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What is cloud computing? A beginners guide | Microsoft Azure

Types of cloud computing

Not all clouds are the same and not one type of cloud computing is right for everyone. Several different models, types, and services have evolved to help offer the right solution for your needs.

Types of cloud deployments: public, private, and hybrid

First, you need to determine the type of cloud deployment, or cloud computing architecture, that your cloud services will be implemented on. There are three different ways to deploy cloud services: on a public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud.

Public clouds are owned and operated by a third-partycloud service providers, which deliver their computing resources like servers and storage over the Internet. Microsoft Azure is an example of a public cloud. With a public cloud, all hardware, software, and other supporting infrastructure is owned and managed by the cloud provider. You access these services and manage your account using a web browser.

A private cloud refers to cloud computing resources used exclusively by a single business or organization. A private cloud can be physically located on the companys on-site datacenter. Some companies also pay third-party service providers to host their private cloud. A private cloud is one in which the services and infrastructure are maintained on a private network.

Hybrid clouds combine public and private clouds, bound together by technology that allows data and applications to be shared between them. By allowing data and applications to move between private and public clouds, a hybrid cloud gives your business greater flexibility, more deployment options, and helps optimize your existing infrastructure, security, and compliance.

Most cloud computing services fall into four broad categories: infrastructure as a service (IaaS), platform as a service (PaaS), serverless, and software as a service (SaaS). These are sometimes called the cloud computing stack because they build on top of one another. Knowing what they are and how theyre different makes it easier to accomplish your business goals.

The most basic category of cloud computing services. With IaaS, you rent IT infrastructureservers and virtual machines (VMs), storage, networks, operating systemsfrom a cloud provider on a pay-as-you-go basis. To learn more, seeWhat is IaaS?

Platform as a service refers to cloud computing services that supply an on-demand environment for developing, testing, delivering, and managing software applications. PaaS is designed to make it easier for developers to quickly create web or mobile apps, without worrying about setting up or managing the underlying infrastructure of servers, storage, network, and databases needed for development. To learn more, seeWhat is PaaS?

Overlapping with PaaS, serverless computing focuses on building app functionality without spending time continually managing the servers and infrastructure required to do so. The cloud provider handles the setup, capacity planning, and server management for you. Serverless architectures are highly scalable and event-driven, only using resources when a specific function or trigger occurs.

Software as a service is a method for delivering software applications over the Internet, on demand and typically on a subscription basis. With SaaS, cloud providers host and manage the software application and underlying infrastructure, and handle any maintenance, like software upgrades and security patching. Users connect to the application over the Internet, usually with a web browser on their phone, tablet, or PC. To learn more, seeWhat is SaaS?

Youre probably using cloud computing right now, even if you dont realize it. If you use an online service to send email, edit documents, watch movies or TV, listen to music, play games, or store pictures and other files, its likely that cloud computing is making it all possible behind the scenes. The first cloud computing services are barely a decade old, but already a variety of organizationsfrom tiny startups to global corporations, government agencies to non-profitsare embracing the technology for all sorts of reasons.

Here are a few examples of whats possible today with cloud services from a cloud provider:

Quickly build, deploy, and scale applicationsweb, mobile, and APIon any platform. Access the resources you need to help meet performance, security, and compliance requirements.

Reduce application development cost and time by using cloud infrastructures that can easily be scaled up or down.

Protect your data more cost-efficientlyand at massive scaleby transferring your data over the Internet to an offsite cloud storage system thats accessible from any location and any device.

Unify your data across teams, divisions, and locations in the cloud. Then use cloud services, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, to uncover insights for more informed decisions.

Connect with your audience anywhere, anytime, on any device with high-definition video and audio with global distribution.

Use intelligent models to help engage customers and provide valuable insights from the data captured.

Also known as software as a service (SaaS), on-demand software lets you offer the latest software versions and updates around to customersanytime they need, anywhere they are.

Go here to read the rest:

What is cloud computing? A beginners guide | Microsoft Azure

What is Cloud Computing? – Amazon Web Services

Whether you are running applications that share photos to millions of mobile users or youre supporting the critical operations of your business, a cloud services platform provides rapid access to flexible and low cost IT resources. With cloud computing, you dont need to make large upfront investments in hardware and spend a lot of time on the heavy lifting of managing that hardware. Instead, you can provision exactly the right type and size of computing resources you need to power your newest bright idea or operate your IT department. You can access as many resources as you need, almost instantly, and only pay for what you use.

Cloud computing provides a simple way to access servers, storage, databases and a broad set of application services over the Internet. A Cloud services platform such as Amazon Web Services owns and maintains the network-connected hardware required for these application services, while you provision and use what you need via a web application.

Read the rest here:

What is Cloud Computing? – Amazon Web Services

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Description Multi-tenant environment with pay-as-you-grow scalability Scalability plus the enhanced security and control of a single-tenant environment For predictable workloads that require enhanced security and control Connect the public cloud to your private cloud or dedicated servers even in your own data center Best for Non-sensitive, public-facing operations and unpredictable traffic Sensitive, business-critical operations Sensitive, business-critical operations, plus demanding performance, security and compliance requirements Combine public, private and/or dedicated servers, for the best of each

Continue reading here:

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Amazon Web Services (AWS) – Cloud Computing Services

Enterprise Transformation

Learn how Capital One implemented its cloud-first strategy through education, long-term planning, and constant focus on customer needs.

Focusing on Customers

In 2014, Capital One had a fledgling private cloud capability and was also experimenting with AWS. In an effort to build the features its customers wanted as quickly as possible, the company chose to pursue AWS.

Doing the Hard Part First

Security and compliance are critical to Capital One as a financial institution. To address these needs, Capital One built a cloud-risk framework and established a cloud-governance function before moving a single workload to AWS.

Education: Key to the Cloud

Capital One offers a cloud training program to engineers who work directly on AWS as well as non-technical stakeholders who need to be able to advocate for the power of cloud computing. The company now ranks in the top three of all enterprises globally for AWS certifications held by employees.

Realizing the Benefits of the Cloud

Using AWS, Capital One brings new products to market in weeks instead of months or years, uses machine learning to improve customer experience, and attracts top developers and engineersall of which help the company achieve its most important goal: creating great experiences for its customers.

Predictive Analytics

Learn how Formula 1 uses Amazon SageMaker and other AWS services to optimize racing decisions and improve fan experience.

Beginning a Transformation

Formula One Group is moving most of its infrastructure from on-premises data centers to AWS and standardizing on AWS machine-learning servicesincludingAmazon SageMaker.

Optimizing Racing with Machine Learning

Using historical race data collected from cars over the past 65 years, Formula 1 data scientists are training deep-learning models that make race predictions and help teams optimize mid-race decisions. The models can predict when teams should pit their cars, determine the best timing for changing tires, and evaluate how drivers are performing.

Bringing Fans onto the Track

Formula 1 then uses AWS data streaming, analytics, and media services to deliver insights about driver decisions and car performance to its more than 500 million fans.

Building for the Future

Because Formula 1 runs its high-performance computing workloads in a scalable environment on AWS, the organization can innovate on the Formula 1 racing experience, car design, and more without worrying about capacity.

Machine Learning

Learn How Americas Professional Baseball League Brings Meaning to Statistics Using AWS Machine Learning

A Foundation for Deep Learning

MLB has been collecting statistical data on its players and clubs for decades, and in 2015 it started using AWS to collect and distribute game-day stats to enhance the fan experience.

Empowering Developers

By using Amazon Sagemaker, MLB is empowering its developers and data scientists to quickly and easily build, train, and deploy machine-learning models at scale.

Lightening the Load

These models help MLB eliminate manual, time-intensive processes associated with recordkeeping and statistics, like scorekeeping, capturing game notes, and classifying pitches.

Personalizing the Game

MLB plans to work with the Amazon ML Solutions Lab to continue improving Statcastits tracking technology that analyzes player performanceincluding testing accuracy of pitch predictions and creating personalized viewer experiences.

A Home Run with Artificial Intelligence

MLB will continue to innovate using artificial intelligence. The organization plans to use Amazon Comprehend to build a language model that could create scripts for live games that simulate iconic announcers.

SERVERLESS

Learn how Matson is using AWS to drive innovation and world-class customer service, while achieving operational reliability, security, and infrastructure cost savings.

Real-Time Container Tracking

Matson built a flagship mobile application for global container tracking that allows customers to perform real-time tracking of their freight shipments. Other valuable features in the application include interactive vessel schedule searching, location-based port map lookups, and live gate-camera feeds.

Mobile Device Access

All mobile devices access AWS via Amazon API Gateway. This provides highly available edge located endpoints for access into resources within Matson’s existing virtual private clouds.

Serverless Computing

The AWS Lambda functions are designed using the microservices pattern and are modeled around specific ocean-based business contexts, such as shipment tracking and vessel schedules.

Database Configuration and Storage

Amazon DynamoDBmanages configuration as well as user-feedbackconfiguration and user-feedback notifications sent from mobile devices. DynamoDB Streams provides real-time notificationsto Matson’s customer service team.

Data Monitoring and Alerts

Matson’s customers rely on accurate, up-to-the-minute container tracking and vessel status information. Monitoring and alerting of system events is achieved by using Amazon CloudWatch, Amazon SNS, Amazon SES, AWS Lambda, and CloudWatch Logs.

End-to-End Serverless Application

Matson can now offer customers an end-to-end serverless application to help track their shipments, and has no infrastructureto maintain.

Gaming

Epic Games Uses AWS to Power Worldwide Game Fortnite

Learn how Epic Games uses AWS to deliver Fortnite to more than 200 million players around the world.

Building a Foundation on the Cloud

Epic Games has been using AWS since 2012 and is now all in on the AWS Cloud, running its worldwide game-server fleet, backend platform systems, databases, websites, analytics pipeline, and processing systems on AWS.

An Overnight Sensation

In 2017, Epic Games launched Fortnite, a cross-platform, multiplayer game that became an overnight sensation. In its first year, Fortnites user base grew by more than 100 times to 200 million players worldwide.

Pushing the Boundaries of Scale

AWS is integral to the success of Fortnite. Using AWS, Epic Games hosts in-game events with hundreds of millions of invited users without worrying about capacity, ingests 125 million events per minute into its analytics pipeline, and handles data-warehouse growth of more than 5 PB per month.

Providing the Best Gaming Experience

Using AWS, Epic Games is always improving the experience of its players and offering new, exciting games and game elements. The company plans to expand its use of AWS services in the future, including machine learning and containerized services.

ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS

See how BP simplified and modernized its suite of SAP applications, improving user experience while gaining cost agility and enhanced performance.

Managing Critical Business Apps

BP’s IT organization manages SAP applications used by thousands of employees worldwide for supply chain, procurement, finance, and more.

Improving Speed & Cost Agility

To improve speed and gain cost agility, BP used Amazon EC2 to migrate these core business apps to the cloud. In addition, the team built EC2 X1 instances to increase scale and to power their real-time analytics.

Increasing Performance

The team can now stand up systems on demand in hours instead of weeks or months. BP is seeing performance increases across the board, including a 40 percent speed improvement for the Lubricants ERP system.

See the rest here:

Amazon Web Services (AWS) – Cloud Computing Services

What is cloud computing? A beginners guide | Microsoft Azure

Types of cloud computing

Not all clouds are the same and not one type of cloud computing is right for everyone. Several different models, types, and services have evolved to help offer the right solution for your needs.

Types of cloud deployments: public, private, and hybrid

First, you need to determine the type of cloud deployment, or cloud computing architecture, that your cloud services will be implemented on. There are three different ways to deploy cloud services: on a public cloud, private cloud, or hybrid cloud.

Public clouds are owned and operated by a third-partycloud service providers, which deliver their computing resources like servers and storage over the Internet. Microsoft Azure is an example of a public cloud. With a public cloud, all hardware, software, and other supporting infrastructure is owned and managed by the cloud provider. You access these services and manage your account using a web browser.

A private cloud refers to cloud computing resources used exclusively by a single business or organization. A private cloud can be physically located on the companys on-site datacenter. Some companies also pay third-party service providers to host their private cloud. A private cloud is one in which the services and infrastructure are maintained on a private network.

Hybrid clouds combine public and private clouds, bound together by technology that allows data and applications to be shared between them. By allowing data and applications to move between private and public clouds, a hybrid cloud gives your business greater flexibility, more deployment options, and helps optimize your existing infrastructure, security, and compliance.

Most cloud computing services fall into four broad categories: infrastructure as a service (IaaS), platform as a service (PaaS), serverless, and software as a service (SaaS). These are sometimes called the cloud computing stack because they build on top of one another. Knowing what they are and how theyre different makes it easier to accomplish your business goals.

The most basic category of cloud computing services. With IaaS, you rent IT infrastructureservers and virtual machines (VMs), storage, networks, operating systemsfrom a cloud provider on a pay-as-you-go basis. To learn more, seeWhat is IaaS?

Platform as a service refers to cloud computing services that supply an on-demand environment for developing, testing, delivering, and managing software applications. PaaS is designed to make it easier for developers to quickly create web or mobile apps, without worrying about setting up or managing the underlying infrastructure of servers, storage, network, and databases needed for development. To learn more, seeWhat is PaaS?

Overlapping with PaaS, serverless computing focuses on building app functionality without spending time continually managing the servers and infrastructure required to do so. The cloud provider handles the setup, capacity planning, and server management for you. Serverless architectures are highly scalable and event-driven, only using resources when a specific function or trigger occurs.

Software as a service is a method for delivering software applications over the Internet, on demand and typically on a subscription basis. With SaaS, cloud providers host and manage the software application and underlying infrastructure, and handle any maintenance, like software upgrades and security patching. Users connect to the application over the Internet, usually with a web browser on their phone, tablet, or PC. To learn more, seeWhat is SaaS?

Youre probably using cloud computing right now, even if you dont realize it. If you use an online service to send email, edit documents, watch movies or TV, listen to music, play games, or store pictures and other files, its likely that cloud computing is making it all possible behind the scenes. The first cloud computing services are barely a decade old, but already a variety of organizationsfrom tiny startups to global corporations, government agencies to non-profitsare embracing the technology for all sorts of reasons.

Here are a few examples of whats possible today with cloud services from a cloud provider:

Quickly build, deploy, and scale applicationsweb, mobile, and APIon any platform. Access the resources you need to help meet performance, security, and compliance requirements.

Reduce application development cost and time by using cloud infrastructures that can easily be scaled up or down.

Protect your data more cost-efficientlyand at massive scaleby transferring your data over the Internet to an offsite cloud storage system thats accessible from any location and any device.

Unify your data across teams, divisions, and locations in the cloud. Then use cloud services, such as machine learning and artificial intelligence, to uncover insights for more informed decisions.

Connect with your audience anywhere, anytime, on any device with high-definition video and audio with global distribution.

Use intelligent models to help engage customers and provide valuable insights from the data captured.

Also known as software as a service (SaaS), on-demand software lets you offer the latest software versions and updates around to customersanytime they need, anywhere they are.

Read more here:

What is cloud computing? A beginners guide | Microsoft Azure

What is cloud computing? – Definition from WhatIs.com

Cloud computing is a general term for anything that involves delivering hosted services over the Internet. These services are broadly divided into three categories: Infrastructure-as-a-Service (IaaS), Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) and Software-as-a-Service (SaaS). The name cloud computing was inspired by the cloud symbol that’s often used to represent the Internet in flowcharts and diagrams.

A cloud service has three distinct characteristics that differentiate it from traditional web hosting. It is sold on demand, typically by the minute or the hour; it is elastic — a user can have as much or as little of a service as they want at any given time; and the service is fully managed by the provider (the consumer needs nothing but a personal computer and Internet access). Significant innovations in virtualization and distributed computing, as well as improved access to high-speed Internet, have accelerated interest in cloud computing.

A cloud can be private or public. A public cloud sells services to anyone on the Internet. (Currently, Amazon Web Services is the largest public cloud provider.) A private cloud is a proprietary network or a data center that supplies hosted services to a limited number of people. Private or public, the goal of cloud computing is to provide easy, scalable access to computing resources and IT services.

Private cloud services are delivered from a business’s data center to internal users. This model offers the versatility and convenience of the cloud, while preserving the management, control and security common to local data centers. Internal users may or may not be billed for services throughIT chargeback. Common private cloud technologies and vendors include VMware and OpenStack.

In the public cloud model, a third-party cloud service provider delivers the cloud service over the internet. Public cloud services are sold on demand, typically by the minute or hour, though long-term commitments are available for many services. Customers only pay for theCPUcycles,storageorbandwidththey consume. Leading public cloud service providers include Amazon Web Services (AWS), MicrosoftAzure,IBMandGoogle Cloud Platform.

A hybrid cloud is a combination of public cloud services and an on-premises private cloud, with orchestration and automation between the two. Companies can run mission-critical workloads or sensitive applications on the private cloud and use the public cloud to handle workload bursts or spikes in demand.The goal of a hybrid cloud is to create a unified, automated, scalable environment that takes advantage of all that a public cloud infrastructure can provide, while still maintaining control over mission-critical data.

In addition, organizations are increasingly embracing a multicloud model, or the use of multiple infrastructure-as-a-service providers. This enables applications to migrate between different cloud providers or to even operate concurrently across two or more cloud providers. Organizations adopt multicloud for various reasons. For example, they could do so to minimize the risk of a cloud service outage or to take advantage of more competitive pricing from a particular provider. Multicloud implementation and application development can be a challenge because of the differences between cloud providers’ services and application program interfaces (APIs). Multicloud deployments should become easier, however, as providers’ services and APIs converge and become more homogeneous through industry initiatives such as the Open Cloud Computing Interface.

Cloud computing boasts several attractive benefits for businesses and end users. Five of the main benefits of cloud computing are:

Although cloud computing has changed over time, it has been divided into three broad service categories: infrastructure as a service (IaaS), platform as a service (PaaS) and software as a service (SaaS).

IaaS providers, such as AWS, supply avirtual serverinstance and storage, as well as APIs that enable users to migrateworkloadsto aVM. Users have an allocated storage capacity and can start, stop, access and configure the VM and storage as desired. IaaS providers offer small, medium, large, extra-large and memory- or compute-optimized instances, in addition to customized instances, for various workload needs.

In the PaaS model, cloud providers host development tools on their infrastructures. Users access these tools over the internet using APIs, webportalsor gateway software. PaaS is used for general software development, and many PaaS providers host the software after it’s developed. Common PaaS providers include Salesforce’sForce.com,AWS Elastic BeanstalkandGoogle App Engine.

SaaS is a distribution model that delivers software applications over the internet; these applications are often calledweb services. Users can access SaaS applications and services from any location using a computer or mobile device that has internet access. One common example of a SaaS application is MicrosoftOffice 365for productivity and email services.

Cloud providers are competitive, and they constantly expand their services to differentiate themselves. This has led public IaaS providers to offer far more than common compute and storage instances.

For example, serverless, or event-driven computing is a cloud service that executes specific functions, such as image processing and database updates. Traditional cloud deployments require users to establish a compute instance and load code into that instance. Then, the user decides how long to run — and pay for — that instance.

With serverless computing, developers simply create code, and the cloud provider loads and executes that code in response to real-world events, so users don’t have to worry about the server or instance aspect of the cloud deployment. Users only pay for the number of transactions that the function executes. AWS Lambda, Google Cloud Functions and Azure Functions are examples of serverless computing services.

Public cloud computing also lends itself well to big data processing, which demands enormous compute resources for relatively short durations. Cloud providers have responded with big data services, including Google BigQuery for large-scale data warehousing and Microsoft Azure Data Lake Analytics for processing huge data sets.

Another crop of emerging cloud technologies and services relates to artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning. These technologies build machine understanding, enable systems to mimic human understanding and respond to changes in data to benefit the business. Amazon Machine Learning, Amazon Lex, Amazon Polly, Google Cloud Machine Learning Engine and Google Cloud Speech API are examples of these services.

Security remains a primary concern for businesses contemplating cloud adoption — especially public cloud adoption. Public cloud service providers share their underlying hardware infrastructure between numerous customers, as public cloud is amulti-tenant environment. This environment demands copious isolation between logical compute resources. At the same time, access to public cloud storage and compute resources is guarded by account login credentials.

Many organizations bound by complexregulatoryobligations andgovernancestandards are still hesitant to place data or workloads in the public cloud for fear of outages, loss or theft. However, this resistance is fading, as logical isolation has proven reliable, and the addition of dataencryptionand various identity and access management tools has improved security within the public cloud.

Link:

What is cloud computing? – Definition from WhatIs.com

Cloud computing: A complete guide | IBM

Enterprises eager to undergo digital transformations and modernize their applications are quick to see the value of adopting a cloud computing platform. They are increasingly finding business agility or cost savings by renting software. Each cloud computing service and deployment model type provides you with different levels of control, flexibility and management. Therefore, its important to understand the differences between them.

Common convention points to public cloud as the delivery model of choice; but, when considering the right architecture of cloud computing for your applications and workloads, you must begin by addressing the unique needs of your business.

This can include many factors, such as government regulations, security, performance, data residency, service levels, time to market, architecture complexity, skills and preventing vendor lock-in. Add in the need to incorporate the emerging technologies, and you can see why IT leaders are challenging the notion that cloud computing migration is easy.

At first glance, the types of cloud computing seem simple: public, private or a hybrid mix of both. In reality, the choices are many. Public cloud can include shared, dedicated and bare metal delivery models. Fully and partially managed clouds are also options. And, in some cases, especially for existing applications where architectures are too complex to move or the cost-benefit ratio is not optimal, cloud may not be the right choice.

The right model depends on your workload. You should understand the pluses and minuses of each cloud deployment model and take a methodical approach to determining which workloads to move to which type of cloud for the maximum benefit.

Dive deeper into specific cloud service and deployment models, cloud computing architecture and cloud computing examples

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Cloud computing: A complete guide | IBM

What is Cloud Computing? – Amazon Web Services

Whether you are running applications that share photos to millions of mobile users or youre supporting the critical operations of your business, a cloud services platform provides rapid access to flexible and low cost IT resources. With cloud computing, you dont need to make large upfront investments in hardware and spend a lot of time on the heavy lifting of managing that hardware. Instead, you can provision exactly the right type and size of computing resources you need to power your newest bright idea or operate your IT department. You can access as many resources as you need, almost instantly, and only pay for what you use.

Cloud computing provides a simple way to access servers, storage, databases and a broad set of application services over the Internet. A Cloud services platform such as Amazon Web Services owns and maintains the network-connected hardware required for these application services, while you provision and use what you need via a web application.

See the original post here:

What is Cloud Computing? – Amazon Web Services

Amazon Web Services (AWS) – Cloud Computing Services

Enterprise Transformation

Learn how Capital One implemented its cloud-first strategy through education, long-term planning, and constant focus on customer needs.

Focusing on Customers

In 2014, Capital One had a fledgling private cloud capability and was also experimenting with AWS. In an effort to build the features its customers wanted as quickly as possible, the company chose to pursue AWS.

Doing the Hard Part First

Security and compliance are critical to Capital One as a financial institution. To address these needs, Capital One built a cloud-risk framework and established a cloud-governance function before moving a single workload to AWS.

Education: Key to the Cloud

Capital One offers a cloud training program to engineers who work directly on AWS as well as non-technical stakeholders who need to be able to advocate for the power of cloud computing. The company now ranks in the top three of all enterprises globally for AWS certifications held by employees.

Realizing the Benefits of the Cloud

Using AWS, Capital One brings new products to market in weeks instead of months or years, uses machine learning to improve customer experience, and attracts top developers and engineersall of which help the company achieve its most important goal: creating great experiences for its customers.

Predictive Analytics

Learn how Formula 1 uses Amazon SageMaker and other AWS services to optimize racing decisions and improve fan experience.

Beginning a Transformation

Formula One Group is moving most of its infrastructure from on-premises data centers to AWS and standardizing on AWS machine-learning servicesincludingAmazon SageMaker.

Optimizing Racing with Machine Learning

Using historical race data collected from cars over the past 65 years, Formula 1 data scientists are training deep-learning models that make race predictions and help teams optimize mid-race decisions. The models can predict when teams should pit their cars, determine the best timing for changing tires, and evaluate how drivers are performing.

Bringing Fans onto the Track

Formula 1 then uses AWS data streaming, analytics, and media services to deliver insights about driver decisions and car performance to its more than 500 million fans.

Building for the Future

Because Formula 1 runs its high-performance computing workloads in a scalable environment on AWS, the organization can innovate on the Formula 1 racing experience, car design, and more without worrying about capacity.

Machine Learning

Learn How Americas Professional Baseball League Brings Meaning to Statistics Using AWS Machine Learning

A Foundation for Deep Learning

MLB has been collecting statistical data on its players and clubs for decades, and in 2015 it started using AWS to collect and distribute game-day stats to enhance the fan experience.

Empowering Developers

By using Amazon Sagemaker, MLB is empowering its developers and data scientists to quickly and easily build, train, and deploy machine-learning models at scale.

Lightening the Load

These models help MLB eliminate manual, time-intensive processes associated with recordkeeping and statistics, like scorekeeping, capturing game notes, and classifying pitches.

Personalizing the Game

MLB plans to work with the Amazon ML Solutions Lab to continue improving Statcastits tracking technology that analyzes player performanceincluding testing accuracy of pitch predictions and creating personalized viewer experiences.

A Home Run with Artificial Intelligence

MLB will continue to innovate using artificial intelligence. The organization plans to use Amazon Comprehend to build a language model that could create scripts for live games that simulate iconic announcers.

SERVERLESS

Learn how Matson is using AWS to drive innovation and world-class customer service, while achieving operational reliability, security, and infrastructure cost savings.

Real-Time Container Tracking

Matson built a flagship mobile application for global container tracking that allows customers to perform real-time tracking of their freight shipments. Other valuable features in the application include interactive vessel schedule searching, location-based port map lookups, and live gate-camera feeds.

Mobile Device Access

All mobile devices access AWS via Amazon API Gateway. This provides highly available edge located endpoints for access into resources within Matson’s existing virtual private clouds.

Serverless Computing

The AWS Lambda functions are designed using the microservices pattern and are modeled around specific ocean-based business contexts, such as shipment tracking and vessel schedules.

Database Configuration and Storage

Amazon DynamoDBmanages configuration as well as user-feedbackconfiguration and user-feedback notifications sent from mobile devices. DynamoDB Streams provides real-time notificationsto Matson’s customer service team.

Data Monitoring and Alerts

Matson’s customers rely on accurate, up-to-the-minute container tracking and vessel status information. Monitoring and alerting of system events is achieved by using Amazon CloudWatch, Amazon SNS, Amazon SES, AWS Lambda, and CloudWatch Logs.

End-to-End Serverless Application

Matson can now offer customers an end-to-end serverless application to help track their shipments, and has no infrastructureto maintain.

Gaming

Epic Games Uses AWS to Power Worldwide Game Fortnite

Learn how Epic Games uses AWS to deliver Fortnite to more than 200 million players around the world.

Building a Foundation on the Cloud

Epic Games has been using AWS since 2012 and is now all in on the AWS Cloud, running its worldwide game-server fleet, backend platform systems, databases, websites, analytics pipeline, and processing systems on AWS.

An Overnight Sensation

In 2017, Epic Games launched Fortnite, a cross-platform, multiplayer game that became an overnight sensation. In its first year, Fortnites user base grew by more than 100 times to 200 million players worldwide.

Pushing the Boundaries of Scale

AWS is integral to the success of Fortnite. Using AWS, Epic Games hosts in-game events with hundreds of millions of invited users without worrying about capacity, ingests 125 million events per minute into its analytics pipeline, and handles data-warehouse growth of more than 5 PB per month.

Providing the Best Gaming Experience

Using AWS, Epic Games is always improving the experience of its players and offering new, exciting games and game elements. The company plans to expand its use of AWS services in the future, including machine learning and containerized services.

ENTERPRISE APPLICATIONS

See how BP simplified and modernized its suite of SAP applications, improving user experience while gaining cost agility and enhanced performance.

Managing Critical Business Apps

BP’s IT organization manages SAP applications used by thousands of employees worldwide for supply chain, procurement, finance, and more.

Improving Speed & Cost Agility

To improve speed and gain cost agility, BP used Amazon EC2 to migrate these core business apps to the cloud. In addition, the team built EC2 X1 instances to increase scale and to power their real-time analytics.

Increasing Performance

The team can now stand up systems on demand in hours instead of weeks or months. BP is seeing performance increases across the board, including a 40 percent speed improvement for the Lubricants ERP system.

Follow this link:

Amazon Web Services (AWS) – Cloud Computing Services

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Description Multi-tenant environment with pay-as-you-grow scalability Scalability plus the enhanced security and control of a single-tenant environment For predictable workloads that require enhanced security and control Connect the public cloud to your private cloud or dedicated servers even in your own data center Best for Non-sensitive, public-facing operations and unpredictable traffic Sensitive, business-critical operations Sensitive, business-critical operations, plus demanding performance, security and compliance requirements Combine public, private and/or dedicated servers, for the best of each

Go here to read the rest:

What is Cloud Computing? | Rackspace Managed Cloud

Cloud Computing and Cloud Server-Technology Solutions | Dell

Cloud promises to revolutionize the future of IT service delivery by enabling a faster and more flexible way to meet the technology needs of your organization. Take the simplest path to your cloud-enabled future with Dells end-to-end portfolio of infrastructure, services and management tools.

Count on Dell to deliver cloud with security and agility in mind so you can focus less on managing technology and more on reaping its rewards. Learn more about how Dell can help you realize the promise of cloud:

Originally posted here:

Cloud Computing and Cloud Server-Technology Solutions | Dell

Cloud Computing – Yahoo

Background

Whats all the fluff about cloud computing? There are plenty of reasons its the most talked-about trend in technology. Starting with the fact that it helps reduce the up-front capital needed to build IT infrastructure and develop software. Cloud services are so appealing that the total market is expected to nearly triple from 2010 to 2016. (Yep, you read that right.)

Of course, technology companies have clamored to add cloud computing to their repertoires, leading to lots of M&A activity. Software and Internet deals represented 57% of transactions closed in 2012, a figure that has grown steadily over the last two years. All of which leaves the cloud looking like a lot more than a passing storm.

We identified US-listed stocks and American Depository Receipts of companies that are engaged in activities relevant to this watchlist’s theme. We then filtered out companies that have a share price of less than .00 or a market capitalization less than 00 million, and excluded illiquid stocks by screening companies for liquidity i.e. average bid-ask spreads, dollar volume traded etc. Finally the proprietary Motif Optimization Engine determined the constituent stocks. Learn more about how we select our watchlists.

Motif is an online brokerage built on thematic portfolios of up to 30 stocks and ETFs. Founded in 2010 by Hardeep Walia, Motif combines complex proprietary algorithms with skilled advisers to develop these thematic portfolios. Learn more about our team.

First, we determined each company’s percentage of total revenue derived from this watchlist’s theme. Second, we applied a pure-play factor to give greater relative weight to companies that derive a higher percentage of their revenue from this theme. Finally, we weighted each company by its market capitalization adjusted for revenue exposure to the theme.

More details on how we build and weight watchlists are available here.

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Cloud Computing – Yahoo

Cloud Computing Services | Google Cloud

We have customer data, Google Ad Manager, Google Ads, YouTube, a broad range of social media, email marketing. We began to feel we had more data than we could handle. Now with the exceptional power of Google BigQuery, we can unlock the potential of that data and put it to use. The cost savings to our marketing are incalculable, but stretch into the millions of euros.

Michele Berra

Digital Marketing Manager, Banca Mediolanum

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Cloud Computing Services | Google Cloud

Cloud Computing – TechSoup

Online file-sharing, content management, and collaboration service with advanced security and admin controls, API access for integration, unlimited storage, and unlimited external collaborators (50 percent discounted rate paid to Box)

Online file-sharing, content management, and collaboration service with advanced security and admin controls, API access for integration, unlimited storage, and unlimited external collaborators (50 percent discounted rate paid to Box)

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Cloud Computing – TechSoup

What Is Cloud Computing, and How Do You Use It?

Cloud computingconsists of hardware and software resources made available on the internet as managed external services. These services rely on advanced software applications and high-end networks of server computers.

Service providers create cloud computing systems to serve common business or research needs. Examples of cloud computing services include:

Cloud computing systems all generally are designed to support large numbers of customers and surges in demand.

Cloud services using a software-as-a-service model, or SaaS, provide fully functional programs to end users even though the programs may not be resident on their local computers. Email providers like Gmail and Outlook.com are SaaS applications, as well as just about any computer program that runs inside of a browser. As such, SaaS is most familiar to home consumers.

An SaaS solution sits atop a platform. Vendors that offer platform-as-a-service portfolios generally face corporate clients. PaaS products include virtual servers, operating environments, database environments, and any other middleware component that sits between the hardware and the consumer-facing application.

Platforms, in turn, sit upon infrastructure. Infrastructure-as-a-service solutions generally get to the level of ‘bare metal’ the physical servers, networking components, and device storage necessary to make platforms (and, hence, services) functional. IaaS is popular with corporate clients, with tradeoffs between speed, cost, and privacy that each vendor balances in different ways.

Many different vendors offer various types of cloud-computing services:

Some providers offer cloud computing services for free, while others require a paid subscription.

A cloud computing system keeps its critical data on internet servers rather than distributing copies of data files to individual client devices. Video-sharing cloud services like Netflix, for example, stream data across the internet to a player application on the viewing device rather than sending customers DVD or BluRay physical discs.

Clients must be connected to the internet in order to use cloud services. Some video games on the Xbox Live service, for example, can only be obtained online (not on physical disc), while some others also cannot be played without being connected.

Some industry observers expect cloud computing to keep increasing in popularity in coming years. The Chromebookis one example of how all personal computers might evolve in the future under this trend devices with minimal local storage space and few local applications besides the web browser (through which online applications and services are reached).

As with any disruptive new technology, cloud computing offers strengths and weaknesses that developers and consumers alike must carefully evaluate.

Service providers are responsible for installing and maintaining core technology within the cloud. Some business customers prefer this model because it limits their own burden of having to maintain infrastructure. Conversely, these customers give up management control over the system, relying on the provider to deliver the needed reliability and performance levels.

Likewise, home users become highly dependent on their internet provider in the cloud computing model: Temporary outages and slower-speed broadbandthat are a minor nuisance today become a significant problem in a fully cloud-based world. On the other hand proponents of cloud technology argue such an evolution would likely drive internet providers to keep improving the quality of their service to stay competitive.

Cloud computing systems are normally designed to closely track all system resources. This, in turn, enables providers to charge customers fees proportional to their network, storage, and processing usage. Some customers prefer thismetered billing approach to saving money, while others prefer a flat-rate subscription to ensure predictable monthly or yearly costs.

Using a cloud computing environment generally requires you to send data over the internet and store it on a vendor-managed system. The privacy and security risks associated with this model must be weighed against the benefits as well as the alternatives.

The average non-IT consumer benefits from SaaS/PaaS/IaaS technologies because of the lower cost, faster deployment time, and increased flexibility that these solutions offer. Although some people prefer to own the license to a piece of unchanging software, others are content to embrace subscription-based software that requires internet connectivity.

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What Is Cloud Computing, and How Do You Use It?

Cloud Computing | CSRC

Project Overview

NIST Cloud Computing Program

Cloud computing is a model for enabling convenient, on-demand network access to a shared pool of configurable computing resources (e.g., networks, servers, storage, applications, and services) that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider interaction. This cloud model promotes availability and is composed of five essential characteristics (On-demand self-service, Broad network access, Resource pooling, Rapid elasticity, Measured Service); three service models (Cloud Software as a Service (SaaS), Cloud Platform as a Service (PaaS), Cloud Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS)); and, four deployment models (Private cloud, Community cloud, Public cloud, Hybrid cloud). Key enabling technologies include: (1) fast wide-area networks, (2) powerful, inexpensive server computers, and (3) high-performance virtualization for commodity hardware.

Visit theNIST Cloud Computing Program homepage.

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Cloud Computing | CSRC

cloud computing

Making Design Thinking real

I was hired into a multidisciplinary corporate strategy team, set up by Hasso Plattner, the chairman of SAP’s supervisory board, and the only co-founder still with the company, whose mission was to help SAP embrace design thinking in how it built products and processes as well as how it worked with customers. It was the best multidisciplinary team one could imagine to be part of. We were multidisciplinary to a fault where I used to joke that my team members and I had nothing in common. I am proud to be part of this journey and the impact we helped achieve. Over the years we managed to take the double quotes out of design thinking making it a default mindset and philosophy in all parts of SAP. It was a testament to the fact that any bold and audacious mission starts with a few simple steps and can be accomplished if there is a small passionate team behind it striving to make an impact.

Be part of foundation of something disruptive

Being part of the Office of CEO I worked with two CEOsHenning and Leoand their respective executive management teams. This was by far the best learning experience of my life. I got an opportunity to work across lines of businesses and got first hand exposure to intricate parts of SAPs business. As part of the corporate strategy team I also got an opportunity to work on Business Objects post-merger integration, especially the joint product vision. Some of that work led to the foundation of one of the most disruptive products SAP later released, SAP HANA.

Fuel the insane growth of SAP HANA

HANA just happened to SAP. The market and competition were not expecting us to do anything in this space. Most people at SAP didnt realize full potential of it and most customers didnt believe it could actually help them. I dont blame them. HANA was such a radically foreign concept that it created a feeling of skepticism and enthusiasm at the same time. I took on many different roles and worked extensively with various parts of organization and SAPs customers to explore, identify, and realize breakthrough scenarios that exploited the unique and differentiating aspects of HANA.

HANAs value was perceived to help customers to do things better, cheaper, and faster. But, I was on an orthogonal, and rather difficult, mission to help our customers do things they could not have done before or could not even have imagined they could do.

I was fortunate enough to significantly contribute to early adoption of HANAzero to billion dollars in revenue in three yearswhich also went on to become the fastest growing product in SAPs history. I got a chance to work closely with Vishal Sikka, the CTO of SAP and informally known as the father of HANA, on this endeavor and on many other things. It was also a pleasure to work with some of the most prominent global SAP customers who are industry leaders. They taught me a lot about their business.

Incubate a completely new class of data-first cloud solutions

As HANA started to become a foundation and platform for everything we built at SAP my team took on a customer-driven part-accelerator and a part-incubator role to further leverage the most differentiating aspects of the platform and combine it with machine learning and AI to help build new greenfield data-first cloud solutions that reimagined enterprise scenarios. These solutions created potential for more sustaining revenue in days to come.

Practice the General Manager model with a start-up mindset

A true General Manager model is rare or non-existent at SAP (and at many other ISVs), but we implemented that model in my team where I was empowered to run all the functionsengineering, design, product management, product marketing, and business developmentand assumed the overall P&L responsibility of the team. The buck stopped with me and as a team we could make swift business decisions. The team members also felt a strong purpose in how their work helped SAP. Often times, people would come up to me and say, so your team is like a start-up. I would politely tell them claiming my team as a start-up will be a great disservice to all the real start-ups out there. However, I tried very hard for us to embrace the start-up culturesmall tight teams, experimentation, rewarding efforts and not just the outcome, mission and purpose driven to a fault, break things to make them work, insanely short project timelines, and mid to long term vision with focused short-term extreme agile executionand we leveraged the biggest asset SAP has, its customers.

Be part of a transformative journey

I was fortunate to witness SAPs successful transformation to a cloud company without compromising on margins or revenue and HANA-led in-memory revolution that not only paved the path for a completely new category of software but also became the fastest growing product in SAPs history. These kind of things simply dont happen to all people and I was fortunate to be part of this journey. I have tremendous respect for SAP as a company and the leaders, especially the CEO Bill McDermott, in what the company has achieved. Im thankful to all the people who helped and mentored me, and more importantly believed in me.

Looking forward to not doing anything, at least for a short period of time

At times, such a long and fast-paced journey somewhat desensitizes you from the real world. I want to slow down, take a step back, and rethink how the current technology storm in the Silicon Valley will disrupt the world again as it has always and how I can be part of that journey, again. There are also personal projects I have been putting off for a while that I want to tend to. Im hoping a short break will help me reenergize and see the world differently. When I broke this news to my mom she didnt freak out. I must have made the right decision!

I want to disconnect to reconnect.

I am looking forward to do away with my commute for a while, on 101, during rush hours, to smell the proverbial roses. I wont miss 6 AM conference calls, but I will certainly miss those cute self-driving Google cars on streets of Palo Alto. They always remind me of why the valley is such a great place. For a product person, a technology enthusiast, and a generalist like me who has experienced and practiced all the three sidesfeasibility, viability, and desirabilityof building software the valley is full of promises and immense excitement. In coming days I am hoping to learn from my friends and thought leaders that would eventually lead me to my next tour of duty.

About the picture: I was on a hiking trip to four national parks a few years ago where I took this picture standing on the middle of a road inside Death Valley National Park. The C curve on a rather straight road is the only place on that long stretch where you could get cell phone reception. Even short hiking trips have helped me gain a new perspective on work and life.

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cloud computing

Cloud Computing – gartner.com

Turn your vision into action at Gartner Symposium/ITxpo, where the worlds top CIOs gain a strategic view of the emerging trends shaping IT and business. An unparalleled gathering of Gartner analysts, industry experts, peers and solution providers lets you explore new ways to approach critical challenges, make decisions with confidence and achieve greater impact as a leader.

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Cloud Computing – gartner.com

Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

In computer science, cloud computing describes a type of outsourcing of computer services, similar to the way in which electricity supply is outsourced. Users can simply use it. They do not need to worry where the electricity is from, how it is made, or transported. Every month, they pay for what they consumed.

The idea behind cloud computing is similar: The user can simply use storage, computing power, or specially crafted development environments, without having to worry how these work internally. Cloud computing is usually Internet-based computing. The cloud is a metaphor for the Internet based on how the internet is described in computer network diagrams; which means it is an abstraction hiding the complex infrastructure of the internet.[1] It is a type of computing in which IT-related capabilities are provided as a service,[2] allowing users to access technology-enabled services from the Internet (“in the cloud”)[3] without knowledge of, or control over the technologies behind these servers, which can lead to ethical and legal issues.[4]

According to a paper published by IEEE Internet Computing in 2008 “Cloud Computing is a paradigm in which information is permanently stored in servers on the Internet and cached temporarily on clients that include computers, laptops, handhelds, sensors, etc.”[5] This concept was first introduced by Cynthia Carter of DataNet, Inc. (https://www.slideshare.net/slideshow/embed_code/key/oQ67EY4it49b0s).

Cloud computing is a general concept that utilizes software as a service (SaaS), such as Web 2.0 and )other technology trends, all of which depend on the Internet for satisfying users’ needs. For example, Google Apps provides common business applications online that are accessed from a web browser, while the software and data are stored on the Internet servers.

Cloud computing is often confused with other ideas:

Cloud computing often uses grid computing, has autonomic characteristics and is billed like utilities, but cloud computing can be seen as a natural next step from the grid-utility model.[8] Some successful cloud architectures have little or no centralised infrastructure or billing systems including peer-to-peer networks like BitTorrent and Skype.[9]

The majority of cloud computing infrastructure currently consists of reliable services delivered through data centers that are built on computer and storage virtualization technologies. The services are accessible anywhere in the world, with The Cloud appearing as a single point of access for all the computing needs of consumers. Commercial offerings need to meet the quality of service requirements of customers and typically offer service level agreements.[10] Open standards and open source software are also critical to the growth of cloud computing.[11]

As customers generally do not own the infrastructure or know all details about it, mainly they are accessing or renting, so they can consume resources as a service, and may be paying for what they do not need, instead of what they actually do need to use. Many cloud computing providers use the utility computing model which is analogous to how traditional public utilities like electricity are consumed, while others are billed on a subscription basis. By sharing consumable and “intangible” computing power between multiple “tenants”, utilization rates can be improved (as servers are not left idle) which can reduce costs significantly while increasing the speed of application development.

A side effect of this approach is that “computer capacity rises dramatically” as customers do not have to engineer for peak loads.[12] Adoption has been enabled by “increased high-speed bandwidth” which makes it possible to receive the same response times from centralized infrastructure at other sites.

Cloud computing is being driven by providers including Google, Amazon.com, and Yahoo! as well as traditional vendors including IBM, Intel,[13] Microsoft[14] and SAP.[15] It can adopted by all kinds of users, be they individuals or large enterprises. Most internet users are currently using cloud services, even if they do not realize it. Webmail for example is a cloud service, as are Facebook and Wikipedia and contact list synchronization and online data backups.

The Cloud[16] is a metaphor for the Internet,[17] or more generally components and services which are managed by others.[1]

The underlying concept dates back to 1960 when John McCarthy expressed his opinion that “computation may someday be organized as a public utility” and the term Cloud was already in commercial use in the early 1990s to refer to large ATM networks.[18] By the turn of the 21st century, cloud computing solutions had started to appear on the market,[19] though most of the focus at this time was on Software as a service.

Amazon.com played a key role in the development of cloud computing when upgrading their data centers after the dot-com bubble and providing access to their systems by way of Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis. They found the new cloud architecture resulted in significant internal efficiency improvements.[20]

2007 observed increased activity, including Google, IBM and a number of universities starting large scale cloud computing research project,[21] around the time the term started gaining popularity in the mainstream press. It was a hot topic by mid-2008 and numerous cloud computing events had been scheduled.[22]

In August 2008 Gartner observed that “organizations are switching from company-owned hardware and software assets to per-use service-based models” and that the “projected shift to cloud computing will result in dramatic growth in IT products in some areas and in significant reductions in other areas”.[23]

Clouds cross many country borders and “may be the ultimate form of globalisation”.[24] As such it is the subject of complex geopolitical issues, whereby providers must satisfy many legal restrictions in order to deliver service to a global market. This dates back to the early days of the Internet, where libertarian thinkers felt that “cyberspace was a distinct place calling for laws and legal institutions of its own”; author Neal Stephenson envisaged this as a tiny island data haven in his science-fiction classic novel Cryptonomicon.[24]

Although there have been efforts to match the legal environment (such as US-EU Safe Harbor), providers like Amazon Web Services usually deal with international markets (typically the United States and European Union) by deploying local infrastructure and allowing customers to select their countries.[25] However, there are still concerns about security and privacy for individual through various governmental levels, (for example the USA PATRIOT Act and use of national security letters and title II of the Electronic Communications Privacy Act, the Stored Communications Act).

In March 2007, Dell applied to trademark the term ‘”cloud computing” in the United States. It received a “Notice of Allowance” in July 2008 which was subsequently canceled on August 6, resulting in a formal rejection of the trademark application in less than a week later.

In November 2007, the Free Software Foundation released the Affero General Public License (abbreviated as Affero GPL and AGPL), a version of GPLv3 designed to close a perceived legal loophole associated with Free software designed to be run over a network, particularly software as a service. According to the AGPL license application service providers are required to release any changes they make to an AGPL open source code.

Cloud architecture[26] is the systems architecture of the software systems involved in the delivery of cloud computing (e.g. hardware, software) as designed by a cloud architect who typically works for a cloud integrator. It typically involves multiple cloud components communicating with each other over application programming interfaces (usually web services).[27]

This is very similar to the Unix philosophy of having multiple programs doing one thing well and working together over universal interfaces. Complexity is controlled and the resulting systems are more manageable than their monolithic counterparts.

Cloud architecture extends to the client where web browsers and/or software applications are used to access cloud applications.

Cloud storage architecture is loosely coupled where metadata operations are centralized enabling the data nodes to scale into the hundreds, each independently delivering data to applications or users.

A cloud application influences The Cloud model of software architecture, often eliminating the need to install and run the application on the customer’s own computer, thus reducing software maintenance, ongoing operations, and support. For example:

A cloud client is computer hardware and/or computer software which relies on The Cloud for application delivery, or which is specifically designed for delivery of cloud services, and which is in either case essentially useless without a Cloud.[33] For example:

Cloud infrastructure (e.g. Infrastructure as a service) is the delivery of computer infrastructure (typically a platform virtualization environment) as a service.[41] For example:

A cloud platform (e.g. Platform as a service) (the delivery of a computing platform and/or solution stack as a service) [42] facilitates deployment of applications without the cost and complexity of buying and managing the underlying hardware and software layers.[43] For example:

A cloud service (e.g. Web Service) is “software system[s] designed to support interoperable machine-to-machine interaction over a network”[44] which may be accessed by other cloud computing components, software (e.g. Software plus services) or end users directly.[45] For example:

Cloud storage is the delivery of data storage as a service (including database-like services), often billed on a utility computing basis (e.g. per gigabyte per month).[46] For example:

Traditional storage vendors have recently begun to offer their own flavor of cloud storage, sometimes in conjunction with their existing software products (e.g. Symantec’s Online Storage for Backup Exec). Others focus on providing a new kind of back-end storage optimally designed for delivering cloud storage (EMC’s Atmos), categorically known as Cloud Optimized Storage.

A cloud computing provider or cloud computing service provider owns and operates cloud computing systems serve someone else. Usually this needs building and managing new data centers. Some organisations get some of the benefits of cloud computing by becoming “internal” cloud providers and servicing themselves, though they do not benefit from the same economies of scale and still have to engineer for peak loads. The barrier to entry is also significantly higher with capital expenditure required and billing and management creates some overhead. However, significant operational efficiency and quickness advantages can be achieved even by small organizations, and server consolidation and virtualization rollouts are already in progress.[47] Amazon.com was the first such provider, modernising its data centers which, like most computer networks were using as little as 10% of its capacity at any one time just to leave room for occasional spikes. This allowed small, fast-moving groups to add new features faster and easier, and they went on to open it up to outsiders as Amazon Web Services in 2002 on a utility computing basis.[20]

The companies listed in the Components section are providers.

A user is a consumer of cloud computing.[33] The privacy of users in cloud computing has become of increasing concern.[48][49] The rights of users is also an issue, which is being addressed via a community effort to create a bill of rights (currently in draft).[50][51]

A vendor sells products and services that facilitate the delivery, adoption and use of cloud computing.[52] For example:

A cloud standard is one of a number of existing (typically lightweight) open standards that have facilitated the growth of cloud computing, including:[57]

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Cloud computing – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Rackspace: Managed Dedicated & Cloud Computing Services

Your IT should be customized to your business and delivered the way you need it. Our experts get to know what you do, and how you do it, before bringing you a highly opinionated, custom solution. We assess the worlds leading technologies and bring two decades of experience helping companies in 150 countries solve their biggest technology challenges.

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