importance since it has been the best and worst part of the western civilization during those times…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 4 Works Cited 1565 words(4.5 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in Literature – Slavery in Literature Frederick Douglass was born into the lifelong, evil, bondage of slavery. His autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself, depicts his accomplishments. The narrative, however, is not only the story of his success. It is not simply a tale of his miraculous escape from slavery. Frederick Douglass’ narrative is, in fact, an account of his tremendous strides through literacy. He exemplifies a literate man who is able to use the psychological tools of thought to escape the intense bonds of slavery…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1499 words(4.3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery and Reparations – Slavery, colonialism and neo-colonialism have caused inestimable damage to billions of people throughout the world. They have also formed the basis for the accumulation of immense wealth in the hands of a small elite The slave trade involved the brutal relocation of tens of millions of people in which families, communities and societies were destroyed and in which millions lost their lives in the most inhumane conditions. At the same time, slavery was a fundamental element of the strengthening of mercantile trade and the rapid accumulation of capital that formed the basis for the emergence of the capitalist system as we know it today…. [tags: Slavery Essays]4382 words(12.5 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Defense Of Slavery – Throughout history many things have happened that were by many thought to be unconscionable. Yet, the people who were putting their mark of unacceptance upon those committing these thought to be deplorable acts, were unaware of the actual situations, and in many cases, committing the same acts themselves. This was true during the Holy Wars, the Crusades and similar events. People who were not involved, often thought these acts of inhumanity to be reprehensible, but the parties involved, in their minds, had just cause for what they were doing…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1105 words(3.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery In America – Slavery in America stems well back to when the new world was first discovered and was led by the country to start the African Slave Trade-Portugal. The African Slave Trade was first exploited for plantations in the Caribbean, and eventually reached the southern coasts of America. The African natives were of all ages and sexes. Women usually worked in the homes cooking and cleaning, while men were sent out into the plantations to farm. Young girls would usually help in the house also and young boys would help in the farm by bailing hay and loading wagons with crops…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1011 words(2.9 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Racism and Slavery – Did race prejudice cause slavery. Or was it the other way round. Winthrop D. Jordan, in his monumental study of white American attitudes to black people from 1550 to 1812, argues that prejudice and slavery may well have been equally cause and effect, ‘dynamically joining hands to hustle the Negro down the road to complete degradation. But we must go deeper than that, if we are to understand the rise of English racism as an ideology, the various roles it has played in the past, and the role it is playing today…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1802 words(5.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Lydia Maria Child’s Propositions Defining Slavery and Emancipation – There has been many debates about the righteousness of slavery in the United States. There were many supporters of slavery as well as people who opposed slavery. Slavery has concentrated on African slaves In the United States. Law and public opinion regarding slavery differed from state to state and from person to person. Slavery has brought about a lot of controversy and stirred emotions even in today’s society which has left a big impact on the people. In the documents, Ads for Runaway Servants and Slaves (1733-72), Lydia Maria Child’s Propositions Defining Slavery and Emancipation (1833) and Lydia Maria Child’s Prejudices against people of color (1836), describes the life of slaves alon… [tags: slavery, african-american, servants]:: 9 Works Cited 1425 words(4.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery in Jamaica – Jamaica has been a land exploited and oppressed by white nations for much of its history. First colonized by the Spanish and then the British, it seems hard to imagine a time when it was just the native people living in peace and harmony with the land. Many years after the white man first jammed himself onto the beaches of Jamaica, reggae music was born. A continuing tradition, this easy-to-groove-to music style originated as a voice against this oppression; it was the peaceful islanders way of finally communicating their plighted history to all who would listen, or all who could appreciate a good beat…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 6 Works Cited 4438 words(12.7 pages)Strong Essays[preview] slavery in brasil – Because certain forms of slavery had existed for centuries on the continent of Africa, Brazilian historians used to say that blacks imported from across the Atlantic were docile and ready to accept their new status as slaves. This assertion is based on the unwarranted assumption that was true of a limited area of Africa was typical of the continent as a whole. All slavery in brazil was essentially the same depending on the task or the labor the slave had to preform. In many cases the slaves was there to perform labor that was deplorable to the nobility…. [tags: Slavery Essays]743 words(2.1 pages)Good Essays[preview] Views On Slavery – There are many perceptions as to how people view slavery. When people talk about slavery, the first thing that comes to their mind will be African American Slaves in the United States. They will also think of how they were brought to the United States against their own will and unequally exploited. However, according to Stephen F. Austin, during the eighteen-twentys and thirtys Mexicans also had slaves. He compares American Slaves and Cruz Arocha as a Mexican Slave. Although there are many differences between Cruz Arocha and the American slaves, especially in the ways they are treated…. [tags: Slavery Essays]761 words(2.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Women and Slavery – SLAVERY AND THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD The simple fact is that everybody has heard of the Underground Railroad, but not everyone knows just what it was. First of all, it wasn=t underground, and it wasn=t even a railroad. The term AUnderground Railroad,@ actually refers to a path along which escaping slaves were passed from farmhouse to storage sheds, from cellars to barns, until they reached safety in the North. One of the most widely known abolitionists in history is a slave by the name of Harriet Tubman…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 2 Works Cited 1466 words(4.2 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery in America – For this assignment we were asked to read the book Modern Medea written Steven Weisenburger, which deals with slavery in the mid-nineteenth century. In my paper I will discuss how the book portrays the daily life as a slave, the issue of freedom, and the racial realities during this time. This particular book tells the story of a slave by the name of Margaret Garner, who one day escaped from her plantation in Covington, KY, and took along with her Robert which was her husband, her four children, and Robert’s parents…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1843 words(5.3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Support of Slavery by the Christian Church – Support of Slavery by the Christian Church The belief in some higher presence, other than our own, has existed since man can recollect. Religion was established from this belief, and it can survive and flourish because of this belief. Christianity, one of several forms of religion that exist today, began sometime during the middle of the first century. Christians believe in a higher presence that they call “God.” This belief in God is based on faith, not fact; faith is “unquestioning belief that does not require proof or evidence.” (Webster’s New World College Dictionary, 1996, p…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 6 Works Cited 2850 words(8.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Contrasting Views of Pro-Slavery vs. Abolitionist – … Samuel Cartwright was a physician and pro-slavery advocate during the 1800s and is well known for his diagnosis of drapetomania, a supposed disease that made slaves runaway. He concluded that the reason African slaves sought to escape was because they were treated inadequately by their masters. Delving deeper in his writings it is discovered he too, like George Fitzhugh, approved of enslavement. Both men advocated the issue and have similar analyzes on how slaves are or should be treated. Cartwright expresses to his audience that slaves will most likely run (drapetomania) if they are treated poorly by their master; according to my experience, the “genu flexit”–the awe and reverence, m… [tags: positions, goals, party, slavery]1248 words(3.6 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in the Nineteenth Century: Viewpoint of the Antislavery and Abolotionist Movements – … They were very well envisioned, however their efforts were only effective for so long due to the vast amounts of funding necessary for compensation of slave owners and shipment of freed slaves to their new settlements. There were far too many slaves and it was certain that the plan would never reach economic sufficiency to follow through with their project, as well as the fact that the growing cotton industry in the South called for much labor work and slaves were the easiest access of productive laborers…. [tags: homelands, slavery, influence, war]751 words(2.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] A Study of the Healing Process from Slavery and Racism – A battle lost or won is easily described, understood, and appreciated, but the moral growth of a great nation requires reflection, as well as observation, to appreciate it.-Frederick Douglass When you think of slavery, you may want to consider the effects of an earthquake because thats how powerful it was. Like many earthquakes, slavery produced various damaging ramifications to everything around it. This included devastation to family structures and in worst cases the loss of human life; and without doubt slavery claimed the lives of many just as Harriet Jacobs expressed I once saw a slave girl dying after the birth of a child nearly white…. [tags: Racial Relations, Slavery, Racism]2560 words(7.3 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Looking Poitively at the Effects of Slavery in the USA: Personal Narrative – A Blessing in Disguise Slavery and capitalism have an interesting relationship. Slavery has existed nearly everywhere in the world, under almost every political and economic system, and was in no way a stranger to capitalism or the United States. America experienced endless economic benefits from slavery, but it was simultaneously a despicable violation of human rights. Natives of Africa were not only captured, but transported to what is now the United States and forced to do work. From the 16th to the 19th centuries, European colonies heavily depended on the labor of the Africans for their economic survival…. [tags: economic systems, capitalism, slavery]:: 5 Works Cited 1012 words(2.9 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Wendell Phillips: A Leading Reformer for the Abolishment of Slavery – Wendell Phillips was a leading reformer for the abolishment of slavery and was known as a passionate abolitionist who was willing to risk his own future to defend the cause he firmly believed in. He was born on November 29, 1811, the son of a wealthy Boston family. With a background of attending the famous Boston Latin School as a kid and later on obtaining a degree from Harvard Law School in 1834. Phillips did not consider himself a reformer until the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society where he heard William Lloyd Garrison speak…. [tags: anti-slavery leaders]727 words(2.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] The Reality of Sex Slavery in the Present Day – In Margaret Atwoods novel, Oryx and Crake, she constantly placesthe reader in an uncomfortable environment. The story takesplacein a not so distant future where todays world no longerexistsdue toanunknown catastrophe. The only human is a man who calls himself theAbominableSnowman or Snowman for short, but in his childhood days his name was Jimmy. If the thought of being all alone in the world is not uneasy enough, Atwood takes this opportunity to point out the flaws of themodernworldthrough Snowmans reminiscing about Jimmys childhood. The truthsexposed are eventsthatpeople do not want to acknowledge: animal abuse for human advancement, elimination of human interacti… [tags: oryx and crake,margaret atwood,modern slavery]:: 2 Works Cited 1386 words(4 pages)Strong Essays[preview]

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Free Slavery Essays and Papers – 123HelpMe

Free Slavery Essays and Papers – 123HelpMe

Title Length Color Rating Slavery and the Anti-slavery Movement – Anytime we hear the word slavery, we tend to think of the Southern United States during the Pre-Civil War era. What many people dont know, is that this horrible act has occurred worldwide. The term slavery has many different definitions, and has occurred all throughout our world history. It wasnt until the early 18th century that the thought of anti-slavery came about. Many economic, social, and technological forces have played a part in the decline of slavery around the globe. The first definition that comes to mind when we hear this term, is the act of being a slave or a person who does not own their own labor…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 11 Works Cited 1030 words(2.9 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Analysis of Arguments for the Slavery Institution – Analysis of Arguments for the Slavery Institution The foundation of this paper will highlight the following questions: How might southern apologists for slavery have used the northern wage slave discussed in the last chapter to justify slavery. To what extent do you agree with this argument. How did slaves use religious belief and kinship to temper their plight. Did this strategy play into the hands of slaveholders. How were non-slaveholding whites and free people of color affected by the institution of slavery…. [tags: Slavery]513 words(1.5 pages)Good Essays[preview] Enormity of Slavery – In the 1800s, many slave owners thought it fair for Africans to work without pay, because they believed that this particular group of people were made by God for this sort of work, and that slave owners were ever caring and conscientious of their slaves anyway, making slavery an easy life; truthfully, however, as both Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs experienced in being slaves most of their lives, and then showed in their narratives, this cruel and unusual practice was the epitome of iniquity- notwithstanding the fact that they were created equal to their malefactors…. [tags: Slavery]1612 words(4.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] 18th Centry Slavery In North America – People crying for freedom and liberty from tyranny built a nation out of greed and unethical acts. The rapacious desires of a nation to gain wealth and possessions lead to the emotional and psychological trauma of West Africans and African Americans. In spite of being taken from Africa, the sweat and blood of these Africans contributed to the birth of the beautiful nation that would eventually recognize their descendants as equals. The Exploration Age commenced in the fifteenth century when European nations decided to expand their power for technological, demographic, and economic reasons…. [tags: Slavery]:: 5 Works Cited 917 words(2.6 pages)Good Essays[preview] An End To Slavery – The society that became known as the United States had its beginnings when the first English settlers set foot on North American soil. Whether that settler landed in Massachusetts or Virginia, their beginnings on this continent were all influenced by the society that they had left behind. These included many aspects of England’s society, culture, economy, and politics. Those societal, cultural, economic and political beginnings can be traced throughout our history in the mindset that both the North and South represented…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1394 words(4 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Origins of Chattel Slavery in Colonial North America – The Origins of Chattel Slavery in Colonial North America There have been many illuminating studies in the field of the origins of chattel slavery in Colonial North America. Alpert, 1970; Edmondson, 1976; Jordan, 1962: Ruchames, 1967; Starr, 1973, wrote seminal studies that did much to bring insight to the subject. Goetz, 2009; Mason, 2006; Smaje, 2002; Neeganagwedgin, 2012, presented evidence that have either reexamined old questions or used new methods and approaches to ask news questions to add insight to this topic…. [tags: Slavery]:: 13 Works Cited 1586 words(4.5 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Consequences of Slavery – Abstract Slavery, like many ill-fated and evil inventions reached epidemic levels in early Europe and the American colonies. The history of slavery is documented most acutely during the period when slaves first arrived to the new land and when the colonies had first developed into the fledging United States of America. This would lead us to believe that slavery had not existed before this period or that the consequences and relevance of it had little historical, social, or economical importance…. [tags: Slavery, history, informative]:: 6 Works Cited 2031 words(5.8 pages)Better Essays[preview] Slavery and Abolition – The term slave is defined as a person held in servitude as the chattel of another, or one that is completely passive to a dominating influence. The most well known cases of slavery occurred during the settling of the United States of America. From 1619 until July 1st 1928 slavery was allowed within our country. Slavery abolitionists attempted to end slavery, which at some point; they were successful at doing so. This paper will take the reader a lot of different directions, it will look at slavery in a legal aspect along the lines of the constitution and the thirteenth amendment, and it will also discuss how abolitionists tried to end slavery…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 4 Works Cited 1581 words(4.5 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Colors of Slavery – When Americans think about slavery, they tend to think about “Africans” being brought to the New World against their will. Which upon their arrival were sold, the same as livestock, as permanent property to the white landowners. They may visualize in their minds a person of color shackled, chained, beaten, and forced to labor under the control of their white master. Their picture is that of chattel slavery; black and white. Americans have come to the assumption that slavery was imposed on people of one color or race…. [tags: History Slavery]:: 3 Works Cited 1795 words(5.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Evolution of Slavery – A person who is the property of and wholly subject to another; this is the definition of a slave. Over a span of 400 years 12 million Africans were captured, brought to the New World by approximately 40,000 ships and then enslaved. Thats 80 or more slaves per day. The perspective of white Southerners, Northerners and persons of color has evolved and are different. The slave trade into the United States began in 1620 with the sale of nineteen Africans to a colony called Virginia. These slaves were brought to America on a Dutch ship and were sold as indentured slaves…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 4 Works Cited 1044 words(3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] The History of Slavery in the United States – Following the success of Christopher Columbus voyage to the Americas in the early16th century, the Spaniards, French and Europeans alike made it their number one priority to sail the open seas of the Atlantic with hopes of catching a glimpse of the new territory. Once there, they immediately fell in love the land, the Americas would be the one place in the world where a poor man would be able to come and create a wealthy living for himself despite his upbringing. Its rich grounds were perfect for farming popular crops such as tobacco, sugarcane, and cotton…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 3 Works Cited 1435 words(4.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery in the American South – Slavery is a form of forced free labor in which one human being is the property of another. Close to two million slaves were brought to the American South from African and the West Indies during the Atlantic slave trade. The American South accounted for over 20% African Americans. As late as 1900, 9 out of every 10 African Americans lived in the South. Slavery supported the economic structure for the planter aristocracy. In 1850 only 1,773 families owned more than 100 slaves each, and this group provided the political and social leadership of the section and nation…. [tags: Slavery Essays]612 words(1.7 pages)Better Essays[preview] The Cotton Gin and Slavery – The Cotton Gin was an invention that allowed the mass production of cotton. Cotton was previously a very difficult crop to profit from, because of the long hours required to separate cotton seeds from the actual cotton fibers. This all changed when Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin in 1793, a machine that sped up the process, thereby making cotton farming a profitable industry for the Southern States. With large areas of prime land ready for crops the Southern states bought and transported slaves in record numbers in order to work on their cotton farms…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1160 words(3.3 pages)Good Essays[preview] Slavery in the English Colonies – Although, Slavery had existed for centuries as a lowest social status in different parts of the world like Africa, Roman Empire, Middle East and etc., in English colonies slavery gained an importance, because of increasing demand for labor force and becoming relationship legitimated by law. Therefore, Englishmen were the reason of slavery in the colonies and its consequences. In the beginning of 17 century a group of merchants established first permanent English colonies in North America at Jamestown, Virginia…. [tags: slavery, USA, ]829 words(2.4 pages)Better Essays[preview] History of Slavery in America – Working long hours, whipped to death, starved, and broken spirits all describe a slave. Its not something you hear every day. Its not something anyone ever wants to hear. Just because we dont hear it every day doesnt mean it doesnt exist. I decided to do Slave Rights to remind people that there is still slavery in the world today. If people are educated about the past then they may not make the same mistakes in the future. It has been postulated that ancient civilizations would not have developed had it not been for slavery…. [tags: American Slavery]:: 15 Works Cited 1738 words(5 pages)Better Essays[preview] Slavery in the American Colonies – 1.In the American colonies, Virginians switched from indentured servants to slaves for their labor needs for many reasons. A major reason was the shift in the relative supply of indentured servants and slaves. While the colonial demand for labor was increasing, a sharp decrease occurred in the number of English migrants arriving in America under indenture. Slaves were permanent property and female slaves passed their status on to their children. Slaves also seemed to be a better investment than indentured servants…. [tags: Slavery Essays]954 words(2.7 pages)Better Essays[preview] Abraham Lincoln Supported Slavery – The Presidents Day holiday is celebrated in the cold month of February; children in classrooms across the United States are given a litany of the Presidents and their most famous accomplishments: George Washington, who could not tell a lie is the father of our country; John Kennedy, the dashing young man who asked, not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country, was assassinated in a mystery that still remains unsolved, and Honest Abe Lincoln, the Great Emancipator who authored the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed the slaves, is credited with beginning the long road in the fight for equality for blacks…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 10 Works Cited 1620 words(4.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Religion’s Influence on the Slavery Debates – Slavery was a dominant part of the political and social arenas of 1800s America. However, it was not homogenous as it divided America into two distinct groups: those who supported it and those who did not. Traditionally, the states in the north had been anti-slavery while the states in the south had been pro-slavery. Southern life and economy depended on slavery and therefore staunchly supported the continued legal status of slavery. The northern states on the other hand recognized the inhumane nature of slavery and campaigned to establish equality for all citizens…. [tags: anti-slavery, pro-slavery, theology, equality]:: 1 Works Cited 1362 words(3.9 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Political Debate of Slavery – During the Antebellum period, the issue of slavery affected many religious and political debates. This was seen in the Lincoln Douglass debates, legislation, and the evolution of political parties. The political debates that fueled the slavery controversy were derived from legislation. The first legislation passed was the three-fifths compromise. Naturally, southern states wanted slaves to be counted as a whole person because the slave population in the south was larger. The northern states opposed this…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 2 Works Cited 1195 words(3.4 pages)Better Essays[preview] Thomas Jefferson and Slavery – Thomas Jefferson is a man who really needs no introduction. He was recognized as a luminous writer who was appointed to draft the Declaration of Independence. Congress formally approved the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. Jefferson owned many slaves that worked for him. He would often even sell his slaves to buy others. Why then would he write in the Declaration of Independence, all men are created equal. Is it possible that Thomas Jefferson was a hypocrite and only wrote what the population wanted to see…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 4 Works Cited 991 words(2.8 pages)Strong Essays[preview] The Abolition of Slavery and the American Constitution – In 1688 the first American movement was the one to abolish slavery when the German and Quakers decent in Pennsylvania. The Quakers establishment had no immediate action for the Quaker Petition against slavery. The first American abolition society was the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully by the Quakers that had strong religious objections of slavery. In 1756 John Woolman gave up his business to campaign against slavery along with other Quakers. Thomas Paine was the first to write an article about the United States abolition of slavery and it was titled African Slavery in America…. [tags: american history, slavery]726 words(2.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] Lincoln’s view on Slavery and How it Evolved – Lincolns View on Slavery.And How It Evolved Abraham Lincoln spent most of his political career as a member of the Whig party endorsing policies that aided economic development, supported free soil and opposed the expansion of slavery. Lincoln was instrumental in creating the voice of the Republican Party and during that process his own views on slavery were shaped. He played the middle ground and therefore appealed to both former conservative northern Whigs, and radical Republicans. The Civil War proved to be a turning point in Lincolns view of slavery and the extent he would go to abolish it…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 2 Works Cited 1675 words(4.8 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Sex Trade: Slavery and Prostitution – Individuals around the world are faced with inhumane treatments and conditions daily. Traffickers use force, fraud or coercion, including techniques such as containment, beatings, rape, confiscation of documents, debt bondage, false owners of employment, and threats of harm in order to maintain control over their slaves (Potocky, 2010). Sex trade is a global problem presently and will increase throughout the world if nothing is done to prevent and eliminate it. Sex slavery is a type of prostitution in which the traffickers make an increased profit through the solicitation of slaves…. [tags: legal issues, slavery, prostitution]:: 8 Works Cited 1384 words(4 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Comparing Slavery of the South and North – Introduction2 Initiation of slavery in America2 Preferences of African (black) slaves3 Similarities between the states towards slavery…..3 Differences.4 Northern states position..4 Southern states position…5 Conclusion…6 Comparing Slavery of the South and North Introduction: The Americas (north and south) was referred to as the new world since they had recently been discovered by the Europeans…. [tags: slavery, african slaves]1600 words(4.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery: The Dividing of a Country – Slavery caused a rift in the American society. The issue of slavery in America divided citizens into two groups, pro-slavery and abolitionists. Unlike other countries America could not decide this issue peacefully. The two groups fought constantly, the issue would not be settled peacefully but would end in a violent war. The pro slavery group accepted and approved of slavery, while the abolitionists viewed slavery in a different light. The abolitionist disagreed with slavery and all it stood for…. [tags: abolitionists, pro-slavery, society]:: 3 Works Cited 528 words(1.5 pages)Good Essays[preview] The Evolution of Slavery in Colonial America – In my essay, The Evolution of Slavery in Colonial America author Jon Butler explains the reasons of the traces of the evolution of slavery. Butler describes the differences of the African experience in America and the European experience in America in detail. The African experience are focus on themes of capture, enslavement, and coercion but the history of Europeans in America concentrated on themes of choice, profit, and considerable freedom. The African and European experiences were never duplicated and paralleled they were powerfully intersecting the decline of the Indian population to become the American future thats what they want, but the Africans wants to end the evolution of s… [tags: slavery, john butler, africans]594 words(1.7 pages)Good Essays[preview] Slavery in American Society: Impact and Evolution – Slavery in American Society: Impact and evolution Slavery in American Society The controversies surrounding slavery have been established in many societies worldwide for centuries. In past generations, although slavery did exists and was tolerated, it was certainly very questionable, ethically. Today, the morality of such an act would not only be unimaginable, but would also be morally wrong. As things change over the course of history we seek to not only explain why things happen, but as well to understand why they do…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 8 Works Cited 1631 words(4.7 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Bible in Relation to Slavery – The Bible is the best-selling book of all time, and with good reason. For the stories written in it have changed the way many think and even believe when it comes to the power greater than this world. The Bible holds very specific opinions on things such as slavery, who humans should treat each other, and ultimately social justice. It has been one of the most important foundations for allowing social reform to occur in modern day history as well as the history of the whole world. However, it is forgotten in history class how prominent the ancient texts have changed the people…. [tags: Religion, History, Slavery]:: 3 Works Cited 1787 words(5.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] If Slavery were Considered Moral – Describe the differences of this time period if slavery was considered “right”. ISSUES TO UNDERSTAND CH. 14 1)The Compromise of 1850 was a dispute on whether or not Mexico (gained by US) would become a slave or free state. The northerners didn’t want the 36’30’ line to be moved to the Pacific and the southerners didn’t want “free soilism” which would make Mexico a free state. Northerners gained from the Compromise California as a free state, New Mexico and Utah as likely future slave states, a favorable settlement of the New Mexico-Texas boundary, and the abolition of the slave trade in the District of Colombia…. [tags: Slavery]1110 words(3.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] The Real Heroes of Slavery in the United States – As a child in elementary and high school, I was taught that President Abraham Lincoln was the reason that African slaves were freed from slavery. My teachers did not provide much more information than that. For an African American student, I should have received further historical information than that about my ancestors. Unfortunately, I did not have the opportunity or desire to research slavery on my own until college. And with my eagerness and thirst for more answers concerning my African American history, I set out to console my spirit, knowledge, and self-awareness of my ancestors history…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1983 words(5.7 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The U.S. Constitution and Slavery – The US constitution was written with great vision to create strong nation. The bill of right were written, it provide all humans with rights. The writers of the constitution we hypocrites, they didnt abide by what they preached. Thomas Jefferson wrote himself all men are created equal but he owned slaves. The founding father didnt look or even think about slavery when they wrote the constitution. They were pre-occupied in getting the southern state to join the union and sign the new constitution…. [tags: USA, constitution, slavery, history, ]408 words(1.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] From Slavery to Presidential Power – When people look at a persons appearance, no two people will ever look alike. When people look at a persons character, no two people will ever look alike. Color, being the only thing that was similar, caused people of white race to see themselves as superior to those of African-American race. Slavery, which first arrived in Virginia in 1619, was followed by a number of events; many laws and amendments were passed, like the Fugitive Slave Law. Slavery resulted in Civil War, later gaining rights for African-Americans…. [tags: Slavery / Civil Rights]:: 6 Works Cited 1274 words(3.6 pages)Strong Essays[preview] History of Slavery in America – Slavery in the United States Slavery in general term consist in the state of a person being a property of another person. It has appeared for thousands of years. From the old Roman emperor to nineteenth century. Regardless, it increased by the development of societies to make profit by cheap human labor. Slavery appeared in the United States in late of seventeen centuries as a result of the trade market. These slaves came from Africa to work in large plantations for free labor in America. Historians believe that the first ship of slaves to arrive in America was Dutch to the Virginia colony of Jamestown in 1619 with around 20 slaves…. [tags: American History, Africans, Slavery]:: 8 Works Cited 909 words(2.6 pages)Better Essays[preview] George Washington’s Feelings About Slavery – An abundance of scholars and general public regard George Washington as a prime example of leadership, citizenship, and overall individual achievement, and with good reason. When first learning of about George Washington in grade school, I was only told of his great accomplishments. The following composition will challenge the readers perception of our Nations first President as well enlighten the reader to debatable evidence of a more selfish racist. Thus forth, the following will show several of his accomplishments and how they not only overshadow his more deplorable actions but place his character and honesty into question…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 5 Works Cited 1319 words(3.8 pages)Strong Essays[preview] American Slavery Vs. Russian Serfdom – American slavery and Russian serfdom were similar in that the laborers were pushed down to the bottom of the social classes, slaves did not have any social mobility, and slaves were tied to the land they worked. In the Americas the Native American slaves were at the very bottom of the social classes. Different mixes of races also caused further denomination of classes between slaves. Similarly, in Russian serfdom, serfs were the lowest of classes and had very limited rights which made them almost like slaves to their landlords…. [tags: Serfs, Slavery]1876 words(5.4 pages)Better Essays[preview] Colonial American Slavery – The study of slavery in the development of early America is an extremely complex, yet vitally important part of American History. There are hundreds of thousands of documents, debates, and historical studies available today. According to Ms. Goetz, the assistant professor of history at Rice University, who states, in The Southern Journal of History, that in addition to geographic and chronological diversity in the Americas, assessment of experiences of colonial slaves is extremely complex, especially in the context of three European colonial powers, vigorous Indian groups, and free and enslaved blacks(Goetz, 599)…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 13 Works Cited 1467 words(4.2 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery is in the Past – Imagine being out in the fields hunting with your father. It has been a long day and a spitted warthog hangs between you. All of a sudden you are ambushed. An enemy tribe attacks you and your father. You fight using your makeshift spear but are overwhelmed by the number of tribesmen. You are hit in the head with a rock and fall unconscious. When you wake you are being loaded into a great wooden monster. You cringe in fear as you and your fellow captives are herded into this great wooden beast. You scream in protest at the white men who have chained you but they just beat you on the head with their rifles…. [tags: Slavery Argumentative]1953 words(5.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Abolishment of Slavery – The Abolishment of Slavery Slavery was a disgraceful and disturbing phenomenon. It was abolished, as people gradually became aware of the conditions of the lives of the slaves. There were many courageous men and women who helped put an end to slavery, both black and white, and the large number of people in Britain in Britain and all over the world that opposed slavery were very important abolishment of slavery. Middle class whites had an important role in the abolishment of slavery…. [tags: Slavery Essays]366 words(1 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in the South – Slavery in the South A large majority of whites in the South supported slavery even though fewer of a quarter of them owned slaves because they felt that it was a necessary evil and that it was an important Southern institution. In 1800 the population of the United States included 893,602 slaves, of which only 36,505 were in the northern states. Vermont, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey provided for the emancipation of their slaves before 1804, most of them by gradual measures…. [tags: Slavery Essays]683 words(2 pages)Good Essays[preview] The Cases Against Slavery – The two addresses by Abraham Lincoln Address at the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery and Second Inaugural address reflect the issues with slavery. The story, as framed by Abraham Lincoln, tells how colored soldiers and non colored soldiers have come together to fight the civil war to abolish slavery and preserve their rights their fore fathers have set up for them and how slavery goes against being a Christian. While the story line follows that of Harriet Beecher Stowe in her book Uncle Toms Cabin, where through a series of sketches she tells the stories of the human cruelty of slavery and enlightens the reader on how being a Christian and being for slavery is wrong…. [tags: Abraham Lincoln, slavery, Civil War]1110 words(3.2 pages)Better Essays[preview] What is Wrong with Slavery?: Utilitarian Thought – In Philosophical Ethics, Utilitarianism is the doctrine that our actions are right if the outcome of our actions generate the greatest happiness amongst the majority. However, in What is Wrong with Slavery? some objectors of utilitarianism have tried to dismiss this moral reasoning as to having any importance by blaming the awful actions of slave traders and slave owners on utilitarianism. They attack this doctrine by saying that utilitarianism is a belief system that can either praise or condemn slavery, and utilitarianism easily commend slavery if a majority of the people visualize a slave-owning society as the most beneficial and generate greatest happiness…. [tags: utilitarianism, slavery, slave trade]733 words(2.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] The Effect of the Industrial Revolution on Slavery – Slavery has always been a part of human history. Therefore on cannot talk about when slavery began in North America. Soon after the American colonies were established in North America, slaves were brought in to meet the growing labor need on plantations. Although the importation of slaves continued to grow as new plantations were developed, it was the industrial revolution that would have the most profound impact on the slave industry. The purpose of this essay is to analyze the effect of slavery in the 13 colonies due to the industrial revolution…. [tags: Slavery, North America, Industrial Revolution, his]1161 words(3.3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in the South – Slavery in the South Slavery of the Black man in America was the cruelest ever known to man. Europeans transported slaves from Africa as early as 1505. The African Slaves were first exploited on an island named Hispaniola, in the Caribbean by the Europeans to do labor work, before they were sent to the Americas. The women usually worked the interior cooking and cleaning while the men were sent out into the plantation fields to farm. These Africans were stripped of their homes, cultures, and languages…. [tags: Slavery Essays]865 words(2.5 pages)Good Essays[preview] Slavery in the Caribbean – Slavery in the Caribbean Caribbean Slavery gave planters and elite in the Caribbean the right to abuse a human by requiring ridiculously long hours of work on the fields and not providing enough nutrition. The article by Kiple and Kiple reviews the state of malnutrition among the slaves and the findings are atrocious. Slaves were lacking basic nutrients such as calcium, fats, and various vitamins. Kiple and Kiple, regardless of these facts, state that according to 18 and 19th century standards, these diets were not poor…. [tags: Slavery Essays]870 words(2.5 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in the United States – A historian once wrote that the rise of liberty and equality in America was accompanied by slavery. There is truth in that statement to great effect. The rise of America in general was accompanied by slavery and the settlers learned early on that slavery would be an effective way to build a country and create free labor. There was a definite accompaniment of slavery with the rising of liberty and equality in America. In 1787, in Philadelphia at the Constitutional Convention, the structure of government wasnt the only thing being discussed…. [tags: Slavery, racial issues, equal rights, civil rights]:: 3 Works Cited 1042 words(3 pages)Better Essays[preview] The South and Slavery – The South and Slavery The Societies of the North and South were very different. They were two regions of the country that depended very heavily on each other but yet seemed so far apart. Disagreeing on almost every aspect of how to reside and especially on very specific issues like slavery and emancipation. The North was an industrious, moneymaking, region. They respected blacks and gave them more rights than in the South where they had none. They still were not given the same rights as whites…. [tags: Slavery Essays]527 words(1.5 pages)Strong Essays[preview] The Longstanding Institution of Slavery in the United States – Slavery, as an institution, has existed since the dawn of civilization. However, by the fifteenth century, slavery in Northern Europe was almost nonexistent. Nevertheless, with the discovery of the New World, the English experienced a shortage of laborers to work the lands they claimed. The English tried to enslave the natives, but they resisted and were usually successful in escaping. Furthermore, with the decline of indentured servants, the Europeans looked elsewhere for laborers. It is then, within the British colonies, do the colonists turn to the enslavement of Africans…. [tags: USA, slavery, history]658 words(1.9 pages)Better Essays[preview] Slavery and the Caribbean – Slavery and the Caribbean Europeans came into contact with the Caribbean after Columbus’s momentous journeys in 1492, 1496 and 1498. The desire for expansion and trade led to the settlement of the colonies. The indigenous peoples, according to our sources mostly peaceful Tainos and warlike Caribs, proved to be unsuitable for slave labour in the newly formed plantations, and they were quickly and brutally decimated. The descendants of this once thriving community can now only be found in Guiana and Trinidad…. [tags: Slavery Essays]767 words(2.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Chapter 19 Outline: Perceptions on Slavery – … Yet again the citizens would vote to make Kansas either pro or free slave state. The Lecompton Constitution is made to control free-soilers and appeal to the pro-slavery southerners. The constitution caused problems because obviously northerners didnt agree with it. In the end the constitution was thrown off by free-soil voters. Kansas never becomes a state until southern states seceded from the Union. IV. Bully Brooks and His Bludgeon: a.Charles Sumner Senator of Massachusetts gives a speech and is afterward beaten by Preston Brook…. [tags: kansas, slavery, debate, union]1219 words(3.5 pages)Strong Essays[preview] African American Issues: Slavery and Continuing Racism – There are many issues that African Americans face in todays society, many of which I had not realized until after taking Africana Studies. Some issues dwell on the horrific past of the Trans-Atlantic Slave Trade, which not only is history, but also is part of African American heritage (Karenga, 2010). African Americans frequently experience many perilous problems, such as dire economic situations and feelings of hostility from the cultural mainstream in America (Kaufman, 1971). The cultural collision between African Americans and whites continues to create several problems in society…. [tags: Race, Slavery]:: 9 Works Cited 894 words(2.6 pages)Better Essays[preview] The Hypocrisy of American Slavery, Through the Eyes of Frederick Douglass – The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave, Written by Himself is a powerful book in many respects. Douglass invites you to vicariously witness the monstrous atrocities he experienced during the antebellum period; a time when said atrocities were not only encouraged, but looked highly upon. Throughout his narrative, Douglass expresses his exponentially growing anger and fortitude. When the reader arrives at The Appendix, it soon becomes that much more apparent that the vice of slavery that is most troublesome to him, is the curtain of pseudo-Christianity surrounding it…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 3 Works Cited 1599 words(4.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] slavery and the plantation – slavery and the plantation During the era of slavery in the United States, not all blacks were slaves. There were a many number of free blacks, consisting of those had been freed or those in fact that were never slave. Nor did all slave work on plantations. There were nearly five hundred thousand that worked in the cities as domestic, skilled artisans and factory hands (Green, 13). But they were exceptions to the general rule. Most blacks in America were slaves on plantation-sized units in the seven states of the South…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 6 Works Cited 2101 words(6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery in the Bible – Slavery in the Bible The first mention of slavery in the Bible is found in Noah’s declaration, “Cursed be Canaan. The lowest of slaves will he be to his brothers” (Gen. 9:25). He said this after waking up from a naked, drunken stupor and learning that his son Ham had mocked him. Although Ham was the guilty party, Noah’s statement was directed at Ham’s youngest son Canaan. If he was involved with his father in this act of disrespect, the statement can be taken as the pronouncement of a curse, “Cursed be Canaan.” It is possible, however, that Canaan did not join his father in making fun of Noah…. [tags: Slavery Essays]780 words(2.2 pages)Good Essays[preview] Slavery Around the World – Throughout this course we have learned about slavery in many parts of the world. I have learned some new things about slavery that I had never been taught before. Slavery has been a major stab wound to the heart of the world ever since it first existed. Slavery has caused years of turmoil and depression to large ethnic groups of people who have done nothing to deserve what came to them. The sad part about the whole slavery situation is that, it was never completely abolished from the world. Maybe on paper slavery may have been abolished, but there are still forms of slavery that exists in the world today…. [tags: Slave, Mende Nazer, child slavery, Sudan]:: 3 Works Cited 1588 words(4.5 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The abolition of slavery in Africa and the Middle East – … The Western civilizatory mission can not accept slave work in a world in which the progress and the ‘humanity’ it was characterized by freedom and wage labor.9 Actually, the end of slavery in Africa was one of the ‘motivations’ of the ‘scramble of Africa’. Colonialism was a way to overcome the savagery and bring natives to progress and civilization through wage labor and production for the market.10 Once the colonial rule was established and slavery legally abolished, images of ‘benign’ slavery were a way to keep good relations with the local rulers…. [tags: British and Foreign Anti-Slavery Society]1001 words(2.9 pages)Better Essays[preview] Slavery, A World History – A labor system that had previously existed throughout history, in many instances and most countries is known as slavery. So what exactly is it. How did slavery begin. And what does it mean in our world today. These are complex questions that are often asked and, possibly, by understanding the forms it takes and the roles such slaves perform. What daily life is like for those enchained and what can be done to end this demeaning practice may help in answering those questions. It is known that slavery is a system under which people are treated as property to be bought, sold and are forced to work…. [tags: labor systems, laws don’t abolish slavery ]:: 2 Works Cited 1098 words(3.1 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Racial Slavery and the Development of Our Nation – … Confrontation between the Native Americans and settlers in western Virginia spearheaded an uprising that demanded Governor Berkeley to provide more land to the poor whites. Berkeley stood by his decision to maintain peaceful relations with the local Native American population, which sparked a series of uprisings and massacres that grew into full rebellion against Berkeley and his men. Berkeley fled when Nathaniel Bacon and his ranks burned Jamestown to the ground, which led to Bacons rule over Virginia for a short while until England sent warships to regain control…. [tags: united states, freedom, liberty, slavery]:: 1 Works Cited 1436 words(4.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] Interpretations of Slavery – Interpretations of Slavery INTRODUCTION Slavery is known to have existed as early as the 18th century B.C. during the Shang Dynasty of China. Slavery was widely practiced in many other countries, including, Korea, India, Greece, Mexico and Africa. (Britannica 288-89). When most people consider slavery, however, they think of Western slavery in North America because it is well documented and it was such a horrible institution. Even though there is no one definition of slavery, the people who study it (historians, anthropologists and sociologists) agree that certain characteristics are present in all forms of slavery…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 8 Works Cited 3740 words(10.7 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery in America – Slavery in America By 1850, ninety-two percent of all American blacks were concentrated in the South, and about 95 percent were slaves. Pre-civil war slaves in America went through a great deal of turmoil and discontent in the South. Slavery has had a huge effect on our country. Many slaves were beaten to death and some did not survive the ruff life of slavery. Slavery then went on to cause the War between the North and the South known as the Civil War. In 1916, a Dutch ship brought twenty enslaved Africans to a Virginia Colony at Jamestown…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 2 Works Cited 410 words(1.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery In 19c – Slavery in 19th Century A justified institution as the 19th century emerged; the infamous institution of slavery grew rapidly and produced some surprising controversy and rash justification. Proslavery, Southern whites used social, political, and economical justification in their arguments defining the institution as a source of positive good, a legal definition, and as an economic stabilizer. The proslavery supporters often used moral and biblical rationalization through a religious foundation in Christianity and supported philosophic ideals in Manifest Destiny to vindicated slavery as a profitable investment…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1159 words(3.3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery In America – Slavery in America Introduction There has been much debate on the topic of slavery in the early times, although most of the countries considered slavery as a criminal activity. Some countries such as Myanmar and Sudan do not abolish it. They even expedite the slavery system. It is no doubt that slavery violent the human rights. However, it was commonly spread in the early times from 17th to 19th century. In this research, I will talk about the origin of the slavery, the reasons for people to becoming slave and the life of the slave…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1493 words(4.3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery In Illinois – Slavery in Illinois This essay talks about the dated events that happened in Illinois, focusing on slavery, from the time it begun, whether it should be implemented or not, its abolishment, and up to the time it ended. The paper also contains a well-opinionated reaction about slavery, how it is different from today. The Civil War Period has always been the primary hub of teaching in any American History classes. The era between the American Revolution and the Civil War was of a great importance since it has been the best and worst part of the western civilization during those times…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 4 Works Cited 1565 words(4.5 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in Literature – Slavery in Literature Frederick Douglass was born into the lifelong, evil, bondage of slavery. His autobiography, Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself, depicts his accomplishments. The narrative, however, is not only the story of his success. It is not simply a tale of his miraculous escape from slavery. Frederick Douglass’ narrative is, in fact, an account of his tremendous strides through literacy. He exemplifies a literate man who is able to use the psychological tools of thought to escape the intense bonds of slavery…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1499 words(4.3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery and Reparations – Slavery, colonialism and neo-colonialism have caused inestimable damage to billions of people throughout the world. They have also formed the basis for the accumulation of immense wealth in the hands of a small elite The slave trade involved the brutal relocation of tens of millions of people in which families, communities and societies were destroyed and in which millions lost their lives in the most inhumane conditions. At the same time, slavery was a fundamental element of the strengthening of mercantile trade and the rapid accumulation of capital that formed the basis for the emergence of the capitalist system as we know it today…. [tags: Slavery Essays]4382 words(12.5 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Defense Of Slavery – Throughout history many things have happened that were by many thought to be unconscionable. Yet, the people who were putting their mark of unacceptance upon those committing these thought to be deplorable acts, were unaware of the actual situations, and in many cases, committing the same acts themselves. This was true during the Holy Wars, the Crusades and similar events. People who were not involved, often thought these acts of inhumanity to be reprehensible, but the parties involved, in their minds, had just cause for what they were doing…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1105 words(3.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery In America – Slavery in America stems well back to when the new world was first discovered and was led by the country to start the African Slave Trade-Portugal. The African Slave Trade was first exploited for plantations in the Caribbean, and eventually reached the southern coasts of America. The African natives were of all ages and sexes. Women usually worked in the homes cooking and cleaning, while men were sent out into the plantations to farm. Young girls would usually help in the house also and young boys would help in the farm by bailing hay and loading wagons with crops…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1011 words(2.9 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Racism and Slavery – Did race prejudice cause slavery. Or was it the other way round. Winthrop D. Jordan, in his monumental study of white American attitudes to black people from 1550 to 1812, argues that prejudice and slavery may well have been equally cause and effect, ‘dynamically joining hands to hustle the Negro down the road to complete degradation. But we must go deeper than that, if we are to understand the rise of English racism as an ideology, the various roles it has played in the past, and the role it is playing today…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1802 words(5.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Lydia Maria Child’s Propositions Defining Slavery and Emancipation – There has been many debates about the righteousness of slavery in the United States. There were many supporters of slavery as well as people who opposed slavery. Slavery has concentrated on African slaves In the United States. Law and public opinion regarding slavery differed from state to state and from person to person. Slavery has brought about a lot of controversy and stirred emotions even in today’s society which has left a big impact on the people. In the documents, Ads for Runaway Servants and Slaves (1733-72), Lydia Maria Child’s Propositions Defining Slavery and Emancipation (1833) and Lydia Maria Child’s Prejudices against people of color (1836), describes the life of slaves alon… [tags: slavery, african-american, servants]:: 9 Works Cited 1425 words(4.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery in Jamaica – Jamaica has been a land exploited and oppressed by white nations for much of its history. First colonized by the Spanish and then the British, it seems hard to imagine a time when it was just the native people living in peace and harmony with the land. Many years after the white man first jammed himself onto the beaches of Jamaica, reggae music was born. A continuing tradition, this easy-to-groove-to music style originated as a voice against this oppression; it was the peaceful islanders way of finally communicating their plighted history to all who would listen, or all who could appreciate a good beat…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 6 Works Cited 4438 words(12.7 pages)Strong Essays[preview] slavery in brasil – Because certain forms of slavery had existed for centuries on the continent of Africa, Brazilian historians used to say that blacks imported from across the Atlantic were docile and ready to accept their new status as slaves. This assertion is based on the unwarranted assumption that was true of a limited area of Africa was typical of the continent as a whole. All slavery in brazil was essentially the same depending on the task or the labor the slave had to preform. In many cases the slaves was there to perform labor that was deplorable to the nobility…. [tags: Slavery Essays]743 words(2.1 pages)Good Essays[preview] Views On Slavery – There are many perceptions as to how people view slavery. When people talk about slavery, the first thing that comes to their mind will be African American Slaves in the United States. They will also think of how they were brought to the United States against their own will and unequally exploited. However, according to Stephen F. Austin, during the eighteen-twentys and thirtys Mexicans also had slaves. He compares American Slaves and Cruz Arocha as a Mexican Slave. Although there are many differences between Cruz Arocha and the American slaves, especially in the ways they are treated…. [tags: Slavery Essays]761 words(2.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Women and Slavery – SLAVERY AND THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD The simple fact is that everybody has heard of the Underground Railroad, but not everyone knows just what it was. First of all, it wasn=t underground, and it wasn=t even a railroad. The term AUnderground Railroad,@ actually refers to a path along which escaping slaves were passed from farmhouse to storage sheds, from cellars to barns, until they reached safety in the North. One of the most widely known abolitionists in history is a slave by the name of Harriet Tubman…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 2 Works Cited 1466 words(4.2 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery in America – For this assignment we were asked to read the book Modern Medea written Steven Weisenburger, which deals with slavery in the mid-nineteenth century. In my paper I will discuss how the book portrays the daily life as a slave, the issue of freedom, and the racial realities during this time. This particular book tells the story of a slave by the name of Margaret Garner, who one day escaped from her plantation in Covington, KY, and took along with her Robert which was her husband, her four children, and Robert’s parents…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1843 words(5.3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Support of Slavery by the Christian Church – Support of Slavery by the Christian Church The belief in some higher presence, other than our own, has existed since man can recollect. Religion was established from this belief, and it can survive and flourish because of this belief. Christianity, one of several forms of religion that exist today, began sometime during the middle of the first century. Christians believe in a higher presence that they call “God.” This belief in God is based on faith, not fact; faith is “unquestioning belief that does not require proof or evidence.” (Webster’s New World College Dictionary, 1996, p…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 6 Works Cited 2850 words(8.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Contrasting Views of Pro-Slavery vs. Abolitionist – … Samuel Cartwright was a physician and pro-slavery advocate during the 1800s and is well known for his diagnosis of drapetomania, a supposed disease that made slaves runaway. He concluded that the reason African slaves sought to escape was because they were treated inadequately by their masters. Delving deeper in his writings it is discovered he too, like George Fitzhugh, approved of enslavement. Both men advocated the issue and have similar analyzes on how slaves are or should be treated. Cartwright expresses to his audience that slaves will most likely run (drapetomania) if they are treated poorly by their master; according to my experience, the “genu flexit”–the awe and reverence, m… [tags: positions, goals, party, slavery]1248 words(3.6 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in the Nineteenth Century: Viewpoint of the Antislavery and Abolotionist Movements – … They were very well envisioned, however their efforts were only effective for so long due to the vast amounts of funding necessary for compensation of slave owners and shipment of freed slaves to their new settlements. There were far too many slaves and it was certain that the plan would never reach economic sufficiency to follow through with their project, as well as the fact that the growing cotton industry in the South called for much labor work and slaves were the easiest access of productive laborers…. [tags: homelands, slavery, influence, war]751 words(2.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] A Study of the Healing Process from Slavery and Racism – A battle lost or won is easily described, understood, and appreciated, but the moral growth of a great nation requires reflection, as well as observation, to appreciate it.-Frederick Douglass When you think of slavery, you may want to consider the effects of an earthquake because thats how powerful it was. Like many earthquakes, slavery produced various damaging ramifications to everything around it. This included devastation to family structures and in worst cases the loss of human life; and without doubt slavery claimed the lives of many just as Harriet Jacobs expressed I once saw a slave girl dying after the birth of a child nearly white…. [tags: Racial Relations, Slavery, Racism]2560 words(7.3 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Looking Poitively at the Effects of Slavery in the USA: Personal Narrative – A Blessing in Disguise Slavery and capitalism have an interesting relationship. Slavery has existed nearly everywhere in the world, under almost every political and economic system, and was in no way a stranger to capitalism or the United States. America experienced endless economic benefits from slavery, but it was simultaneously a despicable violation of human rights. Natives of Africa were not only captured, but transported to what is now the United States and forced to do work. From the 16th to the 19th centuries, European colonies heavily depended on the labor of the Africans for their economic survival…. [tags: economic systems, capitalism, slavery]:: 5 Works Cited 1012 words(2.9 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Wendell Phillips: A Leading Reformer for the Abolishment of Slavery – Wendell Phillips was a leading reformer for the abolishment of slavery and was known as a passionate abolitionist who was willing to risk his own future to defend the cause he firmly believed in. He was born on November 29, 1811, the son of a wealthy Boston family. With a background of attending the famous Boston Latin School as a kid and later on obtaining a degree from Harvard Law School in 1834. Phillips did not consider himself a reformer until the Boston Female Anti-Slavery Society where he heard William Lloyd Garrison speak…. [tags: anti-slavery leaders]727 words(2.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] The Reality of Sex Slavery in the Present Day – In Margaret Atwoods novel, Oryx and Crake, she constantly placesthe reader in an uncomfortable environment. The story takesplacein a not so distant future where todays world no longerexistsdue toanunknown catastrophe. The only human is a man who calls himself theAbominableSnowman or Snowman for short, but in his childhood days his name was Jimmy. If the thought of being all alone in the world is not uneasy enough, Atwood takes this opportunity to point out the flaws of themodernworldthrough Snowmans reminiscing about Jimmys childhood. The truthsexposed are eventsthatpeople do not want to acknowledge: animal abuse for human advancement, elimination of human interacti… [tags: oryx and crake,margaret atwood,modern slavery]:: 2 Works Cited 1386 words(4 pages)Strong Essays[preview]

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Free Slavery Essays and Papers – 123HelpMe

Free Slavery Essays and Papers – 123HelpMe

Title Length Color Rating Slavery and the Anti-slavery Movement – Anytime we hear the word slavery, we tend to think of the Southern United States during the Pre-Civil War era. What many people dont know, is that this horrible act has occurred worldwide. The term slavery has many different definitions, and has occurred all throughout our world history. It wasnt until the early 18th century that the thought of anti-slavery came about. Many economic, social, and technological forces have played a part in the decline of slavery around the globe. The first definition that comes to mind when we hear this term, is the act of being a slave or a person who does not own their own labor…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 11 Works Cited 1030 words(2.9 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Analysis of Arguments for the Slavery Institution – Analysis of Arguments for the Slavery Institution The foundation of this paper will highlight the following questions: How might southern apologists for slavery have used the northern wage slave discussed in the last chapter to justify slavery. To what extent do you agree with this argument. How did slaves use religious belief and kinship to temper their plight. Did this strategy play into the hands of slaveholders. How were non-slaveholding whites and free people of color affected by the institution of slavery…. [tags: Slavery]513 words(1.5 pages)Good Essays[preview] Enormity of Slavery – In the 1800s, many slave owners thought it fair for Africans to work without pay, because they believed that this particular group of people were made by God for this sort of work, and that slave owners were ever caring and conscientious of their slaves anyway, making slavery an easy life; truthfully, however, as both Frederick Douglass and Harriet Jacobs experienced in being slaves most of their lives, and then showed in their narratives, this cruel and unusual practice was the epitome of iniquity- notwithstanding the fact that they were created equal to their malefactors…. [tags: Slavery]1612 words(4.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] 18th Centry Slavery In North America – People crying for freedom and liberty from tyranny built a nation out of greed and unethical acts. The rapacious desires of a nation to gain wealth and possessions lead to the emotional and psychological trauma of West Africans and African Americans. In spite of being taken from Africa, the sweat and blood of these Africans contributed to the birth of the beautiful nation that would eventually recognize their descendants as equals. The Exploration Age commenced in the fifteenth century when European nations decided to expand their power for technological, demographic, and economic reasons…. [tags: Slavery]:: 5 Works Cited 917 words(2.6 pages)Good Essays[preview] An End To Slavery – The society that became known as the United States had its beginnings when the first English settlers set foot on North American soil. Whether that settler landed in Massachusetts or Virginia, their beginnings on this continent were all influenced by the society that they had left behind. These included many aspects of England’s society, culture, economy, and politics. Those societal, cultural, economic and political beginnings can be traced throughout our history in the mindset that both the North and South represented…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1394 words(4 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Origins of Chattel Slavery in Colonial North America – The Origins of Chattel Slavery in Colonial North America There have been many illuminating studies in the field of the origins of chattel slavery in Colonial North America. Alpert, 1970; Edmondson, 1976; Jordan, 1962: Ruchames, 1967; Starr, 1973, wrote seminal studies that did much to bring insight to the subject. Goetz, 2009; Mason, 2006; Smaje, 2002; Neeganagwedgin, 2012, presented evidence that have either reexamined old questions or used new methods and approaches to ask news questions to add insight to this topic…. [tags: Slavery]:: 13 Works Cited 1586 words(4.5 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Consequences of Slavery – Abstract Slavery, like many ill-fated and evil inventions reached epidemic levels in early Europe and the American colonies. The history of slavery is documented most acutely during the period when slaves first arrived to the new land and when the colonies had first developed into the fledging United States of America. This would lead us to believe that slavery had not existed before this period or that the consequences and relevance of it had little historical, social, or economical importance…. [tags: Slavery, history, informative]:: 6 Works Cited 2031 words(5.8 pages)Better Essays[preview] Slavery and Abolition – The term slave is defined as a person held in servitude as the chattel of another, or one that is completely passive to a dominating influence. The most well known cases of slavery occurred during the settling of the United States of America. From 1619 until July 1st 1928 slavery was allowed within our country. Slavery abolitionists attempted to end slavery, which at some point; they were successful at doing so. This paper will take the reader a lot of different directions, it will look at slavery in a legal aspect along the lines of the constitution and the thirteenth amendment, and it will also discuss how abolitionists tried to end slavery…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 4 Works Cited 1581 words(4.5 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Colors of Slavery – When Americans think about slavery, they tend to think about “Africans” being brought to the New World against their will. Which upon their arrival were sold, the same as livestock, as permanent property to the white landowners. They may visualize in their minds a person of color shackled, chained, beaten, and forced to labor under the control of their white master. Their picture is that of chattel slavery; black and white. Americans have come to the assumption that slavery was imposed on people of one color or race…. [tags: History Slavery]:: 3 Works Cited 1795 words(5.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Evolution of Slavery – A person who is the property of and wholly subject to another; this is the definition of a slave. Over a span of 400 years 12 million Africans were captured, brought to the New World by approximately 40,000 ships and then enslaved. Thats 80 or more slaves per day. The perspective of white Southerners, Northerners and persons of color has evolved and are different. The slave trade into the United States began in 1620 with the sale of nineteen Africans to a colony called Virginia. These slaves were brought to America on a Dutch ship and were sold as indentured slaves…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 4 Works Cited 1044 words(3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] The History of Slavery in the United States – Following the success of Christopher Columbus voyage to the Americas in the early16th century, the Spaniards, French and Europeans alike made it their number one priority to sail the open seas of the Atlantic with hopes of catching a glimpse of the new territory. Once there, they immediately fell in love the land, the Americas would be the one place in the world where a poor man would be able to come and create a wealthy living for himself despite his upbringing. Its rich grounds were perfect for farming popular crops such as tobacco, sugarcane, and cotton…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 3 Works Cited 1435 words(4.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery in the American South – Slavery is a form of forced free labor in which one human being is the property of another. Close to two million slaves were brought to the American South from African and the West Indies during the Atlantic slave trade. The American South accounted for over 20% African Americans. As late as 1900, 9 out of every 10 African Americans lived in the South. Slavery supported the economic structure for the planter aristocracy. In 1850 only 1,773 families owned more than 100 slaves each, and this group provided the political and social leadership of the section and nation…. [tags: Slavery Essays]612 words(1.7 pages)Better Essays[preview] The Cotton Gin and Slavery – The Cotton Gin was an invention that allowed the mass production of cotton. Cotton was previously a very difficult crop to profit from, because of the long hours required to separate cotton seeds from the actual cotton fibers. This all changed when Eli Whitney invented the cotton gin in 1793, a machine that sped up the process, thereby making cotton farming a profitable industry for the Southern States. With large areas of prime land ready for crops the Southern states bought and transported slaves in record numbers in order to work on their cotton farms…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1160 words(3.3 pages)Good Essays[preview] Slavery in the English Colonies – Although, Slavery had existed for centuries as a lowest social status in different parts of the world like Africa, Roman Empire, Middle East and etc., in English colonies slavery gained an importance, because of increasing demand for labor force and becoming relationship legitimated by law. Therefore, Englishmen were the reason of slavery in the colonies and its consequences. In the beginning of 17 century a group of merchants established first permanent English colonies in North America at Jamestown, Virginia…. [tags: slavery, USA, ]829 words(2.4 pages)Better Essays[preview] History of Slavery in America – Working long hours, whipped to death, starved, and broken spirits all describe a slave. Its not something you hear every day. Its not something anyone ever wants to hear. Just because we dont hear it every day doesnt mean it doesnt exist. I decided to do Slave Rights to remind people that there is still slavery in the world today. If people are educated about the past then they may not make the same mistakes in the future. It has been postulated that ancient civilizations would not have developed had it not been for slavery…. [tags: American Slavery]:: 15 Works Cited 1738 words(5 pages)Better Essays[preview] Slavery in the American Colonies – 1.In the American colonies, Virginians switched from indentured servants to slaves for their labor needs for many reasons. A major reason was the shift in the relative supply of indentured servants and slaves. While the colonial demand for labor was increasing, a sharp decrease occurred in the number of English migrants arriving in America under indenture. Slaves were permanent property and female slaves passed their status on to their children. Slaves also seemed to be a better investment than indentured servants…. [tags: Slavery Essays]954 words(2.7 pages)Better Essays[preview] Abraham Lincoln Supported Slavery – The Presidents Day holiday is celebrated in the cold month of February; children in classrooms across the United States are given a litany of the Presidents and their most famous accomplishments: George Washington, who could not tell a lie is the father of our country; John Kennedy, the dashing young man who asked, not what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country, was assassinated in a mystery that still remains unsolved, and Honest Abe Lincoln, the Great Emancipator who authored the Emancipation Proclamation, which freed the slaves, is credited with beginning the long road in the fight for equality for blacks…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 10 Works Cited 1620 words(4.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Religion’s Influence on the Slavery Debates – Slavery was a dominant part of the political and social arenas of 1800s America. However, it was not homogenous as it divided America into two distinct groups: those who supported it and those who did not. Traditionally, the states in the north had been anti-slavery while the states in the south had been pro-slavery. Southern life and economy depended on slavery and therefore staunchly supported the continued legal status of slavery. The northern states on the other hand recognized the inhumane nature of slavery and campaigned to establish equality for all citizens…. [tags: anti-slavery, pro-slavery, theology, equality]:: 1 Works Cited 1362 words(3.9 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Political Debate of Slavery – During the Antebellum period, the issue of slavery affected many religious and political debates. This was seen in the Lincoln Douglass debates, legislation, and the evolution of political parties. The political debates that fueled the slavery controversy were derived from legislation. The first legislation passed was the three-fifths compromise. Naturally, southern states wanted slaves to be counted as a whole person because the slave population in the south was larger. The northern states opposed this…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 2 Works Cited 1195 words(3.4 pages)Better Essays[preview] Thomas Jefferson and Slavery – Thomas Jefferson is a man who really needs no introduction. He was recognized as a luminous writer who was appointed to draft the Declaration of Independence. Congress formally approved the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. Jefferson owned many slaves that worked for him. He would often even sell his slaves to buy others. Why then would he write in the Declaration of Independence, all men are created equal. Is it possible that Thomas Jefferson was a hypocrite and only wrote what the population wanted to see…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 4 Works Cited 991 words(2.8 pages)Strong Essays[preview] The Abolition of Slavery and the American Constitution – In 1688 the first American movement was the one to abolish slavery when the German and Quakers decent in Pennsylvania. The Quakers establishment had no immediate action for the Quaker Petition against slavery. The first American abolition society was the Relief of Free Negroes Unlawfully by the Quakers that had strong religious objections of slavery. In 1756 John Woolman gave up his business to campaign against slavery along with other Quakers. Thomas Paine was the first to write an article about the United States abolition of slavery and it was titled African Slavery in America…. [tags: american history, slavery]726 words(2.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] Lincoln’s view on Slavery and How it Evolved – Lincolns View on Slavery.And How It Evolved Abraham Lincoln spent most of his political career as a member of the Whig party endorsing policies that aided economic development, supported free soil and opposed the expansion of slavery. Lincoln was instrumental in creating the voice of the Republican Party and during that process his own views on slavery were shaped. He played the middle ground and therefore appealed to both former conservative northern Whigs, and radical Republicans. The Civil War proved to be a turning point in Lincolns view of slavery and the extent he would go to abolish it…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 2 Works Cited 1675 words(4.8 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Sex Trade: Slavery and Prostitution – Individuals around the world are faced with inhumane treatments and conditions daily. Traffickers use force, fraud or coercion, including techniques such as containment, beatings, rape, confiscation of documents, debt bondage, false owners of employment, and threats of harm in order to maintain control over their slaves (Potocky, 2010). Sex trade is a global problem presently and will increase throughout the world if nothing is done to prevent and eliminate it. Sex slavery is a type of prostitution in which the traffickers make an increased profit through the solicitation of slaves…. [tags: legal issues, slavery, prostitution]:: 8 Works Cited 1384 words(4 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Comparing Slavery of the South and North – Introduction2 Initiation of slavery in America2 Preferences of African (black) slaves3 Similarities between the states towards slavery…..3 Differences.4 Northern states position..4 Southern states position…5 Conclusion…6 Comparing Slavery of the South and North Introduction: The Americas (north and south) was referred to as the new world since they had recently been discovered by the Europeans…. [tags: slavery, african slaves]1600 words(4.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery: The Dividing of a Country – Slavery caused a rift in the American society. The issue of slavery in America divided citizens into two groups, pro-slavery and abolitionists. Unlike other countries America could not decide this issue peacefully. The two groups fought constantly, the issue would not be settled peacefully but would end in a violent war. The pro slavery group accepted and approved of slavery, while the abolitionists viewed slavery in a different light. The abolitionist disagreed with slavery and all it stood for…. [tags: abolitionists, pro-slavery, society]:: 3 Works Cited 528 words(1.5 pages)Good Essays[preview] The Evolution of Slavery in Colonial America – In my essay, The Evolution of Slavery in Colonial America author Jon Butler explains the reasons of the traces of the evolution of slavery. Butler describes the differences of the African experience in America and the European experience in America in detail. The African experience are focus on themes of capture, enslavement, and coercion but the history of Europeans in America concentrated on themes of choice, profit, and considerable freedom. The African and European experiences were never duplicated and paralleled they were powerfully intersecting the decline of the Indian population to become the American future thats what they want, but the Africans wants to end the evolution of s… [tags: slavery, john butler, africans]594 words(1.7 pages)Good Essays[preview] Slavery in American Society: Impact and Evolution – Slavery in American Society: Impact and evolution Slavery in American Society The controversies surrounding slavery have been established in many societies worldwide for centuries. In past generations, although slavery did exists and was tolerated, it was certainly very questionable, ethically. Today, the morality of such an act would not only be unimaginable, but would also be morally wrong. As things change over the course of history we seek to not only explain why things happen, but as well to understand why they do…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 8 Works Cited 1631 words(4.7 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Bible in Relation to Slavery – The Bible is the best-selling book of all time, and with good reason. For the stories written in it have changed the way many think and even believe when it comes to the power greater than this world. The Bible holds very specific opinions on things such as slavery, who humans should treat each other, and ultimately social justice. It has been one of the most important foundations for allowing social reform to occur in modern day history as well as the history of the whole world. However, it is forgotten in history class how prominent the ancient texts have changed the people…. [tags: Religion, History, Slavery]:: 3 Works Cited 1787 words(5.1 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] If Slavery were Considered Moral – Describe the differences of this time period if slavery was considered “right”. ISSUES TO UNDERSTAND CH. 14 1)The Compromise of 1850 was a dispute on whether or not Mexico (gained by US) would become a slave or free state. The northerners didn’t want the 36’30’ line to be moved to the Pacific and the southerners didn’t want “free soilism” which would make Mexico a free state. Northerners gained from the Compromise California as a free state, New Mexico and Utah as likely future slave states, a favorable settlement of the New Mexico-Texas boundary, and the abolition of the slave trade in the District of Colombia…. [tags: Slavery]1110 words(3.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] The Real Heroes of Slavery in the United States – As a child in elementary and high school, I was taught that President Abraham Lincoln was the reason that African slaves were freed from slavery. My teachers did not provide much more information than that. For an African American student, I should have received further historical information than that about my ancestors. Unfortunately, I did not have the opportunity or desire to research slavery on my own until college. And with my eagerness and thirst for more answers concerning my African American history, I set out to console my spirit, knowledge, and self-awareness of my ancestors history…. [tags: Slavery Essays]1983 words(5.7 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The U.S. Constitution and Slavery – The US constitution was written with great vision to create strong nation. The bill of right were written, it provide all humans with rights. The writers of the constitution we hypocrites, they didnt abide by what they preached. Thomas Jefferson wrote himself all men are created equal but he owned slaves. The founding father didnt look or even think about slavery when they wrote the constitution. They were pre-occupied in getting the southern state to join the union and sign the new constitution…. [tags: USA, constitution, slavery, history, ]408 words(1.2 pages)Strong Essays[preview] From Slavery to Presidential Power – When people look at a persons appearance, no two people will ever look alike. When people look at a persons character, no two people will ever look alike. Color, being the only thing that was similar, caused people of white race to see themselves as superior to those of African-American race. Slavery, which first arrived in Virginia in 1619, was followed by a number of events; many laws and amendments were passed, like the Fugitive Slave Law. Slavery resulted in Civil War, later gaining rights for African-Americans…. [tags: Slavery / Civil Rights]:: 6 Works Cited 1274 words(3.6 pages)Strong Essays[preview] History of Slavery in America – Slavery in the United States Slavery in general term consist in the state of a person being a property of another person. It has appeared for thousands of years. From the old Roman emperor to nineteenth century. Regardless, it increased by the development of societies to make profit by cheap human labor. Slavery appeared in the United States in late of seventeen centuries as a result of the trade market. These slaves came from Africa to work in large plantations for free labor in America. Historians believe that the first ship of slaves to arrive in America was Dutch to the Virginia colony of Jamestown in 1619 with around 20 slaves…. [tags: American History, Africans, Slavery]:: 8 Works Cited 909 words(2.6 pages)Better Essays[preview] George Washington’s Feelings About Slavery – An abundance of scholars and general public regard George Washington as a prime example of leadership, citizenship, and overall individual achievement, and with good reason. When first learning of about George Washington in grade school, I was only told of his great accomplishments. The following composition will challenge the readers perception of our Nations first President as well enlighten the reader to debatable evidence of a more selfish racist. Thus forth, the following will show several of his accomplishments and how they not only overshadow his more deplorable actions but place his character and honesty into question…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 5 Works Cited 1319 words(3.8 pages)Strong Essays[preview] American Slavery Vs. Russian Serfdom – American slavery and Russian serfdom were similar in that the laborers were pushed down to the bottom of the social classes, slaves did not have any social mobility, and slaves were tied to the land they worked. In the Americas the Native American slaves were at the very bottom of the social classes. Different mixes of races also caused further denomination of classes between slaves. Similarly, in Russian serfdom, serfs were the lowest of classes and had very limited rights which made them almost like slaves to their landlords…. [tags: Serfs, Slavery]1876 words(5.4 pages)Better Essays[preview] Colonial American Slavery – The study of slavery in the development of early America is an extremely complex, yet vitally important part of American History. There are hundreds of thousands of documents, debates, and historical studies available today. According to Ms. Goetz, the assistant professor of history at Rice University, who states, in The Southern Journal of History, that in addition to geographic and chronological diversity in the Americas, assessment of experiences of colonial slaves is extremely complex, especially in the context of three European colonial powers, vigorous Indian groups, and free and enslaved blacks(Goetz, 599)…. [tags: Slavery Essays]:: 13 Works Cited 1467 words(4.2 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] Slavery is in the Past – Imagine being out in the fields hunting with your father. It has been a long day and a spitted warthog hangs between you. All of a sudden you are ambushed. An enemy tribe attacks you and your father. You fight using your makeshift spear but are overwhelmed by the number of tribesmen. You are hit in the head with a rock and fall unconscious. When you wake you are being loaded into a great wooden monster. You cringe in fear as you and your fellow captives are herded into this great wooden beast. You scream in protest at the white men who have chained you but they just beat you on the head with their rifles…. [tags: Slavery Argumentative]1953 words(5.6 pages)Powerful Essays[preview] The Abolishment of Slavery – The Abolishment of Slavery Slavery was a disgraceful and disturbing phenomenon. It was abolished, as people gradually became aware of the conditions of the lives of the slaves. There were many courageous men and women who helped put an end to slavery, both black and white, and the large number of people in Britain in Britain and all over the world that opposed slavery were very important abolishment of slavery. Middle class whites had an important role in the abolishment of slavery…. [tags: Slavery Essays]366 words(1 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in the South – Slavery in the South A large majority of whites in the South supported slavery even though fewer of a quarter of them owned slaves because they felt that it was a necessary evil and that it was an important Southern institution. In 1800 the population of the United States included 893,602 slaves, of which only 36,505 were in the northern states. Vermont, Pennsylvania, Massachusetts, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, and New Jersey provided for the emancipation of their slaves before 1804, most of them by gradual measures…. [tags: Slavery Essays]683 words(2 pages)Good Essays[preview] The Cases Against Slavery – The two addresses by Abraham Lincoln Address at the Dedication of the Gettysburg National Cemetery and Second Inaugural address reflect the issues with slavery. The story, as framed by Abraham Lincoln, tells how colored soldiers and non colored soldiers have come together to fight the civil war to abolish slavery and preserve their rights their fore fathers have set up for them and how slavery goes against being a Christian. While the story line follows that of Harriet Beecher Stowe in her book Uncle Toms Cabin, where through a series of sketches she tells the stories of the human cruelty of slavery and enlightens the reader on how being a Christian and being for slavery is wrong…. [tags: Abraham Lincoln, slavery, Civil War]1110 words(3.2 pages)Better Essays[preview] What is Wrong with Slavery?: Utilitarian Thought – In Philosophical Ethics, Utilitarianism is the doctrine that our actions are right if the outcome of our actions generate the greatest happiness amongst the majority. However, in What is Wrong with Slavery? some objectors of utilitarianism have tried to dismiss this moral reasoning as to having any importance by blaming the awful actions of slave traders and slave owners on utilitarianism. They attack this doctrine by saying that utilitarianism is a belief system that can either praise or condemn slavery, and utilitarianism easily commend slavery if a majority of the people visualize a slave-owning society as the most beneficial and generate greatest happiness…. [tags: utilitarianism, slavery, slave trade]733 words(2.1 pages)Better Essays[preview] The Effect of the Industrial Revolution on Slavery – Slavery has always been a part of human history. Therefore on cannot talk about when slavery began in North America. Soon after the American colonies were established in North America, slaves were brought in to meet the growing labor need on plantations. Although the importation of slaves continued to grow as new plantations were developed, it was the industrial revolution that would have the most profound impact on the slave industry. The purpose of this essay is to analyze the effect of slavery in the 13 colonies due to the industrial revolution…. [tags: Slavery, North America, Industrial Revolution, his]1161 words(3.3 pages)Strong Essays[preview] Slavery in the South – Slavery in the South Slavery of the Black man in America was the cruelest ever known to man. Europeans transported slaves from Africa as early as 1505. The African Slaves were first exploited on an island named Hispaniola, in the Caribbean by the Europeans to do labor work, before they were sent to the Americas. 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Free Slavery Essays and Papers – 123HelpMe

8 Signs You’re a Slave Instead of an Employee

Literal slavery is a horrible practice that still persists into the modern age. But, I want to talk about another form of human exploitationemployment slavery, which can also ruin a persons life. Generally, I consider this a self-inflicted slavery because its ultimately a persons choice to work under such conditionsbut I also understand that brainwashing can occur, creating the illusion that theres no way out.

Slavery (in general) exists because of the inclination among people to obtain the benefits of human resources, while providing little (or nothing) in return. Human work is the most intelligent, efficient way to create a system of wealth and power. For the morally bankrupt, such benefits are sought for free.

Employment, in the best case scenario, is a business deal of mutual benefit. But in other instances, the company is expending such minimal resources that they are taking advantage of you. In the worst case scenario, through a combination of slave-driving principles and psychological techniques to break you down, such a job can morph into something very similar to actual slavery.

If you dont know any better, its easy to fall into slavery conditions. Here are signs that your sense of freedom in life is totally gone:

Because of the way employers conveniently ignore yearly inflation, todays minimal wage is not enough to maintain any semblance of a normal lifestyle. Minimal wage makes some sense in small businesses just starting out. But, In America, $8.25 an hour, or less, from a large, billion-dollar corporation is inexcusable. In this case, your annual wages cost a second of the companys hourly profits. In other words, your hard work is a very bad deal for you, and a killer opportunity for the suits upstairs.

Youre lucky you even have a job! is a psychological taunt that bad employers use to try and keep their wage-slaves from believing they can do any better. Such statements are made to maintain a sense of control. Understand, voluntary slavery is not a rare phenomenon. It happens when a person is brainwashed into the belief that they have nowhere else they can go.

If your manager uses psychological put-downs like this to denigrate your professional abilitiesunderstand that its being done for a reason.

The idea of getting a raise and a promotion may be dangled in-front of you, but youve seen no evidence to suggest that it really happens. In fact, only a very small percentage of your co-workers ever obtain this goal, and they tend to be the cronies of upper-management. If this is the case, then what exactly is your reason for working at this company?

Inconvenient hours are inevitable in jobs, but some companies will abuse the system. This ranges from illegally denying overtime pay, to scheduling month-long bouts of cloping (working until closing hours late at night, then opening hours the next morning) that leaves the employee physically and emotionally drained.

An employee in this system may feel the intense pressure by the bosses to conform to abusive hours, under the threat of being denied promotions or even getting fired for seeking better treatment.

Americas two-week annual vacation time is one of the weakest in the Western world, and American workers tend to not even use it. This is because many employers will hint that vacationers are likely to end up on the shit-list of not getting promoted. They may even hint that unruly vacation-seekers will be the first to get laid-off or fired at the earliest opportunity.

A system of slavery does not allow free-time for individuals to maintain their own lives outside of their work. This could cause dissent and break the system of total control. An unspoken methodology among abusive managers is to destroy the lifestyles of employees so, instead of tending to family or hobbies, they work at full capacity.

Feeling motivated based on high-standards and being scared to go below those standards is one thing, but being genuinely scared of the people youre working for is another.

Slave-masters maintain systems of fear, to break down their subjects and perhapsin timebuild them back up. For the best example of thisplease see Theon Greyjoy in Game of Thrones.

Psychological and verbal abuse is usually what occurs. An abusive employer understands exactly what strings to pull to generate feelings of shame or guilt, and theyll use the professional context to destroy a subjects sense of self-worth, perhaps by implying worthlessness at the vocation theyve devoted their life to.

In other instances, the abuse is very overt and could include yelling, tantrums and even physical assaults. But the outcome is the same: the employee living in a constant state of paranoia, fear, and subservience.

Read carefully the ten warning-signs youre in a cult by the Cult Education Institute. Some of these that could be very applicable to a workplace include: absolute authoritarianism without meaningful accountability, no tolerance for questions or critical inquiry, the leader (boss) is always right, and former followers (employees) are vilified as evil for leaving.

If the job feels less about, you know, getting the job doneand is more about the influence, charisma and infallibility of the bossthen get the heck out of there. This means the person in charge is getting a side-benefit to running or managing the workplace: power and dominance.

The number one sign youre a slave and not an employee is that youre working an unpaid internship, and its not for college credit. You may be promised great benefits and valuable connections, at what amounts to harsh workplace conditions, long hours, and zero pay.

A huge mistake I see young professionals make, and it really irks me, is naivety about peoples intentions. I went to film school for my bachelors, and many students I knew lusted after top internships at film studios or with big names in the entertainment industry. Such internships are often offered regardless of college credit.

When a person is blindsided by their desire to make it and get in with big names, they are likely to make bad decisionsand unscrupulous employers will prey on this desire.

Internships are great IF its part of a students actual curriculum. It means hands-on work and real experience versus useless classrooms. But, the questionable non-credit internships I warn about also exist to lure young people into systems of slavery. Its gotten so bad these types of arrangements are quickly becoming illegal in California.

The reality of such internships is that the slave-drivers only desire one thing: unpaid work. There is NO promise that you will move up or land any type of a paid job. When your internship finishes, they will discard you and find the next victim.

The biggest reason to avoid internships is the mentality behind the deal. Imagine a law firm or a film studio that is a multi-billion dollar operation. How hard would it be to throw their new recruit at LEAST minimum wage? The fact such a company would, despite their huge profits, still desire unpaid labor is indicative of a slave-driving mentality that funnels wealth to the top at the expense of the people on the bottom making it possible.

As a professional, it would be best for you to avoid doing any type of business with any individual or company that possesses a philosophy like this.

Employment-slavery situations are common. Very common. But ultimately, the biggest factor in determining how bad it is, is a single question: are you happy?

If you are happy at $8.25 an hour with no benefits, because you like the people you work with, you like the nature of the work, and you feel its moving you somewhere you want to bethen its not slavery. Youre making an investment thatll either pay off, or it wontbut at least you enjoy what youre doing.

However, if you are miserable in your current conditions, its quite possible that the uneasy feeling in your gut is your intuition telling you that someone is taking advantage of you.

Employment is supposed to be a business contract, and an exchange of services. Never a system of control. Sometimes, just the willingness to walk away is your strongest defense against a terrible job situation.

For more about avoiding systems of employment-slavery, please see my short books: Freedom: How to Make Money From Your Dreams and Ambitions, and How to Quit Your Job: Escape Soul Crushing Work, Create the Life You Want, and Live Happy.

(For more books, also check out the Developed Life bookstore, http://www.developedlife.com/bookstore).

Original post:

8 Signs You’re a Slave Instead of an Employee

On Monuments and Minimum Wages – The American Prospect – The American Prospect

The statue of Confederate Gen. Stonewall Jackson on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Va.

At 9 p.m. last Tuesday night, city workers began to enclose in plywood the Confederate monument that sits in Birminghams Linn Park. By the following afternoon, Alabama Attorney General Steve Marshall had announced that he was suing the city for violating state law.

Activists in Birmingham first began calling for the removal of the 52-foot Confederate Soldiers and Sailors monument in 2015, after white supremacist Dylann Roof murdered nine parishioners in a Charleston, South Carolina, church. That, in turn, prompted Gerald Allen, a state senator from Tuscaloosa, to introduce the Alabama Memorial Preservation Act to prohibit cities from removing or altering historic monuments more than 40 years old without the approval of a state committee. The predominantly (if not entirely) white Republicans who control the legislature passed the bill along party lines. Republican Governor Kay Ivey signed it into law in May.

Birmingham Mayor William Bell ordered the monument to be covered amid a renewed and urgent call from activists and officials to remove such tributes to the Confederacy, after white nationalists in Charlottesville, Virginia, rallied around a statue of Confederate General Robert E. Lee and proceeded to attack counter-protesters, killing one woman. Several citiesfrom Baltimore to San Antoniohave since taken down Confederate monuments while others debate similar actions.

Mayor Bell, who is black, says he doesnt necessarily want to remove the statuedespite demands from local activistsbut he does think it should provide a broader context that condemns the Confederacy, rather than celebrates it. The Confederacy was an act of sedition and treason against the United States of America and represented the continuation of human bondage of people of color, Bell told the Prospect in an interview. Its anathema to anyone supportive of the United States government to have such a structure sitting on public property.

Furthermore, he points out, Birmingham didnt become a city until 1871, during the post-Civil War Reconstruction era. And the monument wasnt erected until 190550 years after the war endedwhen a local chapter of the United Daughters of the Confederacy commissioned the memorial as a gift to the city.

Its my desire to no longer allow this statute to be seen by public until such time that we can tell the full story of slavery, the full story of what the Confederacy really meant, Bell told reporters last week. Now, Bell says, the city is exploring its legal options in light of the states lawsuit. The state attorney general is asking a district court to fine the city $25,000.

I don’t believe that the legislative body has the authority to dictate what monuments or statues we have on public property. Thats a right that the municipal government should control, Bell says. This was built with private dollars and is now protected by the state. The city should have the power to eliminate any source of contention and to maintain public tranquility.

THE STATE OF ALABAMA’S CRACKDOWN ON BIRMINGHAMis just its latest attempt to limit the authority of the majority-black city, which has a black mayor and a majority-black city council. In February 2016, the Birmingham city council approved a $10.10-an-hour minimum wage. Two days later, the Republican-controlled legislature passed a law prohibiting Alabama cities from passing such ordinances and voiding a wage hike for tens of thousands of Birminghams low-wage workers.

The experience of Birmingham is indicative of a broader GOP-led assault on the political power and home rule of Southern cities, home to large black populations, often led by black politicians, and, increasingly, purveyors of progressive policies that seek to improve upon the low standards of state law. From the removal of Confederate monuments to the enactment of local minimum wages, Republican-controlled statehouses are preempting blue citiesand undermining black voices.

These are nothing more than 21st-century Jim Crow laws, Johnathan Austin, chair of the Birmingham City Council, said of the monument removal and minimum-wage preemption laws in an interview with the Prospect. The state of Alabama is trying to control the [states] largest cityand largest black city by prohibiting us from governing ourselves.

Twenty-five statesincluding nearly every Southern statehave laws that prohibit cities and counties from setting their own minimum wage. The five states that have no minimum wage of their own (Alabama, Louisiana, Mississippi, South Carolina, Tennessee), adhering to the federal minimum instead, are in the South. Now, at least six states have laws limiting the power of cities to remove Confederate monuments, with most passed in the last couple years. All of them are in the South, where Republicans control every single legislative chamber. Despite their calls for local control and fewer regulations, state Republicans are now regulating both the cultural and economic authority of localities.

Last year, state legislators passed the Tennessee Heritage Preservation Act of 2016, which requires public notice, hearings, and a two-thirds majority vote of the legislature in order to remove historic monuments. In 2015, North Carolina signed the Cultural History Artifact Management and Patriotism Act, an Orwellian amalgamation of nouns that requires a state historical commission to approve any removal of monuments. Georgia, Mississippi, and Virginia also have similar laws.

In Memphis, a majority-black city, officials are ready to suethe stateif it denies its a new waiver request to remove a statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis downtown, as well as a statue of Confederate General and Ku Klux Klan founding member Nathan Bedford Forrest. The move came after the city tried and failed to slog its way through the byzantine maze of GOP-instituted regulations protecting such statues. The matter may very well end up before the state Supreme Court. Legislators in Tennessee, which has the highest proportion of minimum-wage workers in the country, also passed a law in 2014 that prohibits cities from enacting minimum-wage ordinances higher than the state level, which is chained to the federal minimum of $7.25 an hour.

As Barry Yeoman reported for the Prospect last week, protesters in Durham, North Carolinaa liberal city stripped of its authority to take down monuments by the right-wing legislaturefound a way around that impasse by pulling down a Confederate statue themselves. I understand why people felt this was the most expedient way, Jillian Johnson, an African American member of the city council, told Yeoman. There was no legal way to make it happen.

Meanwhile, the Durham council has also been barred from increasing the minimum wage (save for city employees) by the same infamous legislation that restricted transgenders bathroom use.

Durham is just one of dozens of Democratic-controlled citiesAtlanta, Birmingham, Charlotte, Charleston, Durham, Jackson, Nashville, Memphis, and so on, the blue dots in red stateswhich have lost the authority to raise wages for their (predominately black) workers struggling to get over the poverty line or to remove prominent monuments to a racist and oppressive ideology so their residents dont have to see a general fighting for slavery looking down on them as they go to work.

Republicans insist that protecting these monumentsthe majority of which were built in the early 1900s or during the 1960sare about preserving the history and heritage of the South. Just as they insist that prohibiting local increases to the minimum wagewhich hasnt been lifted on the federal level in eight yearsis about protecting low-wage workers from job loss.

In these ways, GOP lawmakers are actually memorializing the values of the Antebellum South: White supremacy and lowor, rather, nowages.

This article has been corrected to clarify that the city of Memphis has not yet sued the state, but intends to if its waiver to remove its Confederate monuments is denied, and that one of the statues is of Confederate President Jefferson Davis.

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On Monuments and Minimum Wages – The American Prospect – The American Prospect

FANTASTIC NEGRITO Addresses Current Events in New Tracks – Broadway World

When FANTASTIC NEGRITO released his Grammy award-winning album The Last Days of Oakland in 2016, it received critical acclaim for its honest look at racism, gun violence, wage slavery, and other challenges facing our country. That continues with the re-release of the album on September 1, 2017 via Cooking Vinyl, which features two new tracks, “Push Back” and “The Shadows”, which anticipated the events of today.

Almost prophetic in its subject matter, both “Push Back” and “The Shadows” reveal the soul of an artist trying to make sense of the political world around him that affects not only the governments but the fate of families, especially for people of color. Tackling the results and lack of progress from the current Administration head on in “The Shadows” (“I got trouble on my mind / I’ve been reading the headlines / That man that said “you’re fired” / Brought the Devil out of retirement”) and the Border Wall and immigration in “Push Back” (“They’re trying to build a wall / But that won’t help at all”), these two tracks are a direct response to the current state we as a country are in.

“Being African American in this country is f****** brutal,” he explains. “It’s painful and we, as individuals, have a way to combat that. And Fantastic Negrito for me is a way to combat that.”

In addition, Fantastic Negrito will be supporting Sturgill Simpson on his Fall U.S. tour. TOUR DATES Supporting Sturgill Simpson

SEP 07 Smart Financial Centre / Sugarland, TX SEP 08 Verizon Theatre / Grand Prairie, TX SEP 09 AUSTIN360 Amphitheatre / De Valle, TX SEP 14 Radio City Music Hall / New York, NY SEP 15 Merriweather Post Pavilion / Columbia, MD SEP 16 Blue Hills Bank Pavilion / Boston, MA SEP 19 Fox Theatre / Detroit, MI SEP 21 Fox Theatre / St. Louis, MO SEP 22 Huntington Bank Pavilion / Chicago, IL SEP 25 Red Rocks Amphitheatre / Morrison, CO SEP 28 Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall / Portland, OR SEP 29 Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall / Portland, OR SEP 30 Marymoor Amphitheater / Redmond, WA OCT 06 The Greek Theatre / Los Angeles, CA

Fantastic Negrito’s The Last Days of Oakland took home the 2017 Grammy for Best Contemporary Blues Album Grammy Award. While blues is an integral part of Fantastic Negrito’s overall foundation, his music defies genre, blending hip hop, rock, and other styles to create a sound that led Pitchfork’s Greil Marcus to say “he could be inventing the blues for the first time.”

He made his national television debut as Fantastic Negrito on the season finale of Fox’s Empire, performing both his single “Lost in a Crowd”-the track that brought him to national attention, winning NPR’s inaugural Tiny Desk Concert Contest-and the hit song “Good Enough” alongside “Empire’s” Jamal Lyon.

Photo Credit: Max Claus

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FANTASTIC NEGRITO Addresses Current Events in New Tracks – Broadway World

Letter: Environmental damage is not Christian – Roanoke Times

What if The Bible was written by divinely-inspired men, but not by God? Imagine if there were a Goddess as well as a God. Imagine that homosexuality is a quality of a beautiful, special class of people…

Why doesn’t our nation strive for peace by all means, and end wage slavery in the developing world? Why have we taken and mutilated the land of Native Americans, and killed off most Native Americans? Why have we caused environmental damage worldwide? This is not Christian.

I love just as Jews, Muslims, Africans, Native Americans, Asians, and Christians. We are all sisters and brothers in the love that we believe in. Think about how the military-industrial complex is treating our aforementioned brothers and sisters. This is a nightmare. My question to the dominant group of Christians is, what are you really afraid of? Use common sense at this point. The truth will set you free. We are in the middle of our own fascism. Millions are dead from war, millions are in wage slavery. Read “Killing Hope” by Blum, http://www.workersrights.org and “Made in China” by Ngai to begin to change. We are not a Christian nation.

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Letter: Environmental damage is not Christian – Roanoke Times

Letter: Par for the column – Glenwood Springs Post Independent

Vince Emmer, your golf metaphor for big government is a really, really sad attempt to dis big government. But columns have always been the work of a duffer.

First thing your metaphor misses is there is a par to each hole. You don’t make us understand what constitutes under and over the balance line that would be consensus. What is the bogey or the hole in one, spending wise?

Next most golfers play 18 holes, and the game is much more about the back nine than the front end.

But of course your brand of economics never ventures onto the back nine, where the sand traps of wage slavery and rust-belt industry are negotiated only by Asian players.

Case in point, saying each household owes $56,000 a year is just a fear tactic. With the current tax structure, and the many ways government finances debt, nobody actually owes this. Instead we pay forward a portion of the earning (which the government is borrowing, interest free) plus various fees and taxes to local agency, where one chooses to be a member of the same civility. This would be the front nine.

The back nine is the fact that the structure of government is much the same as corporations, in that they are champions or duffers to the extent they can carry debt.

The ability to carry debt in capitalist societies keeps the operation under par even with forays into the woods like Afghanistan and Iraq, and breath test-qualified mortgage-backed securities, etc. If you equate the per-household equivalent in the corporate world, it would be the cost passed onto consumers, hidden fees and the fact banks are borrowing peoples savings at a rate as close to interest free as it can manage.

But of course, our current neo-liberal economist and business school caddies don’t even know the difference between the putter and the driver in this matter. Face the fact governments are financed by more than one club and must always play the full round, while business can spin off debt into subsidiaries and spend their time in the clubhouse.

Eric Olander

Glenwood Springs

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Letter: Par for the column – Glenwood Springs Post Independent


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