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Psoriasis – NHS

Psoriasis is a skin condition that causes red, flaky, crusty patches of skin covered with silvery scales.

These patches normally appear on your elbows, knees, scalp and lower back, but can appear anywhere on your body.

Most people are only affected with small patches. In some cases, the patches can be itchy or sore.

Psoriasis affects around 2% of people in the UK. It can start at any age, but most often develops in adults under 35 years old, and affects men and women equally.

The severity of psoriasis varies greatly from person to person. For some it's just a minor irritation, but for others it can majorly affect their quality of life.

Psoriasis is a long-lasting (chronic) disease that usually involves periods when you have no symptoms ormild symptoms, followed by periods when symptoms are more severe.

People with psoriasis have anincreased production of skin cells.

Skin cells are normallymade and replaced every 3 to 4 weeks, but in psoriasis this process only takes about 3 to 7 days.

The resulting build-up of skin cells is what creates the patches associated with psoriasis.

Although the process is not fully understood, it's thoughtto be related to a problem with the immune system.

The immune systemis your body's defence against disease and infection, but it attacks healthy skin cells by mistake in people with psoriasis.

Psoriasis can run in families,although the exact role genetics plays in causing psoriasis is unclear.

Many people's psoriasis symptoms start or become worse because of a certain event, known as a trigger.

Possible triggers of psoriasis includean injury to your skin, throat infections and using certain medicines.

The condition is not contagious, so it cannot be spread from person to person.

Find out more about the causes of psoriasis

A GP canoften diagnose psoriasis based on the appearance of your skin.

In rare cases, a small sample of skin called a biopsy will be sent to the laboratory for examination under a microscope.

This determines the exact type of psoriasis and rules out other skin disorders, such as seborrhoeic dermatitis, lichen planus, lichen simplex and pityriasis rosea.

You may be referred to a specialist in diagnosing and treating skin conditions (dermatologist) if your doctor is uncertain about your diagnosis, or if your condition is severe.

If your doctor suspects you have psoriatic arthritis, which is sometimes a complication of psoriasis, you may be referred to a doctor who specialises in arthritis (rheumatologist).

You may have blood tests to rule out other conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis, and X-rays of the affected joints may be taken.

There's no cure for psoriasis, but a range of treatments can improve symptoms and the appearance of skin patches.

In most cases, the first treatment used will be a topical treatment, such as vitamin D analogues or topical corticosteroids. Topical treatments are creams and ointments applied to the skin.

If these are not effective, or your condition is more severe, a treatment called phototherapy may be used. Phototherapy involves exposing your skin to certain types of ultraviolet light.

In severe cases, where the above treatments are ineffective, systemic treatments may be used. These are oral or injected medicines that work throughout the whole body.

Although psoriasis is just a minor irritation for some people, it can have a significant impact on quality of life for those more severely affected.

For example,some people with psoriasis have low self-esteem because of the effect the condition has on their appearance.

It's also quitecommonto developtenderness, pain and swelling in the joints and connective tissue. This is known as psoriatic arthritis.

Speak to a GP or your healthcare team if you have psoriasis and youhave any concerns about your physical and mental wellbeing. Theycan offer advice and further treatment if necessary.

There are also support groups for people with psoriasis, such as The Psoriasis Association, where you can speak to other people with the condition.

Find out more about living with psoriasis

Media last reviewed: 5 November 2018Media review due: 5 November 2021

Page last reviewed: 9 May 2018Next review due: 9 May 2021

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Psoriasis - NHS

Psoriasis – Symptoms and causes – Mayo Clinic

Overview

Psoriasis is a common skin condition that speeds up the life cycle of skin cells. It causes cells to build up rapidly on the surface of the skin. The extra skin cells form scales and red patches that are itchy and sometimes painful.

Psoriasis is a chronic disease that often comes and goes. The main goal of treatment is to stop the skin cells from growing so quickly.

There is no cure for psoriasis, but you can manage symptoms. Lifestyle measures, such as moisturizing, quitting smoking and managing stress, may help.

Psoriasis care at Mayo Clinic

Psoriasis signs and symptoms are different for everyone. Common signs and symptoms include:

Psoriasis patches can range from a few spots of dandruff-like scaling to major eruptions that cover large areas.

Most types of psoriasis go through cycles, flaring for a few weeks or months, then subsiding for a time or even going into complete remission.

There are several types of psoriasis. These include:

Guttate psoriasis. This type primarily affects young adults and children. It's usually triggered by a bacterial infection such as strep throat. It's marked by small, water-drop-shaped, scaling lesions on your trunk, arms, legs and scalp.

The lesions are covered by a fine scale and aren't as thick as typical plaques are. You may have a single outbreak that goes away on its own, or you may have repeated episodes.

Pustular psoriasis. This uncommon form of psoriasis can occur in widespread patches (generalized pustular psoriasis) or in smaller areas on your hands, feet or fingertips.

It generally develops quickly, with pus-filled blisters appearing just hours after your skin becomes red and tender. The blisters may come and go frequently. Generalized pustular psoriasis can also cause fever, chills, severe itching and diarrhea.

If you suspect that you may have psoriasis, see your doctor for an examination. Also, talk to your doctor if your psoriasis:

Seek medical advice if your signs and symptoms worsen or don't improve with treatment. You may need a different medication or a combination of treatments to manage the psoriasis.

Viven Williams: Your fingernails are clues to your overall health. Many people develop lines or ridges from the cuticle to the tip.

Rachel Miest, M.D.: Those are actually completely fine and just a part of normal aging.

Viven Williams: But Dr. Rachel Miest says there are other nail changes you should not ignore that may indicate

Rachel Miest, M.D.: liver problems, kidney problems, nutritional deficiencies ...

Viven Williams: and other issues. Here are six examples: No. 1 is pitting. This could be a sign of psoriasis. Two is clubbing. Clubbing happens when your oxygen is low and could be a sign of lung issues. Three is spooning. It can happen if you have iron-deficient anemia or liver disease. Four is called "a Beau's line." It's a horizontal line that indicates a previous injury or infection. Five is nail separation. This may happen as a result of injury, infection or a medication. And six is yellowing of the nails, which may be the result of chronic bronchitis.

For the Mayo Clinic News Network, I'm Vivien Williams.

The cause of psoriasis isn't fully understood, but it's thought to be related to an immune system problem with T cells and other white blood cells, called neutrophils, in your body.

T cells normally travel through the body to defend against foreign substances, such as viruses or bacteria.

But if you have psoriasis, the T cells attack healthy skin cells by mistake, as if to heal a wound or to fight an infection.

Overactive T cells also trigger increased production of healthy skin cells, more T cells and other white blood cells, especially neutrophils. These travel into the skin causing redness and sometimes pus in pustular lesions. Dilated blood vessels in psoriasis-affected areas create warmth and redness in the skin lesions.

The process becomes an ongoing cycle in which new skin cells move to the outermost layer of skin too quickly in days rather than weeks. Skin cells build up in thick, scaly patches on the skin's surface, continuing until treatment stops the cycle.

Just what causes T cells to malfunction in people with psoriasis isn't entirely clear. Researchers believe both genetics and environmental factors play a role.

Psoriasis typically starts or worsens because of a trigger that you may be able to identify and avoid. Factors that may trigger psoriasis include:

Anyone can develop psoriasis, but these factors can increase your risk of developing the disease:

If you have psoriasis, you're at greater risk of developing certain diseases. These include:

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Psoriasis - Symptoms and causes - Mayo Clinic

Psoriasis Guide: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment Options

Medically reviewed by Drugs.com. Last updated on May 13, 2019.

Psoriasis is a chronic skin disorder that causes scaling and inflammation.

Psoriasis may develop as a result of an abnormality in the body's immune system. The immune system normally fights infection and allergic reactions.

Psoriasis probably has a genetic component. Nearly half of patients have family members with psoriasis.

Certain medications may trigger psoriasis. Other medications seem to make psoriasis worse in people who have the disease.

Psoriasis causes skin scaling and inflammation. It may or may not cause itching. There are several types of psoriasis:

Plaque psoriasis. In plaque psoriasis, there are rounded or oval patches (plaques) of affected skin. These are usually red and covered with a thick silvery scale. The plaques often occur on the elbows, knees, scalp or near the buttocks. They may also appear on the trunk, arms and legs.

Inverse psoriasis. Inverse psoriasis is a plaque type of psoriasis that tends to affect skin creases. Creases in the underarm, groin, buttocks, genital areas or under the breast are particularly affected. The red patches may be moist rather than scaling.

Pustular psoriasis. The skin patches are studded with pimples or pustules.

Guttate psoriasis. In guttate psoriasis, many small, red, scaly patches develop suddenly and simultaneously. Guttate psoriasis often occurs in a young person who has recently had strep throat or a viral upper respiratory infection.

About half of people with skin symptoms of psoriasis also have abnormal fingernails. Their nails are often thick and have small indentations, called pitting.

A type of arthritis called psoriatic arthritis affects some people with psoriasis. Psoriatic arthritis may occur before skin changes appear.

Your doctor will look for the typical skin and nail changes of this disorder. He or she can frequently diagnose psoriasis based on your physical examination.

When skin symptoms are not typical of the disorder, your doctor may recommend a skin biopsy. In a biopsy, a small sample of skin is removed and examined in a laboratory. The biopsy can confirm the diagnosis and rule out other possible skin disorders.

Psoriasis is a long-term disorder. However, symptoms may come and go.

There is no way to prevent psoriasis.

Treatment for psoriasis varies depending on the:

Treatments for psoriasis include:

Topical treatments. These are treatments applied directly to the skin.

Daily skin care with emollients for lubrication. These include petroleum jelly or unscented moisturizers.

Corticosteroid creams, lotions and ointments. These may be prescribed in medium and high-strength forms for stubborn plaques on the hands, feet, arms, legs and trunk. They may be prescribed in low-strength forms for areas of delicate skin such as the face.

Calcipotriol (Dovonex) slows production of skin scales.

Tazarotene (Tazorac) is a synthetic vitamin A derivative.

Coal tar

Salicylic acid to remove scales

Phototherapy. Extensive or widespread psoriasis may be treated with light. Phototherapy uses ultraviolet B or ultraviolet A, alone or in combination with coal tar.

A treatment called PUVA combines ultraviolet A light treatment with an oral medication that improves the effectiveness of the light treatment.

Laser treatment also can be used. It allows treatment to be more focused so that higher amounts of UV light can be used.

Vitamin A derivatives. These are used to treat moderate to severe psoriasis involving large areas of the body. These treatments are very powerful. Some have the potential to cause severe side effects. It's essential to understand the risks and be monitored closely.

Immunosuppressants. These drugs work by suppressing the immune system. They are used to treat moderate to severe psoriasis involving large areas of the body.

Antineoplastic agents. More rarely, these drugs (which are most often used to treat cancer cells) may be prescribed for severe psoriasis.

Biologic therapies. Biologics are newer agents used for psoriasis that has not responded to other treatments. Psoriasis is caused, in part, by substances made by the immune system that cause inflammation. Biologics act against these substances. Biologic treatments tend to be quite expensive.

If you are unsure whether you have psoriasis, contact your doctor. Also contact your doctor if you have psoriasis and are not doing well with over-the-counter treatment.

For most patients, psoriasis is a long-term condition.

There is no cure. But there are many effective treatments.

In some patients, doctors may switch treatments every 12 to 24 months. This prevents the treatments from losing their effectiveness and decreases the risk of side effects.

National Psoriasis Foundation6600 SW 92nd Ave.Suite 300Portland, OR 97223-7195Phone: 503-244-7404Toll-Free: 1-800-723-9166Fax: 503-245-0626http://www.psoriasis.org/

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Psoriasis Guide: Causes, Symptoms and Treatment Options

What Is Plaque Psoriasis? Get the Facts – Otezla

*Certain restrictions apply. *Certain restrictions apply; eligibility not based on income.

Otezla (apremilast) is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis for whom phototherapy or systemic therapy is appropriate.

Otezla is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of adult patients with active psoriatic arthritis.

Otezla is a prescription medicine approved for the treatment of adult patients with oral ulcers associated with Behets Disease.

You must not take Otezla if you are allergic to apremilast or to any of the ingredients in Otezla.

Otezla can cause severe diarrhea, nausea, and vomiting, especially within the first few weeks of treatment. Use in elderly patients and the use of certain medications with Otezla appears to increase the risk of having diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting. Tell your doctor if any of these conditions occur.

Otezla is associated with an increase in depression. In clinical studies, some patients reported depression, or suicidal behavior while taking Otezla. Some patients stopped taking Otezla due to depression. Before starting Otezla, tell your doctor if you have had feelings of depression, or suicidal thoughts or behavior. Be sure to tell your doctor if any of these symptoms or other mood changes develop or worsen during treatment with Otezla.

Some patients taking Otezla lost body weight. Your doctor should monitor your weight regularly. If unexplained or significant weight loss occurs, your doctor will decide if you should continue taking Otezla.

Some medicines may make Otezla less effective, and should not be taken with Otezla. Tell your doctor about all the medicines you take, including prescription and nonprescription medicines.

Side effects of Otezla include diarrhea, nausea, vomiting, upper respiratory tract infection, runny nose, sneezing, or congestion, abdominal pain, tension headache, and headache. These are not all the possible side effects with Otezla. Ask your doctor about other potential side effects. Tell your doctor about any side effect that bothers you or does not go away.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant or planning to breastfeed. Otezla has not been studied in pregnant women or in women who are breastfeeding.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit http://www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-332-1088.

Please click here for Full Prescribing Information.

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What Is Plaque Psoriasis? Get the Facts - Otezla

Psoriasis | DermNet NZ

Author: Hon A/Prof Amanda Oakley, Dermatologist, Hamilton, New Zealand, 1997. Revised and updated, August 2014.

Psoriasis is a chronic inflammatory skin condition characterised by clearly defined, red and scaly plaques (thickened skin). It is classified into several subtypes.

Psoriasis affects 24% of males and females. It can start at any age including childhood, with peaks of onset at 1525 years and 5060 years. It tends to persist lifelong, fluctuating in extent and severity. It is particularly common in Caucasians but may affect people of any race. About one-third of patients with psoriasis have family members with psoriasis.

Psoriasis is multifactorial. It is classified as an immune-mediated inflammatory disease (IMID).

Genetic factors are important. An individual's genetic profile influences their type of psoriasis and its response to treatment.

Genome-wide association studies report that the histocompatibility complex HLA-C*06:02 (previously known as HLA-Cw6) is associated with early-onset psoriasis and guttate psoriasis. This major histocompatibility complex is not associated with arthritis, nail dystrophy or late-onset psoriasis.

Theories about the causes of psoriasis need to explain why the skin is red, inflamed and thickened. It is clear that immune factors and inflammatory cytokines (messenger proteins) such as IL1 and TNF are responsible for the clinical features of psoriasis. Current theories are exploring the TH17 pathway and release of the cytokine IL17A.

Psoriasis usually presents with symmetrically distributed, red, scaly plaques with well-defined edges. The scale is typically silvery white, except in skin folds where the plaques often appear shiny and they may have a moist peeling surface. The most common sites are scalp, elbows and knees, but any part of the skin can be involved. The plaques are usually very persistent without treatment.

Itch is mostly mild but may be severe in some patients, leading to scratching and lichenification (thickened leathery skin with increased skin markings). Painful skin cracks or fissures may occur.

When psoriatic plaques clear up, they may leave brown or pale marks that can be expected to fade over several months.

Certain features of psoriasis can be categorised to help determine appropriate investigations and treatment pathways. Overlap may occur.

Typical patterns of psoriasis.

Post-streptococcal acute guttate psoriasis

Small plaque psoriasis

Chronic plaque psoriasis

Unstable plaque psoriasis

Flexural psoriasis

Scalp psoriasis

Sebopsoriasis

Palmoplantar psoriasis

Nail psoriasis

Erythrodermic psoriasis (rare)

Psoriasis

Generalised pustulosis and localised palmoplantar pustulosis are no longer classified within the psoriasis spectrum.

Patients with psoriasis are more likely than other people to have other health conditions listed here.

Psoriasis is diagnosed by its clinical features. If necessary, diagnosis is supported by typical skin biopsy findings.

Medical assessment entails a careful history, examination, questioning about the effect of psoriasis on daily life, and evaluation of comorbid factors.

Validated tools used to evaluate psoriasis include:

The severity of psoriasis is classified as mild in 60% of patients, moderate in 30% and severe in 10%.

Evaluation of comorbidities may include:

Patients with psoriasis should ensure they are well informed about their skin condition and its treatment. There are benefits from not smoking, avoiding excessive alcohol and maintaining optimal weight.

Mild psoriasis is generally treated with topical agents alone. Which treatment is selected may depend on body site, extent and severity of psoriasis.

Most psoriasis centres offer phototherapy with ultraviolet (UV) radiation, often in combination with topical or systemic agents. Types of phototherapy include

Moderate to severe psoriasis warrants treatment with a systemic agent and/or phototherapy. The most common treatments are:

Other medicines occasionally used for psoriasis include:

Systemic corticosteroids are best avoided due to a risk of severe withdrawal flare of psoriasis and adverse effects.

Biologics or targeted therapies are reserved for conventional treatment-resistant severe psoriasis, mainly because of expense, as side effects compare favourably with other systemic agents. These include:

Many other monoclonal antibodies are under investigation in the treatment of psoriasis.

Oral agents working through the protein kinase pathways are also under investigation. Several JAK (Janus kinase) inhibitors are under investigation for psoriasis, including tofacitinib and the TYK2 (tyrosine kinase 2) inhibitorBMS-986165; both are in Phase III trials for psoriasis.

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Psoriasis | DermNet NZ

Psoriasis Types, Images, Treatments

Plaque Psoriasis

Plaque psoriasis is the most common type of psoriasis and it gets its name from the plaques that build up on the skin. There tend to be well-defined patches of red raised skin that can appear on any area of the skin, but the knees, elbows, scalp, trunk, and nails are the most common locations. There is also a flaky, white build up on top of the plaques, called scales. Possible plaque psoriasis symptoms include skin pain, itching, and cracking.

There are plenty of over-the-counter products that are effective in the treatment of plaque psoriasis. 1% hydrocortisone cream is a topical steroid that can suppress mild disease and preparations containing tar are effective in treating plaque psoriasis.

Scalp psoriasis is a common skin disorder that makes raised, reddish, often scaly patches. Scalp psoriasis can affect your whole scalp, or just pop up as one patch. This type of psoriasis can even spread to the forehead, the back of the neck, or behind the ears. Scalp psoriasis symptoms may include only slight, fine scaling. Moderate to severe scalp psoriasis symptoms may include dandruff-like flaking, dry scalp, and hair loss. Scalp psoriasis does not directly cause hair loss, but stress and excess scratching or picking of the scalp may result in hair loss.

Scalp psoriasis can be treated with medicated shampoos, creams, gels, oils, ointments, and soaps. Salicylic acid and coal tar are two medications in over-the-counter products that help treat scalp psoriasis. Steroid injections and phototherapy may help treat mild scalp psoriasis. Biologics are the latest class of medications that can also help treat severe scalp psoriasis.

Guttate psoriasis looks like small, pink dots or drops on the skin. The word guttate is from the Latin word gutta, meaning drop. There tends to be fine scales with guttate psoriasis that is finer than the scales in plaque psoriasis. Guttate psoriasis is typically triggered by streptococcal (strep throat) and the outbreak will usually occur two to three weeks after having strep throat.

Guttate psoriasis tends to go away after a few weeks without treatment. Moisturizers can be used to soften the skin. If there is a history of psoriasis, a doctor may take a throat culture to determine if strep throat is present. If the throat culture shows that streptococcal is present, a doctor may prescribe antibiotics.

Many patients with psoriasis have abnormal nails. Psoriatic nails often have a horizontal white or yellow margin at the tip of the nail called distal onycholysis because the nail is lifted away from the skin. There can often be small pits in the nail plate, and the nail is often yellow and crumbly.

The same treatment for skin psoriasis is beneficial for nail psoriasis. However, since nails grow slow, it may take a while for improvements to be evident. Nail psoriasis can be treated with phototherapy, systemic therapy (medications that spread throughout the body), and steroids (cream or injection). If medications do not improve the condition of nail psoriasis, a doctor may surgically remove the nail.

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Psoriasis Types, Images, Treatments

Psoriasis – Harvard Health

Published: January, 2015

Psoriasis begins when certain areas of skin produce new skin cells much more rapidly than normal, causing a thickening and scaling of the skin.

The scaly, red patches of skin caused by psoriasis affect men and women of all ages. They can erupt anywhere on the body, clear up for months at a time, and then reappear.

Although the exact causes of psoriasis are not known, the immune system is involved and heredity may play a role; at least 1 of 3 people with psoriasis has an immediate relative with the disease.

Psoriasis can be triggered by a strep throat infection, heavy alcohol consumption, stress, some medicines (such as beta blockers and lithium), injury to the skin, and infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

Psoriasis appears as reddish patches of skin covered with silvery scales; they may or may not cause discomfort.

There are several types of psoriasis:

Among people with psoriasis, 1 in 7 develop psoriatic arthritis, an autoimmune disease that causes inflammation of the joints.

The typical skin and nail changes of this disorder are often all that are needed to make a diagnosis. When skin symptoms aren't typical, your doctor may recommend that you have a skin biopsy, in which a small sample of skin is removed and examined in a laboratory. The biopsy can confirm the diagnosis and rule out other possible skin disorders.

Psoriasis is a chronic condition for which there is no cure. However, there are many treatments available to help keep it from getting worse, or flaring up. Treatment depends on the type, its location, and how widespread it is.

These are treatments applied directly to the skin. They include:

Extensive or widespread psoriasis may be treated with light (phototherapy). A treatment called PUVA combines ultraviolet A light treatment with an oral medication that improves the effectiveness of the light treatment.

Laser treatment also can be used. It allows treatment to be more focused so higher amounts of UV light can be used.

These are used to treat moderate to severe psoriasis involving large areas of the body. These treatments are very powerful. Some have the potential to cause severe side effects, so it is essential to understand the risks and be monitored closely.

These drugs work by suppressing the immune system. They are used to treat moderate to severe psoriasis involving large areas of the body.

Anticancer drugs like methotrexate are sometimes used to treat severe psoriasis.

Biologic drugs, or biologics, target specific parts of the immune system. They block the action of a specific type of immune cell called a T cell, or block proteins in the immune system, such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) or inflammatory proteins known as interleukin-12 and interleukin-23. These cells and proteins all play a major role in developing psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis.

Biologics are given by injection or intravenous infusion. They include

Disclaimer:As a service to our readers, Harvard Health Publishing provides access to our library of archived content. Please note the date of last review on all articles. No content on this site, regardless of date, should ever be used as a substitute for direct medical advice from your doctor or other qualified clinician.

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Psoriasis - Harvard Health

Novartis, Merck and Allergan Join Those Raising U.S. Drug Prices for 2020 – The New York Times

NEW YORK Novartis AG, Merck & Co Inc and Allergan Plc were among companies that raised U.S. prices on more than 100 prescription medicines on Friday, bringing the tally to 445 drugs that will cost more in 2020, according to data analyzed by healthcare research firm 3 Axis Advisors.

That is above the average of 404 drug price increases in the first three days of January over the past five years. Nearly all of the price increases are below 10%, with the median price increase around 5%, according to 3 Axis.

Swiss drugmaker Novartis raised prices on nearly 30 drugs including psoriasis treatment Cosentyx and multiple sclerosis medicine Gilenya, 3 Axis said. Most of those increases were in the range of 5.5% to 7%.

Novartis said that while it is raising the list prices of about 7 percent of its U.S. medicines, after discounts and rebates to commercial and government payers it expects a net price decrease of 2.5% in 2020.

U.S. drugmaker Merck raised prices on about 15 drugs, including diabetes medicines Januvia and Janumet, mostly around 5%, 3 Axis said.

The list price of its top-selling cancer immunotherapy Keytruda, expected to tally more than $13 billion in 2019 sales, was pushed up 1.5%.

Merck in a statement said the increases are consistent with its commitment to not raise U.S. net prices by more than inflation annually.

Ireland-based Allergan, which is being acquired by rival AbbVie Inc for more than $60 billion, said it was raising prices on 25 drugs by 5% and on two more medicines by 2-3%. But with higher rebates and discounts, it said, net pricing would be flat to lower in 2020.

Reuters previously reported that Pfizer Inc, Bristol-Myers Squibb Co and AbbVie were among drugmakers that had raised prices on more than 330 drugs to start the year.

Soaring healthcare costs for U.S. consumers, and prescription drug prices in particular, are expected to again be a central issue in the 2020 presidential campaign for both parties. President Donald Trump, a Republican who made bringing them down a core pledge of his 2016 campaign, is running for re-election in 2020.

Under pressure from politicians and patients, many makers of branded drugs have pledged to keep annual U.S. price increases below 10% a year.

Prescription drug prices are higher in the United States than most developed countries where governments directly or indirectly control the costs, making it the world's most lucrative market for manufacturers.

Drugmakers often negotiate rebates or discounts on their list prices in exchange for favorable treatment from insurers and other healthcare payers. As a result, insurers and covered patients rarely pay the full list price of a drug.

(Reporting by Michael Erman; Editing by Bill Berkrot)

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Novartis, Merck and Allergan Join Those Raising U.S. Drug Prices for 2020 - The New York Times

Psoriasis: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology

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Li WQ, Han JL, Manson JE, Rimm EB, Rexrode KM, Curhan GC, et al. Psoriasis and risk of nonfatal cardiovascular disease in U.S. women: a cohort study. Br J Dermatol. 2012 Apr. 166(4):811-8. [Medline].

Henderson D. Psoriasis severity linked to uncontrolled hypertension. Medscape Medical News. October 27, 2014. [Full Text].

Takeshita J, Wang S, Shin DB, Mehta NN, Kimmel SE, Margolis DJ, et al. Effect of Psoriasis Severity on Hypertension Control: A Population-Based Study in the United Kingdom. JAMA Dermatol. 2014 Oct 15. [Medline].

Wan J, Wang S, Haynes K, Denburg MR, Shin DB, Gelfand JM. Risk of moderate to advanced kidney disease in patients with psoriasis: population based cohort study. BMJ. 2013 Oct 15. 347:f5961. [Medline].

Laidman J. Moderate and Severe Psoriasis Linked to Higher Kidney Risks. Medscape [serial online]. Available at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/812730. Accessed: October 21, 2013.

Kurd SK, Troxel AB, Crits-Christoph P, Gelfand JM. The risk of depression, anxiety, and suicidality in patients with psoriasis: a population-based cohort study. Arch Dermatol. 2010 Aug. 146(8):891-5. [Medline]. [Full Text].

Oostveen AM, de Jager ME, van de Kerkhof PC, Donders AR, de Jong EM, Seyger MM. The influence of treatments in daily clinical practice on the Children's Dermatology Life Quality Index in juvenile psoriasis: a longitudinal study from the Child-CAPTURE patient registry. Br J Dermatol. 2012 May 23. [Medline].

Lucka TC, Pathirana D, Sammain A, Bachmann F, Rosumeck S, Erdmann R, et al. Efficacy of systemic therapies for moderate-to-severe psoriasis: a systematic review and meta-analysis of long-term treatment. J Eur Acad Dermatol Venereol. 2012 Mar 9. [Medline].

Pettey AA, Balkrishnan R, Rapp SR, Fleischer AB, Feldman SR. Patients with palmoplantar psoriasis have more physical disability and discomfort than patients with other forms of psoriasis: implications for clinical practice. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2003 Aug. 49(2):271-5. [Medline].

Sampogna F, Tabolli S, Soderfeldt B, Axtelius B, Aparo U, Abeni D. Measuring quality of life of patients with different clinical types of psoriasis using the SF-36. Br J Dermatol. 2006 May. 154(5):844-9. [Medline].

Langenbruch A, Radtke MA, Krensel M, Jacobi A, Reich K, Augustin M. Nail involvement as a predictor of concomitant psoriatic arthritis in patients with psoriasis. Br J Dermatol. 2014 Nov. 171(5):1123-8. [Medline].

Moadel K, Perry HD, Donnenfeld ED, Zagelbaum B, Ingraham HJ. Psoriatic corneal abscess. Am J Ophthalmol. 1995 Jun. 119(6):800-1. [Medline].

Durrani K, Foster CS. Psoriatic uveitis: a distinct clinical entity?. Am J Ophthalmol. 2005 Jan. 139(1):106-11. [Medline].

Takahashi H, Sugita S, Shimizu N, Mochizuki M. A high viral load of Epstein-Barr virus DNA in ocular fluids in an HLA-B27-negative acute anterior uveitis patient with psoriasis. Jpn J Ophthalmol. 2008 Mar-Apr. 52(2):136-8. [Medline].

Lipper GM. Psoriasis and IBD: Is This Comorbidity for Real?. Medscape Dermatology. Available at https://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/907240. January 11, 2019; Accessed: January 15, 2019.

Fu Y, Lee CH, Chi CC. Association of Psoriasis With Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis. JAMA Dermatol. 2018 Dec 1. 154 (12):1417-1423. [Medline].

Tsai TF, Wang TS, Hung ST, Tsai PI, Schenkel B, Zhang M, et al. Epidemiology and comorbidities of psoriasis patients in a national database in Taiwan. J Dermatol Sci. 2011 Jul. 63 (1):40-6. [Medline].

Elston DM, Ferringer T, Ko C, Peckham S, High W, DiCaudo D. Dermatopathology. 2nd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier Saunders; 2013.

[Guideline] Menter A, Gottlieb A, Feldman SR, Van Voorhees AS, Leonardi CL, Gordon KB, et al. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Section 1. Overview of psoriasis and guidelines of care for the treatment of psoriasis with biologics. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2008 May. 58(5):826-50. [Medline].

[Guideline] Menter A, Korman NJ, Elmets CA, Feldman SR, Gelfand JM, Gordon KB, et al. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis. Section 3. Guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with topical therapies. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2009 Apr. 60(4):643-59. [Medline].

[Guideline] Menter A, Korman NJ, Elmets CA, Feldman SR, Gelfand JM, Gordon KB, et al. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Section 5. Guidelines of care for the treatment of psoriasis with phototherapy and photochemotherapy. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010 Jan. 62(1):114-35. [Medline].

[Guideline] Menter A, Korman NJ, Elmets CA, Feldman SR, Gelfand JM, Gordon KB, et al. Guidelines of care for the management of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis Section 6. Guidelines of care for the treatment of psoriasis and psoriatic arthritis: Case-based presentations and evidence-based conclusions. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2011 Feb 7. [Medline].

Mason AR, Mason J, Cork M, Dooley G, Edwards G. Topical treatments for chronic plaque psoriasis. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009 Apr 15. CD005028. [Medline].

Stern RS. The risk of squamous cell and basal cell cancer associated with psoralen and ultraviolet Atherapy: A30-year prospective study. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2012 Jan 18. [Medline].

Carrascosa JM, Plana A, Ferrandiz C. Effectiveness and Safety of Psoralen-UVA (PUVA) Topical Therapy in Palmoplantar Psoriasis: A Report on 48 Patients. Actas Dermosifiliogr. 2013 Mar 6. [Medline].

Mehta D, Lim HW. Ultraviolet B Phototherapy for Psoriasis: Review of Practical Guidelines. Am J Clin Dermatol. 2016 Feb 12. [Medline].

Stern DK, Creasey AA, Quijije J, Lebwohl MG. UV-A and UV-B Penetration of Normal Human Cadaveric Fingernail Plate. Arch Dermatol. 2011 Apr. 147(4):439-41. [Medline].

Brown T. Fingernail Psoriasis Data Added to Humira Prescribing Info. Medscape News & Perspective. Available at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/877985?src=soc_fb_170405_mscpedt_news_pharm_humira. March 30, 2017; Accessed: April 6, 2017.

Mantovani A, Gisondi P, Lonardo A, Targher G. Relationship between Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease and Psoriasis: A Novel Hepato-Dermal Axis?. Int J Mol Sci. 2016 Feb 5. 17 (2):[Medline].

Salvi M, Macaluso L, Luci C, Mattozzi C, Paolino G, Aprea Y, et al. Safety and efficacy of anti-tumor necrosis factors in patients with psoriasis and chronic hepatitis C. World J Clin Cases. 2016 Feb 16. 4 (2):49-55. [Medline].

Komrokji RS, Kulasekararaj A, Al Ali NH, Kordasti S, Bart-Smith E, Craig BM, et al. Autoimmune Diseases and Myelodysplastic Syndromes. Am J Hematol. 2016 Feb 13. [Medline].

Sorensen EP, Algzlan H, Au SC, Garber C, Fanucci K, Nguyen MB, et al. Lower Socioeconomic Status is Associated With Decreased Therapeutic Response to the Biologic Agents in Psoriasis Patients. J Drugs Dermatol. 2016 Feb 1. 15 (2):147-53. [Medline].

Castaldo G, Galdo G, Rotondi Aufiero F, Cereda E. Very low-calorie ketogenic diet may allow restoring response to systemic therapy in relapsing plaque psoriasis. Obes Res Clin Pract. 2015 Nov 8. [Medline].

Barrea L, Balato N, Di Somma C, Macchia PE, Napolitano M, Savanelli MC, et al. Nutrition and psoriasis: is there any association between the severity of the disease and adherence to the Mediterranean diet?. J Transl Med. 2015 Jan 27. 13:18. [Medline].

Millsop JW, Bhatia BK, Debbaneh M, Koo J, Liao W. Diet and psoriasis, part III: role of nutritional supplements. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2014 Sep. 71 (3):561-9. [Medline].

Finamor DC, Sinigaglia-Coimbra R, Neves LC, Gutierrez M, Silva JJ, Torres LD, et al. A pilot study assessing the effect of prolonged administration of high daily doses of vitamin D on the clinical course of vitiligo and psoriasis. Dermatoendocrinol. 2013 Jan 1. 5 (1):222-34. [Medline].

Hackethal V. Guidelines on Psoriasis Comorbidity Screening in Kids Issued. Medscape News & Perspective. Available at http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/880462?nlid=115307_1584&src=WNL_mdplsfeat_170530_mscpedit_derm&uac=106950CX&spon=33&impID=1357759&faf=1#vp_1. May 23, 2017; Accessed: May 31, 2017.

[Guideline] Smith CH, Jabbar-Lopez ZK, Yiu ZZ, Bale T, Burden AD, Coates LC, et al. British Association of Dermatologists guidelines for biologic therapy for psoriasis 2017. Br J Dermatol. 2017 Sep. 177 (3):628-636. [Medline].

[Guideline] Menter A, Strober BE, Kaplan DH, et al. Joint AAD-NPF guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with biologics. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Apr. 80 (4):1029-1072. [Medline].

[Guideline] Berth-Jones J, Exton LS, Ladoyanni E, Mohd Mustapa MF, Tebbs VM, Yesudian PD, et al. British Association of Dermatologists guidelines for the safe and effective prescribing of oral ciclosporin in dermatology 2018. Br J Dermatol. 2019 Jun. 180 (6):1312-1338. [Medline]. [Full Text].

[Guideline] Elmets CA, Lim HW, Stoff B, et al. Joint American Academy of Dermatology-National Psoriasis Foundation guidelines of care for the management and treatment of psoriasis with phototherapy. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2019 Sep. 81 (3):775-804. [Medline]. [Full Text].

Kui R, Gl B, Gal M, Kiss M, Kemny L, Gyulai R. Presence of antidrug antibodies correlates inversely with the plasma tumor necrosis factor (TNF)- level and the efficacy of TNF-inhibitor therapy in psoriasis. J Dermatol. 2016 Feb 19. [Medline].

Di Lernia V, Bardazzi F. Profile of tofacitinib citrate and its potential in the treatment of moderate-to-severe chronic plaque psoriasis. Drug Des Devel Ther. 2016. 10:533-9. [Medline].

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Psoriasis: Practice Essentials, Background, Pathophysiology

Plaque Psoriasis Treatment Market Expansion Projected to Gain an Uptick During 2017 2025 – Info Street Wire

The comprehensive report published by Persistence Market Research offers an in-depth intelligence related to the various factors that are likely to impact the demand, revenue generation, and sales of the Plaque Psoriasis Treatment Market. In addition, the report singles out the different parameters that are expected to influence the overall dynamics of the Plaque Psoriasis Treatment Market during the forecast period 2017 2025.

As per the findings of the presented study, the Plaque Psoriasis Treatment Market is poised to surpass the value of ~US$ XX by the end of 2029 growing at a CAGR of ~XX% over the assessment period. The report includes a thorough analysis of the upstream raw materials, supply-demand ratio of the Plaque Psoriasis Treatment in different regions, import-export trends and more to provide readers a fair understanding of the global market scenario.

ThisPress Release will help you to understand the Volume, growth with Impacting Trends. Click HERE To get SAMPLE PDF (Including Full TOC, Table & Figures) athttps://www.persistencemarketresearch.co/samples/16069

The report segregates the Plaque Psoriasis Treatment Market into different segments to provide a detailed understanding of the various aspects of the market. The competitive analysis of the Plaque Psoriasis Treatment Market includes valuable insights based on which, market players can formulate impactful growth strategies to enhance their presence in the Plaque Psoriasis Treatment Market.

Key findings of the report:

The report aims to eliminate the following doubts related to the Plaque Psoriasis Treatment Market:

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market players are also exploring the developing market. Novartis launched its Cosentyx in Japan for the treatment of psoriasis arthritis in adults who are not adequately responding to systemic therapy.

Plaque Psoriasis Treatment Market: Market Players

Company manufacturer is converting innovative research into a new therapy by constantly investing in research activities. The number of drugs approved for plaque psoriasis is constantly increasing the number of treatment options for the physician and patients. Eli Lillys interleukin inhibitor was approved by the FDA, second molecule to be approved after Novartis Cosentyx.

Some of the plaque psoriasis treatment market contributors are Allergan, Johnson and Johnson, Amgen, Abbvie, Eli Lilly, Dermira Inc., Novartis, Galectin Therapeutics, Cellceutix Corporation and Biogen Inc., Bayer.

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Plaque Psoriasis Treatment Market Expansion Projected to Gain an Uptick During 2017 2025 - Info Street Wire

Psoriasis: Types, Pictures, Causes, Symptoms, Treatments & Diet

Alwan, W., and F.O. Nestle. "Pathogenesis and Treatment of Psoriasis: Exploiting Pathophysiological Pathways for Precision Medicine." Clin Exp Rheumatol 33 (Suppl. 93): S2-S6.

Arndt, Kenneth A., eds., et al. "Topical Therapies for Psoriasis." Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery 35.2S Mar. 2016: S35-S46.

Benhadou, Fairda, Dillon Mintoff, and Vronique del Marmol. "Psoriasis: Keratinocytes or Immune Cells -- Which Is the Trigger?" Dermatology Dec. 19, 2018.

Conrad, Curdin, Michel Gilliet. "Psoriasis: From Pathogenesis to Targeted Therapies." Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology Jan. 18, 2015.

Dowlatshahi, E.A., E.A.M van der Voort, L.R. Arends, and T. Nijsten. "Markers of Systemic Inflammation in Psoriasis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis." British Journal of Dermatology 169.2 Aug. 2013: 266-282.

Georgescu, Simona-Roxana, et al. "Advances in Understanding the Immunological Pathways in Psoriasis." International Journal of Molecular Sciences 20.739 Feb. 10, 2019: 2-17.

Greb, Jacqueline E., et al. "Psoriasis." Nature Reviews Disease Primers 2 (2016): 1-17.

Kaushik, Shivani B., and Mark G. Lebwohl. "Review of Safety and Efficacy of Approved Systemic Psoriasis Therapies." International Journal of Dermatology 2018.

National Psoriasis Foundation. "Systemic Treatments: Biologics and Oral Treatments." 1-25.

Ogawa, Eisaku, Yuki Sato, Akane Minagawa, and Ryuhei Okuyama. "Pathogenesis of Psoriasis and Development of Treatment." The Journal of Dermatology 2017: 1-9.

Stiff, Katherine M., Katelyn R. Glines, Caroline L. Porter, Abigail Cline & StevenR. Feldman. "Current pharmacological treatment guidelines for psoriasis and psoriaticarthritis." Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology (2018).

Villaseor-Park, Jennifer, David Wheeler, and Lisa Grandinetti. "Psoriasis: Evolving Treatment for a Complex Disease." Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine 79.6 June 2012: 413-423.

Woo, Yu Ri, Dae Ho Cho, and Hyun Jeong Park. "Molecular Mechanisms and Management of a Cutaneous Inflammatory Disorder: Psoriasis." International Journal of Molecular Sciences 18 Dec. 11, 2017: 1-26.

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Psoriasis: Types, Pictures, Causes, Symptoms, Treatments & Diet

Think Twice When Choosing Skin Care Products as Gifts for Kids with JA – Juvenile Arthritis News

As I searched online for Christmas presents for my loved ones recently, I browsed selections of pre-made gift kits. Many of them were bath or skin care based. I saw adorable bubble bath sets for children, makeup and nail kits, and baskets of soaps and creams marketed to young men and women.

Skin care products can make lovely gifts. I bought a unicorn tumbler full of bath bombs for my young cousin. But as I shopped, I thought about how I wouldnt buy gifts like these for myself. As someone withjuvenile-onset psoriatic arthritis, I would worry that they might flare my skin. I realized many of these gifts wouldnt be suitable for kids or young adults with juvenile rheumatic conditions.

Additionally, conditions such as systemic arthritis, dermatomyositis, scleroderma, psoriatic arthritis, and lupus can cause rashes, lesions, and other skin issues, which can be further irritated by skin care products.

Those with skin conditions cant usually tolerate the ingredients used in pre-made bath sets and makeup kits. Items such as bath bombs are not recommended for those with particular skin conditions. Other products may be drying and irritating to those with sensitive or inflamed skin.

But that doesnt mean you have to avoid giving pampering gifts altogether. Many kids with juvenile arthritis benefit from the soothing effects of a warm bathand the confidence boost of wearing makeup. Instead, when choosing a gift, consider the products quality.

If youre thinking of giving soaps, makeup, and lotions as gifts dont be afraid to ask the childs parents which products they use. And stick to those brands. Dont be misled by product labels containing words like natural, healing, or even psoriasis-friendly. While the claims might be valid, its best to stick to products that the family already trusts the brands they use are likely either doctor recommended or theyve discovered them after much trial and error.

Quality is essential for those living with chronic skin conditions. Dont be surprised if the products and brands that the person uses are a little expensive. You dont need to break your budget, but remember that its better to choose quality over quantity. A trusted eye shadow palette with one or two colors is worth much more than another with multiple shades that may irritate the skin.

You might also consider gifting skin care accessories such as makeup brushes or sponges, or a cosmetic bag to keep products in.

You could put together a custom-made bath kit. For younger kids, a bath caddy filled with bath toys and crayons, a hooded towel, a brush and comb, and fun, colored puffs. Older kids and teens might prefer bathrobes, slippers, eye pillows, spa socks, and candles or essential oils. I like this idea because you can pick and choose each item and customize it to the recipient.

Ive received lots of bath and beauty products in the past. Many of them came from my parents, who knew how careful I needed to be with skin products. Im always extremely appreciative of the lotions, makeup, and perfumes they gift, particularly as they can be pricey.

Sometimes Ive received products that I didnt feel comfortable using. But I accepted them with a smile and a genuine thank you. Im grateful for the gift of someone thinking of me, taking the time to buy me a gift, and wrap it up.

***

Note: Juvenile Arthritis News is strictly a news and information website about the disease. It does not provide medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. This content is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this website. The opinions expressed in this column are not those of Juvenile Arthritis News, or its parent company, BioNews Services, and are intended to spark discussion about issues pertaining to juvenile arthritis.

Elizabeth Medeiros is a young adult who has dealt with juvenile arthritis since she was a small child. However, her pain hasnt stopped her from working on a product design degree in Boston. Her passion is to create products that make life easier for the chronically ill, such as shoes and walking canes. When shes not in class, Elizabeth enjoys writing about how shes coped with arthritis at such a young age. You can find more of her writings at ArthritisGirl.Blogspot.com and on Instagram @GirlWithArthritis.

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Think Twice When Choosing Skin Care Products as Gifts for Kids with JA - Juvenile Arthritis News

Mum’s clever hack for getting rid of psoriasis on your scalp – Nottinghamshire Live

While there's no cure for the annoying skin condition psoriasis it's easy to soothe with some cream on your arms and legs - but what about relieving your itchy scalp?

One woman took to the Facebook group Mas on a Mission to ask for help as she is being "driven demented" with the genetic condition, and other women were quick to share their home remedies.

Many of them recommended coconut oil, which has anti-inflammatory properties and can help easy psoriasis pain.

"Coconut oil with lemon juice is very good," one said, while another added: "Coconut oil works for me."

"I put coconut oil in once a week and leave overnight," said a third, reports RSVPLive.

Others swore by tea tree oil, which is said to have antibacterial,antiviral and antifungal properties.

"I found tea tree oil great, I put a few drops in the bath," one suggested.

"I get it when I'm stressed and the best thing for me is a few drops of tea tree oil in my shampoo bottle!" added another.

Another remedy was the anti-dandruff shampoo Nizoral.

One group member said: "I use Nizoral shampoo I get it on prescription from doctor and it's brill!"

Other options include getting prescription medication which contains such active ingredients as coal tar and salicylic acid.

Many psoriasis suffers also find sunlight can help, particularly if you have thin hair.

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Mum's clever hack for getting rid of psoriasis on your scalp - Nottinghamshire Live

Mum’s brilliant trick to get rid of psoriasis from your scalp – and people are swearing by it – Birmingham Live

A mum has shared a brilliant way to get rid of psoriasis from your scalp.

Psoriasis is a skin condition that causes red, flaky, crusty patches of skin covered with silvery scales.

These patches normally appear on your elbows, knees, scalp and lower back, but can appear anywhere on your body.

Most people are only affected with small patches. In some cases, the patches can be itchy or sore.

Psoriasis affects around 2% of people in the UK. It can start at any age, but most often develops in adults under 35 years old, and affects men and women equally.

One woman took to the Facebook group Mas on a Mission to ask for help as she is being "driven demented" with the condition, and other women were quick to share their home remedies.

Many of them recommended coconut oil, which has anti-inflammatory properties and can help easypsoriasispain, reports RSVPLive.

"Coconut oil with lemon juice is very good," one said, while another added: "Coconut oil works for me."

"I put coconut oil in once a week and leave overnight," said a third.

Others swore by tea tree oil, which is said to have antibacterial,antiviraland antifungal properties.

"I found tea tree oil great, I put a few drops in the bath," one suggested.

"I get it when I'm stressed and the best thing for me is a few drops of tea tree oil in my shampoo bottle!" added another.

Another remedy was the anti-dandruff shampoo Nizoral.

One group member said: "I use Nizoral shampoo I get it on prescription from doctor and it's brill!"

Read more here:

Mum's brilliant trick to get rid of psoriasis from your scalp - and people are swearing by it - Birmingham Live

MC2 Therapeutics Announces Positive Top-line Results from EU Phase 3 Head-to-Head Trial Comparing Wynzora Cream to Daivobet Gel in Patients with…

COPENHAGEN, Denmark, December 18, 2019 / B3C newswire / -- MC2 Therapeutics, an emerging pharmaceutical company focused on novel PAD Technology based topical therapies for chronic inflammatory conditions, today announced that its EU Phase 3 trial (n=490) on the companys investigational drug, Wynzora Cream, met its primary endpoint and that a Marketing Authorization Application (MAA) is now in preparation for H1 2020.

Wynzora Cream (calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate, 0.005%/0.064% w/w) was studied in adult patients with plaque psoriasis and compared to Daivobet Gel (marketed in the US as Taclonex Topical Suspension) and cream vehicle.

Top-line data demonstrate that:

Wynzora Cream has statistically significantly greater treatment efficacy compared to Daivobet Gel

Wynzora Cream has statistically significantly better patient reported outcomes compared to Daivobet Gel

Wynzora Cream demonstrates a favorable safety profile

We continue to be impressed by the performance of Wynzora Cream in clinical trials. With a PGA treatment success of 52% and 68% reduction in mPASI and a very favorable safety profile, Wynzora Cream is delivering on its promise to provide high comfort to physicians and patients in treating plaque psoriasis. stated Jesper J. Lange, CEO of MC2 Therapeutics and added: Wynzora Cream takes the treatment experience in daily routines to a new level. Our PAD Technology has enabled an aqueous cream formulation that is designed for high convenience in daily routines illustrated by the positive patient reported treatment convenience and quality of life outcomes in our Phase 3 trials. This is a key component of treatment in real life settings.

MC2 Therapeutics is seeking to upgrade the treatment experience for patients having chronic inflammatory diseases including plaque psoriasis. Enabled by PAD Technology, Wynzora Cream has been developed to provide physicians and patients high comfort on relief of psoriasis symptoms with favorable safety and convenience in daily routines. A once-daily, non-greasy product that quickly absorbs into the skin allowing patients to comfortably put on clothes, go to bed or engage in other physical and social activities within a few minutes after application.

The EU Phase 3 data is an important step in the global development of Wynzora Cream. MC2 Therapeutics recently announced FDAs acceptance of its New Drug Application on Wynzora Cream with July 20th, 2020 as the PDUFA action date.

About the Wynzora Cream Phase 3 TrialThis Phase 3, randomized, multicenter, investigator-blind, parallel-group trial evaluated the efficacy and safety of Wynzora Cream compared to Wynzora vehicle and the active comparator Daivobet Gel in patients with psoriasis vulgaris. The trial enrolled 490 patients at 32 clinical centers across Germany, Poland and Czech Republic. Patients applied trial medication topically once daily for eight weeks.

Data from the trial will be presented at upcoming clinical conferences. Global development of Wynzora Cream will continue and MC2 Therapeutics plans to submit a MAA in EU in the first half of 2020.

About Wynzora CreamWynzora Cream is the first cream-based fixed dose combination of calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate for topical treatment of plaque psoriasis. Wynzora Cream is based on PAD Technology, which uniquely enables stability of both calcipotriene and betamethasone dipropionate in a convenient aqueous formulation. In the Phase 3 trials conducted at multiple sites in the US and the EU, Wynzora Cream has demonstrated a statistically significantly greater efficacy compared to Taclonex Topical Suspension and Daivobet gel. The unique combination of significant clinical efficacy, a favorable safety profile and high convenience of Wynzora Cream holds promise to increase treatment adherence and overall patient satisfaction in topical treatment of plaque psoriasis in the real-world setting.

About MC2 Therapeutics A/SMC2 Therapeutics is a privately held pharmaceutical company focused on topical therapies for chronic inflammatory conditions. Using its proprietary PAD Technology MC2 Therapeutics is developing a pipeline of novel innovative topical therapies designed for unique patient experiences.

For additional information on MC2 Therapeutics Group, please visit http://www.mc2therapeutics.com

Next events

Jesper J. Lange, CEO will present at Dermatology Summit, San Francisco, January 12th, 2020JP Morgan Healthcare Conference, San Francisco, January 13th - 16th, 2020Winter Clinical, Hawaii, January 16th 19th, 2020AAD, Denver, March 20th 24th, 2020

Contact

MC2 Therapeutics A/SLonni Goltermann, EA to the CEO +45 2018 1111 This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Keywords: Humans; betamethasone dipropionate, calcipotriol; calcipotriene; Prostaglandins A; Patient Satisfaction; Drug Users; Betamethasone; Calcitriol; betamethasone-17,21-dipropionate; Xamiol gel; Taclonex; Daivobet; Psoriasis; Drug Combinations; Treatment Outcome; Marketing

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MC2 Therapeutics Announces Positive Top-line Results from EU Phase 3 Head-to-Head Trial Comparing Wynzora Cream to Daivobet Gel in Patients with...

Psoriasis Treatment Market 2019 Industry Size, Shares and Upcoming Trends 2025 – Info Street Wire

Los Angeles, United State, 24 December 2019 The report titled Global Psoriasis Treatment Market is one of the most comprehensive and important additions to QY Researchs archive of market research studies. It offers detailed research and analysis of key aspects of the global Psoriasis Treatment market. The market analysts authoring this report have provided in-depth information on leading growth drivers, restraints, challenges, trends, and opportunities to offer a complete analysis of the global Psoriasis Treatment market. Market participants can use the analysis on market dynamics to plan effective growth strategies and prepare for future challenges beforehand. Each trend of the global Psoriasis Treatment market is carefully analyzed and researched about by the market analysts.

Global Psoriasis Treatment Market is valued at USD XX million in 2019 and is projected to reach USD XX million by the end of 2025, growing at a CAGR of XX% during the period 2019 to 2025.

Top Key Players of the Global Psoriasis Treatment Market : Novartis International AG, Johnson & Johnson, Pfizer Inc., Merck and Co. Inc., AbbVie and Amgen, Eli Lilly

Download Full PDF Sample Copy of Report: (Including Full TOC, List of Tables & Figures, Chart) : https://www.qyresearch.com/sample-form/form/703094/global-psoriasis-treatment-industry-research-report-growth-trends-and-competitive-analysis-2018-2025

The Essential Content Covered in the Global Psoriasis Treatment Market Report :

* Top Key Company Profiles.* Main Business and Rival Information * SWOT Analysis and PESTEL Analysis * Production, Sales, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin* Market Share and Size

Global Psoriasis Treatment Market Segmentation By Product :TNF Inhibitors, Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors, Interleukin Blockers, Others

Global Psoriasis Treatment Market Segmentation By Application :Oral, Tropical, Injectable

In terms of region, this research report covers almost all the major regions across the globe such as North America, Europe, South America, the Middle East, and Africa and the Asia Pacific. Europe and North America regions are anticipated to show an upward growth in the years to come. WhilePsoriasis Treatment Market in Asia Pacific regions is likely to show remarkable growth during the forecasted period. Cutting edge technology and innovations are the most important traits of the North America region and thats the reason most of the time the US dominates the global markets.Psoriasis Treatment Market in South, America region is also expected to grow in near future.

Key questions answered in the report

Research Methodology

We provide detailed product mapping and analysis of various market scenarios. Our analysts are experts in providing in-depth analysis and breakdown of the business of key market leaders. We keep a close eye on recent developments and follow latest company news related to different players operating in the global Psoriasis Treatment market. This helps us to deeply analyze companies as well as the competitive landscape. Our vendor landscape analysis offers a complete study that will help you to stay on top of the competition.

Table of Contents

1 Report Overview1.1 Research Scope1.2 Major Manufacturers Covered in This Report1.3 Market Segment by Type1.3.1 Global Psoriasis Treatment Market Size Growth Rate by Type1.3.2 TNF Inhibitors1.3.3 Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors1.3.4 Interleukin Blockers1.3.5 Others1.4 Market Segment by Application1.4.1 Global Psoriasis Treatment Market Share by Application (2018-2025)1.4.2 Oral1.4.3 Tropical1.4.4 Injectable1.5 Study Objectives1.6 Years Considered

2 Global Growth Trends2.1 Production and Capacity Analysis2.1.1 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production Value 2013-20252.1.2 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production 2013-20252.1.3 Global Psoriasis Treatment Capacity 2013-20252.1.4 Global Psoriasis Treatment Marketing Pricing and Trends2.2 Key Producers Growth Rate (CAGR) 2018-20252.2.1 Global Psoriasis Treatment Market Size CAGR of Key Regions2.2.2 Global Psoriasis Treatment Market Share of Key Regions2.3 Industry Trends2.3.1 Market Top Trends2.3.2 Market Drivers

3 Market Share by Manufacturers3.1 Capacity and Production by Manufacturers3.1.1 Global Psoriasis Treatment Capacity by Manufacturers3.1.2 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production by Manufacturers3.2 Revenue by Manufacturers3.2.1 Psoriasis Treatment Revenue by Manufacturers (2013-2018)3.2.2 Psoriasis Treatment Revenue Share by Manufacturers (2013-2018)3.2.3 Global Psoriasis Treatment Market Concentration Ratio (CR5 and HHI)3.3 Psoriasis Treatment Price by Manufacturers3.4 Key Manufacturers Psoriasis Treatment Plants/Factories Distribution and Area Served3.5 Date of Key Manufacturers Enter into Psoriasis Treatment Market3.6 Key Manufacturers Psoriasis Treatment Product Offered3.7 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion Plans

4 Market Size by Type4.1 Production and Production Value for Each Type4.1.1 TNF Inhibitors Production and Production Value (2013-2018)4.1.2 Phosphodiesterase Inhibitors Production and Production Value (2013-2018)4.1.3 Interleukin Blockers Production and Production Value (2013-2018)4.1.4 Others Production and Production Value (2013-2018)4.2 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production Market Share by Type4.3 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production Value Market Share by Type4.4 Psoriasis Treatment Ex-factory Price by Type

5 Market Size by Application5.1 Overview5.2 Global Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Application

6 Production by Regions6.1 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production (History Data) by Regions 2013-20186.2 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production Value (History Data) by Regions6.3 United States6.3.1 United States Psoriasis Treatment Production Growth Rate 2013-20186.3.2 United States Psoriasis Treatment Production Value Growth Rate 2013-20186.3.3 Key Players in United States6.3.4 United States Psoriasis Treatment Import & Export6.4 Europe6.4.1 Europe Psoriasis Treatment Production Growth Rate 2013-20186.4.2 Europe Psoriasis Treatment Production Value Growth Rate 2013-20186.4.3 Key Players in Europe6.4.4 Europe Psoriasis Treatment Import & Export6.5 China6.5.3 Key Players in China6.5.2 China Psoriasis Treatment Production Value Growth Rate 2013-20186.5.3 Key Players in China6.5.4 China Psoriasis Treatment Import & Export6.6 Japan6.6.1 Japan Psoriasis Treatment Production Growth Rate 2013-20186.6.2 Japan Psoriasis Treatment Production Value Growth Rate 2013-20186.6.3 Key Players in Japan6.6.4 Japan Psoriasis Treatment Import & Export6.7 Other Regions6.7.1 South Korea6.7.2 India6.7.3 Southeast Asia

7 Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Regions7.1 Global Psoriasis Treatment Consumption (History Data) by Regions7.2 North America7.2.1 North America Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Type7.2.2 North America Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Application7.2.3 North America Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Countries7.2.4 United States7.2.5 Canada7.2.6 Mexico7.3 Europe7.3.1 Europe Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Type7.3.2 Europe Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Application7.3.3 Europe Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Countries7.3.4 Germany7.3.5 France7.3.6 UK7.3.7 Italy7.3.8 Russia7.4 Asia Pacific7.4.1 Asia Pacific Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Type7.4.2 Asia Pacific Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Application7.4.3 Asia Pacific Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Countries7.4.4 China7.4.5 Japan7.4.6 Korea7.4.7 India7.4.8 Australia7.4.9 Indonesia7.4.10 Thailand7.4.11 Malaysia7.4.12 Philippines7.4.13 Vietnam7.5 Central & South America7.5.1 Central & South America Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Type7.5.2 Central & South America Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Application7.5.3 Central & South America Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Countries7.5.4 Brazil7.6 Middle East and Africa7.6.1 Middle East and Africa Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Type7.6.2 Middle East and Africa Psoriasis Treatment Consumption by Application

8 Company Profiles8.1 Novartis International AG8.1.1 Novartis International AG Company Details8.1.2 Company Description and Business Overview8.1.3 Production and Revenue of Psoriasis Treatment8.1.4 Psoriasis Treatment Product Introduction8.1.5 Novartis International AG Recent Development8.2 Johnson & Johnson8.2.1 Johnson & Johnson Company Details8.2.2 Company Description and Business Overview8.2.3 Production and Revenue of Psoriasis Treatment8.2.4 Psoriasis Treatment Product Introduction8.2.5 Johnson & Johnson Recent Development8.3 Pfizer Inc.8.3.1 Pfizer Inc. Company Details8.3.2 Company Description and Business Overview8.3.3 Production and Revenue of Psoriasis Treatment8.3.4 Psoriasis Treatment Product Introduction8.3.5 Pfizer Inc. Recent Development8.4 Merck and Co. Inc.8.4.1 Merck and Co. Inc. Company Details8.4.2 Company Description and Business Overview8.4.3 Production and Revenue of Psoriasis Treatment8.4.4 Psoriasis Treatment Product Introduction8.4.5 Merck and Co. Inc. Recent Development8.5 AbbVie and Amgen8.5.1 AbbVie and Amgen Company Details8.5.2 Company Description and Business Overview8.5.3 Production and Revenue of Psoriasis Treatment8.5.4 Psoriasis Treatment Product Introduction8.5.5 AbbVie and Amgen Recent Development8.6 Eli Lilly8.6.1 Eli Lilly Company Details8.6.2 Company Description and Business Overview8.6.3 Production and Revenue of Psoriasis Treatment8.6.4 Psoriasis Treatment Product Introduction8.6.5 Eli Lilly Recent Development

9 Market Forecast: Production Side9.1 Production and Production Value Forecast9.1.1 Global Psoriasis Treatment Capacity, Production Forecast 2018-20259.1.2 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production Value Forecast 2018-20259.2 Psoriasis Treatment Production and Production Value Forecast by Regions9.2.1 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production Value Forecast by Regions9.2.2 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production Forecast by Regions9.3 Psoriasis Treatment Key Producers Forecast9.3.1 United States9.3.2 Europe9.3.3 China9.3.4 Japan9.3.5 Other Regions9.4 Forecast by Type9.4.1 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production Forecast by Type9.4.2 Global Psoriasis Treatment Production Value Forecast by Type

10 Market Forecast: Consumption Side10.1 Consumption Forecast by Application10.2 Psoriasis Treatment Consumption Forecast by Regions10.3 North America Market Consumption Forecast10.3.1 North America Psoriasis Treatment Consumption Forecast by Countries 2018-202510.3.2 United States10.3.3 Canada10.3.4 Mexico10.4 Europe Market Consumption Forecast10.4.1 Europe Psoriasis Treatment Consumption Forecast by Countries 2018-202510.4.2 Germany10.4.3 France10.4.4 UK10.4.5 Italy10.4.6 Russia10.5 Asia Pacific Market Consumption Forecast10.5.1 Asia Pacific Psoriasis Treatment Consumption Forecast by Countries 2018-202510.5.2 China10.5.3 Japan10.5.4 Korea10.5.5 India10.5.6 Australia10.5.7 Indonesia10.5.8 Thailand10.5.9 Malaysia10.5.10 Philippines10.5.11 Vietnam10.6 Central & South America Market Consumption Forecast10.6.1 Central & South America Psoriasis Treatment Consumption Forecast by Country 2018-202510.6.2 Brazil10.7 Middle East and Africa Market Consumption Forecast10.7.1 Middle East and Africa Psoriasis Treatment Consumption Forecast by Countries 2018-202510.7.2 Middle East and Africa10.7.3 GCC Countries10.7.4 Egypt10.7.5 South Africa

11 Value Chain and Sales Channels Analysis11.1 Value Chain Analysis11.2 Sales Channels Analysis11.2.1 Psoriasis Treatment Sales Channels11.2.2 Psoriasis Treatment Distributors11.3 Psoriasis Treatment Customers

12 Opportunities & Challenges, Threat and Affecting Factors12.1 Market Opportunities12.2 Market Challenges12.3 Porters Five Forces Analysis12.4 Macroscopic Indicator12.4.1 GDP for Major Regions12.4.2 Price of Raw Materials in Dollars: Evolution

13 Key Findings

14 Appendix14.1 Research Methodology14.1.1 Methodology/Research Approach14.1.1.1 Research Programs/Design14.1.1.2 Market Size Estimation14.1.1.3 Market Breakdown and Data Triangulation14.1.2 Data Source14.1.2.1 Secondary Sources14.1.2.2 Primary Sources14.2 Author Details14.3 Disclaimer

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Psoriasis Treatment Market 2019 Industry Size, Shares and Upcoming Trends 2025 - Info Street Wire

Psoriasis Treatment Market Key Manufacturers, Development Trends and Competitive Analysis – Market Reports Observer

The intense rivalry between the leading psoriasis treatment providers across the world characterizes the global psoriasis treatment market. According to Transparency Market Research (TMR), a leading market research and intelligence firm, thepsoriasis treatment marketdemonstrates a high competitive and fragmented vendor landscape. Led by AbbVie, LEO Pharma, AstraZeneca, Biogen, and Pfizer, this market has gained significant momentum due to the competition among these players. To sustain in this competitive environment, these companies are relying on new product launches and research and development of their existing product portfolio.

TMR evaluates the opportunity in the global psoriasis market to rise at a CAGR of 5.10% during the period from 2016 to 2024. The main products in this market are TNF inhibitors, interleukin blockers, and vitamin D analogues or combinations. Due to their efficiency and safety, the demand for TNF inhibitors has been relatively higher than other products available in this market. On the other hand, interleukin blockers are gaining momentum due to their ability to act by targeting the proteins, which will raise their demand in the near future, states the research report.

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Rising Prevalence of Psoriasis to Support Market

The global psoriasis treatment market derives growth from a number of factors. The most important one among them is the alarming rise in the prevalence of psoriasis among people across the world. Psoriasis is an autoimmune disease, which means it can only be controlled and not cured completely. It also indicates that a person suffering from psoriasis needs to be on medication throughout his/her life, creating an opportune situation for psoriasis treatment providers.

Companies active in this market are increasingly being involved in research and developments to innovate and introduce new products for the treatment of psoriasis. At present, there is a strong pipeline of products related to psoriasis treatment across the world. The speedy approvals of these novel drugs and therapies by the U.S. FDA is further supporting the growth of the worldwide psoriasis treatment market. Additionally, the continued infrastructural development in the medical and healthcare sector, especially in emerging countries, leading to an easy access to better medical services, will propel this market in the years to come.

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Increase in Patient Pool to Boost North America Psoriasis Treatment Market

In terms of the geography, the worldwide psoriasis treatment market registers its presence across Latin America, North America, Europe, Middle East and Africa, and Asia Pacific. With constantly rising patient pool, North America has emerged as the leading regional psoriasis treatment market. Researchers expect this regional market to remain on top over the next few years. A number of well-established psoriasis treatment providers have their headquarters in the U.S. and they consider North America as their main market. This factor is likely to have a positive influence on the North America psoriasis treatment in the years to come.

Currently, Europe is also registering a decent growth in its psoriasis treatment market. However, it will witness a decline in the sale over the forthcoming years, following an intense challenge from biosimilars. Among others, Asia Pacific and Latin America are expected to display promising opportunities for market players in the near future, thanks to their untapped status. The increasing awareness among people regarding the treatment of psoriasis in emerging Asian and Latin American countries will boost the growth of their respective regional markets for psoriasis treatments in the forthcoming years, notes the markets study.

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Psoriasis Treatment Market Key Manufacturers, Development Trends and Competitive Analysis - Market Reports Observer

Psoriasis: Types, Pictures, Causes, Symptoms, Treatments …

Alwan, W., and F.O. Nestle. "Pathogenesis and Treatment of Psoriasis: Exploiting Pathophysiological Pathways for Precision Medicine." Clin Exp Rheumatol 33 (Suppl. 93): S2-S6.

Arndt, Kenneth A., eds., et al. "Topical Therapies for Psoriasis." Seminars in Cutaneous Medicine and Surgery 35.2S Mar. 2016: S35-S46.

Benhadou, Fairda, Dillon Mintoff, and Vronique del Marmol. "Psoriasis: Keratinocytes or Immune Cells -- Which Is the Trigger?" Dermatology Dec. 19, 2018.

Conrad, Curdin, Michel Gilliet. "Psoriasis: From Pathogenesis to Targeted Therapies." Clinical Reviews in Allergy & Immunology Jan. 18, 2015.

Dowlatshahi, E.A., E.A.M van der Voort, L.R. Arends, and T. Nijsten. "Markers of Systemic Inflammation in Psoriasis: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis." British Journal of Dermatology 169.2 Aug. 2013: 266-282.

Georgescu, Simona-Roxana, et al. "Advances in Understanding the Immunological Pathways in Psoriasis." International Journal of Molecular Sciences 20.739 Feb. 10, 2019: 2-17.

Greb, Jacqueline E., et al. "Psoriasis." Nature Reviews Disease Primers 2 (2016): 1-17.

Kaushik, Shivani B., and Mark G. Lebwohl. "Review of Safety and Efficacy of Approved Systemic Psoriasis Therapies." International Journal of Dermatology 2018.

National Psoriasis Foundation. "Systemic Treatments: Biologics and Oral Treatments." 1-25.

Ogawa, Eisaku, Yuki Sato, Akane Minagawa, and Ryuhei Okuyama. "Pathogenesis of Psoriasis and Development of Treatment." The Journal of Dermatology 2017: 1-9.

Stiff, Katherine M., Katelyn R. Glines, Caroline L. Porter, Abigail Cline & StevenR. Feldman. "Current pharmacological treatment guidelines for psoriasis and psoriaticarthritis." Expert Review of Clinical Pharmacology (2018).

Villaseor-Park, Jennifer, David Wheeler, and Lisa Grandinetti. "Psoriasis: Evolving Treatment for a Complex Disease." Cleveland Clinic Journal of Medicine 79.6 June 2012: 413-423.

Woo, Yu Ri, Dae Ho Cho, and Hyun Jeong Park. "Molecular Mechanisms and Management of a Cutaneous Inflammatory Disorder: Psoriasis." International Journal of Molecular Sciences 18 Dec. 11, 2017: 1-26.

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Psoriasis: Types, Pictures, Causes, Symptoms, Treatments ...

Thick, scaly patches appearing on your skin? It’s psoriasis – The Star Online

I have never had any skin problems before in all my life. Then I was put on a beta-blocker drug and one of the side effects I got was some patches on my body and scalp. The doctor said it was psoriasis. What is that?

Psoriasis is actually a common skin condition.

It develops when the life cycle of your skin cells is speeded up, causing them to die and build up on your skin surface quickly.

These extra skin cells form scales on your skin, as well as red patches, which can be itchy, and even painful.

What is the difference between psoriasis and eczema?

Psoriasis has well-defined, thick, red and scaly patches, especially at your elbows and knees.

The patches can also appear on your face, buttocks, palms, soles and scalp.

Your skin is thicker and more inflamed than those with eczema.

Eczema also causes your skin to be red and inflamed. It is sometimes scaly, but it can also be oozing or crusty.

There may be swelling or dark, leathery patches.

Eczema tends to appear in the crooks (or inner parts) of your knees and elbows, i.e. the parts of your body that bend.

However, it can also appear on your neck, wrists, ankles and other places on babies.

Eczema is more commonly associated with children.

The itching in eczema is also more intense than in psoriasis.

Stress is one of the major factors that contribute to the triggering or worsening of psoriasis. VisualHunt.com

I heard that there are many types of psoriasis. Is this true?

Yes, everyone has different manifestations of psoriasis.

We know already that the distinct common feature is red, scaly patches on your skin due to overproduction of skin cells.

Plaque psoriasis is the commonest form. The red, silvery scaly patches are called plaques.

These plaques can occur on any part of your body, including inside your mouth and on your genitals.

There is also nail psoriasis. Obviously, this affects your fingernails and toenails, and can cause abnormal nail growth, pits (little holes) and discolouration of your nails.

Your nails can also separate from your nail bed, or even crumble entirely.

When the psoriasis patches are not formed in plaques, but in waterdrop-shaped lesions instead, it is called guttate psoriasis.

This affects young children and young adults. It is usually triggered by a bacterial infection such as a sore throat.

The skin lesions are not as thick as plaque psoriasis.

Then there is inverse psoriasis, which affects the skin on your armpits, groin, under your breasts or around your genitals.

These become worse with friction or sweating, like if you wear tight clothing.

This one has a correlation with fungal infections.

One uncommon type is pustular psoriasis. This one has pus-filled blisters on top of your red skin.

It can get quite bad because it may be associated with fever, severe itching and diarrhoea.

The rarest type is also one of the worst due to the way it looks, called erythrodermic psoriasis.

This one covers your entire body with a red rash that peels easily. It can also unfortunately itch or burn badly.

I know a relative with psoriasis who also has joint pain. Does psoriasis give rise to joint pain?

Some psoriasis patients can also suffer from joint pain due to their condition. TPNYes, this is called psoriatic arthritis. It does not happen in all psoriatic cases.

It is not as bad as rheumatoid arthritis, but can be severe as well.

This type of joint pain affects any joint. The underlying issue is inflammation and erosion of your joints.

This leads to stiffness, swelling and worsening deformity.

What is the cause of psoriasis?

No one really knows, but it is believed to be an autoimmune disease.

Your white blood cells called T lymphocytes and neutrophils attack healthy skin cells by mistake.

They travel to your skin, causing your blood vessels to dilate and your skin cells to overproduce.

That is why you have redness, swelling, and even pus it is as though your body is fighting off a skin infection.

There is also a genetic element in psoriasis. If your parents had psoriasis, you are more likely to have it too.

Is there anything that triggers psoriasis? I was told it was because of the medication I took.

Many things can trigger psoriasis, especially if you have an underlying genetic predisposition for it already.

We have already discussed that sore throats caused by bacteria, especially Streptococcus, can trigger it.

So can skin infections and injuries, like burns, sunburns, bites and cuts.

Stress can also trigger psoriasis. So can smoking and alcohol.

The types of medicines that can trigger it include beta-blockers, used for high blood pressure; lithium, used for psychotic disorders; and drugs used for malaria.

There is unfortunately no cure for psoriasis, but you can moisturise your skin, give up smoking and alcohol, stop taking those medications giving you psoriasis, and manage your stress levels, to help manage your condition.

Dr YLM graduated as a medical doctor, and has been writing for many years on various subjects such as medicine, health, computers and entertainment. For further information, email starhealth@thestar.com.my. The information contained in this column is for general educational purposes only. Neither The Star nor the author gives any warranty on accuracy, completeness, functionality, usefulness or other assurances as to such information. The Star and the author disclaim all responsibility for any losses, damage to property or personal injury suffered directly or indirectly from reliance on such information.

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Thick, scaly patches appearing on your skin? It's psoriasis - The Star Online

Medical News Today: Does my baby have psoriasis? Symptoms and treatment – Stock Daily Dish

Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disorder affecting the skin and anyone, including babies and young children, can develop it. Although psoriasis does occur in infants, it is uncommon.

The disease speeds up the life cycle of skin cells, causing them to build up too quickly on the skins surface. The resulting extra skin cells can create thick, silver or white scales and patches that are dry, red, itchy, and sometimes painful.

Contents of this article:

Plaque psoriasis may appear on the elbows, scalp and lower back.

Infant is considered a rare condition. In fact, children under the age of 10 are to develop psoriasis as people between the ages of 15 and 35.

While infants and very young children can develop psoriasis, it can only be diagnosed after close observation.

If an infant does have psoriasis, it tends to develop in the diaper area. This makes it particularly easy to confuse with more common rashes and it is far more likely that the baby has developed one of these that will go away with time and proper treatment.

There are of psoriasis that people can develop, including infants:

Plaque psoriasis is the most common form in children, adults, and babies. Plaque psoriasis causes areas of raised, red patches covered with a silvery-white buildup of dead skin cells.

The patches occur mostly on the elbows, scalp, lower back, and knees. The often itchy and painful patches can crack and bleed.

Guttate psoriasis appears as small, dot-like lesions on the skins surface and is the second most common type of psoriasis in babies, children, and adults. Guttate psoriasis often starts in children and young adults and can be triggered by strep infections.

Pustular psoriasis appears as red skin surrounding white pustules. The consists of white blood cells.

Like any psoriasis, it is not an infection and is not contagious. Pustular psoriasis mostly occurs on hands and feet, but it can occur on any part of the body.

Nail psoriasis affects fingernails and toenails, causing pitting, abnormal nail growth, and color changes.

Psoriasis that affects the nails may cause them to become loose and separate from the nail bed. Severe cases may cause the nail to crumble.

Scalp psoriasis, as the name suggests, forms on the scalp and appears as red, itchy areas with silver or white scales that often extend beyond the hairline.

A person with scalp psoriasis will likely notice flakes of dead skin in the hair and on their shoulders after scratching the scalp.

In infants this should not be confused with seborrheic dermatitis (cradle cap), which appears as greasy, yellowish scales, or a crust on the scalp.

Inverse psoriasis may appear to be shiny and smooth will often appear alongside another form of psoriasis.

Inverse psoriasis appears as very red lesions around areas of body folds, such as in the groin, under the arms, and behind the knees. Often its appearance is smooth and shiny.

A person with inverse psoriasis often has another form of psoriasis happening at the same time elsewhere on the body.

Erythrodermic psoriasis is a severe, life-threatening form of psoriasis marked by widespread, fiery redness over much of the body. Erythrodermic psoriasis can cause severe itching, pain, and cause the skin to come off in large sections.

It is very rare, most frequently occurring in people who have unstable plaque psoriasis.

Infant psoriasis has the same cause as psoriasis in other age groups, but is often triggered by an upper respiratory infection, or .

As with other autoimmune diseases, researchers believe that certain sets of genes and abnormalities in those genes may cause psoriasis.

Doctors and researchers have no way of predicting who will develop psoriasis. The disease affects people of all ethnicities. However, a baby is more likely to develop psoriasis if there is a family history of it.

Psoriasis in infants can be extremely hard to diagnose because of the symptoms similarity to other, much more common infant skin conditions.

The most common symptom is a red rash that may appear to have scaly, white patches. Other symptoms may include:

As said, infant psoriasis is a very rare condition. If an infant has a rash, it is likely to be a more common skin rash such as .

Other rashes that babies are prone to include the following:

The only true way to determine if an infant has psoriasis or another skin condition is through careful observation. Unlike other rashes, psoriasis eventually scales over, with patches of white or silver over the red.

Psoriasis in infants may be concentrated on the skin around the knees, face, scalp, elbows, and neck while other rashes may occur anywhere.

Light therapy may be offered as a treatment for infant psoriasis.

If a rash appears on a babys skin and remains for several days despite the use of over-the-counter creams and treatments, caregivers should consult a doctor to check the rash.

For a doctor to diagnose psoriasis, they will need to observe the rash for some time.

Once diagnosed, however, psoriasis has many treatment options, which may include the following:

Psoriasis is an unpredictable and lifelong condition. It is most often associated with periods when symptoms become more severe and periods when they improve. Some people see a complete improvement while others always have some symptoms present.

Psoriasis can typically be managed with proper medical attention.

Written by Jenna Fletcher

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