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There are few certainties in coronavirus medicine research is our best weapon – The Guardian

This pandemic is frightening for many people especially those at the highest risk and the need for effective prevention and treatment is pressing.

When there is no direct evidence about what is best to do with a new disease, we need to create it. Clearly, that means recognising that some seemingly sensible interventions may not produce the intended effects. All of medicine is a bit uncertain (unlike maths, where proof is immutable). We can be very certain about some things (drinking bleach is harmful) and less certain about others (could vitamin D be useful?) Admitting uncertainty is something medicine historically finds difficult. But if we dont recognise the gaps in our knowledge, we wont research them. And good research has to be the way out of this.

There are now thousands of research papers on Covid-19, but many of such poor quality that we shouldnt rely on them. This means extra care and critique is needed. And on that basis, we simply dont know if vitamin D, for example, will help with Covid-19 (although all UK residents get a recommendation either to take or consider taking vitamin D the evidence for benefit is either absent or small with the exception of asthma). To know if it will help against Covid-19 needs rapid research for instance, assessing the vitamin D levels of people with severe Covid-19 against similar people who have less severe Covid-19 or avoid getting it altogether, or asking a group of people at high risk to diligently take supplements, and monitoring what happens.

As far as hydroxychloroquine goes, initial trials of this drug which is typically used to prevent malaria (and has been promoted by Donald Trump as a possible cure for all things Covid-19) were initially of poor quality, tiny, and with no control groups. Yet they were widely reported as showing it helped, while better quality trials that followed showed it didnt. Research is now focused on whether it might work as a preventive measure. Knowing what doesnt work is vital. It means that we can stop wasting resources on things that dont work and avoid unnecessary side-effects. Its also clear that hydroxychloroquine has cardiac side-effects, a fact that needs care in monitoring. There is no such thing as an intervention that is free of side-effects.

This doesnt just go for drug treatments. It should hold true for non-drug treatments. There is a clamour for everyone in public to wear a face covering. Does it work? Some research papers insist it does offering reasons as to why fabric will stop the passage of viral particles from the mouth and nose. But what really matters is whether this would result in fewer people being infected. So far, three reviews of the evidence (which have yet to be peer-reviewed) have found no or slender evidence, at best, for any benefit. But a bigger concern is a lack of investigation of unintended consequences. Would people wearing face coverings manage not to touch their faces or would they subconsciously take risks, which results in more infections, not fewer? What does this mean for deaf or lipreading people, or those with cognitive difficulties? Hazards for some may be accepted if there are outweighing benefits for everyone but, when the evidence is so slender, we need rational deliberation.

Would policymakers assume face coverings work, and make decisions on, for instance, encouraging the use of public transport on this basis without high-quality evidence to tell us this is safe? The truth is that we dont know, because we dont have the studies. The counter-argument is its a global pandemic, we cant wait for the results of research. I would argue that because it is a global pandemic, we need good, rapid research even more: the results will be applicable to far more people than usual when a drug or potential preventive measure is tested, hence the need to get better evidence for everyone. And yes, the need is urgent but this pandemic has no clear end in sight.

We could do fast, pragmatic, real-world studies, supplying masks to a geographical area with encouragement and instruction on use, and monitor for comparative changes in infection rates, together with carrying out field studies to observe peoples behaviour. Difficult, yes; but impossible, no. The World Health Organization has made it clear that we need research during pandemics (and drug trials have got off to an amazingly fast start), but this needs to hold true for things like face coverings too. What seems a sensible and obvious solution may not be. Harms and unintended consequences are everywhere, but are only reckoned with properly if we look for them.

Medicine is now in the era of Covid-19. This could be a turning point: where we take the uncertainty we are facing and, rather than assuming that our interventions will work, everyone citizens, patients, researchers and healthcare staff comes together to reduce it.

Margaret McCartney is a GP who writes about evidence-based medicine; she is the author of The State of Medicine: keeping the promise of the NHS

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There are few certainties in coronavirus medicine research is our best weapon - The Guardian

AIIMS former head of medicine dept dies of COVID – The Tribune India

Tribune News Service

New Delhi, May 23

Dr Jitendra Nath Pande, an acclaimed medical specialist and former head of the Department of Medicine at the All India Institute of Medical Sciences (AIIMS), New Delhi, died at his residence on Saturday.

Dr Jitendra Nath Pande was 79.

He was serving as a consultant at a Delhi-based private hospital after retiring from the AIIMS. His wife is also currently hospitalised with the infection.

Dr Jitendra Nath Pande had tested positive for COVID-19 earlier this week.

Dr Pande and his wife tested positive for COVID-19 on Tuesday with mild symptoms and had decided to remain in home isolation, said AIIMS director Dr Randeep Guleria.

But his wife was shifted to the AIIMS on Saturday.

We were following up on him regularly and he said he was improving. Yesterday, after having his dinner, he went off to sleep and then passed away in his sleep possibly because of an acute cardiac event, Dr Guleria said.

Dr Pande had co-morbid conditions.

Knowledge and humility can co-exist and Dr Pande was an epitome of that. He was an excellent human being and it is a great loss to the medical fraternity. AIIMS family will miss him the most because he joined AIIMS as an MBBS student and retired as the head of the Department of Medicine, Dr Guleria said.

I have closely worked with him and knew him since my childhood as he was the student of my father, he added.

After his retirement in 2003, Dr Pande joined the Sitaram Bhartia Institute of Science and Research and worked there as a senior consultant in the Respiratory Medicine Department.

He was a legendary physician who had taught many practising doctors at AIIMS and continued to mentor physicians even after joining this hospital. What was remarkable was that most difficult cases would come to him, said the institutes director, Abhishek Bhartia.

I even spoke to him yesterday. He was under home care and seemed to be recovering.

Sangita Reddy, joint managing director, Apollo Hospitals Group, and president of industry chamber FICCI, said in a tweet: Deeply saddened to hear that today. @covid19 claimed its most illustrious victim Dr JN Pande Director & Prof of Pulmonology @aiims_newdelhi. A stalwart of the medical world his work in pulmonology will continue to ensure better health for many. My Condolences to his family. With agency inputs

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AIIMS former head of medicine dept dies of COVID - The Tribune India

My Turn: It’s time to take our medicine – Concord Monitor

Published: 5/22/2020 6:20:14 AM

Modified: 5/22/2020 6:20:03 AM

This past weekend offered a snapshot of where we are in the pandemic. On Saturday, there were protests at the State House.

The group ReOpenNH led the display with both the protests (no masks, no social distancing) and a coordinated op-ed piece in local papers.

Meanwhile, there were 13 more COVID-19 deaths in New Hampshire and the Strafford County jail reported its first two cases of COVID-19: one staff member and one ICE detainee.

In his opinion, Mr. Manuse, the chair of ReOpenNH, feels the restrictions have been an unnecessary intrusion upon our liberties and this entire pandemic is some sort of political ploy. He states that according to New Hampshire statistics, were more likely to die from an opioid overdose than from COVID-19. He further states that people under the age of 15 are more likely to die from the flu.

Of course, the reality is much more complicated and different from Mr. Manuses beliefs. Anyone can be a viral vector and spread the disease whether or not they experience symptoms. The virus will spread to our most vulnerable through contact with his or her younger loved ones.

He also ignores the fact that the only people who die from an opioid overdose are those who use them recreationally. No one gets COVID-19 intentionally.

The youth in New Hampshire are no different biologically than the youth in Massachusetts or New York. Thats where a mysterious offshoot of COVID-19, called Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome in Children is killing some children and hospitalizing about 200 other in the United States alone. So if the disease doesnt prove fatal to our children, the hospital bill might be fatal to the parents.

We need to listen to our doctors advice. They dont get paid for preaching a political agenda and they dont want to prolong their own lockdown restrictions any more than the rest of us.

Our health and our economy are sick, but if we all just take our medicine we will all be back on our feet again.

(Dr. James Fieseher lives in Dover.)

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My Turn: It's time to take our medicine - Concord Monitor

The China Precision Medicine Industry Analysis by BIS Research projects the market to grow at a significant CAGR of 12.82% during the forecast period,…

China Precision Medicine Market to Reach $18,723. 5 Million by 2029. Key Questions Answered in this Report: What are the major market drivers, challenges, and opportunities in the China precision medicine market?

New York, May 23, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report "China Precision Medicine Market: Focus on Ecosystems, Applications, and Competitive Landscape Analysis and Forecast, 2019-2029" - https://www.reportlinker.com/p05803973/?utm_source=GNW What are the underlying structures resulting in the emerging trends within the China precision medicine market? How will each segment of the China precision medicine market grow during the forecast period and what will be the revenue generated by each of the segments by the end of 2029? What would be the compound growth rate witnessed by the leading players in the market during the forecast period 2019-2029? What are the key applications in China precision medicine market? What are the major segments of these applications? What are the major technologies that are employed in the China precision medicine market? Which is the current dominant technology? Who are the key manufacturers and service providers in the China precision medicine market, and what are their contributions? Moreover, what is the growth potential of each major precision medicine manufacturer and service provider?

China Precision Medicine Market Forecast, 2019-2029The China Precision Medicine Industry Analysis projects the market to grow at a significant CAGR of 12.82% during the forecast period, 2019-2029. The China precision medicine market generated $4,919.7 million revenue in 2018, in terms of value.

The China Precision Medicine market growth is majorly driven by factors such as shifting the significance in medicine from reaction to prevention, government initiatives for the incorporation of precision medicine in China, lowering costs and advancement in sequencing technologies, and surge in underlying direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic testing market in China. However, factors such as fragmented healthcare system in China, a lack of knowledge dissemination for advanced diagnostic capabilities, and a lack of a unified framework for big data integration hamper the overall market growth.

Expert Quote on the China Precision Medicine MarketAnnouncement of the China Precision Medicine Initiative in 2016 has radically changed healthcare regimes in the country, with renewed focus being directed toward capitalizing the present genome sequencing boom in the country. Further, with the establishment of the China Precision Medicine Cloud by WuXi NextCODE and Huawei, cloud-based genomics is set to be the cornerstone of Chinas precision medicine revolution.

Scope of the Market Intelligence on China Precision Medicine MarketThe China precision medicine market research provides a gain a holistic view of the China precision medicine market in terms of various factors influencing it, including regulatory reforms, and technological advancements.

The scope of this report is centered upon conducting a detailed study of the products and services allied with the precision medicine market. In addition, the study also includes exhaustive information on the unmet needs, perception on the new products, competitive landscape, market share of leading manufacturers, growth potential of each underlying sub-segment, and company, as well as other vital information with respect to China precision medicine market.

Market SegmentationThe China precision medicine market segmentation (on the basis of applied sciences) is further segmented into genomics, pharmacogenomics, and other applied sciences.Genomics is the prevalent applied sciences type in the China precision medicine market.

This segment constitutes the majority shareholder in the applied sciences ecosystem for precision medicine and is also expected to continue dominating through 2029.

The China precision medicine market segmentation (on the basis of digital health and information technology) is segmented into CDSS, big data analytics, IT infrastructure, genome informatics, in-silicon informatics, and mobile health.

The China precision medicine market segmentation (on the basis of application) is segmented into oncology, infectious diseases, neurology/psychiatry, lifestyle and endocrinology, cardiology, gastroenterology, and other applications.

Key Companies in the China Precision Medicine IndustryThe key manufacturers and service providers who have been contributing significantly to the china precision medicine market include Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc., F. Hoffmann-La Roche Ltd., BGI Genomics Co., Ltd., Illumina, Inc., Shanghai Fosun Pharmaceutical Group, WuXi AppTec, Berry Genomics Co., Ltd., Agilent Technologies, Inc., and PerkinElmer Inc., among others.

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05803973/?utm_source=GNW

About ReportlinkerReportLinker is an award-winning market research solution. Reportlinker finds and organizes the latest industry data so you get all the market research you need - instantly, in one place.

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The China Precision Medicine Industry Analysis by BIS Research projects the market to grow at a significant CAGR of 12.82% during the forecast period,...

Coronavirus tests the value of artificial intelligence in medicine – FierceBiotech

Albert Hsiao, M.D., and his colleagues at the University of California, San Diego (USCD) health system had been working for 18 months on anartificial intelligence programdesigned to help doctors identify pneumonia on a chest X-ray. When thecoronavirushit the U.S., they decided to see what it could do.

The researchers quickly deployed the application, which dots X-ray images with spots of color where there may be lung damage or other signs of pneumonia. It has now been applied to more than 6,000 chest X-rays, and its providing some value in diagnosis, said Hsiao, director of UCSDs augmented imaging and artificial intelligence data analytics laboratory.

His team is one of several around the country that has pushed AI programs developed in a calmer time into the COVID-19 crisis to perform tasks like deciding which patients face the greatest risk of complications and which can be safely channeled into lower-intensity care.

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Join FiercePharma for our ASCO pre- and post-show webinar series. We'll bring together a panel of experts to preview what to watch for at ASCO. Cancer experts will highlight closely watched data sets to be unveiled at the virtual meeting--and discuss how they could change prescribing patterns. Following the meeting, well do a post-show wrap up to break down the biggest data that came out over the weekend, as well as the implications they could have for prescribers, patients and drugmakers.

The machine-learning programs scroll through millions of pieces of data to detect patterns that may be hard for clinicians to discern. Yet few of the algorithms have been rigorously tested against standard procedures. So while they often appear helpful, rolling out the programs in the midst of a pandemic could be confusing to doctors or even dangerous for patients, some AI experts warn.

AI is being used for things that are questionable right now, said Eric Topol, M.D., director of the Scripps Research Translational Institute and author of several books on health IT.

Topol singled out a system created byEpic, a major vendor of electronic health record software, that predicts which coronavirus patients may become critically ill. Using the tool before it has been validated is pandemic exceptionalism, he said.

Epic said the companys model had been validated with data from more 16,000 hospitalized COVID-19 patients in 21 healthcare organizations. No research on the tool has been published, but, in any case, it was developed to help clinicians make treatment decisions and is not a substitute for their judgment, said James Hickman, a software developer on Epics cognitive computing team.

Others see the COVID-19 crisis as an opportunity to learn about the value of AI tools.

My intuition is its a little bit of the good, bad and ugly, said Eric Perakslis, Ph.D., a data science fellow at Duke University and former chief information officer at the FDA. Research in this setting is important.

Nearly $2 billion poured into companies touting advancements in healthcare AI in 2019. Investments in the first quarter of 2020 totaled $635 million, up from $155 million in the first quarter of 2019, according to digital health technology funderRock Health.

At least three healthcare AI technology companies have made funding deals specific to the COVID-19 crisis, includingVida Diagnostics, an AI-powered lung-imaging analysis company, according to Rock Health.

Overall, AIs implementation in everyday clinical care is less common than hype over the technology would suggest. Yet the coronavirus crisis has inspired some hospital systems to accelerate promising applications.

UCSD sped up its AI imaging project, rolling it out in only two weeks.

Hsiaos project, with research funding from Amazon Web Services, the UC system and the National Science Foundation (NSF), runs every chest X-ray taken at its hospital through an AI algorithm. While no data on the implementation have been published yet, doctors report that the tool influences their clinical decision-making about a third of the time, said Christopher Longhurst, M.D., UCSD Healths chief information officer.

The results to date are very encouraging, and were not seeing any unintended consequences, he said. Anecdotally, were feeling like its helpful, not hurtful.

AI has advanced further in imaging than other areas of clinical medicine because radiological images have tons of data for algorithms to process, and more data make the programs more effective, said Longhurst.

But while AI specialists have tried to get AI to do things like predict sepsis and acute respiratory distressresearchers at Johns Hopkins Universityrecently won a NSF grantto use it to predict heart damage in COVID-19 patientsit has been easier to plug it into less risky areas such as hospital logistics.

In New York City, two major hospital systems are using AI-enabled algorithms to help them decide when and how patients should move into another phase of care or be sent home.

AtMount Sinai Health System, an artificial intelligence algorithm pinpoints which patients might be ready to be discharged from the hospital within 72 hours, said Robbie Freeman, vice president of clinical innovation at Mount Sinai.

Freeman described the AIs suggestion as a conversation starter, meant to help assist clinicians working on patient cases decide what to do. AI isnt making the decisions.

NYU Langone Healthhas developed a similar AI model. It predicts whether a COVID-19 patient entering the hospital will suffer adverse events within the next four days, said Yindalon Aphinyanaphongs, M.D., Ph.D., who leads NYU Langones predictive analytics team.

The model will be run in a four- to six-week trial with patients randomized into two groups: one whose doctors will receive the alerts, and another whose doctors will not. The algorithm should help doctors generate a list of things that may predict whether patients are at risk for complications after theyre admitted to the hospital, Aphinyanaphongs said.

Some health systems are leery of rolling out a technology that requires clinical validation in the middle of a pandemic. Others say they didnt need AI to deal with the coronavirus.

Stanford Health Careis not using AI to manage hospitalized patients with COVID-19, saidRon Li, M.D., the centers medical informatics director for AI clinical integration. The San Francisco Bay Areahasnt seen the expected surge of patientswho would have provided the mass of data needed to make sure AI works on a population, he said.

Outside the hospital, AI-enabled risk factor modeling is being used to help health systems track patients who arent infected with the coronavirus but might be susceptible to complications if they contract COVID-19.

At Scripps Health in San Diego, clinicians are stratifying patients to assess their risk of getting COVID-19 and experiencing severe symptoms using a risk-scoring model that considers factors like age, chronic conditions and recent hospital visits. When a patient scores seven or higher, a triage nurse reaches out with information about the coronavirus and may schedule an appointment.

Though emergencies provide unique opportunities to try out advanced tools, its essential for health systems to ensure doctors are comfortable with them and to use the tools cautiously, with extensive testing and validation, Topol said.

When people are in the heat of battle and overstretched, it would be great to have an algorithm to support them, he said. We just have to make sure the algorithm and the AI tool isnt misleading, because lives are at stake here.

Kaiser Health News(KHN) is a national health policy news service. It is an editorially independent program of theHenry J. Kaiser Family Foundationwhich is not affiliated with Kaiser Permanente.

ThisKHNstory first published onCalifornia Healthline, a service of theCalifornia Health Care Foundation

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Coronavirus tests the value of artificial intelligence in medicine - FierceBiotech

A Coronavirus Fad Or The Future Of Medicine? Telehealth Is Having A Moment – WBUR

Telehealth is having a moment.

In the midst of the coronavirus pandemic, many people can't, or won't, visit their doctors in person. So, some are making virtual visits, instead.

This could be the future of medicine or a fad that won't last beyond the current outbreak. The idea that video calls could replace some trips to the doctor's office isn't new, andit never really caught on, until COVID-19 suddenly changed everything.

"We started seeing unprecedented growth never seen before," said Girish Navani, CEO of Westborough-based eClinicalWorks.

Though Navani's company is a leading maker of medical software, the telehealth platform it introduced several years ago wasn't a big hit. Before the coronavirus pandemic, average daily usage by all clients combined was just 28 hours.

Practically overnight, usage has skyrocketed to about 25,000 hours per day.

"What's even more exciting is not just the growth in usage," Navani said. "The stories that we are hearing every day is that the doctors find this to be very, very convenient, easy, safe. And, on the other side, the patients find it to be extremely convenient."

Navani's company hopes patients and doctors are hooked and that telehealth is here to stay. But getting people to like telehealth is only half the battle.

Until recently, doctors and hospitals had little incentive to offer virtual visits because many health insurers didn't cover them or paid far less than the prices of face-to-face appointments. Like many states, Massachusetts is temporarily requiring equal payments during the pandemic, under an orderfrom Gov. Charlie Baker.

"You talk to almost anybody in the provider community and people on the payer side, and they'll tell you the arrival of the coronavirus and the executive emergency order that we issued on telehealth has brought this into the mainstream in Massachusetts," Baker said at a recent news conference.

A big question is whether insurance companies will continue to cover telehealth at the same rate as in-person careafter the pandemic. For now, many are noncommittal.

"At the appropriate time, we will work with all stakeholders customers, health care providers, and policymakers on transitioning to a post-COVID-19 environment, with a continued focus on making high-quality health care accessible and affordable,"Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts, the state's largest insurer, said in a statement.

WBUR previously reported that Blue Cross Blue Shield of Massachusetts customers are using telehealth technology about 100 times more than usual.

Harvard Pilgrim said it "will continue to evaluate as the months progress," and Tufts Health Plan said it "will continue to examine reimbursement levels as time goes on." The two insurersplan to merge this year.

AllWays Health Partners said it "will work with state officials and other members of the health care community on appropriate telemedicine policies in a post-COVID-19 environment."

AllWays Vice President Jennifer St. Thomas said in a recent online forum organized by the Massachusetts High Technology Council that telehealth looked like risky business before the coronavirus.

"Health plans have really held back because of the concern over adoption," she said. "Am I going to change my product design just to have it be a flop?"

Adoption is through the roof, at the moment. But, in the long run, telehealth coverage and demand appear to present a chicken-and-egg dilemma: Insurers may need steady demand after the pandemic subsides to make coverage worthwhile. But the demand could depend on continued coverage.

That's because doctors might drop telehealth if asked to accept low insurance payments, and patients may be unwilling to make up the difference, out of pocket.

A compromise may be the key to making the economics of telehealth work in Massachusetts and beyond, according to Dr. Jim Leavitt, whose gastroenterology practice is funded by a Boston private equity firm but has offices in Florida, Alabama, Virginia and Washington state.

"Will it be the same rate as a regular visit? Maybe not," Leavitt said. "If it's 20% of the rate, it's a problem, from a business structure. But if it's 80% [or] 85% of the rate, it's reasonable."

For now, Leavitt's doctors are conducting telehealth visits using software from eClinicalWorks something they hardly ever did before the spread of COVID-19. If insurance coverage remains at the level Leavitt calls reasonable, after the pandemic, he predicts one-quarter to one-third of his practice's visits could stay virtual.

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A Coronavirus Fad Or The Future Of Medicine? Telehealth Is Having A Moment - WBUR

Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment market worldwide is projected to grow by US$760.9 Million – GlobeNewswire

New York, May 22, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Reportlinker.com announces the release of the report "Global Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Industry" - https://www.reportlinker.com/p05442559/?utm_source=GNW Poised to reach over US$1.4 Billion by the year 2025, Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Systems will bring in healthy gains adding significant momentum to global growth.

- Representing the developed world, the United States will maintain a 3.3% growth momentum. Within Europe, which continues to remain an important element in the world economy, Germany will add over US$27.3 Million to the regions size and clout in the next 5 to 6 years. Over US$21.8 Million worth of projected demand in the region will come from Rest of Europe markets. In Japan, Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Systems will reach a market size of US$69.7 Million by the close of the analysis period. As the worlds second largest economy and the new game changer in global markets, China exhibits the potential to grow at 6.8% over the next couple of years and add approximately US$220.2 Million in terms of addressable opportunity for the picking by aspiring businesses and their astute leaders. Presented in visually rich graphics are these and many more need-to-know quantitative data important in ensuring quality of strategy decisions, be it entry into new markets or allocation of resources within a portfolio. Several macroeconomic factors and internal market forces will shape growth and development of demand patterns in emerging countries in Asia-Pacific, Latin America and the Middle East. All research viewpoints presented are based on validated engagements from influencers in the market, whose opinions supersede all other research methodologies.

Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05442559/?utm_source=GNW

NUCLEAR MEDICINE IMAGING EQUIPMENT MCP-1MARKET ANALYSIS, TRENDS, AND FORECASTS, MAY 2CONTENTS

I. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & REPORT SCOPE

II. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1. MARKET OVERVIEW Recent Market Activity Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment - A Prelude US - The Dominant Market Developing Nations Offer Lucrative Opportunities PET Scanners to Outshine SPECT Systems Positive Outlook for the Healthcare Industry Signals Growth Rising Incidence of Cancer - A Major Growth Driver Ageing Population - A Vital Demography Competitive Landscape Competitive Overview in Nuclear Medicine Market A Competitive Analysis of Major Players in the Nuclear Medicine Market Global Competitor Market Shares Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Competitor Market Share Scenario Worldwide (in %): 2020 & 2029 Impact of Covid-19 and a Looming Global Recession 2. FOCUS ON SELECT PLAYERS Digirad Corp. (US) GE Healthcare Plc (UK) Mediso Medical Imaging Systems (Hungary) Mediso Medical Imaging Systems (Hungary) Positron Corporation (US) Siemens Healthineers (Germany) 3. MARKET TRENDS & DRIVERS Technology Innovations Promise Bright Prospects Technological Advancements to Drive Growth Select Technological Advances Full-Body PET Scanner on the Horizon Wearable PET Scanner for Neurological Imaging CZT Detectors Help GE's New Scanner to Provide Better Images at Low Radiation Limited Potential Exists for Further Improvements in System Physics Software Developments Improve Nuclear Medicine Imaging Software Makes an Impact in SPECT Image Acquisition Times Hybrid Imaging to Herald a New Era of Diagnosis Duration of Hybrid Imaging Procedure Bodes Well for Market Personalized Medicine Slowly Gaining Ground; To Drive Nuclear Medicine Battling Alzheimer's Disease - A Powerful Market Force for Nuclear Medicine Hypoxia Imaging - The Future of Cancer Therapy PET or SPECT for Cardiac Imaging - The Debate Continues Innovative Radiotracers - Key to PET & SPECT Success SPECT Innovations to Improve Efficiency Cardiocentric SPECT Cardio-Focused Collimation Novel Biomarkers to Extend PET in Oncology Cardiac Amyloidosis Visualization - A Potential Application for PET Application of PET in Drug Development to Expand Opportunities PET/MRI Makes Inroads Major Players Come Up with New Hybrid PET/MRI Systems Broad Clinical Applications to Drive Demand for Hybrid PET/MR Systems Digital Silicon Photomultiplier Array for PET/MRI Systems PET-MRI Emerging as a Promising Standard for Imaging Soft Tissue Contrast Innovative Radiopharmaceuticals to Boost Cardiac Applications Factors Restricting Market Growth High Costs - A Major Threat for Market Growth Supply Shortages: A Niggling Cause of Concern Canadian Scientists Discover Means to Address Supply Shortages Price Sensitivity & Competition from Alternatives Limit Market Potential Unfounded Fears of Radiation Exposure Hinder Growth Bottlenecks in Developing Markets 4. GLOBAL MARKET PERSPECTIVE Table 1: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Global Market Estimates and Forecasts in US$ Thousand by Region/Country: 2020-2027 Table 2: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Global Retrospective Market Scenario in US$ Thousand by Region/Country: 2012-2019 Table 3: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Shift across Key Geographies Worldwide: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 Table 4: Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Systems (Product Type) World Market by Region/Country in US$ Thousand: 2020 to 2027 Table 5: Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Systems (Product Type) Historic Market Analysis by Region/Country in US$ Thousand: 2012 to 2019 Table 6: Hybrid Positron Emission Tomography (PET) Systems (Product Type) Market Share Breakdown of Worldwide Sales by Region/Country: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 Table 7: Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Systems (Product Type) Potential Growth Markets Worldwide in US$ Thousand: 2020 to 2027 Table 8: Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Systems (Product Type) Historic Market Perspective by Region/Country in US$ Thousand: 2012 to 2019 Table 9: Single-Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) Systems (Product Type) Market Sales Breakdown by Region/Country in Percentage: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 Table 10: Planar Scintigraphy (Product Type) Geographic Market Spread Worldwide in US$ Thousand: 2020 to 2027 Table 11: Planar Scintigraphy (Product Type) Region Wise Breakdown of Global Historic Demand in US$ Thousand: 2012 to 2019 Table 12: Planar Scintigraphy (Product Type) Market Share Distribution in Percentage by Region/Country: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 III. MARKET ANALYSIS GEOGRAPHIC MARKET ANALYSIS UNITED STATES Market Facts & Figures US Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share (in %) by Company: 2020 & 2025 Market Analytics Table 13: United States Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Projections in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2020 to 2027 Table 14: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in the United States by Product Type: A Historic Review in US$ Thousand for 2012-2019 Table 15: United States Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 CANADA Table 16: Canadian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Forecasts in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2to 2027 Table 17: Canadian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Review by Product Type in US$ Thousand: 2012-2019 Table 18: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Canada: Percentage Share Breakdown of Sales by Product Type for 2012, 2020, and 2027 JAPAN Table 19: Japanese Market for Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment: Annual Sales Estimates and Projections in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 20: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Japan: Historic Sales Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2012-2019 Table 21: Japanese Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Analysis by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 CHINA Table 22: Chinese Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Growth Prospects in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 23: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Analysis in China in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 24: Chinese Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market by Product Type: Percentage Breakdown of Sales for 2012, 2020, and 2027 EUROPE Market Facts & Figures European Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market: Competitor Market Share Scenario (in %) for 2020 & 2025 Market Analytics Table 25: European Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Demand Scenario in US$ Thousand by Region/Country: 2020-2027 Table 26: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Europe: A Historic Market Perspective in US$ Thousand by Region/Country for the Period 2012-2019 Table 27: European Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Shift by Region/Country: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 Table 28: European Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Forecasts in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2020-2027 Table 29: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Europe in US$ Thousand by Product Type: A Historic Review for the Period 2012-2019 Table 30: European Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 FRANCE Table 31: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in France by Product Type: Estimates and Projections in US$ Thousand for the Period 2020-2027 Table 32: French Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Scenario in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 33: French Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Analysis by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 GERMANY Table 34: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Germany: Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 35: German Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 36: German Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 ITALY Table 37: Italian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Growth Prospects in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 38: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Analysis in Italy in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 39: Italian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market by Product Type: Percentage Breakdown of Sales for 2012, 2020, and 2027 UNITED KINGDOM Table 40: United Kingdom Market for Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment: Annual Sales Estimates and Projections in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 41: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in the United Kingdom: Historic Sales Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2012-2019 Table 42: United Kingdom Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Analysis by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 SPAIN Table 43: Spanish Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Forecasts in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2to 2027 Table 44: Spanish Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Review by Product Type in US$ Thousand: 2012-2019 Table 45: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Spain: Percentage Share Breakdown of Sales by Product Type for 2012, 2020, and 2027 RUSSIA Table 46: Russian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Projections in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2to 2027 Table 47: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Russia by Product Type: A Historic Review in US$ Thousand for 2012-2019 Table 48: Russian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 REST OF EUROPE Table 49: Rest of Europe Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Forecasts in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2020-2027 Table 50: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Rest of Europe in US$ Thousand by Product Type: A Historic Review for the Period 2012-2019 Table 51: Rest of Europe Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 ASIA-PACIFIC Table 52: Asia-Pacific Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Forecasts in US$ Thousand by Region/Country: 2020-2027 Table 53: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Asia-Pacific: Historic Market Analysis in US$ Thousand by Region/Country for the Period 2012-2019 Table 54: Asia-Pacific Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Analysis by Region/Country: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 Table 55: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Asia-Pacific by Product Type: Estimates and Projections in US$ Thousand for the Period 2020-2027 Table 56: Asia-Pacific Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Scenario in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 57: Asia-Pacific Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Analysis by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 AUSTRALIA Table 58: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Australia: Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 59: Australian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 60: Australian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 INDIA Table 61: Indian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Forecasts in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2to 2027 Table 62: Indian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Review by Product Type in US$ Thousand: 2012-2019 Table 63: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in India: Percentage Share Breakdown of Sales by Product Type for 2012, 2020, and 2027 SOUTH KOREA Table 64: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in South Korea: Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 65: South Korean Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 66: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Distribution in South Korea by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 REST OF ASIA-PACIFIC Table 67: Rest of Asia-Pacific Market for Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment: Annual Sales Estimates and Projections in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 68: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Rest of Asia-Pacific: Historic Sales Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2012-2019 Table 69: Rest of Asia-Pacific Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Analysis by Product Type: 2012 VS 2VS 2027 LATIN AMERICA Table 70: Latin American Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Trends by Region/Country in US$ Thousand: 2020-2027 Table 71: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Latin America in US$ Thousand by Region/Country: A Historic Perspective for the Period 2012-2019 Table 72: Latin American Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Percentage Breakdown of Sales by Region/Country: 2012, 2020, and 2027 Table 73: Latin American Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Growth Prospects in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 74: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Analysis in Latin America in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 75: Latin American Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market by Product Type: Percentage Breakdown of Sales for 2012, 2020, and 2027 ARGENTINA Table 76: Argentinean Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Forecasts in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2020-2027 Table 77: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Argentina in US$ Thousand by Product Type: A Historic Review for the Period 2012-2019 Table 78: Argentinean Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 BRAZIL Table 79: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Brazil by Product Type: Estimates and Projections in US$ Thousand for the Period 2020-2027 Table 80: Brazilian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Scenario in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 81: Brazilian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Analysis by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 MEXICO Table 82: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Mexico: Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 83: Mexican Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 84: Mexican Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 REST OF LATIN AMERICA Table 85: Rest of Latin America Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Projections in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2020 to 2027 Table 86: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Rest of Latin America by Product Type: A Historic Review in US$ Thousand for 2012-2019 Table 87: Rest of Latin America Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2VS 2027 MIDDLE EAST Table 88: The Middle East Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Forecasts in US$ Thousand by Region/Country: 2020-2027 Table 89: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in the Middle East by Region/Country in US$ Thousand: 2012-2019 Table 90: The Middle East Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Region/Country: 2012, 2020, and 2027 Table 91: The Middle East Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Forecasts in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2020 to 2027 Table 92: The Middle East Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market by Product Type in US$ Thousand: 2012-2019 Table 93: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in the Middle East: Percentage Share Breakdown of Sales by Product Type for 2012,2020, and 2027 IRAN Table 94: Iranian Market for Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment: Annual Sales Estimates and Projections in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 95: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Iran: Historic Sales Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2012-2019 Table 96: Iranian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Analysis by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 ISRAEL Table 97: Israeli Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Forecasts in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2020-2027 Table 98: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Israel in US$ Thousand by Product Type: A Historic Review for the Period 2012-2019 Table 99: Israeli Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 SAUDI ARABIA Table 100: Saudi Arabian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Growth Prospects in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 101: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Analysis in Saudi Arabia in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 102: Saudi Arabian Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market by Product Type: Percentage Breakdown of Sales for 2012, 2020, and 2027 UNITED ARAB EMIRATES Table 103: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in the United Arab Emirates: Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 104: United Arab Emirates Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 105: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Distribution in United Arab Emirates by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 REST OF MIDDLE EAST Table 106: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Rest of Middle East: Recent Past, Current and Future Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type for the Period 2020-2027 Table 107: Rest of Middle East Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Historic Market Analysis in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2012-2019 Table 108: Rest of Middle East Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2VS 2027 AFRICA Table 109: African Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Estimates and Projections in US$ Thousand by Product Type: 2to 2027 Table 110: Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market in Africa by Product Type: A Historic Review in US$ Thousand for 2012-2019 Table 111: African Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment Market Share Breakdown by Product Type: 2012 VS 2020 VS 2027 IV. COMPETITION

Total Companies Profiled: 30 Read the full report: https://www.reportlinker.com/p05442559/?utm_source=GNW

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Nuclear Medicine Imaging Equipment market worldwide is projected to grow by US$760.9 Million - GlobeNewswire

Q: I Feel Like Im the Only Guy Taking ADHD Medicine – ADDitude

DO YOU HAVE A QUESTION FOR RYAN WEXELBLATT?Ask your question about ADHD in boys here!

Q: I hate taking ADHD medicine because no one else does. Im the only one, and I dont want everyone knowing Im different.

A: Lots of guys take medicine everyday for different things. Some take it for diabetes, some take it for asthma, some for other things. Whatever the reason, theres nothing wrong with taking medicine. It doesnt make you different. Also, if your brain works with ADHD, you probably wont have to take medicine for the rest of your life. When youre an adult, you may decide to take it some times and not other times. Even if you do decide to take it all the time, theres nothing wrong with that.

1. Read This: Why Kids Resist Medicine2. Read This: Refusing ADHD Meds Due to Stigma3. Read This: How to Improve Medication Adherence

Ryan Wexelblatt, LCSW is the facilitator of theADHD Dude Facebook Group andYouTube channel. Ryan specializes in working with males (ages 5-22) who present with ADHD, anxiety with ADHD, and learning differences; he is the one professional in the United States who specializes in teaching social cognitive skills to boys from a male perspective.

Submit your questions about ADHD in boys here!

Updated on May 22, 2020

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Q: I Feel Like Im the Only Guy Taking ADHD Medicine - ADDitude

The Father of Functional Medicine Says Drink Oat Milk and Beer – The Beet

Now,he has some additional recommendations on what to eat, and these two may surprise you: oat (milk) and beer.

Okay, so Bland takes his oats in the warm bowlful topped with cinnamon or berries. But there's nothing wrong with the frothy espresso-topped kind, either.

"Oats have a lot of beta-glucan, which is a really important modulator of your microbiome," he says. That's right, eating or drinking your oats may help keep your gut healthy. Oats are also rich in vitamin E, phytic acid, and certain antioxidants that may help to reduce inflammation in the body.

Quarantine or not, having a beer now and then can take the edge off. But it may have more benefits than just a buzz. And when it comes to beer, the hoppier, the better.

"Beer has hops in it,"Bland says. "Hops are not only a bittering agent, but they are a bioactive member of the phytochemical families that stimulate insulin sensitivity and cause lipid metabolism."

Hops has been revered for its ability to help you sleep. You can get hops extract on its own if you don't want the buzz (or calories) of beer. Consuming hops has also been linked to reducing the risks ofmetabolic syndrome.

But don't just grab any old beer. Go for something that's extra hoppy, says Bland.

"Go for an IPA, because you have more of those isoflavones and humulones from the hops." And don't overdo it. "Just as with wine or with tequila, it has to do with magnitude," he says.

No surprise that the father of functional medicine recommends balance.

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The Father of Functional Medicine Says Drink Oat Milk and Beer - The Beet

Power of Precision Medicine Could be Fueled Here – ETF Trends

The ARK Genomic Revolution Multi-Sector Fund (CBOE: ARKG) is establishing a reputation for being one of the best-performing healthcare ETFs, a legacy forged over its multi-year lifespan, not just a few weeks.

One of the driving forces behind ARKGs enviable long-term track records its the managers ability to identify disruptive forces in the healthcare and genomics arenas. The intersection of precision medicine and genomics could be the next growth frontier for ARKG investors.

Increasingly, clinicians are tailoring treatments to a patients specific genetic mutations, said ARK analyst Simon Barnett in a recent note. While the number of precision therapies targeting these mutations has grown, only recently have costs dropped to a low enough level that physicians can sequence an individuals genomic profile and identify his or her mutations.

ARKG includes companies that merge healthcare with technology and capitalize on the revolution in genomic sequencing. These companies try to better understand how biological information is collected, processed and applied by reducing guesswork and enhancing precision; restructuring health care, agriculture, pharmaceuticals, and enhancing our quality of life.

Empowered by the cost declines of next generation DNA sequencing (NGS), diagnostic providers such as Veracyte (VCYT), Exact Sciences (EXAS), and Guardant Health (GH) are advancing personalized medicine by matching patients to precision therapies. ARK believes that therapeutics companies increasingly will use NGS in clinical trials, creating targeted therapies that ultimately will supplant traditional chemotherapies, writes Barnett.

Guardant Health and Veracyte combine for almost 6% of ARKGs roster.

Bolstering the long-term case for genetic sequencing is the fields ability to help healthcare professionals more accurately diagnose ailments, delivering a higher level of personalized patient care.

In the lucrative oncology field, a prime target for many genomics companies, there are myriad ways genomics and precision medicine can combine to potentially increase positive outcomes for patients.

Some mutations are not inherited and can appear spontaneously, giving rise to aggressive cells that coalesce into tumors. In the case of spontaneous variants, cancer patients are matched to targeted therapies with a lock-and-key system, according to Barnett. First, using molecular diagnostic tests, oncologists search for the mutationthe lockthat is driving tumor growth. Then, diagnostic vendors introduce the molecular information to a genomic biomarker database and search for the best treatmentthe key. Importantly, as the data on clinical outcomes feeds back into the system, the accuracy of the algorithms that match patients to therapies increases continuously.

For more on disruptive technologies, visit our Disruptive Technology Channel.

The opinions and forecasts expressed herein are solely those of Tom Lydon, and may not actually come to pass. Information on this site should not be used or construed as an offer to sell, a solicitation of an offer to buy, or a recommendation for any product.

Excerpt from:

Power of Precision Medicine Could be Fueled Here - ETF Trends

Here’s how COVID-19 is reshaping medicine, according to experts – Fast Company

For Fast Companys Shape of Tomorrow series, were asking business leaders to share their inside perspective on how the COVID-19 era is transforming their industries. Heres whats been lostand what could be gainedin the new world order.

James Merlino,chief clinical transformation officer of the Cleveland Clinic

The old saying in crisis is never let the opportunity go to waste. Weve learned a couple things. One is that this has reemphasized the importance of safety. Were doing thermal screening for healthcare providers. Were testing any patient whos coming in for any surgery or ambulatory care. If theyre COVID-positive, well delay their procedure unless its an emergency.

The second thing is were seeing technology innovations, such as virtual rounding done on an iPad and virtual [visits]. Before COVID hit, we were doing 3,000 virtual visits a month. In March, we did 60,000. Then there are small things, such as putting IV pumps and ventilators outside the door in our COVID ICU.

We have to learn how to live with COVID. Some hospitals may suffer. But I want to believe that this is going to make us deliver care more efficiently. Weve been talking about social determinants and chronic health for a long time, but this is our opportunity to step in. COVID-19 preys on the elderly, on the socially disadvantaged. Going forward, we have to manage COVID-19 with more consistent care.

Nancy Lublin, CEO of Crisis Text Line, a nonprofit organization that provides free mental health texting services

If you were feeling things before, if you were struggling before, if you had an addiction or an eating disorder or anxiety or depression or a bad relationship, those things just became a lot harder. And even if you were perfect before, you are not perfect now.

53% of our texters before COVID were under the age of 17, and now the biggest age group were seeing is 18 to 34. Their lives have just been turned upside down. They were adulting, and now theyre home with their parents. Or theyre quarantined with roommates whom they didnt really know that well, or sheltering alone, and thats really hard. Or they have little children. Dating has been disrupted for the 18-to-34 age groupfor everybody.

When COVID first hit America, we saw a massive influx in anxiety. They were using words like freaked out, panic, and it was mostly about symptoms. That shifted into what we consider the second wave of feeling: the impact of the quarantines. Weve seen a 78% increase in domestic violence, a 44% increase in sexual abuse. Weve seen a huge increase in financial stress, people worried about homelessness, or thinking about financial ruin.

Mental health and well-being should be part of our education. One of the most important things is how to communicate with people, how to disagree with people, how to have productive relationships. And yet we dont learn any of this. Instead we learn calculuswhich I still havent used.

Christos Christou, international president of Doctors Without Borders

Because of COVID, it is now extremely challenging to move our resources and our people to those places that need them. Were not allowed to fly from Canada or Europe to Yemen, Tanzania, etc. And we are not allowed to export any material, because of nationalism, a very selfish approach by states, which are fighting against each other for supplies. They want to show that they can protect [their citizens]. They will ban any exportation of PPE and, in the event we get a new vaccine, they will make sure that they can stockpile it.

There are multiple crises within the COVID crisis. TB patients are not allowed to access any hospitals at the moment, and they need treatments every day. HIV patients, the same. We have war traumas. Some of the facilities have been repurposed, so its not easy for us to run surgeries. Malaria kills millions of people. We have the treatments, but [theyve] been affected a little bit because of all these debates about the chloroquine. We [also] have a rapid test for malaria. [But] the company that is producing this test has decided now that theres much more profit by repurposing it into a rapid test for COVID.

We have to rethink health systems. Its obvious that only public health systems and national health systems are going to provide the solution.

Im afraid for those places we cannot access. In Northwest Syria, [after] Idlib was bombed [in February], people were in desperate need of food, accommodation, and health services. All of a sudden, with COVID, everyone forgot about this situation. But this doesnt mean that their problems evaporated. Yemen is another place. In the past few days we have confirmed that theres a local transmission of COVID, and theres zero capacity. Im not talking about ventilators or ICU beds. They dont even have the test, the diagnostic. This is one of my nightmares.

[Source images: Videvo; _Aine_/iStock]The other one is related to those places where people live in high-density settlements. Im talking about communities like Coxs Bazar in Bangladesh, the Greek Islands, the favelas in Brazil, the [refugee] camps in Kenya. Anything related to good hygiene or stay-at-home policies in these place is just a luxury. [Its] not an option.

We have to rethink health systems. Its obvious that only public health systems and national health systems are going to provide the solution. If we leave it to the free market, their rules are different: Their driver is profit making. They have every right to do so, but you cannot ask for vaccines or therapeutics and diagnostics from those people. In this [pandemic], we should not allow anyone to profit from the solution.

Dr. Gianrico Farrugia,CEO of Mayo Clinic

COVID has enabled us to create virtual health as a new normal. Not only in terms of remote monitoring and acute medical care, but also for advanced care at home. For example, electrocardiograms can be done on a smartwatch to diagnose heart failure or to measure potassium.

As a nation, we have been promising and not delivering on telehealth now for several years, and that has had to do with licensure, regulation, billing, but also just healthcares reluctance to change. With those barriers removed, weve been able to move from maybe 400 to 35,000 virtual visits a week.

Some of the regulations that have been relaxed need to become permanentand in a way that can be enforced so patient safety does not suffer. We [shouldnt] go back to where we were, because we would have lost a huge opportunitythis tiny silver lining in the pandemic, which is the digital revolution of healthcare.

Yonatan Adiri,CEO of Healthy.io, a company that uses cellphone cameras to create clinical grade at-home tests for urinary tract infections and kidney disease

I dont buy that this has been the watershed moment for healthcare. The forces of status quo are very strong. Physicians can now practice across state lines; Medicare will reimburse remote patients sessions at the same price as in-person. People thought these things would take a decade to happen. We now have to work to keep this the new normal. All it takes is one company making false claims that creates a safety or efficacy issue and the whole thing will be rolled back.

If this had happened 10 years ago, it would have been a million-and-counting dead, and not 300,000 dead.

If this had happened 10 years agowithout computation, without DNA sequencing, without cloud, without bandwidth, without high-resolution selfie camerasit would have been a million-and-counting dead, and not 300,000 dead.

Andrew Diamond,chief medical officer at primary care company One Medical, which offers outdoor testing sites for COVID-19

We need a strategy to test enormous numbers of people, almost on a surveillance-like basis. And if you cant do that, then you need an alternative, like really robust contact tracing. I could see by the fall or maybe mid-winter that we could have technology where you couldat the door of your office building or apartment building or mass transit station or airport airline terminalspit into a disposable cup at a machine that gives you a readout in a matter of minutes.We also need to double down on taking care of hypertension, diabetes, and obesity. Some of the people who are most vulnerable to the worst effects of the infection are people with those conditions. Thats our bread and butter in primary care, but thats also how were actually going to contain the damage from COVID-19, as it lives with us for months and years to come.

Peter Diamandis,founder of the XPrize Foundation and several companies in the health space, including Cellularity, Human Longevity, and Covaxx

People feel abandoned by the healthcare system. They feel its dangerous to go to hospitals because theyre overloaded. There is a significant opportunity for new startups and for Apple, Google, and Amazon to step in and deliver much more efficient turnkey data-driven services.

The government should be pouring capital into research, but its going to be entrepreneurial companies that are in your home already that are delivering and collecting the data [that will] make you the CEO of your own health. How do you partner with AI to really understand whats going on and what your options are? I dont think health systems can innovate sufficiently [on their own].

Richard Park,cofounder of CityMD and CEO of Rendr Care

Whats going on now is this huge, bubbling, socioeconomic friction between the haves and the have-nots. COVID-19 is a real reflection of that, especially in New York. If you look at CityMD and its hot spots, its [where you find] the vulnerable populations.

I was born here in the States, but to immigrant parents, who migrated here in the late 60s. They were grateful to be second-class citizens here in the greatest country on the planet. That humility, that you are always in debt to the greater society . . . was an underlying theme at home.

Theres going to be more and more pressure to be efficient on healthcare, and so the baseline standards will get more and more meager.

[My family] would open stores and close stores and [have] terrible financial troubles. Not unlike so many other New Yorkers today, especially now with COVID. We had borrowed money from so many people to pay rent. It accentuated a tremendous amount of shame and guilt. I would, as a kid, walk around, knowing, That person lent us $5,000. That person lent us $10,000, over the years. I couldnt even look them in the eye. The beautiful part of it was, as a community, they lent us money and they knew they were never getting it back. And I finally actually paid back everybody. Some of that debt was more than 35 years old. People were never expecting it.

[Source images: Videvo; _Aine_/iStock]At CityMD, the other founders are immigrants, and they understood this. We made a decision early on not to separate Medicaid [patients] from [those with] commercial [insurance plans]. People said, You cant mix the two populations. The Wall Street banker will not sit next to the Medicaid person. Maybe that was true in the past, but we said, Were not going to do that. Now we know, it absolutely does work together.

Concierge medicine is wrong. I consider that wrong. Its not how I want to roll. I dont want to participate in that. [But] as the economy has difficulty, as Medicaid enrollment swells, revenue decreases at the state level. Its a bad mix: more enrollment, less revenue for it. This puts pressure on everybody. In the same way, employers have this impossible 5% year-over-year [increase in] healthcare costs. Its not sustainable. Theres going to be more and more pressure on healthcare to be efficient, and so the baseline standards will get more and more meager. Thats why the [concierge medical services] will arise. There are people who can afford it.

More from Fast Companys Shape of Tomorrow series:

Excerpt from:

Here's how COVID-19 is reshaping medicine, according to experts - Fast Company

COVID-19 Presents an Opportunity for Precision Medicine to Play Expanded Role in Care – Targeted Oncology

The crisis of coronavirus disease 2019, also known as COVID-19, presents a set of unprecedented circumstances to the health care community. The disease has a particular impact on patients with cancer and their oncology care teams who are trying to maintain the right balance between the use of immunosuppressive treatment and risk of cancer progression. Wenhua Liang, PhD, and colleagues analyzed the risk for severe COVID-19 in patients with cancer.1 They reported that patients with cancer might have a higher risk of COVID-19 than individuals without cancer. They emphasized that patients with malignancy had poorer outcomes from COVID-19, providing a timely reminder to physicians that more intensive attention should be paid to patients with cancer to prioritize treatment versus risk of death and adverse outcomes. Patients who underwent chemotherapy or surgery in the past month had a numerically higher risk (3 of 4 patients [75%]) of clinically severe events than did those not undergoing chemotherapy or surgery, observed by logistic regression (odds ratio, 5.34; 95% CI, 1.80-16.18; P = .0026) after adjusting for other risk factors, including age, smoking history, and other comorbidities.

The authors of this study have proposed 3 major strategies for treating patients with cancer in the COVID-19 crisis. The first approach is an intentional postponing of adjuvant chemotherapy or elective surgery for stable cancer in endemic areas. Second, stronger personal protection provisions should be made for patients with cancer or cancer survivors. Third, more intensive surveillance or treatment should be considered when patients with cancer are infected with COVID-19, especially in older individuals or those with other comorbidities.

Oncologists and institutions caring for these patients face the continued challenges of administering treatment while simultaneously reducing the risk of complications in the event they end up contracting COVID-19. Stopping chemotherapy may be an option for patients in complete remission on maintenance therapy. In those patients, we may be able to switch chemotherapy from intravenous to oral therapies. This change would decrease the frequency of clinic visits. A chemotherapy break may be an option when feasible. Delays or modifying adjuvant treatment may be balanced with the risk of recurrence. The prophylactic growth factors and antibiotics in high-risk chemotherapy regimens is of paramount importance. When the absolute benefit of adjuvant chemotherapy may be quite small, and if non-immunosuppressive options are available (eg, hormonal therapy in estrogen receptorpositive early-stage breast cancer), risk of COVID-19 infection may be considered as an additional factor in weighing the patients available treatment options.

Providers caring for patients with cancer undergoing cytotoxic chemotherapy need to consider changing their treatment plan when feasible to reduce the risk of life-threatening complications as well as reducing the frequency of their clinic visits. Targeted therapies are approved for a number of aggressive cancers from nonsmall cell lung cancer, stage IV melanoma, to acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia. These therapeutic options offer an opportunity to consider treatment of patients with the likelihood of a better response while at the same time increasing dose density and intensity without raising the toxicity profile.

Precision medicineguided targeted therapies as well as immunotherapy may have a special role in identifying patients who may need cancer treatment. Most targeted agents are orally administered. The toxicity and adverse event profiles of many orally administered targeted therapies is significantly different from chemotherapy. A much higher complication rate from cytotoxic chemotherapy places patients with cancer at a much higher risk of complications from COVID-19 infection. Rigorous biomarker testing and appropriate therapeutic choice should be considered in this patient population, especially in the face of a global pandemic.

Assessing Cancer by Treatment Priority Determination: Top, Intermediate, and Low Priority

Instead of an arbitrary approach, a system to determine the priority for consultation and treatment of patients with cancer may provide a consistent approach for all patients and providers (TABLE).2 It is also important to avoid, as much as possible, having different levels of care. We recommend following an assessment for patients with cancer and treatment priority determination that would assist cancer clinics and decision makers in the management of these patients. Given the dynamic situation, it is likely that this will vary from day to day, and daily accommodation reassessment may be required. The patient priority assessment and classification would allow flexibility determined by the local circumstances and available resources. The local or regional circumstances and the availability of resources may influence a cancer clinics ability to follow the criteria.

This virus was previously referred to as novel betacoronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome virus coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2).3 What started in early December 2019 with 3 patients diagnosed with unexplained pneumonia in the Wuhan province of China has led to a global pandemic. At the time this article was written, more than 3 million cases have been reported and 207,973 deaths across Europe, the Americas, Western Pacific, Eastern Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and Africa are attributed to the disease.4 The United States alone has 1,005,147 cases and 57,505 deaths.5

In March 2020, the World Health Organization declared COVID-19, caused by SARS-CoV-2, a public health emergency of international magnitude and a global pandemic.6 According to the World Health Organization, the definition of pandemic is a worldwide spread of a new disease for which most people do not have immunity.

A sudden surge in the cases of COVID-19 due to the pandemic, along with efforts to contain it, has led to multiple challenges that no country has experienced in the last several decades. The global pandemic from COVID-19 poses a unique set of challenges not only for patients with cancer who need their treatment, but also for caregivers, oncologists, and the overall care team. It is recognized that there is a need to treat patients with cancer during a pandemic, due to their immunocompromised state from the nature of their disease or type of treatment they are receiving. Further, it is of paramount importance that the oncology care team develop and evolve a systemic approach that prioritizes patients, disease, and types of treatment. So far, the efforts of organizations and individual oncologists are being rapidly outpaced by the increasing number of patients with COVID-19. It is likely that this will be a dynamic situation that will vary each day.

Deaths from COVID-19 have been caused by multiple organ dysfunction. This observation might be attributable to the widespread distribution of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2the functional receptor for SARS-CoV-2in multiple organs.7,8 Patients with cancer are more susceptible to infection than individuals without cancer because of their malignancy and anticancer treatments, such as chemotherapy.9 These patients might be at increased risk of COVID-19 and have a poorer prognosis.

Rapid growth in the number of patients with COVID-19 symptoms has led to capacity pressures to the health care system on a local, regional, and national level. Cancer clinics and hospital inpatient and outpatient areas have started experiencing capacity challenges. Patients with cancer are faced with difficult decisions and anxieties related to the risks of treatment versus exposure and increased risk of contracting COVID-19. It is expected that the COVID-19 global pandemic will hit in 1 or more waves. At the peak of the COVID-19 wave, a significant portion of hospital or clinic staff will be ill or unavailable to work (eg, due to school closures, family obligations, fear, disease, illness, etc.

COVID-19 has left an indelible mark on the history of the world. Although the death toll world wide approaches 140,000, it is only through humanitys collective ingenuity and compassion to care for one another will we weather this pandemic. We are making daily progress and we applaud all health care workers who find themselves on the frontlines against this disease.

References:

1. Liang W, Guan W, Chen R, et al. Cancer patients in SARS-CoV-2 infection: a nationwide analysis in China. Lancet Oncol. 2020;21(3):335-337. doi:10.1016/S1470-2045(20)30096-6

2. Dietz JR, Moran MS, Isakoff SJ, et al. Recommendations for prioritization, treatment, and triage of breast cancer patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. the COVID-19 pandemic breast cancer consortium [published online ahead of print, 2020 Apr 24]. Breast Cancer Res Treat. 2020;1-11. doi:10.1007/s10549-020-05644-z

3. Chen N, Zhou M, Dong X, et al. Epidemiological and clinical characteristics of 99 cases of 2019 novel coronavirus pneumonia in Wuhan, China: a descriptive study. Lancet. 2020;395(10223):507-513. doi:10.1016/S01406736(20)30211-7.

4. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic. Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak situation. World Health Organization website. Updated March 31, 2020. Accessed March 31, 2020. bit.ly/2QZvZlg.

5. Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). Cases in U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention website. Updated March 31, 2020. Accessed March 31, 2020. https://bit.ly/2vKBtc6.

6. WHO Director-Generals opening remarks at the media briefing on COVID-19 - 11 March 2020. World Health Organization website. Published March 11, 2020. Accessed March 31, 2020. https://bit.ly/3al0yJE.

7. Zhou P, Yang XL, Wang XG, et al. A pneumonia outbreak associated with a new coronavirus of probable bat origin. Nature. 2020;579(7798):270-273. doi: 10.1038/s41586-020-2012-7

8. Hamming I, Timens W, Bulthuis ML, Lely AT, Navis G, van Goor H. Tissue distribution of ACE2 protein, the functional receptor for SARS coronavirus. A first step in understanding SARS pathogenesis. J Pathol. 2004;203(2):631-637. doi: 10.1002/path.1570

9. Kamboj M, Sepkowitz KA. Nosocomial infections in patients with cancer. Lancet Oncol. 2009;10(6):589-597. doi: 10.1016/S1470-2045(09)70069-5

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COVID-19 Presents an Opportunity for Precision Medicine to Play Expanded Role in Care - Targeted Oncology

It takes more than medicine to fight the coronavirus – Martinsville Bulletin

Pandemic or not, Leigh Reynolds will be at the hospital doing what she loves keeping others safe in her own hometown. Shes the acute care services clinical manager at Sovah HealthMartinsville, which has treated patients who have fallen ill from the coronavirus.

We often think of medical care as a series of treatments and medications, but good care is about more than addressing physical conditions it is about connecting with patients in ways that help them embrace their recovery, she said. The best nurses know that forming a strong relationship with their patients is an integral part of succeeding as a nurse, and how we interact with our patients influences their recovery.

In January, most Americans hadnt even heard of the novel coronavirus. In February, 2019-nCoV seemed like a bit of a nuisance in the United States, but not much of a threat. In March, COVID-19 struck hard, causing national shutdowns of schools, nonessential businesses and even elective medical procedures.

When the virus hit Virginia on March 7, hospitals prepared to handle a surge of infected patients. Now, the daily case count appears to be on the mend and local hospitals never stretched beyond capacity. The case count in the Martinsville and Henry County area isnt as high as it is in other portions of the state. And the staff at Sovah HealthMartinsville say they are prepared to handle whatever may come.

Jackie Wilkerson, Chief Nursing Officer, confirmed that the hospital has treated patients who tested positive for COVID-19.

The hospital put extra precautions in place to lessen the spread of the virus and also treat it as effectively as possible.

Treating infectious diseases is not new to our hospital and the guidelines for protecting patients, staff and visitors are comprehensive and evidence based. Out of an abundance of caution, we are taking several additional precautions, Wilkerson said. For example, increased sanitation and hand washing, implementing a no-visitor policy, all patients and staff are being screened appropriately and temperature checks are taken upon entry, all persons entering the facility must wear a mask throughout the entire building and a designated COVID-19 unit to treat positive patients as well as suspected positives.

There are certain practices and precautions that are unique to treating COVID-19 patients.

Some extra precautions would be increased personal protective equipment [PPE] usage, such as a respirator and face shield, along with increased sanitation and using a separate room to put on and take off necessary personal protective equipment, said Ashley Williams, director of acute care services.

Taking an abundance of precaution to keep the infection rate as low as possible, the no-visitor policy can make a hospital stay rather lonely for patients. To boost patient morale, the role of nurses and others on the medical team had to become even more pronounced. In addition to completing their normal rounds, nurses at Sovah HealthMartinsville also serve as temporary family members to each hospital patient, especially those in isolation.

The care needed for a COVID-19 patient is more intense and involves more detail, Williams said, referring to how the disease attacks the respiratory system. The other challenge is isolation. Not being able to allow visitors is a tremendous physical and emotional challenge for the caregivers because we see the toll it takes on our patients. We, as caregivers, are stepping up and taking care of these patients as if they were our own family.

As essential workers, the hospital staff of doctors, nurses, nursing assistants, respiratory therapists, housekeepers, dietary staff and others are not staying at home during the pandemic.

Instead, they report to work so that they can care for others potentially infected with the virus.

Being able to keep our community members in their hometown and care for them close by gives me every reason to come to work because that is what I would want for myself or my own family, Reynolds said. Our patients become our family, and to see them recover is truly life changing.

When a patient does recover, whether its from COVID-19 or another ailment, theres nothing like the feeling medical professionals get from knowing that they helped when a patient does recover.

We cheer and pray for our patients just like we do our own family, Reynolds said. Seeing them recover and being able to go home healthy and happy is a feeling like no other. We do it for them, not for us.

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Antihypertensive medications and risk of COVID-19 – 2 Minute Medicine

1. Amongst the five examined classes of antihypertensive medications (ACE Inhibitors, ARBs, beta blockers, calcium-channel blockers, and thiazide diuretics), none were associated with a substantial increase in likelihood of COVID-19.

Evidence Rating: 2 (Good)

Infection of host cells by SARS-CoV-2 is mediated via an interaction with membrane-bound angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) 2, and as such, it has been suggested that treatment with ACE inhibitors or angiotensin-receptor blockers (ARBs) may be associated with an increased risk of developing COVID-19. Antihypertensive medications such as calcium channel blockers, which do not interact with the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), have been suggested as potential beneficial alternatives in affected patients. As hypertension affects nearly half of the adult American population, any potential interactions between antihypertensive medications and COVID-19 must be meaningfully sorted out, especially when considering ACE inhibitors are often prescribed as first line pharmacologic treatment for the condition. In this retrospective cohort study, data from a large health care network in New York City was used to determine whether antihypertensive medications were associated with any difference in risk of developing COVID-19. The study included 12,594 patients, 5894 (46.8%) who had confirmed COVID-19, of which 1002 patients had severe illness as indicated by ICU admission, mechanical ventilation requirements, or death. A total of 4357 (34.6%) patients from the dataset had hypertension, of which 2573 (59.1%) were COVID-19 positive. Using propensity-score matched analyses, an absolute difference of at least 10 percentage points in the likelihood of a positive test with at least 97.5% certainty was ruled out for ACE inhibitors, ARBs, beta-blockers, calcium-channel blockers, and thiazide diuretics. Likewise, there was no substantial difference in risk of developing severe disease among patients taking any of the antihypertensive medications. Overall, evidence from the study suggests that there are no direct adverse effects associated with ACE inhibitors, ARBs, or any of the other examined antihypertensive medications in the context of increasing risk of developing COVID-19.

Click to read the study in NEJM

Image: PD

2020 2 Minute Medicine, Inc. All rights reserved. No works may be reproduced without expressed written consent from 2 Minute Medicine, Inc. Inquire about licensing here. No article should be construed as medical advice and is not intended as such by the authors or by 2 Minute Medicine, Inc.

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Laying It Out: Throwin’ stones and coming up empty – Medicine Hat News

By Medicine Hat News Opinion on May 23, 2020.

Curling legend Pat Ryan was a game changer in every sense.

Id watched him as a kid and was still in journalism school in 2007 when I had the opportunity to sit down with him at The Continental Cup in Medicine Hat.

The interview was one of my first, so it stuck with me, and when I saw he was the subject of an episode on a Netflix series called The Losers, I skipped right to his and sat down to watch.

The title is misleading, as Ryan was anything but a loser. Except in 1985, when a string of errors and his opponent making the greatest shot in the sports history cost Ryans Alberta rink the Brier, our Canadian championship.

Whats more, Ryans team missed several easy hits to lose to Al Hackner, a shot-making master from the Thunder Bay region whose finesse for the game was unmatched at the time. Ryan was so distraught that he almost quit the sport.

Almost.

As many Albertans will remember fondly, Ryan stayed with the game and soon formed a team that would include Randy Ferbey, now one of the biggest names the sport has ever had. Ruling with an iron fist, Ryan shaped his new team into the nations best through a strategy no team before had ever used.

Hit everything.

They throw a guard? Hit it out of there. They throw one in the house? Smash it into oblivion. No matter what the other team threw, Ryan aggressively attacked it with 44-pound granite torpedoes as if he were captaining a submarine.

It worked to perfection and no one had an answer for it. Ryans Alberta rink won back-to-back Brier championships using this strategy, going on to World Championship silver in 1988 and gold in 1989.

There was only one problem Outside his own rink and his Albertan supporters, everyone either hated playing him or despised watching him. Ryans strategy was annoying and it was boring without rocks in play throughout an end, his team had become so awful to watch that in the 1989 Brier final, they had to win while the crowd chanted, Booooring! Booooring! over and over.

None of it sat well with the sports governing bodies, both in Canada and internationally, and not long after Ryan was booed at the Brier, they literally changed the rules of the sport to stop it. Hit everything? Nope, not anymore.

Alls well that ended well in the world of curling, of course, as not only did the games excitement level dramatically improve, but Ryan even went on to win again under the new rules, this time skipping a rink out of B.C.

So, the question is, why is a political columnist telling a 35-year-old curling story? If you havent already picked it up yourself, as I watched this 37-minute Netflix episode I couldnt help but see glaring similarities to Premier Jason Kenney and his United Conservative team.

Kenneys strategy is exactly like Ryans was no matter what anyone does, hit it with an aggressive attack. There is no finesse to Kenneys game.

In fact, he despises finesse. Finesse means playing nice. Finesse means working with other peoples rocks in play. Finesse means dirty words like social licence. To Kenney, finesse is a losers game. As far as Kenney is concerned, Albertans dont play nice Albertans hit everything.

Since long before the UCP even won the election, Kenney has promised to make the world bow to Albertas needs. According to Kenney, we must force our enemies to submit, and we will fly out of the hack to deliver stones at a blistering pace until they do.

Kenney has delivered hits in every direction foreign radicals, environmentalists, the green left, B.C., Quebec, Texas, Saudi Arabia, Russia, Norway, Moodys, David Suzuki, George Soros, whoever is controlling Greta Thunberg while shes supposed to be in school, the Medicine Hat News, Justin Trudeau, Rachel Notley and he never runs out of rocks.

Most recently he took aim at China over COVID-19, and decided Gerald Butts and Barack Obama are now behind our oil woes. And lo and behold, just like with Ryans curling strategy, people outside Alberta have grown bored of it, and his so-called opponents have only become irritated by it.

Outside his fans in Alberta, Kenney is just not very well liked, and we didnt need the Chinese consulate to put him in his place last week to see it. But, no matter how many similarities I can draw between Jason Kenney and Pat Ryan, there is still one major difference.

Pat Ryan was winning.

Jason Kenney, and therefore Alberta as a whole, is getting his butt whipped. Even if every opponent he has targeted was actually working to defeat Alberta somehow (spoiler alert: they arent) his hit-everything strategy is an utter failure, and hes far too slow to learn that he does not control the sport.

Ryan at least brought home some hardware before curling snuffed out his strategy. Whats Kenney brought home so far? Jobs? Investment? Nope, not even a shiny trophy we can admire. All we have is the reverberating chants of the world growing bored of him.

The fans hate us. Our opponents wont play with us. And our premier is too stubborn to realize theyve already changed the game.

Scott Schmidt is the layout editor for the Medicine Hat News. Contact him at sschmidt@medicinehatnews.com or follow him on Twitter at @shmitzysays. Scotts opinions are his own and do not necessarily reflect those of the News editorial board.

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The Innovative Medicines Accelerator turns its focus on COVID-19 | Stanford News – Stanford University News

As the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic continues to deliver both health and economic blows, hopes are pinned on medical researchers identifying drugs and vaccines needed to stop the viruss spread, heal those who are sick and ease concerns about returning to a semblance of normal. But the process of developing new medicines is a long one, and at best new vaccines can take more than a year.

Go to the web site to view the video.

Video by Farrin Abbott

The Innovative Medicines Accelerator builds on and expands existing programs and adds new resources to help Stanford investigators turn their good ideas into effective drugs for people.

Into this landscape enters the newly created Innovative Medicines Accelerator (IMA), which was envisioned to overcome obstacles in developing medicines. The IMA arose as part of Stanfords Long-Range Vision long before COVID-19 found a foothold in humans, and was designed to aid in medicines for everything from deadly diseases like cancer to rare disorders overlooked by most pharmaceutical companies. But in this time of need, its programs are focused entirely on helping researchers test their ideas about potential medicines for COVID-19.

Our programs were envisioned before our new priority came along, and thats the COVID-19 pandemic, said Chaitan Khosla, Baker Family co-Director ofStanford ChEM-H who is also leading the IMA. The scale of what Stanford researchers have accomplished in the past two and a half months is unprecedented. Where we are today might not have been so powerful if not for the efforts of people associated with the IMA.

A valley of death lies between a good idea in the lab and a drug that can be tested in humans. (Image credit: Farrin Abbott)

The IMAs programs aid scientists in traversing the so-called valley of death that chasm between a good idea in the lab and the first test of a new drug in humans. This valley, created by a lack of funding and drug development expertise on the academic side and by concerns about financial risk on the industry side, isnt entirely unnavigable. Many ideas cross the divide each year, but the difficulty adds to the time and cost of developing new medicines.

Stanford faculty who have successfully developed vaccines and drug prototypes were aided by a network of expertise and programs centered in the School of Medicine and in the interdisciplinary life sciences institutes like Stanford ChEM-H, Stanford Bio-X and the Wu Tsai Neurosciences Institute. The IMA builds on and expands those resources so more can benefit, while also filling in gaps that have waylaid some projects. These added programs include funding promising early-stage research, adding technical capabilities and expertise and assisting with studies in human tissues to help ensure good ideas discovered in mice will be effective in people.

The Innovative Medicines Accelerator builds on and expands resources already available at Stanford to create a bridge across the valley of death. (Image credit: Farrin Abbott)

The concept of building on existing resources was immediately helpful in responding to COVID-19, particularly the Stanford ChEM-H Knowledge Centers, which are facilities run by staff with deep drug development experience and who provide expertise along with the technical resources.

If ChEM-H didnt exist, the first thing the IMA would have to do in order to be successful is create it, said Carolyn Bertozzi, Baker Family co-director of ChEM-H, andAnne T. and Robert M. Bass Professor in theSchool of Humanities and Sciences.

For example, Peter Kim, professor of biochemistry, is making use of the ChEM-H Macromolecular Structure Knowledge Center to learn how human antibodies bind SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, as part of work to develop a vaccine. Jeffrey Glenn, professor of medicine, is one of several researchers developing drug prototypes against various types of viruses, including SARS-CoV-2, with assistance from the ChEM-H Medicinal Chemistry Knowledge Center.

As the IMA considers research funding for COVID-19 projects, it is augmenting these knowledge centers in anticipation of increased need, and adding new ones that fill additional gaps like allowing investigators to screen a high volume of molecules as potential drugs known as high-throughput screening.

In addition to networking existing facilities, the IMA is expanding space in the Keck Science Building where researchers can safely handle deadly, airborne pathogens, called a biosafety level 3 (BSL3) facility. Researchers including Catherine Blish, associate professor of medicine, are already carrying out experiments in the smaller space to test existing drugs against SARS-CoV-2 in infected cells, and studying the virus biology to identify new drug candidates. When it is complete, the expanded space will provide access to more investigators developing COVID-19 medicines and could also aid in addressing possible future pandemics or known airborne pathogens like tuberculosis.

As part of the Long-Range Vision, which emphasizes partnership to accelerate impact, IMA will also form alliances with biotechnology and pharmaceutical companies, governments and nongovernmental organizations to exchange knowledge and expertise. These would resemble an existing relationship between Takeda Pharmaceutical Company and Stanford ChEM-H called the Stanford Alliance for Innovative Medicines, in which Takeda provides access to drug development expertise, not generally available in academia, to help potential medicines reach patients more quickly.

In addition to easing the path to drug prototypes, the IMA overcomes another hurdle in developing effective medicines the fact that many great ideas originate with lab animals like mice or flies but fail when they reach human trials. Khosla calls this a second valley of death.

If theres one thing weve learned from clinical trials its that mice arent humans, said Khosla, who is also the Wells H. Rauser and Harold M. Petiprin Professor in the School of Engineering and professor of chemical engineering and of chemistry.

The challenge has been that investigators used to working with laboratory animals often dont have the resources or regulatory expertise to access human subjects or tissues. To overcome that problem, IMA will provide funding and expertise and also assist with collecting and storing tissues. (These experiments will have the added benefit of producing new discoveries about human biology.)

Many drugs arent effective in humans because they come from ideas developed in laboratory animals like mice, flies and worms. (Image credit: Farrin Abbott)

That approach which they call Experimental Human Biology is already being applied toward COVID-19 at the IMA-supported COVID Clinical and Translational Research Unit (CTRU). Here, researchers are gathering blood samples from people with or without COVID-19 and from people participating in trials of existing drugs to see if they are effective against COVID-19. Those samples can help researchers understand how the human immune system responds to an experimental drug, and they are being banked for possible future experiments as investigators have new ideas for medicines or vaccines.

Stanford also has expertise in creating mini organs including brains, and lung and intestinal tissue in laboratory dishes. These organoids can be used to test ideas in cells representing human biology. Some COVID-19 work takes advantage of such labs-in-a-petri-dish in the form of clusters of cells that mimic the human immune system. Looking beyond the current crisis, Stanford also has banks of stem cells derived from people with different disease backgrounds that can be grown into a range of tissue types.

These programs, which are ramping up now to address COVID-19, will ultimately benefit a range of diseases in need of new medicines or even help prepare for a future pandemic.

The metrics of success for the IMA are based on impact, said Khosla. That doesnt have to be just in terms of reducing the time or cost of developing a drug. What if you could powerfully benefit the health of one kid with an extremely rare disease? Thats a pretty big impact.

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The Innovative Medicines Accelerator turns its focus on COVID-19 | Stanford News - Stanford University News

Many home remedies were good medicine if you could survive the cure – The Mountaineer

Third in a series on the self-sufficiency of Appalachian culture.

Until World War II, many a mountain woman doctored herself and her family with what she had, and while the idea of home-grown medicine may conjure images of hot tea and honey by a fireside, some of the old country cures were almost as tough as the illnesses themselves.

During my early years in Haywood County, Marvin and Elizabeth Green of Fines Creek became two of my favorite people to visit. They were warm and welcoming, and willing to share remarkable memories.

Their recollections of early life in Haywood County were full of home remedies, some of them almost incredible. Another historic treasure, the late Dr. Stuart Roberson, Haywood County physician from 1930 until retirement in 1985, backed up their stories with memories of his own.

More than a century ago, when people got sick in Cruso, or Fines Creek, it might take a day to summon a doctor, another day for him to arrive. Families had to make or contrive their own cures, using a little bit of store-bought goods and a whole lot of what nature provided.

Youd get sick here, there might be some old country doctor to help, but there was no hospital until you got to Asheville, no automobiles, Marvin Green told me. He was born in 1901. I was nine or 10 years old before I saw my first car.

We did a little bit of everything, his wife, Elizabeth, added. I reckon it helped some; we thought it did, anyhow.

Groundhog grease, onions and catnip

Following are some of the homemade treatments the Greens recalled from their childhood, including some that are not for the faint of heart.

Elizabeths brother struggled with croup. His mother made him swallow groundhog grease. Elizabeth said it would break up the congestion in his system, though she was grateful she never had to try the cure firsthand; the smell was bad enough.

Another treatment for croup, the Marvins said, was a poultice made of onions fried in grease. The poultice went on the chest, but the patient was also expected to drink the onion juice. Ive used many a mustard plaster and onion poultice on the chest, Dr. Roberson agreed.

Tea from the bark of the red alder tree treated babies with jaundice. Other tree barks were also used for treatments. Elizabeth Green treated herself for kidney infections many times with a tea made of peach tree bark.

Mothers treated fever with the herb boneset.

Catnip tea was used to help babies sleep.

Mountain people also believed ginger root could treat the measles. Marvin Green was working in Detroit, Michigan, when he came down with the measles in 1922. Visitors from home had him make a ginger root tea, which he declared kept him out of the hospital.

Elizabeths mother would take cornmeal and salt and make a dough, which she put on her head to treat headaches.

Blackberry juice helped diarrhea and stomach troubles, Elizabeth told me. Dr. Roberson agreed that the juice was good medicine.

A mix of honey and alum was gargled to treat a sore throat.

I remember one thing, I thought it was horrible, that my mother did one time, Elizabeth Green said. My half-brother, he used to have what we called the quinsy they call it tonsillitis now. He had swelling up in his throat til he couldnt breathe or swallow. The doctor wasnt doing much good, and my mother says, Well, Im going to do the old remedy; Ive got to do something.

Her mother took hog manure and made a poultice, which she put on the young mans throat, to break the congestion and swelling.

It was a terrible thing to do, but she said he was going to die if she didnt get something done.

Elizabeth said the swelling went down within minutes.

Dr. Roberson recalled patients telling him of sheep droppings added to tea to draw out the measles.

Until World War II, he said, he would make home visits to mothers in labor and would often find an axe under the bed, pointed side up, to cut the pain.

Camphor and confiscated moonshine

Living on Bald Mountain in Buncombe County, my paternal grandmother relied on laxatives, including Dr. Pearces Pleasant Pellets, Black Draught, epsom salts and castor oil. She treated scrapes and abrasions with camphor. As my father wrote, the camphor, Im sure, was a good disinfectant since it was pure moonshine whiskey with camphor shavings added.

At that time you could go to the sheriffs office in Asheville and get a jar of confiscated whiskey free if you wanted it for medicine. The rule was that you had to take a block of camphor and shave it into the jar there at the office. If you knew the sheriff, the rule was usually waived on your word that you were using it for medicine.

Band Aids were unknown, so usually a cut or stubbed toe was tied up with a piece of old sheet and sewing thread and doused in camphor.

Local author Louise Nelson, who grew up in Crabtree and Big Branch during the 1920s and 1930s, lists a number of home remedies in her book Country Folklore, including the groundhog oil for croup. Among her familys treatments:

Use chimney soot in the wound for blooding.

For a cold in the chest, use a poultice of camphor and turpentine. (They used an onion and turpentine poultice for croup.)

For sore throat, gargle with salt and vinegar water.

Make a candy from Jerusalem Oak to get rid of worms.

For bee stings, cover with wet snuff.

For poison ivy, use buttermilk, vinegar and salt.

A number of home remedies are also mentioned in Heritage of Healing, the history of Haywood County medicine. Bark from the poplar tree, brewed into a tea, was used for digestive problems, as were teas made of bayberry or the outer bark of the hemlock tree.

Tea from holly leaves was used to reduce fever. Sassafras was a common herbal medicine, used for stomach trouble, skin problems, dropsy, gout and a poor appetite. It was mixed with honey to treat influenza.

Many early settlers herbal remedies were used or adapted from the Cherokee, whose medicine men used more than 600 different plants in their practices.

Sources for this story include: Families practiced their own medicine with groundhog grease, teas and herbs, The Mountaineer, April 15, 1988; Country Folklore 1920s and 1930s and thats the way it was, by Louise Nelson; Heritage of Healing: A Medical History of Haywood County by Nina L. Anderson and William L. Anderson, published by the Waynesville Historical Society and Bald Mountain and Beyond by Stuart A. Nanney

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Many home remedies were good medicine if you could survive the cure - The Mountaineer

CRISPR Therapeutics and Vertex Pharmaceuticals Announce FDA Regenerative Medicine Advanced Therapy (RMAT) Designation Granted to CTX001 for the…

ZUG, Switzerland and CAMBRIDGE, Mass. and BOSTON, May 11, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- CRISPR Therapeutics (Nasdaq: CRSP) and Vertex Pharmaceuticals Incorporated (Nasdaq: VRTX) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) granted Regenerative Medicine Advanced Therapy (RMAT) designation to CTX001, an investigational, autologous, gene-edited hematopoietic stem cell therapy, for the treatment of severe sickle cell disease (SCD) and transfusion-dependent beta thalassemia (TDT).

RMAT designation is another important regulatory milestone for CTX001 and underscores the transformative potential of a CRISPR-based therapy for patients with severe hemoglobinopathies, said Samarth Kulkarni, Ph.D., Chief Executive Officer of CRISPR Therapeutics. We expect to share additional clinical data on CTX001 in medical and scientific forums this year as we continue to work closely with global regulatory agencies to expedite the clinical development of CTX001.

The first clinical data announced for CTX001 late last year represented a key advancement in our efforts to bring CRISPR-based therapies to people with beta thalassemia and sickle cell disease and demonstrate the curative potential of this therapy, said Bastiano Sanna, Ph.D., Executive Vice President and Chief of Cell and Genetic Therapies at Vertex. We are encouraged by these recent regulatory designations from the FDA and EMA, which speak to the potential impact this therapy could have for patients.

Established under the 21st Century Cures Act, RMAT designation is a dedicated program designed to expedite the drug development and review processes for promising pipeline products, including genetic therapies. A regenerative medicine therapy is eligible for RMAT designation if it is intended to treat, modify, reverse or cure a serious or life-threatening disease or condition, and preliminary clinical evidence indicates that the drug or therapy has the potential to address unmet medical needs for such disease or condition. Similar to Breakthrough Therapy designation, RMAT designation provides the benefits of intensive FDA guidance on efficient drug development, including the ability for early interactions with FDA to discuss surrogate or intermediate endpoints, potential ways to support accelerated approval and satisfy post-approval requirements, potential priority review of the biologics license application (BLA) and other opportunities to expedite development and review.

In addition to RMAT designation, CTX001 has received Orphan Drug Designation from the U.S. FDA for TDT and from the European Commission for TDT and SCD. CTX001 also has Fast Track Designation from the U.S. FDA for both TDT and SCD.

About CTX001CTX001 is an investigational ex vivo CRISPR gene-edited therapy that is being evaluated for patients suffering from TDT or severe SCD in which a patients hematopoietic stem cells are engineered to produce high levels of fetal hemoglobin (HbF; hemoglobin F) in red blood cells. HbF is a form of the oxygen-carrying hemoglobin that is naturally present at birth and is then replaced by the adult form of hemoglobin. The elevation of HbF by CTX001 has the potential to alleviate transfusion requirements for TDT patients and painful and debilitating sickle crises for SCD patients. CTX001 is the most advanced gene-editing approach in development for beta thalassemia and SCD.

CTX001 is being developed under a co-development and co-commercialization agreement between CRISPR Therapeutics and Vertex.

About the CRISPR-Vertex CollaborationCRISPR Therapeutics and Vertex entered into a strategic research collaboration in 2015 focused on the use of CRISPR/Cas9 to discover and develop potential new treatments aimed at the underlying genetic causes of human disease. CTX001 represents the first treatment to emerge from the joint research program. CRISPR Therapeutics and Vertex will jointly develop and commercialize CTX001 and equally share all research and development costs and profits worldwide.

About CRISPR TherapeuticsCRISPR Therapeutics is a leading gene editing company focused on developing transformative gene-based medicines for serious diseases using its proprietary CRISPR/Cas9 platform. CRISPR/Cas9 is a revolutionary gene editing technology that allows for precise, directed changes to genomic DNA. CRISPR Therapeutics has established a portfolio of therapeutic programs across a broad range of disease areas including hemoglobinopathies, oncology, regenerative medicine and rare diseases. To accelerate and expand its efforts, CRISPR Therapeutics has established strategic partnerships with leading companies including Bayer, Vertex Pharmaceuticals and ViaCyte, Inc. CRISPR Therapeutics AG is headquartered in Zug, Switzerland, with its wholly-owned U.S. subsidiary, CRISPR Therapeutics, Inc., and R&D operations based in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and business offices in San Francisco, California and London, United Kingdom. For more information, please visit http://www.crisprtx.com.

CRISPR Forward-Looking StatementThis press release may contain a number of forward-looking statements within the meaning of the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, as amended, including statements regarding CRISPR Therapeutics expectations about any or all of the following: (i) the status of clinical trials (including, without limitation, the expected timing of data releases) and discussions with regulatory authorities related to product candidates under development by CRISPR Therapeutics and its collaborators, including expectations regarding the benefits of RMAT designation; (ii) the expected benefits of CRISPR Therapeutics collaborations; and (iii) the therapeutic value, development, and commercial potential of CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technologies and therapies. Without limiting the foregoing, the words believes, anticipates, plans, expects and similar expressions are intended to identify forward-looking statements. You are cautioned that forward-looking statements are inherently uncertain. Although CRISPR Therapeutics believes that such statements are based on reasonable assumptions within the bounds of its knowledge of its business and operations, forward-looking statements are neither promises nor guarantees and they are necessarily subject to a high degree of uncertainty and risk. Actual performance and results may differ materially from those projected or suggested in the forward-looking statements due to various risks and uncertainties. These risks and uncertainties include, among others: the potential impacts due to the coronavirus pandemic, such as the timing and progress of clinical trials; the potential for initial and preliminary data from any clinical trial and initial data from a limited number of patients (as is the case with CTX001 at this time) not to be indicative of final trial results; the potential that CTX001 clinical trial results may not be favorable; that future competitive or other market factors may adversely affect the commercial potential for CTX001; uncertainties regarding the intellectual property protection for CRISPR Therapeutics technology and intellectual property belonging to third parties, and the outcome of proceedings (such as an interference, an opposition or a similar proceeding) involving all or any portion of such intellectual property; and those risks and uncertainties described under the heading "Risk Factors" in CRISPR Therapeutics most recent annual report on Form 10-K, and in any other subsequent filings made by CRISPR Therapeutics with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, which are available on the SEC's website at http://www.sec.gov. Existing and prospective investors are cautioned not to place undue reliance on these forward-looking statements, which speak only as of the date they are made. CRISPR Therapeutics disclaims any obligation or undertaking to update or revise any forward-looking statements contained in this press release, other than to the extent required by law.

About VertexVertex is a global biotechnology company that invests in scientific innovation to create transformative medicines for people with serious diseases. The company has multiple approved medicines that treat the underlying cause of cystic fibrosis (CF) a rare, life-threatening genetic disease and has several ongoing clinical and research programs in CF. Beyond CF, Vertex has a robust pipeline of investigational small molecule medicines in other serious diseases where it has deep insight into causal human biology, including pain, alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency and APOL1-mediated kidney diseases. In addition, Vertex has a rapidly expanding pipeline of genetic and cell therapies for diseases such as sickle cell disease, beta thalassemia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and type 1 diabetes mellitus.

Founded in 1989 in Cambridge, Mass., Vertex's global headquarters is now located in Boston's Innovation District and its international headquarters is in London, UK. Additionally, the company has research and development sites and commercial offices in North America, Europe, Australia and Latin America. Vertex is consistently recognized as one of the industry's top places to work, including 10 consecutive years on Science magazine's Top Employers list and top five on the 2019 Best Employers for Diversity list by Forbes. For company updates and to learn more about Vertex's history of innovation, visit http://www.vrtx.com or follow us on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIn, YouTube and Instagram.

Vertex Special Note Regarding Forward-Looking StatementsThis press release contains forward-looking statements as defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including, without limitation, the information provided regarding the status of, and expectations with respect to, the CTX001 clinical development program and related global regulatory approvals, and expectations regarding the RMAT designation. While Vertex believes the forward-looking statements contained in this press release are accurate, these forward-looking statements represent the company's beliefs only as of the date of this press release and there are a number of factors that could cause actual events or results to differ materially from those indicated by such forward-looking statements. Those risks and uncertainties include, among other things, that the development of CTX001 may not proceed or support registration due to safety, efficacy or other reasons, and other risks listed under Risk Factors in Vertex's annual report and quarterly reports filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission and available through the company's website at http://www.vrtx.com. Vertex disclaims any obligation to update the information contained in this press release as new information becomes available.

(VRTX-GEN)

CRISPR Therapeutics Investor Contact:Susan Kim, +1 617-307-7503susan.kim@crisprtx.com

CRISPR Therapeutics Media Contact:Rachel EidesWCG on behalf of CRISPR+1 617-337-4167 reides@wcgworld.com

Vertex Pharmaceuticals IncorporatedInvestors:Michael Partridge, +1 617-341-6108orZach Barber, +1 617-341-6470orBrenda Eustace, +1 617-341-6187

Media:mediainfo@vrtx.com orU.S.: +1 617-341-6992orHeather Nichols: +1 617-961-0534orInternational: +44 20 3204 5275

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CRISPR Therapeutics and Vertex Pharmaceuticals Announce FDA Regenerative Medicine Advanced Therapy (RMAT) Designation Granted to CTX001 for the...

Manmohan Singh stable, had developed reaction to new medicine: AIIMS sources – The Tribune India

Tribune News ServiceNew Delhi, May 11

Former prime minister Manmohan Singh is stable but under observation for a fever, hospital sources said on Monday, a day after he was admitted to AIIMS New Delhi.

Singh developed the fever as a reaction to a new medication and was being investigated further, said sources.They said the ex-PM was admitted to cardiothoracic unit of the hospital and was undergoing tests and medical observation to rule out other causes of the fever.

He is under the care of a team of doctors.

Hospital sources said, Dr Manmohan Singh was admitted for observation and investigation after he developed a febrile reaction to a new medication. He is being investigated to rule out other causes of fever and is being provided care as needed. He is stable and under the care of a team of doctors at the Cardiothoracic Centre of AIIMS.

Singh was taken to AIIMS Cardiac Care Unit on Sunday night and doctors said they were observing his condition. He was later shifted to a private room and remains under observation.

Earlier, in 2009, he had undergone a coronary artery bypass surgery by a team of surgeons led by cardiothoracic surgeon Ramakant Panda at AIIMS.

Singh is a senior leader of the opposition Congress and currently represents Rajasthan in the Upper House of Parliament. He was the Prime Minister between 2004 and 2014.

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Manmohan Singh stable, had developed reaction to new medicine: AIIMS sources - The Tribune India

Veterinary medicine changing in wake of COVID-19: Pet Connection – GoErie.com

Even after the pandemic is over, telehealth practices will probably continue.

The way our pets receive veterinary care changed dramatically two months ago. One day we were in the exam room with them; the next, we were all driving to the clinic, calling from our cars to announce our arrival, and staying in them while masked vet techs came and took pets inside for exams. Intercoms at clinic entrances enable germ-free communication with the front desk. Telehealth is trending.

High-tech accommodations that veterinarians and pet owners have made to deal with the COVID-19 virus will likely remain in the future. Phone calls, video and social media may all play a role in the way pets receive care and the way we witness it.

For instance, if you can't go in with your pet, can you still see the exam and communicate with the veterinarian?

"Absolutely," said Peter Weinstein, a veterinarian and executive director of the Southern California Veterinary Medical Association. Once the pet is in the exam room, he said, it's easy to initiate a Zoom, Skype or FaceTime call with the client so they can see what's going on.

Veterinarian Julie Reck, who practices in South Carolina, foresees using video and social media more frequently to let owners see what's going on if a pet has to "go to the back" for a procedure or is recovering from surgery.

"We do a lot on our social media for our veterinary page," she said. "We get video content of our patients all the time, whether that's while we're in the exam room or if they're in the back treatment area. If we're going to change that dynamic and separate the pet parent and the pet, we need to up the ante with that a little bit."

Anxious about letting your pet go into the veterinary clinic without you? It's not surprising that he might be weirded out by that masked and gowned technician and veterinarian. Separating pets and their people isn't ideal, but veterinary staff can ease pet anxiety by using low-stress or Fear-Free handling techniques, food rewards, stress relievers such as pheromone diffusers or soft music, and nonskid surfaces on exam tables to help them remain calm and comfortable.

Remote health care, or telehealth, may become more common for what were once routine in-clinic visits. Beyond a pandemic situation, it can benefit people who are sick but have a pet who needs to be seen or who don't have access to transportation. It's also useful in remote areas where specialist care or even general practice care isn't available.

Maybe your dog has a lump on his chin. If you have an already-established doctor-patient relationship, you can take a photo of the lump and email or text it to your veterinarian for advice on whether it can wait, or if needs to be treated immediately.

In some instances, you may not need an already-established relationship for your pet to receive treatment. Last month, the Food and Drug Administration temporarily relaxed some requirements regarding physical examinations to make it easier for veterinarians to prescribe drugs in certain situations without directly examining the pet. State veterinary medical association requirements may still be in effect in some areas, though.

Whenever the pandemic is over, lingering fear will likely affect the way veterinary medicine is delivered. We may see hybrid models combining traditional delivery of veterinary medicine with new drive-up, drop-off or telehealth services.

Weinstein counsels patience to pet owners and veterinarians who are navigating new territory and are concerned about their own health as well as that of their families and pets.

"If we can all respect one another's needs, we'll all come out of this just fine," he said.

Pet Connection is produced by a team of pet-care experts headed by veterinarian Marty Becker and journalist Kim Campbell Thornton of Vetstreet.com. Joining them is dog trainer and behavior consultant Mikkel Becker.

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Veterinary medicine changing in wake of COVID-19: Pet Connection - GoErie.com


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