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The Halted Progress of Criminal-Justice Reform – The New Yorker

The cause of criminal-justice reform has been, in recent years, a welcome exception to the extreme polarization that has afflicted so much of our politics. Since 2008, the prison population has dropped in most parts of the country, in both red states and blue. Its gone down sixteen per cent in Louisiana and twenty-two per cent in South Carolina, which is roughly similar to reductions in more liberal places, such as California (twenty-six per cent) and New York (twenty-one per cent). The fight against mass incarceration even engendered a brief moment of bipartisanship in Washington, in 2018, when Congress overwhelmingly passed, and President Trump signed, the First Step Act, which made modest improvements in federal sentencing practices.

But this progress, at least at the federal level, has come to a halt. In the weeks since protests erupted around the nation following the murder of George Floyd, in Minneapolis, on May 25th, the President has returned to the law and order bluster that characterized his 2016 campaign. More to the point, the Justice Department, under Attorney General William Barr, has engaged in precisely the kinds of excesses that the reform movement has endeavored to correct. Most of the protests were peaceful, of course, but there was some violence and destruction of property. These sorts of crimes have traditionally belonged in the bailiwick of state prosecutors, who handle most violent crime in the United States. Yet Barrs prosecutors have stepped in and charged at least seventy people with crimes in connection with the protests. In Mobile, Alabama, a protester allegedly used a bat to break a window of a police cruiser. Such an act is a paradigmatic state crimean assaultbut federal prosecutors contrived to bring a case for civil disorder, drawing on a rarely used federal law. Bringing the case in federal court allows Barr to posture against the protesters and, even more important, to make them eligible for longer prison sentences, as is usually the case in federal prosecutions.

The most egregious example of this kind of federal excess is taking place in New York, where prosecutors in Brooklyn may be on the verge of responding to a crime with an injustice. On May 29th, two well-regarded lawyers, Colinford Mattis and Urooj Rahman, participated in protests in Fort Greene. According to the complaint filed in federal court, just after midnight, Rahman stepped out of a minivan driven by Mattis and flung a Molotov cocktail through a broken window of an unoccupied police car. (In another part of Brooklyn, Samantha Shader, a twenty-seven-year-old woman from upstate New York, was charged in a separate Molotov-cocktail attack on a police van; neither attack caused any injuries.)

The two lawyers are both in their early thirties. Mattis is a graduate of Princeton and of New York Universitys law school, and he worked until recently at a well-known corporate law firm in Manhattan. He is active in community affairs in Brooklyn, and is responsible for the care of several young family members. Rahman, a graduate of Fordham Universitys college and law school, worked at Bronx Legal Services. Neither had a criminal record. (Shader did have a record of various arrests in different parts of the country.) Mattis and Rahman have pleaded not guilty, but the case against them appears strong. According to prosecutors, there is video evidence of Rahman throwing the improvised bomb, and police found the ingredients to make Molotov cocktails in Mattiss van.

In bringing the case against them, though, the Justice Department has engaged in grotesque overreach. If convicted of the charges in the indictment, Mattis and Rahman face a minimum of forty-five years and a maximum of life in prison. (If they were prosecuted in state court, as they should be, they would likely face five years or less.) The case demonstrates the perversity of mandatory-minimum sentences, which remain common in federal court, despite the changes wrought by the First Step Act. The problems with mandatory minimums only begin with the simple fact that they keep people in prison for too many years. They also concentrate power in the hands of prosecutors and remove discretion from judges, who usually have a broader perspective on the appropriate levels of punishment. Moreover, mandatory minimums warp the entire judicial system, by putting unbearable pressure on defendants (and their lawyers) to enter guilty pleas and avoid the risk posed by a trial. (Prosecutors often waive the minimums if defendants offer to plead guilty.)

The case of Mattis and Rahman illustrates this point clearly. Faced with the certainty of decades of prison time if convicted by a jury, what defendant wouldnt try to cut a deal for a lesser sentence? In federal court today, a remarkable ninety-seven per cent of defendants plead guilty rather than go to trial. But a system in which practically no one goes to trial gives government prosecutors far too much power. Judges and juries are supposed to operate as a check on prosecutors, and they cant do that job if nearly every defendant pleads guilty. Too often, prosecutors, like those in the case of Mattis and Rahman, use indictments to extort guilty pleas rather than to achieve justice.

This is, in many respects, a hopeful moment for progress in the criminal-justice system. District attorneys in cities like Philadelphia, Milwaukee, and San Francisco are pulling back from the mindless pursuit of more convictions and longer sentences. Eric Gonzalez, the Brooklyn District Attorney, is also a reformer, which may be a reason that Barrs minions snatched the Molotov-cocktail cases away from him. The Attorney General has expressed nothing but contempt for more civilized approaches to law enforcement. In a speech in February, he attacked the new generation of prosecutors, asserting, These D.A.s think they are helping people, but they end up hurting them. These policies actually lead to greater criminality. This, to put it charitably, is unproven. Reformers have been winning elections around the country not because their constituents want greater criminality but because they recognize that we have incarcerated too many people (and particularly too many people of color) for too long.

As usual, Barr is channelling his boss, who has responded to the George Floyd protests with ugly spasms of race-baiting and bigotry. But, as bad as Trumps invective is on Twitter and elsewhere, Barrs actions are worse, because individuals and communities will be paying the costs for years, or decades, to come.

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The Halted Progress of Criminal-Justice Reform - The New Yorker

After 6 months and little progress controlling the pandemic, return to normal remains out of sight – The Spokesman-Review

Its been nearly half a year since the first case of COVID-19 was identified in the United States, in the Puget Sound area, on Jan. 21.

While the state eventually shut down in late March in an effort to slow the diseases spread, Washington began the gradual process of reopening after little more than a month.

But as counties began moving through the stages of the states phased reopening plan, the coronavirus was just beginning its wider spread outside the Seattle area and into other parts of the state, including to Yakima, the Tri-Cities and, eventually, Spokane.

Since April, after a particularly bad first wave in Western Washington, Central and Eastern Washington have been hit with their own first waves of the virus, leading to newly reopened restaurants shutting down all over again, to outbreaks in prison units and food processing plants, and to community spread, even in rural counties.

Case rates statewide are higher now, with half the counties partially reopened, than they were in April, and state public health officials have paused any further reopening for now.

In Spokane, hospitalizations have doubled in a month, and intensive care capacity remains a concern due to questions about staffing levels.

In Yakima, where Gov. Jay Inslees masking orders first went into effect , patients were sent to hospitals outside the area when staff needs hit capacity.

Franklin County has the highest percent-positive rate in the state, with 32% of individuals tested in the last two weeks returning positive results.

Six months into the pandemic, it feels like not a lot has changed.

Test results are backed up again, with people having to wait a week to 10 days in isolation to see if they are positive or negative. Community spread, when the virus is contracted without known connections to other cases, is back on the rise, as it was in March and April.

The rising number of cases has put increased challenges and pressure on contact tracing efforts, which began with reopening and are now incredibly strained and overwhelmed.

Despite the state training hundreds of workers and National Guard members to do contact tracing, counties like Spokane have opted to hire outside companies to conduct contact tracing. With more than 460 cases confirmed this week alone, the work has eclipsed what local epidemiologists can handle.

Washington was on lockdown from late March to early May, giving public health officials and state leaders an opportunity to prepare outbreaks underway and on the way, predominantly in long-term care facilities across the state and more broadly in the Puget Sound area.

By May, residents were antsy, and reopening lurched forward, with Ins-lees phased plan taking effect.

Despite state leaders efforts to ensure counties were ready to move ahead, its apparent now they miscalculated in some cases. Some counties hadnt had their first wave yet.

According to Eric Lofgren, an epidemiologist at Washington State University, some took the absence of cases in some areas as evidence the virus had been safely contained. In reality, he said, the first wave hadnt fully reached parts of Eastern Washington, including Spokane and the Tri-Cities.

If you dont have cases, that means either your epidemic hasnt started yet or youve successfully controlled it, Lofgren said. So I think everyone said we successfully controlled it, and what we discovered was that in several states we discovered that your epidemic was a little slower in coming.

The same story played out across the country in states that reopened this summer after seeing relatively low case counts but are now seeing hospitalizations and case counts surge.

Washington is now seeing higher daily case counts in July than April.

Testing capacity is back to waits of 10 days to two weeks for results , largely due to rising demand and growing backlogs at national laboratories, where the majority of the countrys testing capacity lies.

We are truly back to where we were in March, Spokane County Health Officer Bob Lutz said Friday, noting the challenges felt in Spokane are felt statewide and nationally .

Long wait times make it challenging for public health officials asking people to isolate at home until they get test results.

Delays are harmful because they dont allow us to quickly contain a case, Secretary of Health John Wiesman told reporters Thursday. We know people are most infectious early on and thats why we say to anybody getting a test that if you have any reason to get a test, we want you to stay home until you get your results.

With more testing, came more cases, but that doesnt paint the full picture of the disease burden.

The statewide percent-positive rate has also steadily increased this summer, as has the rate of people testing positive in counties per 100,000 people. Only 16 counties statewide are meeting case rate goals set by the governors Safe Start plan.

Could more have been done during the states lockdown to prevent the COVID-19 resurgence? Lofgren thinks so.

I think at both a national and local level, what happened is we did sort of waste the opportunities we had to get things in place for people to start taking this seriously, to put testing strategies in place, he said.

The states positive rate is back up to nearly 6%, and modelers are now confident the epidemic was growing in both Eastern and Western Washington in mid- to late June.

While the resurgence in cases was originally limited to a few hot spots, upward trends are now prominent in most counties, the most recent state modeling report says.

Summer is nearly half over, and schools are set to open in less than two months. With so much of the response feeling like dj vu, health officials lament the lost time.

We had breathing room, and weve largely used it on politicizing the epidemic, Lofgren said.

In half a year, treatment options for COVID-19 have improved, but doctors and researchers are still far from a treatment that works even half the time on patients who are hospitalized with the virus.

Two standout treatments, remdesivir and dexamethasone, appear to have some positive results, although the studies are ongoing and results are still preliminary in both clinical trials.

A study from a large drug trial led by Oxford University researchers found that dexamethasone, a common steroid, was helpful in treating patients with COVID-19 who were on oxygen or ventilated. While their study has not yet been peer-reviewed or published, their early results look somewhat promising. The steroid kept one person in a group of 20 with severe symptoms from dying .

These results are impressive in the drug trial world, but they have a long way to go before proving entirely useful.

Both MultiCare and Providence hospitals have enrolled in the clinical trials for remdesivir guided by the National Institutes of Health, and Dr. Henry Arguinchona, an infectious disease practitioner at Sacred Heart Medical Center, said initial trials of the drug also look promising.

Patients receiving remdesivir in the trial are faring better than those who get the placebo. The trial will soon move into its third phase; second phase results are forthcoming.

Early in the pandemic, ventilators were an in-demand lifesaving tool . While they are still being used for some patients, physicians are not immediately putting patients on them anymore. The National Institutes of Health now recommends a less invasive intervention a high-flow nasal cannula over a ventilator in some instances.

Some patients are doing well and able to get more oxygen to their lungs when they are simply flipped onto their stomachs, Arguinchona said, another technique doctors, nurses and intensivists are using.

I feel that we know better now how to take care of these patients, but I am hopeful that one or two or three or four months now, we know even more, Arguinchona said.

Recovering from COVID-19 is far from a linear process, and some people have experienced ongoing symptoms or side effects of their bodys fight with the virus for months. As The Atlantics Ed Yong notes, some people with COVID-19 and ongoing illness call themselves long-haulers. Yong writes that they are navigating a landscape of uncertainty and fear with a map whose landmarks dont reflect their surroundings.

Arguinchona said the phenomenon of patients not getting better is being seen more and more in COVID patients, but he noted that lingering health conditions are not necessarily indicative of persisting virus in the person.

There are many infections a person can get, and afterwards they can get a postinfectious syndrome, Arguinchona said. They can be left with lingering symptoms. With regards to post-COVID-19 symptoms, its not known what the causes or etymology of those is.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers a patient who is not admitted to the hospital with the virus as having a mild case, but Lofgren notes that mild doesnt really give weight to potential symptoms and conditions patients experience.

There are a lot of people who had supposedly mild cases of COVID who are still struggling with lung function and struggling with cardiovascular issues, Lofgren said.

The virus has exposed the inequities that already run rampant throughout the American health care system, including here in Washington.

When adjusted for population size, Hispanics and Pacific Islanders have nine times the number of COVID-19 cases than white people in Washington. The disproportionate rates of the virus trickle into hospitalizations and deaths from the virus , and nonwhite communities are hit hard by the virus statewide.

In Spokane County, the Marshallese community has experienced devastating effects of the virus.

The pandemic has exacerbated the underlying and persistent inequities among historically marginalized communities and those disproportionately impacted due to structural racism and other forms of systemic oppression, a July 8 report from the Department of Health says.

The department allotted a half-million dollars to get community organizations funding to bolster virus prevention and response efforts in a large swath of communities statewide. DOH awarded dozens of community organizations contracts that ranged from $5,000 to $20,000 to fund communication and emergency outreach services for communities that are disproportionately impacted by the virus.

Some pregnant women are also not faring well if they contract COVID-19. A CDC report found that pregnant women with COVID-19 are more likely to be hospitalized and are at increased risk for ICU admission than nonpregnant women. Nationwide, 11,312 pregnant women have contracted the virus, and 31 of them have died.

Arguinchona said some pregnant women have become very ill with COVID.

Young people, who were not as impacted at the beginning of the pandemic, are now driving case counts locally, statewide and nationally.

Twenty- and 30-somethings make up 38% of confirmed COVID-19 cases statewide and 45% of cases in Spokane County.

In recent weeks, health officials have pleaded with young people to stop gathering in large groups and to wear masks when around one another. Most young people might experience mild symptoms with the virus, but the fear is that they will bring the virus to their older parents or grandparents, or spread the virus when they are at work.

We have a lot of work to do with younger folks here in Washington limiting their social interactions and make sure theyre wearing masks, State Health Officer Kathy Lofy told reporters on July 8.

With the start of the school year less than two months away, community members and public health officials remain skeptical that kids will be back in their classrooms.

Dr. David Line, the public health program director at Eastern Washington University, says the county will pay for our actions, including July 4 gatherings with case counts and hospitalizations.

At the end of the first wave, if enough of the community has started wearing masks and adhering to small gathering requirements, it should be doing well, he said.

If we arent doing well at the end of (the next) seven weeks, if we dont have a low caseload, we are in really big trouble because thats when school starts, Line said. If we miss that window that occurs right now through the rest of the summer, we will not be able to contain that wildfire at least through all next school year.

Wearing masks and face coverings could determine what school districts do when school begins.

Lofgren has studied how schools can stay open and avoid transmission of infectious disease.

Its possible we can have school, but its not as fun as it used to be, he said. Its possible we cant get a 5-year-old to wear a mask, but we can get an 8-year-old to wear a mask.

Measures such as not allowing group activities such as band and choir, having teachers instead of students move from classroom to classroom, and having students eat in the classroom, could help minimize widespread interaction of students in schools.

Schools might use hybrid models of partial reopening , depending on the district and the countys phase of reopening . The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction wants schools to reopen in-person but officials acknowledge districts in Phase 1 or modified Phase 1 counties might have to implement additional safety measures.

DOH guidance for schools requires universal masking but leaves additional measures at the discretion of school districts.

As for colleges, research indicates congregate living settings like dorms are perfect breeding grounds for virus transmission.

A group of college students from the University of Texas who went to Cabo San Lucas for spring break in March ended up in a perfect COVID environment. Three symptomatic students were tested when they returned, and the contact tracing investigation revealed 64 total people had contracted the virus.

Shared housing both on-campus and during their spring break trip led researchers to believe that patterns of living and interacting in close settings could lead to propagated spread, similar to the continued person-to-person transmission observed in long-term care facilities.

As Washington and other states experience a surge in cases this month, health officials insist widespread mask use is key to bringing down transmission rates in the near future.

For EWUs Line, it comes down to community buy-in on masking and cooperation with contact tracing efforts.

We could do nothing and let the whole thing burn up. We could do this fake open-close thing and suffer the whole way through. Or we can do some pretty simple things and get full support by everybody and not have to suffer and be fine in seven to eight weeks, he said.

The Department of Health and the CDC recommended the use of face coverings in early April, but mandates took longer. Leaders hoped residents would take the advice and wear face coverings, in place of hunkering down at home. That didnt work.

In mid-May, some local jurisdictions, including King and Spokane counties, mandated masks, though the mandates werent always enforced.

Statewide, however, masks were not required for all residents until late June. That requirement is likely to remain in place for a long time.

Wear a mask, social distance, try to take responsibility for your own part of this outbreak, and that means things arent going to be fun for a while and thats hard, but those sacrifices mean maybe kids can go to school, maybe those stressed households are less stressed, Lofgren said.

The notion that we will be done with COVID-19 soon is not realistic, Lofgren said.

We need to start engaging with the idea that this isnt a couple months, he said. Its the better part of the year.

Researchers and health care providers are working overtime around the country and the world to find out just how effective and long-lasting antibodies are, and how effective a vaccine could be as a result.

Were not promised a treatment or a vaccine, Lofgren said.

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After 6 months and little progress controlling the pandemic, return to normal remains out of sight - The Spokesman-Review

Firefighters Halt Progress of Alum Fire in Hills Above San Jose – CBS San Francisco

SAN JOSE (CBS SF) A wildfire ignited in the grasslands in the hills above San Jose Saturday, sending a large smoke plume skyward that was visible for miles and bringing crews from Santa Clara County and Cal Fire to battle the blaze.

Cal Fire air support joined dozens of firefighters who managed to halt forward progress of the 30-acre fire shortly after noon

Fire officials said the Alum Fire was burning at the top of a hillside near Mount Hamilton Rd. and Crothers Rd. east of the San Jose Country Club and south of Alum Rock Park.

Forward progress of the fire has been stopped. All fixed wing aircraft have been released and reported to be 30 acres, San Jose fire officials tweeted.

The National Weather Service tweeted that blaze was burning so intensely it had generated enough heat to trigger an alert from a GOES satellite orbiting over the West Coast.

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Firefighters Halt Progress of Alum Fire in Hills Above San Jose - CBS San Francisco

Penn Hills Progress area real estate transactions for the week of July 12 – TribLIVE

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Penn Hills Progress area real estate transactions for the week of July 12 - TribLIVE

After Six Months and Little Progress Controlling the Pandemic, Return to Normal Remains Out of Sight – Centralia Chronicle

It's been nearly half a year since the first case of COVID-19 was identified in the United States, in the Puget Sound area, on Jan. 21.

While the state eventually shut down in late March in an effort to slow the disease's spread, Washington began the gradual process of reopening after little more than a month.

But as counties began moving through the stages of the state's phased reopening plan, the coronavirus was just beginning its wider spread outside the Seattle area and into other parts of the state, including to Yakima, the Tri-Cities and, eventually, Spokane.

Since April, after a particularly bad first wave in Western Washington, Central and Eastern Washington have been hit with their own first waves of the virus, leading to newly reopened restaurants shutting down all over again, to outbreaks in prison units and food processing plants, and to community spread, even in rural counties.

Case rates statewide are higher now, with half the counties partially reopened, than they were in April, and state public health officials have paused any further reopening for now.

In Spokane, hospitalizations have doubled in a month, and intensive care capacity remains a concern due to questions about staffing levels.

In Yakima, where Gov. Jay Inslee's masking orders first went into effect , patients were sent to hospitals outside the area when staff needs hit capacity.

Franklin County has the highest percent-positive rate in the state, with 32% of individuals tested in the last two weeks returning positive results.

Six months into the pandemic, it feels like not a lot has changed.

Test results are backed up again, with people having to wait a week to 10 days in isolation to see if they are positive or negative. Community spread, when the virus is contracted without known connections to other cases, is back on the rise, as it was in March and April.

The rising number of cases has put increased challenges and pressure on contact tracing efforts, which began with reopening and are now incredibly strained and overwhelmed.

Despite the state training hundreds of workers and National Guard members to do contact tracing, counties like Spokane have opted to hire outside companies to conduct contact tracing. With more than 460 cases confirmed this week alone, the work has eclipsed what local epidemiologists can handle.

The ripple effect

Washington was on lockdown from late March to early May, giving public health officials and state leaders an opportunity to prepare outbreaks underway and on the way, predominantly in long-term care facilities across the state and more broadly in the Puget Sound area.

By May, residents were antsy, and reopening lurched forward, with Ins-lee's phased plan taking effect.

Despite state leaders' efforts to ensure counties were ready to move ahead, it's apparent now they miscalculated in some cases. Some counties hadn't had their first wave yet.

According to Eric Lofgren, an epidemiologist at Washington State University, some took the absence of cases in some areas as evidence the virus had been safely contained. In reality, he said, the first wave hadn't fully reached parts of Eastern Washington, including Spokane and the Tri-Cities.

"If you don't have cases, that means either your epidemic hasn't started yet or you've successfully controlled it," Lofgren said. "So I think everyone said we successfully controlled it, and what we discovered was that in several states we discovered that your epidemic was a little slower in coming."

The same story played out across the country in states that reopened this summer after seeing relatively low case counts -- but are now seeing hospitalizations and case counts surge.

Washington is now seeing higher daily case counts in July than April.

Testing capacity is back to waits of 10 days to two weeks for results , largely due to rising demand and growing backlogs at national laboratories, where the majority of the country's testing capacity lies.

"We are truly back to where we were in March," Spokane County Health Officer Bob Lutz said Friday, noting the challenges felt in Spokane are felt statewide and nationally .

Long wait times make it challenging for public health officials asking people to isolate at home until they get test results.

"Delays are harmful because they don't allow us to quickly contain a case," Secretary of Health John Wiesman told reporters Thursday. "We know people are most infectious early on ... and that's why we say to anybody getting a test that if you have any reason to get a test, we want you to stay home until you get your results."

With more testing, came more cases, but that doesn't paint the full picture of the disease burden.

The statewide percent-positive rate has also steadily increased this summer, as has the rate of people testing positive in counties per 100,000 people. Only 16 counties statewide are meeting case rate goals set by the governor's Safe Start plan.

Could more have been done during the state's lockdown to prevent the COVID-19 resurgence? Lofgren thinks so.

"I think at both a national and local level, what happened is we did sort of waste the opportunities we had to get things in place for people to start taking this seriously, to put testing strategies in place," he said.

The state's positive rate is back up to nearly 6%, and modelers are now confident the epidemic was growing in both Eastern and Western Washington in mid- to late June.

"While the resurgence in cases was originally limited to a few hot spots, upward trends are now prominent in most counties," the most recent state modeling report says.

Summer is nearly half over, and schools are set to open in less than two months. With so much of the response feeling like dj... vu, health officials lament the lost time.

"We had breathing room, and we've largely used it on politicizing the epidemic," Lofgren said.

Finding a treatment

In half a year, treatment options for COVID-19 have improved, but doctors and researchers are still far from a treatment that works even half the time on patients who are hospitalized with the virus.

Two standout treatments, remdesivir and dexamethasone, appear to have some positive results, although the studies are ongoing and results are still preliminary in both clinical trials.

A study from a large drug trial led by Oxford University researchers found that dexamethasone, a common steroid, was helpful in treating patients with COVID-19 who were on oxygen or ventilated. While their study has not yet been peer-reviewed or published, their early results look somewhat promising. The steroid kept one person in a group of 20 with severe symptoms from dying .

These results are impressive in the drug trial world, but they have a long way to go before proving entirely useful.

Both MultiCare and Providence hospitals have enrolled in the clinical trials for remdesivir guided by the National Institutes of Health, and Dr. Henry Arguinchona, an infectious disease practitioner at Sacred Heart Medical Center, said initial trials of the drug also look promising.

Patients receiving remdesivir in the trial are faring better than those who get the placebo. The trial will soon move into its third phase; second phase results are forthcoming.

Early in the pandemic, ventilators were an in-demand lifesaving tool . While they are still being used for some patients, physicians are not immediately putting patients on them anymore. The National Institutes of Health now recommends a less invasive intervention -- a high-flow nasal cannula -- over a ventilator in some instances.

Some patients are doing well and able to get more oxygen to their lungs when they are simply flipped onto their stomachs, Arguinchona said, another technique doctors, nurses and intensivists are using.

"I feel that we know better now how to take care of these patients, but I am hopeful that one or two or three or four months now, we know even more," Arguinchona said.

Recovering from COVID-19 is far from a linear process, and some people have experienced ongoing symptoms or side effects of their body's fight with the virus for months. As The Atlantic's Ed Yong notes, some people with COVID-19 and ongoing illness call themselves "long-haulers." Yong writes that they are "navigating a landscape of uncertainty and fear with a map whose landmarks don't reflect their surroundings."

Arguinchona said the phenomenon of patients not getting better is being seen more and more in COVID patients, but he noted that lingering health conditions are not necessarily indicative of persisting virus in the person.

"There are many infections a person can get, and afterwards they can get a postinfectious syndrome," Arguinchona said. "They can be left with lingering symptoms. With regards to post-COVID-19 symptoms, it's not known what the causes or etymology of those is."

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention considers a patient who is not admitted to the hospital with the virus as having a mild case, but Lofgren notes that "mild" doesn't really give weight to potential symptoms and conditions patients experience.

"There are a lot of people who had supposedly mild cases of COVID who are still struggling with lung function and struggling with cardiovascular issues," Lofgren said.

Who is impacted by COVID-19

The virus has exposed the inequities that already run rampant throughout the American health care system, including here in Washington.

When adjusted for population size, Hispanics and Pacific Islanders have nine times the number of COVID-19 cases than white people in Washington. The disproportionate rates of the virus trickle into hospitalizations and deaths from the virus , and nonwhite communities are hit hard by the virus statewide.

In Spokane County, the Marshallese community has experienced devastating effects of the virus.

"The pandemic has exacerbated the underlying and persistent inequities among historically marginalized communities and those disproportionately impacted due to structural racism and other forms of systemic oppression," a July 8 report from the Department of Health says.

The department allotted a half-million dollars to get community organizations funding to bolster virus prevention and response efforts in a large swath of communities statewide. DOH awarded dozens of community organizations contracts that ranged from $5,000 to $20,000 to fund communication and emergency outreach services for communities that are disproportionately impacted by the virus.

Some pregnant women are also not faring well if they contract COVID-19. A CDC report found that pregnant women with COVID-19 are more likely to be hospitalized and are at increased risk for ICU admission than nonpregnant women. Nationwide, 11,312 pregnant women have contracted the virus, and 31 of them have died.

Arguinchona said some pregnant women have become very ill with COVID.

Young people, who were not as impacted at the beginning of the pandemic, are now driving case counts locally, statewide and nationally.

Twenty- and 30-somethings make up 38% of confirmed COVID-19 cases statewide and 45% of cases in Spokane County.

In recent weeks, health officials have pleaded with young people to stop gathering in large groups and to wear masks when around one another. Most young people might experience mild symptoms with the virus, but the fear is that they will bring the virus to their older parents or grandparents, or spread the virus when they are at work.

"We have a lot of work to do with younger folks here in Washington limiting their social interactions and make sure they're wearing masks," State Health Officer Kathy Lofy told reporters on July 8.

Back to school?

With the start of the school year less than two months away, community members and public health officials remain skeptical that kids will be back in their classrooms.

Dr. David Line, the public health program director at Eastern Washington University, says the county will "pay for our actions," including July 4 gatherings with case counts and hospitalizations.

At the end of the first wave, if enough of the community has started wearing masks and adhering to small gathering requirements, it should be doing well, he said.

"If we aren't doing well at the end of (the next) seven weeks, if we don't have a low caseload, we are in really big trouble because that's when school starts," Line said. "... If we miss that window that occurs right now through the rest of the summer, we will not be able to contain that wildfire at least through all next school year."

Wearing masks and face coverings could determine what school districts do when school begins.

Lofgren has studied how schools can stay open and avoid transmission of infectious disease.

"It's possible ... we can have school, but it's not as fun as it used to be," he said. "It's possible we can't get a 5-year-old to wear a mask, but we can get an 8-year-old to wear a mask."

Measures such as not allowing group activities such as band and choir, having teachers instead of students move from classroom to classroom, and having students eat in the classroom, could help minimize widespread interaction of students in schools.

Schools might use hybrid models of partial reopening , depending on the district and the county's phase of reopening . The Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction wants schools to reopen in-person but officials acknowledge districts in Phase 1 or modified Phase 1 counties might have to implement additional safety measures.

DOH guidance for schools requires universal masking but leaves additional measures at the discretion of school districts.

As for colleges, research indicates congregate living settings like dorms are perfect breeding grounds for virus transmission.

A group of college students from the University of Texas who went to Cabo San Lucas for spring break in March ended up in a perfect COVID environment. Three symptomatic students were tested when they returned, and the contact tracing investigation revealed 64 total people had contracted the virus.

Shared housing both on-campus and during their spring break trip led researchers to believe that patterns of living and interacting in close settings could lead to "propagated spread, similar to the continued person-to-person transmission observed in long-term care facilities."

'The better part of a year'

As Washington and other states experience a surge in cases this month, health officials insist widespread mask use is key to bringing down transmission rates in the near future.

For EWU's Line, it comes down to community buy-in on masking and cooperation with contact tracing efforts.

"We could do nothing and let the whole thing burn up. We could do this fake open-close thing and suffer the whole way through. Or we can do some pretty simple things and get full support by everybody and not have to suffer and be fine in seven to eight weeks," he said.

The Department of Health and the CDC recommended the use of face coverings in early April, but mandates took longer. Leaders hoped residents would take the advice and wear face coverings, in place of hunkering down at home. That didn't work.

In mid-May, some local jurisdictions, including King and Spokane counties, mandated masks, though the mandates weren't always enforced.

Statewide, however, masks were not required for all residents until late June. That requirement is likely to remain in place for a long time.

"Wear a mask, social distance, try to take responsibility for your own part of this outbreak, and that means things aren't going to be fun for a while and that's hard, but those sacrifices mean maybe kids can go to school, maybe those stressed households are less stressed," Lofgren said.

The notion that we will be "done" with COVID-19 soon is not realistic, Lofgren said.

"We need to start engaging with the idea that this isn't a couple months," he said. "It's the better part of the year."

Researchers and health care providers are working overtime around the country and the world to find out just how effective and long-lasting antibodies are, and how effective a vaccine could be as a result.

"We're not promised a treatment or a vaccine," Lofgren said.

See the original post here:

After Six Months and Little Progress Controlling the Pandemic, Return to Normal Remains Out of Sight - Centralia Chronicle

After months of little progress, will Dak Prescott make a deal with the Cowboys? Time to decide is running out. – The Dallas Morning News

The last year of Dak Prescotts contract impasse moved like two hours on a gym bicycle: exhausting but stationary. And as the Cowboys and their franchise quarterback spun their wheels, unable to broker a deal, the surrounding landscape changed significantly.

A new collective bargaining agreement with the seeming promise of long-term league prosperity was enacted. A Chiefs quarterback was paid like an Angels outfielder. Now, a pandemic threatens to cancel the upcoming season.

Moving in place is no longer an option.

By 3 p.m. Wednesday, the Cowboys and Prescott must sign or get off the cash pot.

That is the NFL deadline for any player who has been franchise-tagged to finalize a multiyear contract. Otherwise, no such deal can be completed until after the conclusion of the 2020 season.

One way or another, barring a change to the NFL calendar, the days of wondering how soon a blockbuster Prescott contract could come are numbered. It is either a few days away or several-plus months away.

Deadlines tend to drive action. Cowboys running back Ezekiel Elliott can attest to that.

Last summer, Elliott skipped all of training camp during a 40-day holdout, chowing on sushi rolls for dinner between workouts and friendly poker tournaments at a Cabo San Lucas resort. His contract was not agreed upon until nearly 5 a.m. on the Wednesday before a Sunday season opener against the New York Giants.

A last-ditch deal happened then. It can happen now.

Then again, Prescott might not necessarily feel tremendous urgency as Wednesdays deadline nears. Under his signed franchise tag, he is scheduled to earn $31.4 million in 2020. If the Cowboys tag him again in 2021, the salary value increases by 20% to about $37.7 million.

This is a meaningful jump in any year. Its especially consequential when the COVID-19 pandemic is sure to disrupt the leagues revenue this season.

Revenue and the salary cap are directly correlated. While the exact repercussions of the pandemic are still developing, the NFL and NFL Players Association probably will have to borrow from future years in order to buoy the 2021 cap to a respectable figure, keeping it flat instead of allowing the current $198.2 million figure to tank.

So, Prescotts 20% salary increase would come at a time when the cap is static.

Last Monday, Kansas City Chiefs quarterback Patrick Mahomes signed a 12-year, $477.6 million contract with incentives, the potential value is about $503 million. This contract was a landmark development, but it bears little relevance on what the Cowboys and Prescott are working to accomplish.

Mahomes was still playing on his rookie contract. Apples.

Prescott is on the franchise tag. Oranges.

Prescott appears sure to earn more than Mahomes over the next four to five years, at which point he could be scheduled to hit free agency again. By that point, the COVID-19 probably wouldnt be holding back the cap, and Prescott could strike again while still in his prime.

He turns 27 this month.

The real question, the one that only Prescott and his agent Todd France at CAA can answer, is how the uncertainty surrounding COVID-19 impacts their willingness to stay the course. Few answers are available regarding what would happen to player salaries if the 2020 regular-season schedule is shortened or canceled outright.

How much of that $31.4 million would Prescott lose?

How much of that would he keep if, by Wednesday, he signed a multiyear contract that turned most of the money into a signing or roster bonus?

There is much to decide in the coming days. The Cowboys and France have gone months, at certain times during this grueling process, without achieving progress toward a multiyear contract. They must deliberate now to change that. They have hurdles to clear. They have to give and take.

This wont be like riding a bike.

Find more Cowboys stories from The Dallas Morning News here.

View post:

After months of little progress, will Dak Prescott make a deal with the Cowboys? Time to decide is running out. - The Dallas Morning News

Louisiana governor says progress against coronavirus has been wiped out in past three weeks – CNN

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","descriptionText":"CNN contributor Ana Navarro slams Trump supporters for not wearing a mask as Covid-19 continues to rise across the US. "},{"title":"Rise in road trips, rise in coronavirus","duration":"01:57","sourceName":"CNN","sourceLink":"http://www.cnn.com","videoCMSUrl":"/video/data/3.0/video/travel/2020/07/10/coronavirus-road-trips-july-vpx.cnn/index.xml","videoId":"travel/2020/07/10/coronavirus-road-trips-july-vpx.cnn","videoImage":"//cdn.cnn.com/cnnnext/dam/assets/200710134335-san-diego-highway-traffic-stock-large-169.jpg","videoUrl":"/videos/travel/2020/07/10/coronavirus-road-trips-july-vpx.cnn/video/playlists/coronavirus/","description":"New research shows Americans are taking to road trips across the country and potentially spreading the virus as they go. 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More:

Louisiana governor says progress against coronavirus has been wiped out in past three weeks - CNN

Weddings pose threat to Turkeys coronavirus progress | Daily Sabah – Daily Sabah

After months of waiting for permission from authorities for weddings to resume, couples were finally allowed to tie the knot on July 1, but officials now mull whether the decision was wrong, as health experts warn weddings pose a significant risk to Turkeys coronavirus fight.

On a regular year, spring marks the beginning of the wedding season in Turkey, but it is the summer when the ceremonies pick up the pace. Wedding motorcades on roads, the grooms friends doing their best to perform local dances outside the brides house and the extravagant ceremonies itself become an increasing sight with the summer.

But the outbreak changed it all. At least thats what the authorities had hoped for.

Shortly after the Health Ministry announced the countrys first COVID-19 case on March 10, weddings were among the many other things that were restricted. While the outbreak negatively impacted almost everyones lives, weddings perhaps suffered the most as most couples arrange their weddings nearly a year in advance, with most of the things already decided upon and down payments done.

For the first two months of the outbreak, couples were certain they would have to postpone their weddings to next year as the outbreak only worsened in Turkey. But in late April, Turkey managed to not only flatten the curve but actually significantly reduce the rate of daily new infections.

With the improving outlook, the government removed most of the restrictions on June 1, including the lifting of intercity travel restrictions and allowing restaurants, cafes and gyms to reopen.

But weddings still posed a risk. It took another month for authorities to allow weddings to resume under severe restrictions which would turn the ceremonies a far cry from traditional festivities. The move was criticized even back then by health experts as too early and too risky. And they might have been right.

What rules?

Following the decision, the Interior Ministry outlined the rules that people would have to follow at weddings.

Wedding parties will be short and held outdoors as much as possible while guests are required to wear masks and sit at least 1.5 meters (4.9 feet) apart from each other.

Only the newlywed couple is permitted to dance. Handshakes and hugs are banned and gifts usually gold coins and jewelry will be required to be placed in a box, instead of attaching it on the dress and suit of the newlywed couple.

Mass photoshoots of guests with the couple are also banned, and guests can only take a photo with the couple by adhering to social distancing.

Wedding halls are also required to hold weddings in one day with at least one hour between two weddings, to enable proper ventilation of the building. To the chagrin of children who prefer playing instead of joining adults dancing, playgrounds in wedding halls will be closed.

In their attempt to allow weddings to resume, the authorities issued rules even for the finer details, but soon after the ceremonies resumed, scenes emerged showing that they mattered little, as many people attending the weddings ignored them in favor of festivities.

Since the weddings resumed, photos and videos circulated on news outlets and social media that showed attendees standing shoulder to shoulder and performing the halay dance, a staple of Turkish weddings.

A similar disregard for rules was witnessed with the couples posing with guests for photos, or guests getting in crowded queues to gift their gold coins in person.

Health Minister Fahrettin Koca and other experts repeatedly warned that such scenes were perfect ways to contract the virus, but their warnings were left unheeded. With warnings ignored, many governorates decided to introduce further restrictions in their respective provinces.

The northern province of Karabk decided to restrict weddings to a maximum of three-hour ceremonies, while eastern Hakkari announced the duration as four hours. Ktahya province, meanwhile, banned all ceremonies and festivities outside of wedding halls.

Meanwhile, the Health Ministry introduced observers for weddings, a designated person who will make sure the rules are followed, from social distancing to wearing masks.

While members of the countrys Coronavirus Science Board claimed the majority of the weddings were carried out in line with rules and that violations occurred at around 10% of the weddings, one member of the board still warned senior citizens to avoid weddings.

The elderly should avoid going to weddings. If they must go, they should wear their mask and leave as soon as possible. What we really want is for our seniors and other at-risk groups to skip weddings altogether, professor Hasan Tezer said.

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America & Race: The Progress & the Task Ahead – National Review

The Gallant Charge of the Fifty Fourth Massachusetts (Colored) Regiment, on the Rebel works at Fort Wagner, Morris Island near Charleston, July 18th 1863, and Death of Colonel Robert G. Shaw, Currier and Ives(Keith Lance/Getty Images)It is remarkable, and it continues

There are two things that I believe to be true. First, that America has a long history of brutal and shameful mistreatment of racial minorities with black Americans its chief victims. And second, that America is a great nation, and that American citizens (and citizens of the world) should be grateful for its founding. Perhaps no nation has done more good for more people than the United States. It was and is a beacon of liberty and prosperity in a world long awash in tyranny and poverty.

In much of our modern political discourse, it seems to be taken as a given that the existence of one truth has to negate the other. A nation simply cant be great and also inflict such immense pain and suffering on so many millions of black and brown citizens.

And so the public debate warps and twists. Speak about the greatness of the nation, and critics immediately accuse you of minimizing the undeniably hideous sin of white supremacy. Emphasize white supremacy, and opponents will accuse you of minimizing the immense sacrifices of black and white soldiers in the Union Army, the undeniable progress in civil rights since Jim Crow, and the obvious fact that black and brown citizens from across the globe flock to our shores in search of the American dream.

Lets dodge that back-and-forth and go back and ask two more-fundamental questions. What is the nature of man? And what does that nature imply for the history of nations and cultures? Absent truthful answers to those questions, its not possible to accurately analyze a nations worth. And the answers are grim.

Human beings, to quote no lesser authority than Jesus Christ, are evil. As G. K. Chesterton observed, original sin is the only part of Christian theology which can really be proved. It doesnt take a historian to know that a survey of human civilization over the ages leads us to conclude that social justice has been hard to find. Indeed, there isnt even a straight line between, say, Athenian democracy and American liberty, or the Magna Carta and the American Constitution. Instead, there were times when three steps forward were followed by nine steps back.

The American republic was thus founded against the backdrop of millennia of conquest, oppression, slavery, monarchy, and tyranny all of it an expression of humanitys dark nature. That doesnt mean there werent pockets of virtue or periodic prophetic condemnations of wickedness, but the presence of evil in human affairs has been persistent and often overpowering.

Noting that the evils of slavery and conquest have been pervasive doesnt make them less evil. It does, however, help us to explain our appreciation for the American founding and the trajectory of the American nation.

That founding and that trajectory were hardly inevitable. Indeed, the introduction of slavery to our shores in 1619 showed that there was nothing particularly special about our new civilization. It was more of the dreary human same. The signing of the Declaration of Independence and the ratification of the Constitution (and the Bill of Rights) were, by contrast, remarkable. They marked the beginning of something new.

Its important to emphasize the word beginning. Ive been struggling to think of the right analogy to describe the role of the American founding in world history. Lets try a term from counterinsurgency warfare: the ink blot.

In counterinsurgency warfare, the strategist looks at a nation or countryside in chaos one thats descending into a state of nature and attempts to establish an island of safety and security. The purpose is for that island of safety and security to spread across the map the way an ink blot spreads across the paper.

The American founding declared universal principles: We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. But then its constitution and laws granted only a particularized and narrow defense of those rights.

Even the Bill of Rights, sweeping in its language, was extraordinarily limited in its scope. It originally restrained only the actions of a small and relatively weak central government. The ink blot of liberty was tiny. The only people who could confidently assert those universal rights were a small class of white male property owners clustered on the Eastern Seaboard of the new United States.

Everyone else, to a greater or lesser extent, lived still within the ordinary state of nature, with slaves, as always, the most vulnerable of all. But the combination of a universal declaration of liberty and the obvious joy and prosperity of its exercise created an unbearable tension within the new nation. There was a tension between our founding ideals and our founding reality.

Thomas Jefferson, a slave owner, understood this tension. These words, adapted from his writings, are engraved on Panel Three of the Jefferson Memorial:

God who gave us life gave us liberty. Can the liberties of a nation be secure when we have removed a conviction that these liberties are the gift of God? Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just, that His justice cannot sleep forever. Commerce between master and slave is despotism. Nothing is more certainly written in the book of fate than that these people are to be free.

It is absolutely true that too many of those Americans who enjoyed the blessings of liberty did not ponder the question Frederick Douglass posed: What to the slave is the Fourth of July? Too many, once they cashed in their own promissory note of freedom, did not concern themselves with those who were still owed a debt of liberty. But in every generation, there were Americans white and black, slave and free who sought to close the gap between promise and reality.

And make no mistake, in the face of often violent resistance, the American promise is prevailing. The ink blot of liberty is spreading, blotting out the default human background of oppression and misery. Critically, that ink blot has jumped our borders. The mightiest military power in the history of the world has used its strength to defeat the worlds worst tyrannies, secure the existence of liberal democracies from Japan to Germany, and then maintained a long and prosperous peace.

But its a mistake to think that our chief task is to point backwards, to look at the immense gap between slavery and freedom, between Jim Crow and civil rights, and believe that our work has been done. One does not undo the consequences of 345 years of legalized oppression in a mere 56 years of contentious change. Instead, our task is to continue the struggle to match American principles with American reality. Its to spread the ink blot to continue the American counterinsurgency against the chaos of history.

In July of every year, I think of two seminal infantry charges. The first occurred on July 2, 1863, when Colonel Joshua Chamberlain led the 20th Maine Infantry Regiment on a desperate counterattack against Confederate troops on Little Round Top on perhaps the most fateful day in American history day two of the Battle of Gettysburg.

The second charge happened just 16 days later, when the 54th Massachusetts Infantry launched its own desperate attack against the walls of Fort Wagner in South Carolina. The 54th was a black regiment, and its charge was a direct and physical manifestation that Americas black citizens were rising up to seize their inheritance.

The lesson of those two historic moments has been repeated time and again throughout American history. It took white Americans and black Americans to end slavery and not through a revolt against the Founding but rather through a defense of the Founding. It took white Americans and black Americans to end Jim Crow. Again, not through a revolt against the Founding but rather through a defense of the Founding. Through appeals to Americas founding promise, every marginalized American community has muscled its way into more-complete membership in the American family.

Its right to celebrate a nation that has over time combined courageous people with righteous principles to secure a more perfect union. Light the fireworks. Defend the monuments to the imperfect (though indispensable) people who in their turn and their time advanced human liberty and dignity.

Its most important, however, that we run the race in our turn, that we look forward so that future generations can look back and say of us that we didnt simply secure and maintain the gains of the past we made our own payments on that promissory note of freedom. We continued to close the gap between American principles and American reality. We have far to go, but the courageous history of this great nation should give us confidence that the best part of the American story is yet to be told.

This article appears as On Racial Progress in the July 27, 2020, print edition of National Review.

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New York State continues to make progress in the fight against COVID-19, hospitalizations dip below 800 – WSYR

Posted: Jul 11, 2020 / 01:18 PM EDT / Updated: Jul 11, 2020 / 06:12 PM EDT

(WSYR-TV) For the first time since March 18, COVID-19 hospitalizations dipped below 800 on Friday, as New York State continues to make progress in the fight against coronavirus.

New York continues to reach encouraging milestones regarding the coronavirus, as the data released on Saturday shows 799 people are currently hospitalized throughout the state with COVID-19. This is the lowest number of coronavirus hospitalizations in the state since March 18.

Tragically, six more New Yorkers lost their lives to COVID-19 on Friday, but the three-day average death toll is the lowest the state has seen since March 16.

Below is the COVID-19 data from Friday that was released by the New York State Health Department on Saturday.

New York State confirmed 730 new coronavirus cases on Friday, which is about 1.05% of the people that were tested.

Each regions percent of positive tests over the last three days can be found below.

In total, there have been over 400,000 confirmed COVID-19 cases in New York State.

Although New York State is making great progress in the fight against COVID-19, the story is much different in other parts of the country.

For more coronavirus data, click here.

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New York State continues to make progress in the fight against COVID-19, hospitalizations dip below 800 - WSYR

Bunny cuddles, fluffy feathers, and a rooster riding piggyback – Progress Index

Dinwiddie Animal Swap and Farmers Market kicks off the season

DINWIDDIE - Locals hoping to add some furry and feathered pets to their family showed up at the Dinwiddie Animal Swap and Farmers Market held at the Tractor Supply Company on Saturday.

"Due to the coronavirus pandemic, this is the first one of our third season," shared host and founder Jessica Lowe of Dinwiddie. "We have a good turnout here today selling, swapping, or trading chickens, ducks, pigs, jewelry, farm fresh eggs, baked goods, turkeys, essential oils, produce, herbal teas, quails, and much more."

Over 15 vendors set up their wares and livestock for sale in the grassy area along Boydton Plank Road. Temperatures reached the 90s, and most everyone used canopies to protect themselves and their critters from the sun.

According to Lowe, their mission is to provide access to locally grown farm animals and produced products to create a sense of community, and their goal is to increase access to locally produced nourishing and safe foods for all to enjoy.

"My mom [Becky Woods] and I have participated in swaps together since I was 10...so I guess about 14 or 15 years now," said Tiffany Crowder of Dinwiddie. "We did it through the Dinwiddie 4-H."

The monthly event is designed to encourage, support and promote entrepreneurs' efforts of local growers and artisans seeking to sell products, produce and farm animals directly to consumers and the community.

"We aim to create an opportunity for people to meet, greet, eat, learn, and to share stories, recipes and knowledge in a place dedicated to the cultivation of local products, talents, and crafts," said Lowe.

All of The Progress-Indexs coverage of coronavirus is being provided for free to our readers. Please consider supporting local journalism by subscribing to The Progress-Index at progress-index.com/subscribe.

"We like to talk shop about farming and the artisan community," said vendor Carmen Kraus of Dinwiddie. "I sell soaps, salves, gemstones and jewelry."

"We strive to create an atmosphere that serves our community not only the market but contributes to our prosperous rural areas while promoting a great sense of community," said Lowe. "Our season goes into November, and I hope to see everyone."

Are new vendors welcome?

"We welcome new vendors," said Lowe. "Were still relatively small at this time, so there is no vendor fee."

The swap and market takes place on the second Saturday of the month from 10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m. For more information, visit Dinwiddie Animal Swap and Farmers Market on Facebook or email DinwiddieSwapsTSC@gmail.com.

Kristi K. Higgins can be reached at khiggins@progress-index.com. On Twitter: @KristiHigginsPI

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Bunny cuddles, fluffy feathers, and a rooster riding piggyback - Progress Index

Opinion: We need ‘serious progress toward all of our students feeling valued and learning at their full potential’ – BethesdaMagazine.com

MCPS superintendent calls for greater urgency, purpose in eradicating racism

By Jack Smith

| Published: 2020-07-11 00:49

Most years, I spend the Fourth of July holiday enjoying the company of my family and friends; watching the joy on a grandchilds face during a fireworks display; and reflecting on my whereabouts during the many July 4 holidays Ive experienced.

This year, my social time was distanced; fireworks shows were canceled; and I was thinking of a specific July 4 in Montgomery County history I recently read about the day the last recorded lynching took place not far from where I now sit in Rockville as the superintendent of schools.

Recently, a colleague shared with me that the location of the current MCPS central office building on Hungerford Drive and Mannakee Street is close to the location of the last lynching in our county. I was forwarded an article from The Washington Post that shared the details of this horrible event.

According to the article, on July 4, 1896, a lynch mob of 20 to 30 masked men brutally killed Sidney Randolph, a 28-year-old Black man. Mr. Randolph was accused of killing a 7-year-old white girl.

The article goes on to say that the evidence against Mr. Randolph was circumstantial and conflicting, and that he lacked a motive to commit the crime. Yet, police arrested him and a mob saw fit to hang him from a chestnut tree.

While this horrific lynching occurred more than a century ago, my heart sank and my anger was intense as if it had just happened. My thoughts raced forward in time to the 2020 killings of Ahmaud Arbery and George Floyd.

In the last 124 years, we have traveled to the bottom of the ocean and into space; created the internet; and sequenced the human genome. Yet, as a country, we are still unable to protect, value and respect the life and liberty of Black Americans, specifically Black men.

I believe Montgomery County has made progress toward this goal by being on the forefront of desegregation of schools in the 1950s; by years of equity policies and initiatives in the school system; and by the countys passage of a Racial Equity and Social Justice law in 2019.

However,recent social media posts from students of color in our school system that detail their experiences with racism and bias in our schools are a stark reminder that there is much more work to be done. In some of these posts, students shared allegations of bias, stereotyping and racism at the hands of their peers and, more disturbingly, our staff members.

I am grateful to those who stepped forward to share their painful, personal stories. They help us do the work that must be done.

Many of the experiences highlighted in the social media posts reflect what research has confirmed implicit bias exists across the educational spectrum, including preschool. The research also shows that this bias can contribute to disparities in academic outcomes for students of color.

I have no reason to believe that students and educators in our county are immune. Moreover, we know that public education institutions, including MCPS, have only taught a small fraction of what students should know about the Black experience in the United States, including the barriers that exist to full access and opportunity in education.

The good news is we know that bias can be interrupted and curricula can be enhanced to achieve these goals. The MCPS staff is working to enhance our mandatory equity and cultural proficiency training and practices. Work is underway to integrate cultural proficiency and implicit bias training with effective instructional practice and sound content knowledge into all professional learning experiences.

By changing the experience of our students of color through culturally responsive relationships and expanding learning opportunities, we can truly unleash the potential of our students.

Additionally, we have made significant changes to our elementary and middle school literacy and math curricula. Next, we must work on high school literacy, as well as social studies and other curricula at all levels. Providing curricula that meet the needs of our students and creating equitable access and opportunity across the system must continue to be the priority.

While we have made progress in many areas, we must work with a greater sense of urgency and purpose. I am not naive, but I am committed. We will not be able to eradicate racism overnight.

Based on the story of Sidney Randolph and the aforementioned social media posts, racism and bias have long roots. But I believe we can and must move the needle quickly.

I expect to see serious progress toward all of our students feeling valued and learning at their full potential by the time July 4 arrives next year. We cannot wait another century for change.

Jack Smith is the superintendent of Montgomery County Public Schools.

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Opinion: We need 'serious progress toward all of our students feeling valued and learning at their full potential' - BethesdaMagazine.com

For Boston College womens basketball team, early progress is easy to see – The Boston Globe

Now its not so much that people have to really believe in something that hasnt been done yet. They can actually see the steps that weve made and the progress weve made going toward one of the top teams in the country, which is the goal.

The Eagles already have reaped the benefits on the recruiting trail, lining up a trio of players last fall in the 2020 class that are expected to make immediate contributions.

The group is led by 6-foot guard Josiah Lacey, an ESPN five-star recruit from Westtown (Pa.) High School.

She is athletic, has the ability to shoot from the outside and also finish around the basket, and her length and her speed allow her to play really good defense, Bernabei-McNamee said. I think shell be a really good two-way player that can generate some offense, and also not just by working within the offense, but also with her good defense.

The Eagles also added a floor general in Kaylah Ivey out of Riverdale Baptist in Maryland.

She is really a pass-first point guard but truly has the ability to score, Bernabei-McNamee said. Thats really the best kind of point guard. She has great court vision, she sees the floor, she knows the correct pass, but she can also hit the 3 and hit a pull-up jumper. I see her being able to fit into what we do offensively.

Bernabei-McNamees offense depends on a skilled post player, and 6-foot-2 inch forward Sydney McQuietor fits the mold coming out of Keller (Texas) High School.

Shes a crafty lefty, Bernabei-McNamee said. Shes a touch undersized at the post, but because she has that craftiness and the ability to shoot and a really soft touch around the basket, I think shes going to have the capabilities to do something for us as well.

The Eagles 2020 class is ranked 22nd in the country by Blue Star Basketball. The players started online courses at Boston College this week.

In a normal summer, the Eagles coaching staff would get seven weeks with incoming players, with four hours of skill development and four hours of weight training along with pickup games. The weekends provide an opportunity to host recruits, and for players to bond either on campus or with trips into the city.

As the country continues to rebound from the COVID-19 pandemic, the Eagles have had to navigate different circumstances.

Thats the part of this that really stinks for us, is we take so much pride in the way we develop players once we get them, and I think the biggest growth for skill development is in the summertime, Bernabei-McNamee said. They always say thats when players are made is during the offseason and I completely believe that.

That theyre missing out on right now is tragic I think for our players, but I do think this distance will help them. You know how absence makes the heart grow fonder? I really think they are all dying to get back together. They miss each other, they miss us, they miss Boston College.

As the Eagles look to 2021, 6-foot-2-inch forward Ally VanTimmeren (Jenison High School, in Michigan) announced her commitment to BC in May. Recruiting under quarantine forced Bernabei-McNamee to adjust.

The thing, I guess, that makes it most different for us is that face-to-face, our personality and getting to know us and what were about comes through a lot better when we can be together and really in front of recruits and their families, she said.

Without the true face-to-face experience, she had to take advantage of technology, whether it was by hosting a Zoom meeting or sharing a video so recruits could get a sense of the campus experience.

A lot of the process was already under way, Bernabei-McNamee said. The 2021 class, we had already established good relationships with them and it was more looking forward to getting them on campus for their official or unofficial visits. Then when this whole pandemic hit it was more, OK, youre not going to get to visit us officially or unofficially right now, but we can bring part of campus to you via Zoom.'

Typically, the recruiting process gives recruits a chance to meet the current players and get a feel for the program. The NCAA tweaked its rules to allow recruits to reach out to players. Recruits from the 2021 class can participate in team Zoom calls.

I hate that weve missed out on being in person, Bernabei-McNamaee said. Weve spent so much of the recruiting process on the phone and maybe doing FaceTimes or on the phone. We really cherish the time when we finally get to come face-to-face with them. So missing out on that part has been a little sad for us, but everybodys on an equal playing field and everyones missing out on that right now.

Julian Benbow can be reached at julian.benbow@globe.com.

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For Boston College womens basketball team, early progress is easy to see - The Boston Globe

The Shadow of Progress – Merion West

In a worldview that prizes purity above progress, the flawed and erroneous are stains to be expunged. Their remembrance is not only deplorable but damning by association.

Indeed, history is nothing more than a tableau of crimes and misfortunes. History is nothing but a pack of tricks that we play upon the dead.

~Voltaire

We are at war with the past. What began as a stand against state-sponsored violence has metastasized; it has spread to every facet of politics and culture and has spiraled to the brink of complete moral frenzy. The anti-racism Leftstill well in the throes of George Floyds deathhas moved away from the police, politicians, and partisan prejudice towards a new (or, rather, not-so-new) nemesis: the pages of history themselves.

In its crusade against racial and social injustice, Black Lives Matter and its ideological peers are making no exceptions for neither the ancient nor the antiquated. They make no distinctions among those who lived 50, 100, or even 1,000 years ago. Indeed, from the indignant throngs of recent weeks, we have stood witness to a second wave of statue removalsranging from democratic campaigns to criminal defenestrationsacross the United States and beyond, in what can only be described as some desperate attempt at historical redaction. In a worldview that prizes purity above progress, the flawed and erroneous are stains to be expunged. Their remembrance is not only deplorable but damning by association.

It is this latter sentiment that should have us most concerned. While it is the nature of cynical traditions to deny progress and its many achievements, it is an entirely new form of pessimism to deplore its very existence. If ones worldview is a mixture of mistrust and misanthropy, it should come as no surprise that ones past appears populated by villains and reprobates. It should come as no surprise in principleas we shall seebut it is a novel and enfeebling mistake to bear such wickedness as ones own. In reaching so deep into the gutters of the past, we are finding ourselves sullied with regard to the present. We find ourselves sickened by the legacies of evil. In merely perceiving the long-since departed, we find ourselves shackledand, in many cases, sentencedby the sins of our fathers.

Such is the nature of our new, historical masochism. It is a fallacy that owes, in large part, to presentism: the tendency to judge the past by todays morality. It is a mistake that centers on days gone by, but it threatens everything that we have achieved and stand for in the future. This is not hyperbole: The war against history is a philosophical mistake bordering on existential threat not because those who do not learn history are doomed to repeat itbut because it was never really about history in the first place. It is about progress. The presentism paradox is all about how we can only perceive past evils from a position of virtue. Its mistake is to conflate the two. The result is a war not against those historical failures we deplorebut against their corrections. We are at war with our achievements.

As a society, we stand at a unique perspective throughout history. We exist at the pinnacle of all scientific, technological, and moral understanding after a long and distinguished career of misery. Fans of Steven Pinkers 2011 book The Better Angels of Our Nature will be familiar with this position, as well as his trademark brand of quantitative optimism. Those who are not may think it perverse to even suggest. How could a society racked with injustice, plagued with war, and all but enthralled by the specter of power be anything but detestable? How could a civilization poised to destroy itself be anything other than falling apart?

The answers are, in part, factual and, in part, philosophical. The short version is: It is not true. It is not true that we have reached new heights of death and despair. It is not true that our destruction is imminent. Indeed, Pinkers work remains as our greatest rebuke of such despondency. He shows us how the opposite is true; he shows us all the ways in which we are healthier, happier, more wealthy, more peaceful, more compassionate, and more loving than ever before. By every metric, material and meaning-filled, we are leading the way to a better tomorrow. We have known this for some time nowever since the Enlightenment and its exceptional achievements, heretical visionaries have dared to honor an unprecedented success. Pinker is just the latest in a long line of heroic optimists, building upon the sentiments of such Enlightenment figures as William Godwin, Anthony Ashley-Cooper and, some centuries later, the philosopher Karl Popper. In his 1963 book Conjectures and Refutations, it was Popper who wrote:

In spite of our great and serious troubles, and in spite of the fact that ours is surely not the best possible society, I assert that our own free world is by far the best society which has come into existence during the course of human history.

Not quite convinced? That is okay. In any other argument of this type, contemporary optimism would require further defense. There is more to be said about destitution, climate change, existential risk, Our Final Hour, and Superintelligence; there is more to be discussed if one hopes to dispel an adored desperation. But it is the miraculous irony of our newest afflictionstanding in the face of such a robust and wistful gloomthat the fight against history is itself optimistic. In order to admonish with righteous authority, one must first assume some measure of moral advantage. One must first contend some basis by which abolition supplants enslavement.

Concealed within the logic of our new-found presentism is a commitment to moral realism. After all, crimes are only so much if we are correct in our convictions. This stands in stark contrast to the moral and epistemological relativism so treasured by the Left: a relativism from which many derive contempt towards a uniquely Western hubris. However, as we have seen, it is a hubris shared across oceans of time if not water, against those less fortunate in wisdom. I am sure that the relativist-Left, alerted to their spatial and temporal hypocrisy, shall be quick to renounce such bigotry: one they so selectively despise.

But probably notit is foundational to their cherished masochism. They have arrived at a contemporary optimism by accident; they subvert it to pessimistic ends. This is the error I am referring to: a bizarre new form of moral and historical inversion that holds solutions accountable for their problems, progress accountable for its obstacles, and the present accountable for its past. In their view, our superior vantage is merely a window into damnation. In 2020, hindsight is blinding.

But there is another way! Despite its seductive nature, historical pessimism is a surprisingly easy mistake to correct forif you know how. The answer is gratitude. The correct response to fortune is thanks and compassion to those with lessnot guilt and hatred of those with more. And if history is the shadow cast by progress, then we should feel grateful that it is cast behind usnot forward, or downwardsand be careful not to heed its familiar call. As Pinker urges us to recall:

If the past is a foreign country, it is a shockingly violent one. It is easy to forget how dangerous life used to be, how deeply brutality was once woven into the fabric of daily existence. Cultural memory pacifies the past, leaving us with pale souvenirs whose bloody origins have been bleached away.

It is easy to forget just how far we have come. It is easy to forget just how mistaken we can be, and have been, and are; and we should be thankful. We should be thankful that in place of past monsters we have only their monuments, that in place of old slavers we have only their memory. The shadow of progress is an illusion cast by self-doubt. It is a mistake. When we do look towards the past, towards those figures less privileged than ourselves, we should do so with compassion, and forgiveness, for the right to condemn is, itself, a sign of good fortune. We should embrace our privileges as giftsnot sins. And we must understand thatmore than any otherour greatest privilege is the time in which we find ourselves. Our greatest privilege is today. We should be quick to salute it.

Tom Hyde is a graduate of University College London and a freelance writer. He is primarily interested in how science and philosophy influence cultural trends.

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The Shadow of Progress - Merion West

The Limits of Democrats’ Climate Progress – The New Republic

Thursday morning, the World Meteorological Organization released a report projecting that there is a one in five chance of global temperatures rising by 1.5 degrees Celsius (2.7 degrees Fahrenheit) in the next five years, a line beyond which millions of livelihoods will become unviable and homes uninhabitable. In the midst of a summer that has already seen Siberia on fire, the prediction felt more than plausible.

The day before, a group of Joe Biden and Bernie Sanders advisers focused on projecting unity in the Democratic Party released 110 pages worth of policy recommendations, starting with climate policy. The persistent sit-ins, climate strikes, and insurgent candidate success stories of the past four years seem to have accomplished this much: The policy recommendations contained in this document, like just about every other climate plan to emerge from mainstream nodes of the Democratic Party in the last year, are orders of magnitude more sweeping than anyone, even Sanders, would have thought possible in 2016. Thanks doubtless to the influence of the Sunrise Movements Varshini Prakash, Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, and other left-leaning members of the unity advisers climate segment, the documents climate goals are ambitious: zeroing out building and power sector emissions by 2030 and 2035, respectively; an embrace of environmental justice principles and targeted investments in this countrys most vulnerable communities; installing 500 million solar panels in five years; the creation of a Cabinet position for emissions reductions. Encouragingly, climate also makes an appearance in the recommendations of the economy and immigration recommendations.

Still, the recommendations for phasing out fossil fuels remain weak. The plan doesnt fully grapple with the crisis now gripping oil and gas companies and the financial sector that supports them. Few international commitments are suggested, leaving the United States to eat up most of the worlds remaining carbon budget.

The plans are better than they were. The plans are not enough. What are the plans for?

Though its ostensibly my job to analyze these kinds of climate plans on their own terms, the whole exercise is starting to feel pretty pointless. Documents like the task force recommendationslike presidential campaign platforms or the House Committee on the Climate Crisis reportreally only indicate where were starting from. So far, all the plans on offer will likely produce warming greater than two degrees Celsius. And thats a relatively rosy scenario.

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The Limits of Democrats' Climate Progress - The New Republic

AweSun update supports macOS to accelerate the progress of building connections from anywhere – Help Net Security

AweRay, an international remote desktop service provider, released AweSun updated version which supports macOS in the US and worldwide. Since its initial launch, AweSun solutions for remote desktop have already covered Windows, iOS and Android devices.

And now, its support for macOS comprehensively achieve the goal of cross-platform connections. The technology firm is dedicated to achieve their work ambition: make connections anywhere, anytime.

AweSun Remote Desktop enables people to connect to remote work computer, from home laptop, iPad or iPhone. It facilitates remote access to any device as if users were right in front of them. As the most affordable remote desktop solution on the market, AweSun offers free yet powerful features which users expect to find in other paid software.

Including all the features the Free Version provides, the upgraded Pro Version enables users to perform Remote CMD and access to the remote camera. IT professionals and experts can get more convenience from the enhanced features.

AweSun Game Version, which attracts much attention, makes the software stand out among its competitors. The Game Version enables users to customize a gaming keyboard on the mobile device. Users can therefore freely play favourite PC games on their phones.

As a remote access service provider, AweSun is deeply aware that our users pose great emphasis on security and privacy. Out of security concern, AweSun adopts a two-factor authentication with RSA/AES (256-bit) encryption method to ensure a secure line. Privacy security is AweSuns priority.

Meanwhile, AweSun has never stopped continuously updating and developing products. In March, 2020, AweSun launched the AweSun Client app installed for mobile devices. The app offers a great solution for users who want to assist their family, friends, or clients with phone setup, app installation, or troubleshooting.

In June, 2020, AweSun for Windows 1.5 provides users with a series of new features and upgrades, including two-way audio, dual-authentication access to optimize remote connection.

Maybe thats one of the reasons that AweSun received many thanks letters this year. Remote work is not an experimental trail or an ideal concept today. Technology firms like AweSun are making smart tools for all.

During recent work from home wave, the surge in the number of users is obvious and many users expressed their gratitude to AweSun for providing a free and practical tool that help them quickly adapt to remote work, said Joseph Chan, CEO of AweRay Limited.

The release of AweSun for macOS strengthens AweSuns position in the market as the most reliable and most affordable remote desktop solution available. Multi-platform remote connection offers our customers a more effective user experience. As AweRays vision goes, empowering everyone with the tools they need to do great work and have great fun.

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AweSun update supports macOS to accelerate the progress of building connections from anywhere - Help Net Security

McLaren: Were making progress in the right direction – Grand Prix 247

McLaren report from the Styrian Grand Prix, Round 2 of the 2020 Formula 1 World Championship at Red Bull Ring in which their drivers Lando Norris finished fifth and Carlos Sainz crossed the line in ninth.

Carlos Sainz: A very disappointing day for me. We missed out on big points after a problem at the pit-stop. The first part of the race we were running P5 with a solid pace and managing the gap to the cars behind.

Unfortunately, we had a bad pit-stop, which meant we came out of the pits in the middle of traffic. I had to push too hard too early to try to recover the gap, and that drained my battery and ultimately compromised my tyres for the second part of the race.

One of those days when nothing goes your way. Time to turn the page and come back stronger, but we missed out on a good P5 today. We win and we lose as a team, so well try to fight back in Hungary next week.

Lando Norris: A very good race from us today. First of all, the team did an awesome job with the strategy and I did a good job with managing the Soft tyres in the first stint.

We got to lap 39 before we boxed and that was one of the key aspects to our race in allowing us to be so strong in the second stint, to go out on the Mediums and be one of the fastest on track for some of the laps. We managed to go from tenth all the way up to fifth, with three of those overtakes on the final two laps.

It was a race where I had to go forwards and not maintain my position like I had to last week. It was much more a race of attacking and overtaking, which was nice to do. Very happy for myself but even more for the team, and getting some more points on the board with also the fastest lap from Carlos.

A really good two weekends and a very good start to the season. We just need to try to maintain it into the next one.

Andreas Seidl, Team Principal: Second race in a row here in Austria and another good performance from the team and both drivers. Its great to see both cars finish in the points, confirming were making progress in the right direction.

We could see that both in dry and wet conditions we have a car that can fight with the competitors around us, which is obviously very encouraging moving forward. It will be very interesting to see if we can now carry this performance and momentum into Hungary and to other tracks with different characteristics.

We want to apologise to Carlos for the issue we had at his first pit-stop, which made his race more difficult than it shouldve been. The delay cost him several track positions and we sent him into heavy traffic, which ruined his tyres and didnt allow him to fight for the position he deserved to be in today.

Carlos didnt give up and did a great job securing the fastest lap, the second time in a row for us. Lando showed hes a fighter despite the pain he suffered during the weekend. He continued to perform and stepped up when it really mattered, especially in the second half of the race and again with some exciting final laps. Great teamwork between the two drivers swapping on track when it was needed.

Thank you again to Renault for ensuring we got the most out of our power unit and maximising our performance over the course of this weekend in varying weather conditions.

Tomorrow we start another race week. Well take away a lot of positives from these first two weekends, but at the same time well focus on all the areas we have to improve. As always, well use the time next week to analyse in detail what happened, try to learn from it and come back stronger in Budapest.

Well done to the FIA, F1 and the local promoter here in Austria, who allowed us to race again in the safest manner possible. Finally, a massive thank you to our partners and fans for their continued support, which has been incredible again despite not being able to be at the track with us.

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McLaren: Were making progress in the right direction - Grand Prix 247

YMCA fire: Crews making progress on wildfire burning near Caon City – OutThere Colorado

Firefighters expect to continue making progress Friday containing theYMCA fire that has burned nearly 300 acres southwest of Caon City, theBureau of Land Management said.

Firefighters started to take the upper hand Thursday on the lightning-caused fire.

The fire was 30% contained as of 8 p.m. Thursday. Helicopters continued making bucket drops of water through the day to cool off hot spots and hit spots that were inaccessible by ground crews.

Much of the smoke produced on Thursday was from interior fuels, the BLM said, which kept the fire from growing significantly. Overnight, it had grown from about 100 acres to 268 acres. The fire is currently mapped at 293 acres.

Although containment is increasing, smoke and possibly flames will continue to be visible from Caon City and neighboring areas.

The fire was reported about 3:37 p.m. Wednesday on Bureau of Land Management-Royal Gorge Field Office lands. No structures are threatened, no evacuation orders are planned.

According to the Caon City Area Fire Protection District, the fire was in the area of Temple Canyon.

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YMCA fire: Crews making progress on wildfire burning near Caon City - OutThere Colorado

Burglary in progress calls lead to two arrests within minutes – Hot Springs Sentinel

Hot Springs police responding to separate burglary in progress calls Wednesday evening ended up arresting a homeless man and a local teen on felony charges within about 10 minutes of each other.

Sky Starr Daulton, 18, who lists a Helen Street address, was taken into custody at 5:32 p.m. in the 1600 block of Seventh Street and charged with residential burglary, punishable by up to 20 years in prison, and Lawrence Shawn Howell, 44, who is reportedly homeless, was taken into custody at 5:41 p.m. in the 200 block of Pansy Street and charged with breaking or entering, punishable by up to six years in prison.

Both remained in custody Thursday with Daulton being held on a $5,000 bond and Howell being held on a $2,500 bond. They are both set to appear today in Garland County District Court.

According to the probable cause affidavit on Daulton, shortly before 5:30 p.m., officers responded to a residence in the 1600 block of Seventh Street after the homeowner called to report there was an unknown man who had broken into his house through a window in the back and was still inside.

Officers spoke with the owner and called out to the suspect, later identified as Daulton, from the front of the residence, but he refused to come outside.

Officers made entry and utilized K-9 Nitro, who reportedly located and apprehended Dalton in a back bedroom. Officers noted Daulton had broken glass on his clothing so LifeNet was called to the scene to check him out. He was cleared and taken into custody without further incident.

It was noted the back window, valued at $200, and a front glass door, valued at $200, were broken. When interviewed at the police department, Daulton allegedly said he had "scoped out" the residence earlier in the day to "make sure no other people were staying there."

He said he came back around 5 p.m. and tried to break in without causing any damage. He said he put a chair at the front door to keep anyone else from coming in. He reportedly admitted he later heard the homeowner and then heard officers, but still didn't come out until the dog found him.

According to the probable cause affidavit for Howell, around 5:30 p.m. officers responded to a residence in the 200 block of Pansy Street regarding a burglary in progress and upon arrival made contact with Howell at the scene and detained him.

They spoke to the female resident of the house next door who is reportedly the caretaker for the vacant house where the burglary had reportedly occurred. She stated she saw a shed door at the residence was open and then heard someone inside the house. Moments later, she said she saw Howell coming out the front door.

Inside the house, they noted several items that had been removed from the shed, including a folding chair, an ice chest, two toolboxes, a weed trimmer, leaf blower, hand tools and an air conditioning unit.

The owner of the residence came to the scene and indicated she wanted to press charges. It was determined a window screen had been removed off the shed which allowed entry into the house.

When questioned, Howell allegedly claimed he had paid someone he "knows from the streets" $174 to rent the house for the night. He said the person he rented it from had dropped him off earlier that morning and he had unloaded items from that person's truck and put them inside.

Howell denied ever entering the shed on the property. He said the person he rented the house from had opened the front door for him that morning and that he had swept the floors and slept there during the day.

Lawrence Shawn Howell - Submitted photo

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Burglary in progress calls lead to two arrests within minutes - Hot Springs Sentinel

Progress On Leading Health Care of Louisianas New $4.5M Home Office – Developing Lafayette

Last year, in October, we shared the news that Leading Health Care of Louisiana started construction on a new 4.5 million dollar m home office building, located at 206 La Rue Francejust off Pinhook Road.

You can read more about this in our initial post here: https://developinglafayette.com/wp/new-4-5m-home-office-building-to-house-lafayette-based-leading-health-care-of-louisiana/Rendering of the new facility provided by Lynn Guidry

Just the other day, we asked ourselves, what does this project look like now? It has been several monthsalmost a yearand you really arent able to see the building from Pinhook. So we decided to go check it out.

It appears that most of the steel structure is up and wall paneling will start to go up shortly if it hasnt already.

The building will be a two-story facility with approximately 20,000 square feet. The architect for the project is Lynn Guidry Architect from Carencro, and the general contractor is Master Builders & Specialists from Lafayette.

Tentative completion was set for the Summer of 2020, but with this global pandemic, the timeline appears to be pushed back some.

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Progress On Leading Health Care of Louisianas New $4.5M Home Office - Developing Lafayette


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