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Nanobiotechnology Applications, Markets and Companies, 2017-2021 & 2026 – GlobeNewswire (press release)

Dublin, Sept. 07, 2017 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The "Nanobiotechnology Applications, Markets and Companies" report from Jain PharmaBiotech has been added to Research and Markets' offering.

The report starts with an introduction to various techniques and materials that are relevant to nanobiotechnology. It includes some of the physical forms of energy such as nanolasers. Some of the technologies are scaling down such as microfluidics to nanofluidic biochips and others are constructions from bottom up. Application in life sciences research, particularly at the cell level sets the stage for role of nanobiotechnology in healthcare in subsequent chapters.

An increasing use of nanobiotechnology by the pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries is anticipated. Nanotechnology will be applied at all stages of drug development - from formulations for optimal delivery to diagnostic applications in clinical trials. Many of the assays based on nanobiotechnology will enable high-throughput screening. Some of nanostructures such as fullerenes are themselves drug candidates as they allow precise grafting of active chemical groups in three-dimensional orientations. The most important pharmaceutical applications are in drug delivery. Apart from offering a solution to solubility problems, nanobiotechnology provides and intracellular delivery possibilities. Skin penetration is improved in transdermal drug delivery. A particularly effective application is as nonviral gene therapy vectors. Nanotechnology has the potential to provide controlled release devices with autonomous operation guided by the needs.

Nanomedicine is now within the realm of reality starting with nanodiagnostics and drug delivery facilitated by nanobiotechnology. Miniature devices such as nanorobots could carry out integrated diagnosis and therapy by refined and minimally invasive procedures, nanosurgery, as an alternative to crude surgery. Applications of nanobiotechnology are described according to various therapeutic systems. Nanotechnology will markedly improve the implants and tissue engineering approaches as well. Of the over 1,000 clinical trials of nanomedicines, approximately 100 are selected and tabulated in major therapeutic areas. Other applications such as for management of biological warfare injuries and poisoning are included. Contribution of nanobiotechnology to nutrition and public health such as supply of purified water are also included.

Future nanobiotechnology markets are calculated on the basis of the background markets in the areas of application and the share of this market by new technologies and state of development at any given year in the future. This is based on a comprehensive and thorough review of the current status of nanobiotechnology, research work in progress and anticipated progress. There is definite indication of large growth of the market but it will be uneven and cannot be plotted as a steady growth curve. Marketing estimates are given according to areas of application, technologies and geographical distribution starting with 2016. The largest expansion is expected between the years 2021 and 2026.

Profiles of 252 companies, out of over 500 involved in this area, are included in the last chapter along with their 183 collaborations.The report is supplemented with 51 Tables, 31 figures and 800 references to the literature.

Key Topics Covered:

Part I: Applications & Markets

1. Introduction

2. Nanotechnologies

3. Nanotechnologies for Basic Research Relevant to Medicine

4. Nanomolecular Diagnostics

5. Nanopharmaceuticals

6. Role of Nanotechnology in Biological Therapies

7. Nanodevices & Techniques for Clinical Applications

8. Nanooncology

9. Nanoneurology

10. Nanocardiology

11. Nanopulmonology

12. Nanoorthopedics

13. Nanoophthalmology

14. Nanomicrobiology

15. Miscellaneous Healthcare Applications of Nanobiotechnology

16. Nanobiotechnology and Personalized Medicine

17. Nanotoxicology

18. Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Nanomedicine

19. Research and Future of Nanomedicine

20. Nanobiotechnology Markets

21. References

Part II: Companies

22. Nanobiotech Companies

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/research/xnnnck/nanobiotechnology

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Nanobiotechnology Applications, Markets and Companies, 2017-2021 & 2026 - GlobeNewswire (press release)

Global Nanomedicine Industry 2017 Market Growth, Trends and Demands Research Report – MENAFN.COM

(MENAFN Editorial) iCrowdNewswire - Sep 4, 2017

The Global Nanomedicine Market 2017 Industry Research Report' report provides a basic overview of the industry including its definition, applications and manufacturing technology. Then, the report explores the Global major industry players in detail.

The Global Nanomedicine Market Research Report 2017 renders deep perception of the key regional market status of the Nanomedicine Industry on a global level that primarily aims the core regions which comprises of continents like Europe, North America, and Asia and the key countries such as United States, Germany, #China and Japan.

Complete report on Nanomedicine market report spread across 116 pages, profiling 12 companies and supported with tables and figuresavailable @

The report on 'Global Nanomedicine Market is a professional report which provides thorough knowledge along with complete information pertaining to the Nanomedicine industry propos classifications, definitions, applications, industry chain summary, industry policies in addition to plans, product specifications, manufacturing processes, cost structures, etc.

The potential of this industry segment has been rigorously investigated in conjunction with primary market challenges. The present market condition and future prospects of the segment has also been examined. Moreover, key strategies in the market that includes product developments, partnerships, mergers and acquisitions, etc., are discussed. Besides, upstream raw materials and equipment and downstream demand analysis is also conducted.

Report Includes:-

The report cloaks the market analysis and projection of 'Nanomedicine Market on a regional as well as global level. The report constitutes qualitative and quantitative valuation by industry analysts, first-hand data, assistance from industry experts along with their most recent verbatim and each industry manufacturers via the market value chain. The research experts have additionally assessed the in general sales and revenue generation of this particular market. In addition, this report also delivers widespread analysis of root market trends, several governing elements and macro-economic indicators, coupled with market improvements as per every segment.

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Global Nanomedicine market competition by top manufacturers/players, with Nanomedicine sales volume, Price (USD/MT), revenue (Million USD) and market share for each manufacturer/player; the top players including: GE Healthcare, Johnson & Johnson, Mallinckrodt plc, Merck & Co. Inc., Nanosphere Inc., Pfizer Inc., SigmaTau Pharmaceuticals Inc., Smith & Nephew PLC, Stryker Corp, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., UCB (Union chimique belge) S.A

The report is generically segmented into six parts and every part aims on the overview of the Nanomedicine industry, present condition of the market, feasibleness of the investment along with several strategies and policies. Apart from the definition and classification, the report also discusses the analysis of import and export and describes a comparison of the market that is focused on the trends and development. Along with entire framework in addition to in-depth details, one can prepare and stay ahead of the competitors across the targeted locations. The fact that this market report renders details about the major market players along with their product development and current trends proves to be very beneficial for fresh entrants to comprehend and recognize the industry in an improved manner. The report also enlightens the productions, sales, supply, market condition, demand, growth, and forecast of the Nanomedicine industry in the global markets.

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Every region's market has been studied thoroughly in this report which deals with the precise information pertaining to the Marketing Channels and novel project investments so that the new entrants as well as the established market players conduct intricate research of trends and analysis in these regional markets. Acknowledging the status of the environment and products' up gradation, the market report foretells each and every detail.So as to fabricate this report, complete key details, strategies and variables are examined so that entire useful information is amalgamated together for the understanding and studying the key facts pertaining the global Nanomedicine Industry. The production value and market share in conjunction with the SWOT analysis everything is integrated in this report.

Table of Contents

1 Nanomedicine Market Overview 2 Global Nanomedicine Market Competition by Manufacturers 3 Global Nanomedicine Capacity, Production, Revenue (Value) by Region (2011-2016) 4 Global Nanomedicine Supply (Production), Consumption, Export, Import by Regions (2011-2016) 5 Global Nanomedicine Production, Revenue (Value), Price Trend by Type 6 Global Nanomedicine Market Analysis by Application 7 Global Nanomedicine Manufacturers Profiles/Analysis

8 Nanomedicine Manufacturing Cost Analysis 9 Industrial Chain, Sourcing Strategy and Downstream Buyers 10 Marketing Strategy Analysis, Distributors/Traders 11 Market Effect Factors Analysis 12 Global Nanomedicine Market Forecast (2016-2021) 13 Research Findings and Conclusion

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Global Nanomedicine Industry 2017 Market Growth, Trends and Demands Research Report - MENAFN.COM

Nanomedicine Research Journal

Nanomedicine Research Journal (Abbreviation: Nanomed Res J)

is an international, open access, peer-reviewed, electronic and print quarterly publication released by the Iranian Society of Nanomedicine (ISNM). Nanomedicine Research Journal publishes original research articles, review papers, mini review papers, case reports and short communications covering a wide range of field-specific and interdisciplinary theoretical and experimental results related to applications of nanoscience and nanotechnology in medicine including, but not limited to, diagnosis, treatment, monitoring, prediction and prevention of diseases, tissue engineering, nano bio-sensors, functionalized carriers and targeted drug delivery systems.

* Publication process of manuscripts submitted to Nanomed Res J is free of charge.

To see Acceptance timeline Please follow the link below:

Acceptance Timeline Diagram

About the publisher

Founded in 2011 by the leading ofSchool of Advanced Technologies in medicine (SATiM),Tehran University of Medical Sciences (TUMS) and Iran Nanotechnology Initiative Council, the Iranian Society of Nanomedicine (ISNM) attempts to promote and develop medical nanotechnology in Iran. For more information about the publisher, please visit us at http://isnm.ir/en/.

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Nanomedicine Research Journal

Molecular nanosubmarines can target and kill specific cancer cells – New Atlas

In 2015, scientists from Rice University revealed they had created light-driven nanosubmarines. These tiny molecular machines were activated by ultraviolet light and based on earlier work from Nobel laureate Bernard Feringa, whose ground-breaking research won the prize for chemistry in 2016. These single-molecule machines have now been shown to be able to target, and drill into, specific cancer cells, paving the way for a variety of highly targeted future nanomedicine treatments.

These molecular machines consist of 244 atoms with a tail-like propeller that creates propulsion when exposed to UV light. After proving the concept worked back in 2015, the team moved on to exploring whether the molecular motor could penetrate an individual cell.

"We thought it might be possible to attach these nanomachines to the cell membrane and then turn them on to see what happened," explains chemist James Tour.

First the team needed to attach the molecular motor to a component that allowed it to target a specific cell. In these early experiments a peptide was utilized that drove the molecule to attach itself to the membrane of human prostate cancer cells. The molecules were shown to effectively locate and attach to the targeted cells, but not drill into them until specifically triggered by UV light. Once triggered, the motors spun up to two to three million rotations per second to break through the cell membrane and kill the cell within one to three minutes.

The obvious challenge that needs to be overcome is to develop an activation trigger other than ultraviolet light, which currently limits the molecular motors to being controllable when concentrated at the surface of tissue. Other triggers are currently being investigated, with near infra-red (IR) light looking like the best option to control these motors when delivered deep into a body.

"In this process, the motor will absorb two photons simultaneously and get enough energy to start the rotor," says Gufeng Wang, a chemist on the Rice University team. "Since near IR light has deep penetration depth, we are no longer limited to the surface of the tissue."

There is much work that still needs to be done before these molecular motors become a real, clinical treatment, but there are a variety of exciting outcomes this technology promises. As well as targeting and destroying cancer cells, the molecular motors could be utilized to deliver drugs directly into diseased cells.

As well as working on additional activation mechanisms, the team is embarking on a series of small animal tests to examine the effectiveness of the molecules on living organisms.

"The researchers are already proceeding with experiments in microorganisms and small fish to explore the efficacy in-vivo," says Tour. "The hope is to move this swiftly to rodents to test the efficacy of nanomachines for a wide range of medicinal therapies."

The research was published in the journal Nature and the video below provides a closer look at the team's breakthrough.

Source: Rice University

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Molecular nanosubmarines can target and kill specific cancer cells - New Atlas

Nanomedicine Market Growth Opportunities for Distributers 2017 – Equity Insider (press release)

Global Nanomedicine Market Research Report 2017 to 2022 provides a unique tool for evaluating the market, highlighting opportunities, and supporting strategic and tactical decision-making. This report recognizes that in this rapidly-evolving and competitive environment, up-to-date marketing information is essential to monitor performance and make critical decisions for growth and profitability. It provides information on trends and developments, and focuses on markets and materials, capacities and technologies, and on the changing structure of the Nanomedicine Market.

Companies Mentioned are GE Healthcare, Johnson & Johnson, Mallinckrodt plc, Merck & Co. Inc., Nanosphere Inc., Pfizer Inc., Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals Inc., Smith & Nephew PLC, Stryker Corp, Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., UCB (Union chimique belge) S.A.

Primary sources are mainly industry experts from core and related industries, and suppliers, manufacturers, distributors, service providers, and organizations related to all segments of the industrys supply chain. The bottom-up approach was used to estimate the global market size of Nanomedicine based on end-use industry and region, in terms of value. With the data triangulation procedure and validation of data through primary interviews, the exact values of the overall parent market, and individual market sizes were determined and confirmed in this study.

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This report segments the global Nanomedicine market on the basis of types Regenerative Medicine, In-vitro & In-vivo Diagnostics, Vaccines, Drug Delivery. On the basis of application Clinical Cardiology, Urology, Genetics, Orthopedics, Ophthalmology.

Essential points covered in Global Nanomedicine Market 2017 Research are:-

This independent 116 page report guarantees you will remain better informed than your competition. With over 170 tables and figures examining the Nanomedicine market, the report gives you a visual, one-stop breakdown of the leading products, submarkets and market leaders market revenue forecasts as well as analysis to 2022.

The global Nanomedicine market consists of different international, regional, and local vendors. The market competition is foreseen to grow higher with the rise in technological innovation and M&A activities in the future. Moreover, many local and regional vendors are offering specific application products for varied end-users. The new vendor entrants in the market are finding it hard to compete with the international vendors based on quality, reliability, and innovations in technology.

Browse Full Report at: https://www.marketinsightsreports.com/reports/08308548/global-nanomedicine-market-research-report-2017

Geographically, this report is segmented into several key Regions, with production, consumption, revenue (million USD), and market share and growth rate of Storage Area Network Switch in these regions, from 2012 to 2022 (forecast), covering

by Regions

The report provides a basic overview of the Nanomedicine industry including definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain structure. And development policies and plans are discussed as well as manufacturing processes and cost structures.

Then, the report focuses on global major leading industry players with information such as company profiles, product picture and specifications, sales, market share and contact information. Whats more, the Nanomedicine industry development trends and marketing channels are analyzed.

The research includes historic data from 2012 to 2016 and forecasts until 2022 which makes the reports an invaluable resource for industry executives, marketing, sales and product managers, consultants, analysts, and other people looking for key industry data in readily accessible documents with clearly presented tables and graphs. The report will make detailed analysis mainly on above questions and in-depth research on the development environment, market size, development trend, operation situation and future development trend of Nanomedicine on the basis of stating current situation of the industry in 2017 so as to make comprehensive organization and judgment on the competition situation and development trend of Nanomedicine Market and assist manufacturers and investment organization to better grasp the development course of Nanomedicine Market.

The study was conducted using an objective combination of primary and secondary information including inputs from key participants in the industry. The report contains a comprehensive market and vendor landscape in addition to a SWOT analysis of the key vendors.

There are 15 Chapters to deeply display the global Nanomedicine market.

Chapter 1, to describe Nanomedicine Introduction, product scope, market overview, market opportunities, market risk, market driving force;

Chapter 2, to analyze the top manufacturers of Nanomedicine, with sales, revenue, and price of Nanomedicine, in 2016and 2017;

Chapter 3, to display the competitive situation among the top manufacturers, with sales, revenue and market share in 2016and 2017;

Chapter 4, to show the global market by regions, with sales, revenue and market share of Nanomedicine, for each region, from 2012to 2017;

Chapter 5, 6, 7,8and 9, to analyze the key regions, with sales, revenue and market share by key countries in these regions;

Chapter 10and 11, to show the market by type and application, with sales market share and growth rate by type, application, from 2012 to 2017;

Chapter 12, Nanomedicine market forecast, by regions, type and application, with sales and revenue, from 2017to 2022;

Chapter 13, 14 and 15, to describe Nanomedicine sales channel, distributors, traders, dealers, Research Findings and Conclusion, appendix and data source.

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Nanomedicine Market Growth Opportunities for Distributers 2017 - Equity Insider (press release)

Eun Ji Chung Receives 2017 AIChE 35 Under 35 Award – USC Viterbi School of Engineering (press release) (blog)

The goal-setting Assistant Professor rounds out a successful 2017 with an early career honor from the American Institute of Chemical Engineers

Eun Ji Chung is a Gabilan Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Engineering and recipient of a 2017 AIChE 35 Under 35 Award. Photo credit/Michelle Henry

To describe Eun Ji Chung as goal-oriented might be the understatement of the year.

Chung, a Gabilan Assistant Professor in the USC ViterbiDepartment of Biomedical Engineering, has racked up an impressive number of achievements in 2017 alone. In addition to receiving a 2017 USC Stem Cell Eli and Edythe Broad Innovation Award, she was selected for the 2017 Emerging Investigator Issue of the journal Biomaterials Science and a 2017 Biomedical Engineering Society (BMES) Career Development Award.

This summer, Chung found out that she was being honored with a 2017 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE) 35 Under 35 Award for her exceptional work in bioengineering.

Bright-Eyed Youth

People like Chung tend to be driven at a young age, perhaps ever since birth.

As an undergraduate at Scripps College, she pursued a degree in molecular biology and conducted biology research in unicellular organisms. While there, her interests became more patient-focused.

While I had a strong foundation in biology, I wanted to pursue a field that could help human health and patients, Chung said. This led me to pursue biomedical engineering as a graduate student (at Northwestern University) and choose a lab that focused on biomaterials research.

During her post-doctoral training at the University of Chicago, Chung achieved a goal she ranks as her proudest professional achievement: an NIH K99/R00 Pathway to Independence Award for her proposal to develop a nanoparticle that could be delivered intravenously and detect atherosclerosis, a potentially fatal build-up of plaque in the arteries. The nanodevice could also deliver therapeutics and signal whether the treatment was successful.

The first time she applied for the award, her application was streamlined and rejected, but she was determined to succeed.

Despite the statistics and critics confirming the high likelihood of being streamlined again in the resubmission, I persisted, addressed all of the reviewer comments diligently, and received a top score the second time around, Chung said.

The Bioengineer

In her lab, Chung and her research group investigate molecular design, nanomedicine and tissue engineering to generate biomaterial strategies for clinical applications. She is emphatic about working with her students (both undergraduate and graduate) and postdoctoral trainees toward their own individual aspirations.

While it takes continuous dialogue, planning and learning together, every small milestone that we achieve towards the larger goals makes me feel proud and gives me a sense of pride in my work and role, Chung said.

In the future, Chungs research goals include providing cost-efficient nanodiagnostics and therapeutics for patients that are not well-understood or overlooked. She believes that to achieve this goal requires an interdisciplinary team of scientists, clinicians and trainees. This belief makes Chung an excellent fit as one of the faculty members joining the new USC Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience when it opens this November.

In order to train the next generation of the STEM workforce, I hope to inspire students and convey biomedical engineering and biomaterials research as both tangible and compelling, Chung said.

The Juggling Act

Chung describes her pursuit of both an ambitious academic career and family life as a juggling act that requires frequent fine-tuning.

She has even developed her own system of goal attainment that all starts with putting a pencil to paper.

Every December, I write out my career and family goals for the upcoming year, as well as any additional personal goals that I might have, and categorize them into a timeline of seasons, Chung said. In addition, I have longer, five-year goals. This way, I can approach ambition in a holistic manner.

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Eun Ji Chung Receives 2017 AIChE 35 Under 35 Award - USC Viterbi School of Engineering (press release) (blog)

Impact of Existing and Emerging Europe Nanomedicine Market – MilTech

The global Nanomedicine Market size was estimated at USD XX billion in 2017. Technological advancements coupled with relevant applications in early disease diagnosis, preventive intervention, and prophylaxis of chronic as well as acute disorders is expected to bolster growth in this market.

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Nanotechnology involves the miniaturization of larger structures and chemicals at nanometric scale which has significantly revolutionized drug administration, thus influencing adoption of the technology through to 2022.

Expected developments in nanorobotics owing to the rise in funding from the government organizations is expected to induce potential to the market. Nanorobotics engineering projects that are attempting to target the cancer cells without affecting the surrounding tissues is anticipated to drive progress through to 2022.

Ability of the nanotechnology to serve in diagnostics as well as the therapeutic sector at the same time as a consequence of its characteristic principle to is anticipated to augment research in this sector. Furthermore, utilization of DNA origami for healthcare applications is attributive for the projected growth.

The global nanomedicine market is segmented based on modality, application, indication, and region. Based on application, it is classified into drug delivery, diagnostic imaging, vaccines, regenerative medicine, implants, and others.

On the basis of indication, it is categorized into oncological diseases, neurological diseases, urological diseases, infectious diseases, ophthalmological diseases, orthopedic disorders, immunological diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and others. Based on modality, it is bifurcated into treatments and diagnostics.

The global market is driven by emerging technologies for drug delivery, increase in adoption of nanomedicine across varied applications, rise in government support & funding, growth in need for therapies with fewer side effects, and cost-effectiveness of therapies. However, long approval process and risks associated with nanomedicine (environmental impacts) restrain the market growth.

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Impact of Existing and Emerging Europe Nanomedicine Market - MilTech

Expert Radiologist and Clinician Scientist, Michelle S. Bradbury, MD, PhD, is to be Recognized as a 2017 Top Doctor … – PR NewsChannel (press…

Michelle Bradbury MD, PhD, who is a Professor of Radiology, Director of Intraoperative Imaging, and Co-Director of an National Cancer Institute awarded Nanomedicine Center (MSK-Cornell Center for Translation of Cancer Nanomedicines), has been named a 2017 Top Doctor in New York City, New York. Top Doctor Awards is dedicated to selecting and honoring those healthcare practitioners who have demonstrated clinical excellence while delivering the highest standards of patient care.

Dr. Michelle S. Bradbury is a highly experienced physician who has been in practice for over two decades. Her career in medicine started in 1997, when she graduated from the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences in Washington, D.C. An internship, residency and then fellowship followed, all completed at Wake Forest University in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Dr. Bradbury also holds a Doctor of Philosophy Degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

Dr. Bradbury is certified by the American Board of Radiology in both Diagnostic Radiology and Neuroradiology. She is particularly renowned, however, as a leading expert in nanomedicine and in neuroradiology, using CT and MRI imaging of the brain, neck and spine to diagnose conditions of the nervous system. Alongside her work in this field she has been at the forefront of nanomedicine research and clinical trials.

Dr. Bradbury keeps up to date with the latest advances in her field through her active membership of professional organizations including the American College of Radiology, the World Molecular Imaging Congress, and the American Society of Nanomedicine. Her expertise and dedication makes Dr. Michelle S. Bradbury a very deserving winner of a 2017 Top Doctor Award.

About Top Doctor Awards

Top Doctor Awards specializes in recognizing and commemorating the achievements of todays most influential and respected doctors in medicine. Our selection process considers education, research contributions, patient reviews, and other quality measures to identify top doctors

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Expert Radiologist and Clinician Scientist, Michelle S. Bradbury, MD, PhD, is to be Recognized as a 2017 Top Doctor ... - PR NewsChannel (press...

Growth in the Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2021 trends, forecasts, analysis – satPRnews (press release)

Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2021

This Nanomedicine market research is an intelligence report with meticulous efforts undertaken to study the right and valuable information. The data which has been looked upon is done considering both, the existing top players and the upcoming competitors. Business strategies of the key players and the new entering market industries are studied in detail. Well explained SWOT analysis, revenue share and contact information are shared in this report analysis.

Download sample pages of this report:http://tinyurl.com/y7bs9wea

Data integration and capabilities are analyzed to support the findings and study the predicted geographical segmentations. Various key variables and regression models were considered to calculate the trajectory of Nanomedicine market. Detailed analysis is explained and given importance to with best working models.

Geographically, the segmentation is done into several key regions like North America, Middle East & Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe and Latin America. The production, consumption, revenue, shares in mill UDS, growth rate of Nanomedicine market during the forecast period of 2017 to 2021 is well explained.

The ongoing market trends of Nanomedicine market and the key factors impacting the growth prospects are elucidated. With increase in the trend, the factors affecting the trend are mentioned with perfect reasons. Top manufactures, price, revenue, market share are explained to give a depth of idea on the competitive side.

Each and every segment type and their sub types are well elaborated to give a better idea about this market during the forecast period of 2017 to 2021 respectively.

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Growth in the Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2021 trends, forecasts, analysis - satPRnews (press release)

Director of The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health earns doctorate in nursing practice – Mountain Xpress (blog)

Press release:

Park Ridge Health is celebrating the success of Beth Cassidy, DNP, MSN, RNC-OB, NE-BC, Director of The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health who recently earned her Doctorate of Nursing Practice degree.Cassidy has been the director of The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health since 2011. In her time as director, The Baby Place has earned national recognition for its exemplary care for mothers and babies across Western North Carolina, including the Womens Choice Award as one of Americas Best Hospitals for Obstetrics.Cassidy says she embarked on the journey to earn her doctorate because of her love of learning and her love for empowering her team. As a unit director in a small facility, which I prefer, you have to be an educator, said Cassidy. My team supported me through the two full years of doctorate work in anticipation of how we would turn it around to be directly applicable to each of them and their goals of expanding their skills.Park Ridge Health makes it a priority to discover the goals each of our employees may have for their lives and then encourages and empowers them to achieve those goals, said Jimm Bunch, Park Ridge Health President and CEO. Beths determination and drive to expand her skills as a caregiver and as a nursing leader are an inspiration, not only to her team, but to the entire Park Ridge Health family.The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health has become the labor and delivery center of choice for hundreds of families across Western North Carolina. Cassidy works as part of a caring team of Physicians, Nurses, Midwives, Lactation Consultants, Childbirth Educators and other support personnel to bring families the best possible care, so they can focus on one of the most important experiences of their lives. The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health cares for women through their choices which range from traditional delivery, to natural labor, to midwifery. In 2016, Cassidy and her team helped welcome nearly 650 babies into the world. To learn more about The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health, call 855.PRH.LIFE (855.774.5433) or visit myPRH.com.About Park Ridge Health: Founded in 1910, Park Ridge Health is dedicated to meeting the health care needs of our growing communities, providing high-quality, compassionate care in a Christian environment. In 1984, Park Ridge Health became a member of Adventist Health System, a family of 45 exceptional, faith-based hospitals across the country that operate independently to deliver care and services that best meet the needs of their communities. Leading the way in many medical firsts for the region, Park Ridge Health is the first hospital in Western North Carolina to offer nanomedicine in the operating room with the Nanolock Spinal technology and the only hospital in the region with the Pro-Axis Spine Surgery table. Park Ridge Health provides personalized care at more than 30 locations, offering a dedicated network of more than 250 physicians and providers, cardiac care & rehabilitation, emergency services, nationally awarded cancer care, state-of-the-art surgical care, full-service orthopedic care, an award-winning labor & delivery experience, and a full range of imaging services. For more information about Park Ridge Health or to find a physician, please visit parkridgehealthor call 855.PRH.LIFE (855.774.5433).

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Director of The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health earns doctorate in nursing practice - Mountain Xpress (blog)

Lungs in Space – Texas Medical Center (press release)


Texas Medical Center (press release)
Lungs in Space
Texas Medical Center (press release)
This investigation represents the third of four collaborative projects currently active at the HMRI's Center for Space Nanomedicine. The center, directed by Alessandro Grattoni, chairman and associate professor of the Department of Nanomedicine at HMRI ...

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Lungs in Space - Texas Medical Center (press release)

Global Nanomedicine Market Research Report 2016 satPRnews – satPRnews (press release)

Global Nanomedicine Market Research Report 2016

2016 Global Nanomedicine Market Report is a professional and in-depth research report on the worlds major regional market conditions of the Nanomedicine industry, focusing on the main regions (North America, Europe and Asia) and the main countries (United States, Germany, Japan and China).

Download sample pages of this report: https://goo.gl/cBLFx6

The report firstly introduced the Nanomedicine basics: definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain overview; industry policies and plans; product specifications; manufacturing processes; cost structures and so on. Then it analyzed the worlds main region market conditions, including the product price, profit, capacity, production, capacity utilization, supply, demand and industry growth rate etc. In the end, the report introduced new project SWOT analysis, investment feasibility analysis, and investment return analysis.

The report includes six parts, dealing with: 1.) basic information; 2.) the Asia Nanomedicine industry; 3.) the North American Nanomedicine industry; 4.) the European Nanomedicine industry; 5.) market entry and investment feasibility; and 6.) the report conclusion.

Download sample pages of this report: https://goo.gl/cBLFx6

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Global Nanomedicine Market Research Report 2016 satPRnews - satPRnews (press release)

Growth in Nanomedicine market-2017 trends, forecasts, analysis … – satPRnews (press release)

The report firstly introduced the Nanomedicine basics: definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain overview; industry policies and plans; product specifications; manufacturing processes; cost structures and so on. Then it analyzed the worlds main region market conditions, including the product price, profit, capacity, production, capacity utilization, supply, demand and industry growth rate etc. In the end, the report introduced new project SWOT analysis, investment feasibility analysis, and investment return analysis.

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Nanomedicine is a branch of medicine that applies the knowledge and tools of nanotechnology to the prevention and treatment of disease. Nanomedicine involves the use of nanoscale materials, such as biocompatible nanoparticles and nanorobots, for diagnosis, delivery, sensing or actuation purposes in a living organism.

The ongoing market trends of Nanomedicine market and the key factors impacting the growth prospects are elucidated. With increase in the trend, the factors affecting the trend are mentioned with perfect reasons. Top manufactures, price, revenue, market share are explained to give a depth of idea on the competitive side.

Each and every segment type and their sub types are well elaborated to give a better idea about this market during the forecast period of 2017respectively.

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Growth in Nanomedicine market-2017 trends, forecasts, analysis ... - satPRnews (press release)

siRNA Treatment for Brain Cancer Stops Tumor Growth in Mouse Model – Technology Networks

Early phase Northwestern Medicine research published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has demonstrated a potential new therapeutic strategy for treating deadly glioblastoma brain tumors.

The strategy involves using lipid polymer-based nanoparticles to deliver molecules to the tumors, where the molecules shut down key cancer drivers called brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs).

BTICs are malignant brain tumor populations that underlie the therapy resistance, recurrence and unstoppable invasion commonly encountered by glioblastoma patients after the standard treatment regimen of surgical resection, radiation and chemotherapy, explained the studys first author, Dou Yu, MD, PhD, research assistant professor of Neurological Surgery.

Using mouse models of brain tumors implanted with BTICs derived from human patients, the scientists injected nanoparticles containing small interfering RNA (siRNA) short sequences of RNA molecules that reduce the expression of specific cancer-promoting proteins directly into the tumor. In the new study, the strategy stopped tumor growth and extended survival when the therapy was administered continuously through an implanted drug infusion pump.

This major progress, although still at a conceptual stage, underscores a new direction in the pursuit of a cure for one of the most devastating medical conditions known to mankind, said Yu, who collaborated on the research with principal investigator Maciej Lesniak, MD, Michael J. Marchese Professor of Neurosurgery and chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery.

Glioblastoma is particularly difficult to treat because its genetic makeup varies from patient to patient. This new therapeutic approach would make it possible to deliver siRNAs to target multiple cancer-causing gene products simultaneously in a particular patients tumor.

In this study, the scientists tested siRNAs that target four transcription factors highly expressed in many glioblastoma tissues but not all. The therapy worked against classes of glioblastoma BTICs with high levels of those transcription factors, while other classes of the cancer did not respond.

This paints a picture for personalized glioblastoma therapy regimens based on tumor profiling, Yu said. Customized nanomedicine could target the unique genetic signatures in any specific patient and potentially lead to greater therapeutic benefits.

The strategy could also apply to other medical conditions related to the central nervous system not just brain tumors.

Degenerative neurological diseases or even psychiatric conditions could potentially be the therapeutic candidates for this multiplexed delivery platform, Yu said.

Before scientists can translate this proof-of-concept research to humans, they will need to continue refining the nanomedicine platform and evaluating its long-term safety. Still, the findings from this new research provide insight for further investigation.

Nanomedicine provides a unique opportunity to advance a therapeutic strategy for a disease without a cure. By effectively targeting brain tumor-initiating stem cells responsible for cancer recurrence, this approach opens up novel translational approaches to malignant brain cancer, Lesniak summed up.

This article has been republished frommaterialsprovided by Northwestern University. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Reference

Dou Yu, Omar F. Khan, Mario L. Suv, Biqin Dong, Wojciech K. Panek, Ting Xiao, Meijing Wu, Yu Han, Atique U. Ahmed, Irina V. Balyasnikova, Hao F. Zhang, Cheng Sun, Robert Langer, Daniel G. Anderson, Maciej S. Lesniak. Multiplexed RNAi therapy against brain tumor-initiating cells via lipopolymeric nanoparticle infusion delays glioblastoma progression. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2017; 201701911 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1701911114

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siRNA Treatment for Brain Cancer Stops Tumor Growth in Mouse Model - Technology Networks

‘Nanomedicine’: Potentially revolutionary class of drugs are made-in-Canada – CTV News

It's rare for researchers to discover a new class of drugs, but a University of Calgary microbiology professor recently did so -- by accident and now hopes to revolutionize autoimmune disease treatment.

In 2004, Dr. Pere Santamaria and his research lab team at the Cumming School of Medicine conducted an experiment to image a mouse pancreas, using nanoparticles coated in pancreatic proteins.

The work didnt go as planned.

Our experiment was a complete failure, he recently told CTV Calgary. We were actually quite depressed, frustrated about the outcome of that.

But the team was surprised to discover the nanoparticles had a major effect on the mice: resetting their immune systems.

The team realized that, by using nanoparticles, they can deliver disease-specific proteins to white blood cells, which will then go on to reprogram the cells to actively suppress the disease.

Whats more, the nanoparticles stop the disease without compromising the immune system, as current treatments often do.

Santamarias team believes nanomedicine drugs can be modified to treat all kinds of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, including Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Convinced that nanomedicine has the potential to disrupt the pharmaceutical industry, Santamaria founded a company to explore the possibilities, called Parvus Therapeutics Inc.

This past spring, Novartis, one of the worlds largest pharmaceutical companies, entered into a license and collaboration agreement with Parvus to fund the process of developing nanomedicine.

Under the terms of the agreement, Parvus will receive research funding to support its clinical activities, while Novartis receives worldwide rights to use Parvus technology to develop and commercialize products for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

Its a good partnership, Santamaria said in a University of Calgary announcement. Bringing a drug to market requires science as well as money.

Santamaria cant say how long it might be before nanomedicine can be used to create human therapies, but he says everyone involved is working aggressively to make it happen.

With a report from CTV Calgarys Kevin Fleming

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'Nanomedicine': Potentially revolutionary class of drugs are made-in-Canada - CTV News

UCalgary researcher signs deal to develop nanomedicines for treatment of Type 1 diabetes – UCalgary News

When Dr. Pere Santamaria arrived in Calgary in 1992 to join the Cumming School of Medicine, he never could have imagined he would make a groundbreaking discovery that would lead to a spinoff company. When I arrived, I found out that the grant money I was expecting hadnt come through, says Santamaria, a professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases and member of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases. So I had an empty lab with no research assistants and no salary. I had to beg my supervisor to give me $10,000 to start my research.

Despite the rocky start, Santamaria has achieved something many scientists dream of making a discovery that has practical applications for health care. Santamarias discovery revolves around the use of nanoparticles coated in proteins to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

They can be modified for different diseases, such as Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis without compromising the entire immune system, Santamaria explains. Instead, they basically work to reset the immune system.

Nanomedicines unique mechanism has the potential to disrupt the pharmaceutical industry entirely. Developing a new class of drugs is rare. With the assistance of Innovate Calgary, Santamaria started a company, Parvus Therapeutics Inc., to represent the technology and explore ways of bringing it to market. Announced in April 2017, Parvus entered into an exclusive deal with the Swiss pharma giant Novartis, hopefully leading to the development and commercialization of Parvuss nanomedicine to treat Type 1 diabetes.

Its a good partnership, Santamaria says. Bringing a drug to market requires science as well as money.

Supporting commercialization should be a top priority for all research, he continues. Our biggest responsibility is to the patients and making sure they have access to the medicine they need. With that in mind, Santamaria shares his insight for other researchers who may be interested in bringing their discoveries from the lab bench to the market.

If youre interested in investigating spin-out opportunities, get in touch with Innovate Calgary, which offers mentors, coaching, business skill development programs, intellectual property services and other back-office support.

Throughout the years, Santamarias work has been funded by numerous organizations, including Diabetes Canada, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Diabetes Association, Foothills.He is a member of the Snyder Institute and associate member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute.Santamaria named his company Parvus from the Greek word meaning small.

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UCalgary researcher signs deal to develop nanomedicines for treatment of Type 1 diabetes - UCalgary News

Cancer survivor becomes a cancer fighter at a Philly start-up – Philly.com

What Debra Travers really wanted to be was a marine biologist, until I found out Jacques Cousteau wasnt hiring.

How she wound up as chief executive of PolyAurum LLC, a Philadelphia start-up developing biodegradable gold nanoparticles for treating cancerous tumors, involved a professional journey of more than 30 years in pharmaceutical and diagnostics industries, and a personal battle with the disease shes now in business to defeat.

After determining that studying sea creatures was not a viable career choice, Travers a military kid from all over switched her major at Cedar Crest College in Allentown to medical technology. She graduated in 1979, then worked for three years in a hospital laboratory until she concluded she didnt like shift work and could do more.

What followed was an impressive career progression: Travers started as a chemistry technician at DuPont Biomedical Products Division, advancing to executive positions in marketing and product development at Centocor, GlaxoSmithKline, Endo Pharmaceuticals, and IMS Health.

Much of that work involved bringing new products through the long development and regulation-heavy process from concept to launch, with experience in therapeutic areas including oncology, urology, pain medicine, cardiology, and rheumatology. In an industry of specialty silos, Travers developed a uniquely blended expertise in marketing and R&D.

It was on March 23, 2006, that her health-care vocation turned personal: Travers, then a 50-year-old mother of two, was diagnosed with breast cancer.

An oncologist recommended a double mastectomy, removal of both ovaries, and chemotherapy. The tearful pleadings of her daughter, Kelly, then 18 I need you here when I graduate college, when I get married, when I have kids persuaded Travers to follow that recommendation.

She returned to work at Endo for seven more years, as a director in project management, before being laid off in June 2013, one month before her daughters wedding. The break gave Travers time to concentrate on the big event and to start to think what Id like to do when I grow up.

That process would lead her in late 2015 to PolyAurum, a start-up spun out of the University of Pennsylvania.

I became a CEO and a grandmother in the same year, said Travers, now 61, chuckling during a recent interview at the Pennovation Center incubator in West Philadelphia. From there, her home in Delaware, and the sites of pitch opportunities with investors, she is working to raise $1.3 million in seed funding by early in the fourth quarter, to help get PolyAurum closer to clinical trials on humans.

So far, research and testing funded through $4 million in grants to the university has been limited to mice with tumors. It has shown that gold nanocrystals greatly enhance the effectiveness of radiation on tumors without increasing harm to healthy surrounding tissue, said Jay Dorsey, an associate professor and radiation oncologist at Penn and one of four university faculty who developed the technology.

The effectiveness of metals in improving a tumors ability to absorb radiation has long been known, Dorsey said. But one of the stumbling blocks to incorporating gold nanoparticles in such therapeutics is that the metal is not eliminated from the body well, posing serious problems to vital organs such as the liver and spleen.

Penns David Cormode, a professor of radiology, and Andrew Tsourkas, a professor of bioengineering, have worked to make gold more biocompatible, resulting in PolyAurums current technology, Dorsey said. The gold nanocrystals are contained in a biodegradable polymer that allows enough metal to collect in a tumor. The polymer then breaks down, releasing the gold for excretion from the body so that it does not build up in key organs.

The companys name is a combination of those two essential ingredients: Poly, derived from polymer, and Aurum, the Latin word for gold.

Explaining all that, and the potential that PolyAurums founders see for extending and saving lives, is the message Travers now is in charge of disseminating the part of the critical path to commercialization that is not the strength of most researchers toiling in laboratories.

She knows what the founders dont know it just makes a perfect match, said Michael Dishowitz, portfolio manager at PCI Ventures, an arm of Penn that helps university start-ups find investors, recruit management, and get to market.

Since its formation about eight years ago, PCI has helped more than 150 companies secure more than $100 million in funding, said Dishowitz, who has a doctoratein bioengineering from Penn and spent several years studying the impact of cell-signaling pathways on orthopedic injury.

While calling PolyAurums technology cool and very transformative for treatment, Dishowitz also delivered a dose of reality about the rigors ahead, as health-care start-ups must navigate a course with no guarantees their products will lead to actual clinical implementation.

PolyAurum is one of 13 companies that entered Philadelphia Media Networks second annual Stellar StartUps competition in the health-care/life sciences category. A total of nine categories drew 88 applicants. The winners will be announced Sept. 12 at an event at the Franklin Institutes Fels Planetarium. (Details at http://www.philly.com/stellarstartups.)

A lot has to go right, all the planets and stars have to align for this to hit the market, Dishowitz said of PolyAurums commercial prospects.

Which is why the team behind any start-up is so essential to investors, he said, calling Travers interest in joining a company that has yet been unable to pay her (she has equity in PolyAurum) incredibly lucky.

Margo Reed

At the Nanomedicine and Molecular Imaging Lab at Penn Medicine are (front row, from left) Jay Dorsey, a radiation oncologist and a founder of PolyAurum; Debra Travers, CEO; and Andrew Tsourkas, another founder of PolyAurum; and (back row, from left) Michael Dishowitz, portfolio manager, PCI Ventures at Penn; and David Cormode, lab director and PolyAurum founder. (MARGO REED / Staff Photographer)

The only thing Travers corporate-heavy background lacked, he said, was raising money for a start-up. It doesnt worry him, Dishowitz said, citing Travers perseverance, no-quit attitude.

When youre out there raising money, youre going to hear no about 100, 150 times before you hear yes, Dishowitz said.

When it comes to pitching for PolyAurum, Travers has extra incentive.

I am working on a cancer therapeutic, which is very important to the 11-year cancer survivor in me, she said.

As for handling nos, shes had plenty of professional experience with that.

After spending 30-plus years in the drug and diagnostic industries, where it is hard to find women CEOs or board members, Travers said, Ive learned to ignore the negative voices.

When: 5:30-8:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 12.

Where: Fels Planetarium, Franklin Institute, 222 N. 20th St., Philadelphia 19103

For more information: http://www.philly.com/stellarstartups

Published: July 28, 2017 3:01 AM EDT

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Cancer survivor becomes a cancer fighter at a Philly start-up - Philly.com

Koch Institute’s Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine Brings Together Renowned Faculty to Combat Cancer – AZoNano

Written by AZoNanoJul 10 2017

The Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at MIT will soon be reaching the first anniversary of the launch of the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine, founded through a generous gift from Kathy and Curt Marble 63.

The Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicines faculty is made up of Koch Institute members who are committed to fighting cancer with nanomedicine through research, education, and collaboration. Top row (l-r) Sangeeta Bhatia, director; Daniel Anderson; and Angela Belcher. Bottom row: Paula Hammond; Darrell Irvine; and Robert Langer. (Photo: Koch Institute Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine)

Bringing together leading Koch Institute faculty members and their teams, the Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine focuses on huge challenges in cancer detection, treatment and monitoring that can profit from the latest physics and biology of the nanoscale.

These challenges include spotting cancer earlier than present techniques allow, harnessing the immune system to combat cancer even as it progresses, using therapeutic insights from cancer biology to design therapies for formerly undruggable targets, integrating current drugs for synergistic action, and developing tools for more accurate diagnosis and improved surgical intervention.

Koch Institute member Sangeeta N. Bhatia, the John J. and Dorothy Wilson, Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, serves as the Inaugural Director of the center.

A major goal for research at the Marble Center is to leverage the collaborative culture at the Koch Institute to use nanotechnology to improve cancer diagnosis and care in patients around the world.

Sangeeta N. Bhatia, Koch Institute Member

Transforming nanomedicine

The Marble Center joins MITs larger efforts at the forefront of discovery and advancement to solve the critical global challenge that is cancer. The concept of convergence the combination of the life and physical sciences with engineering is a trademark of MIT, the founding principle of the Koch Institute, and at the heart of the Marble Centers mission.

The center galvanizes the MIT cancer research community in efforts to use nanomedicine as a translational platform for cancer care. Its transformative by applying these emerging technologies to push the boundaries of cancer detection, treatment, and monitoring and translational by promoting their development and application in the clinic.

Tyler Jacks, Director of the Koch Institute and a David H. Koch Professor of Biology

The centers faculty six renowned MIT Professors and Koch Institute Members are committed to combating cancer with nanomedicine through research, education and partnership. They are, Sangeeta Bhatia (director), the John J. and Dorothy Wilson Professor of Health Sciences and Technology and Electrical Engineering and Computer Science; Daniel G. Anderson, the Samuel A. Goldblith Professor of Applied Biology in the Department of Chemical Engineering and the Institute for Medical Engineering and Science; Angela M. Belcher, the James Mason Crafts Professor in the departments of Biological Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering; Paula T. Hammond, the David H. Koch Professor of Engineering and head of the Department of Chemical Engineering; Darrell J. Irvine, Professor in the departments of Biological Engineering and Materials Science and Engineering; and Robert S. Langer, the David H. Koch Institute Professor.

Extending their partnership within the walls of the Institute, members of the Marble Center profit greatly from the support of the Peterson (1957) Nanotechnology Materials Core Facility in the Koch Institutes Robert A. Swanson (1969) Biotechnology Center. The Peterson Facilitys array of technological resources and know-how is unparalleled in the United States, and gives members of the center and of the Koch Institute, a distinctive advantage in the development and application of materials and technologies at the nanoscale.

Looking ahead

The Marble Center made the most of its first year, and has provided backing for advanced research projects including theranostic nanoparticles that can both detect and treat cancers, real-time imaging of interactions between cancer and immune cells to properly understand reaction to cancer immunotherapies, and delivery technologies for a number of powerful RNA-based therapeutics capable of engaging specific cancer targets with precision.

As part of its efforts to help adopt a multifaceted science and engineering research force, the center has offered fellowship support for trainees as well as valuable opportunities for scientific exchange, mentorship and professional development.

Promoting wider engagement, the Marble Center serves as a bridge to a broad network of nanomedicine resources, linking its members to MIT.nano, other Nanotechnology Researchers, and Clinical Partners across Boston and beyond. The center has also set up a scientific advisory board, whose members come from leading clinical and academic centers around the country, and will assist in shaping the centers future programs and continued development.

As the Marble Center enters another year of partnerships and innovation, there is a new landmark in sight for 2018. Nanomedicine has been chosen as the main theme for the Koch Institutes 17th Annual Cancer Research Symposium. The event is scheduled for June 15th, 2018, and will bring together national domain experts, providing a perfect forum for Marble Center members to share the discoveries and progresses made during its sophomore year.

Having next years KI Annual Symposium dedicated to nanomedicine will be a wonderful way to further expose the cancer research community to the power of doing science at the nanoscale. The interdisciplinary approach has the power to accelerate new ideas at this exciting interface of nanotechnology and medicine.

Sangeeta N. Bhatia, Koch Institute Member

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Koch Institute's Marble Center for Cancer Nanomedicine Brings Together Renowned Faculty to Combat Cancer - AZoNano

Nanomedicine opens door to precision medicine for brain tumors – Phys.Org

Killer T cells surround a cancer cell. Credit: NIH

Early phase Northwestern Medicine research has demonstrated a potential new therapeutic strategy for treating deadly glioblastoma brain tumors.

The strategy involves using lipid polymer based nanoparticles to deliver molecules to the tumors, where the molecules shut down key cancer drivers called brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs).

"BTICs are malignant brain tumor populations that underlie the therapy resistance, recurrence and unstoppable invasion commonly encountered by glioblastoma patients after the standard treatment regimen of surgical resection, radiation and chemotherapy," explained the study's first author, Dr. Dou Yu, research assistant professor of neurological surgery at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine.

The findings were published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Using mouse models of brain tumors implanted with BTICs derived from human patients, the scientists injected nanoparticles containing small interfering RNA (siRNA)short sequences of RNA molecules that reduce the expression of specific cancer promoting proteinsdirectly into the tumor. In the new study, the strategy stopped tumor growth and extended survival when the therapy was administered continuously through an implanted drug infusion pump.

"This major progress, although still at a conceptual stage, underscores a new direction in the pursuit of a cure for one of the most devastating medical conditions known to mankind," said Yu, who collaborated on the research with principal investigator Dr. Maciej Lesniak, Michael J. Marchese Professor of Neurosurgery and chair of neurological surgery.

Glioblastoma is particularly difficult to treat because its genetic makeup varies from patient to patient. This new therapeutic approach would make it possible to deliver siRNAs to target multiple cancer-causing gene products simultaneously in a particular patient's tumor.

In this study, the scientists tested siRNAs that target four transcription factors highly expressed in many glioblastoma tissuesbut not all. The therapy worked against classes of glioblastoma BTICs with high levels of those transcription factors, while other classes of the cancer did not respond.

"This paints a picture for personalized glioblastoma therapy regimens based on tumor profiling," Yu said. "Customized nanomedicine could target the unique genetic signatures in any specific patient and potentially lead to greater therapeutic benefits."

The strategy could also apply to other medical conditions related to the central nervous systemnot just brain tumors.

"Degenerative neurological diseases or even psychiatric conditions could potentially be the therapeutic candidates for this multiplexed delivery platform," Yu said.

Before scientists can translate this proof-of-concept research to humans, they will need to continue refining the nanomedicine platform and evaluating its long-term safety. Still, the findings from this new research provide insight for further investigation.

"Nanomedicine provides a unique opportunity to advance a therapeutic strategy for a disease without a cure. By effectively targeting brain tumor initiating stem cells responsible for cancer recurrence, this approach opens up novel translational approaches to malignant brain cancer," Lesniak summed up.

Explore further: Cold virus, stem cells tested to destroy deadly brain cancer

More information: Dou Yu et al, Multiplexed RNAi therapy against brain tumor-initiating cells via lipopolymeric nanoparticle infusion delays glioblastoma progression, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (2017). DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1701911114

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Nanomedicine opens door to precision medicine for brain tumors - Phys.Org

Precision NanoSystems to Host Nanomedicines Symposium – Technology Networks

Join Precision NanoSystems for its second annual nanomedicines symposium, entitled Nanomedicines: enabling new therapeutic modalities, on the 15th of July in Boston, MA. Following the success of last years inaugural event, the symposium will bring together distinguished researchers and drug developers from across the nanomedicines industry, and will precede the Controlled Release Societys Annual Meeting and Exposition from the 16th to 18th of July.

The symposium schedule has been designed to provide an overview of the latest developments in nanomedicine research, including strategies for overcoming in vitro and in vivo barriers to effective and targeted drug delivery. It will cover a diverse range of applications, with the keynote address To target or not to target: lessons from RNAi-based targeted lipid nanoparticles being provided by Professor Dan Peer from the Department of Cell Research and Immunology at Tel Aviv University. Other topics covered during the symposium will explore cutting-edge research in the fields of gene therapy, genetic vaccines and small molecule delivery. This will include industry talks from GSK, CureVac and Genentech, as well as presentations from the Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, the University of British Columbia and Houston Methodist/Weill Cornell Medical College.

The symposium will also give attendees a chance to explore the latest enabling technologies in the nanomedicines sector with presentations from Precision NanoSystems and event sponsors Spectradyne, SpectrumLabs, Malvern Instruments and Sigma-Aldrich as well as providing networking opportunities throughout the day.

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Precision NanoSystems to Host Nanomedicines Symposium - Technology Networks


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