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A Guide to the Caribbean Islands Reopening this Summer – Cond Nast Traveler

We'd all love to lay out on a beach right nowand no one does beaches better than the Caribbean. But more than toes in the sand, what the Caribbean and its economies need right now are tourist dollars. According to the Inter-American Development Bank, 14 of the 15 most tourism-dependent nations in the world are in the Caribbean, with Aruba, Antigua and Barbuda, and the Bahamas in the top three spots. But as many of these island nations and territories reopen to kick start their economies, health and safety questions for travelers remain: Do you need to take a COVID-19 test before arriving? How are hotels and resorts stepping up cleaning efforts? Will you be able to rent snorkel equipment? And, importantly, do you have to wear a face mask on the beach?

To help you sift from all the information out there, we broke down exactly what to expect if you're heading to the Caribbean in the coming months, for every destination with a reopening plan. Note that not everyone is rushing to welcome travelers back: you won't find the Cayman Islands, Guadeloupe, or Curaao belowas they don't plan on open their borders anytime soon.

Read on for what to know about visiting the Caribbean this summer. And as you plan your visits, remember to keep checking in on local government and tourism board sites, as coronavirus updates come often.

This dual-island country officially reopened its borders, and its international airport on Antigua, on June 1. (As of publishing, American is flying the only route from the U.S., with a daily flight from Miami.) Visitors have two options when it comes to Antigua and Barbuda's mandatory coronavirus testing: you can pay $100 for free test at the airport upon arrival and quarantine in your hotel for about 24 hours until you get the results; or you can quarantine at your hotel or rental for the first 14 days of your stay.

You'll have to wear a mask in all public places, and when interacting with others outside your family circlebut you won't have to wear them at beaches or pools where social distancing is possible, Colin James, head of the country's tourism board told the Telegraph. At beach bars, stools will be removed and tables will be at last six feet apart; and, for now, local restaurants outside of hotels will be restricted to takeout. All hotels and villas are also being certified by the local government to ensure they're following local health and cleaning guidelines. Check back on the government's COVID-19 site for continuing updates.

Aruba is reopening its border in stages. First, on July 1, European, Canadian, and Caribbean tourists (with the exception of the those from the Dominican Republic and Haiti) will be able to visit. Then, on July 10, that will extend to U.S. travelers. No date has been announced for travelers from countries not mentioned above. Like a number of U.S. airlines, Aruba is requiring visitors to both complete a health questionnaire and upload negative COVID-19 PCR test results, within 72 hours of arriving, as part of a new embarkation and disembarkation (ED) card process. (You can also prepay for a COVID-19 test upon arrival at Queen Beatrix International Airport.) Once you've filled out that ED card and received approval to visit, you're set to fly.

As for the experience on the ground, masks are not required, but are requested in situations where social distancing is difficult. Hotels have installed plexiglass barriers at front desks, and many are offering contactless check-in. Outdoor restaurants have been open since late May, restaurants with seating inside (as well as spas) opened June 1, and bars and nightclubs opened on June 10. The island has also instituted a Health & Happiness Codeessentially a certification that shows that a tour operator, water activities coordinator, car rental company, or spa is complying with suggested safety guidelines.

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A Guide to the Caribbean Islands Reopening this Summer - Cond Nast Traveler

Address ‘unprecedented’ impact of coronavirus on Latin America and the Caribbean, urges Guterres – UN News

The UN brief revealsthat several countries in the region, are now among those with the highest per capita infection rates worldwide and shines a light on how the crisis is impacting vulnerable groups, includingindigenous communities and women.

The most vulnerable populations and individuals are once again being hit the hardest, Secretary-General Antnio Guterres said in a video message on the pandemics effect throughout a zone grappling with fragmented health services even before the coronavirus.

The UN chief emphasized the impact of the coronavirus on women across the region, who make up the majority of the workforce and now bear the brunt of additional caregiving. He highlighted the plight of older persons and individuals with disabilities, who are at greater risk; and indigenous peoples, those of African descent, migrants and refugees, who suffering disproportionately.

It is projected that there will be a 9.1 per cent contraction in gross domestic product (GDP), which will be the largest in a century.

While stressing the need to do everything possible to limit the spread of the virus and tackle the health effects of the pandemic, Mr. Guterres noted that we must also address the unprecedented social and economic impacts.

The policy brief underlines an array of urgent and longer-term steps for better recovery, including the prioritization of distance learning and continued child-centered services to mitigate education interruptions.

Governments within the region are also being asked to do more to reduce poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition, such as by providing basic emergency income and anti-hunger grants.

Mr. Guterres also flagged the urgent need for greater international support.

I have called for a rescue and recovery package equivalent to more than 10 per cent of the global economy, reminded the UN chief, underscoring the need of the international community to provide liquidity, financial assistance and debt relief for Latin America and the Caribbean.

Latin American and Caribbean countries and in particular small island developing States should not be excluded from global assistance, he asserted. The international multilateral response needs to be extended to middle-income countries.

Broader structural challenges must be addressed to build back better and transform the regions development model.

Against the backdrop of pervasive inequality, accessible and comprehensive welfare systems must be developed, fair taxation systems created, decent jobs promoted, environmental sustainability strengthened, and social protection mechanisms reinforced, according to the UN chief.

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Address 'unprecedented' impact of coronavirus on Latin America and the Caribbean, urges Guterres - UN News

All the Pirates of the Caribbean Movies Ranked – Collider.com

Pirates of the Caribbean was never supposed to work.

The film was born out of an initiative, started by former Disney CEO Michael Eisner, to mine the companys many theme park attractions for potential movie franchises. It was already off to a wobbly start with Brian De Palmas Mission to Mars and, er, The Country Bears. And pirate movies, of any kind, were seen as box office kryptonite, especially since the last big budget endeavor, 1995s Cutthroat Island, bankrupted its studio and made the Guinness Book of World Records for the biggest flop. While in production, Disney executives were nervous about Johnny Depps fey portrayal of the lead pirate, Captain Jack Sparrow, and the dark tone being conjured by director Gore Verbinski. When the film was released in 2003, it was the first Disney film to carry a PG-13 rating.

And yet somehow, Pirates of the Caribbean has become one of the most dependably bankable franchises in Hollywood. Even the last film, 2017s Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Men Tell No Tales, which was already mired in Depps controversial private life, grossed $800 million worldwide. And as it was inspired by a theme park attraction, so has it inspired theme park attractions, with Jack Sparrow being added to the classic attraction and a brand new, state-of-the-art ride based on the franchise, Pirates of the Caribbean: Battle for the Sunken Treasure, developed for Shanghai Disneyland (it debuted with the rest of the park in 2016). And recent rumors have suggest that the franchise will be resurrected soon enough, with one possibility being a female-led entry starring Margot Robbie and written by Christina Hodson.

But which Pirates of the Caribbean entry is the most swashbuckling, supernatural creature-filled joy? And which entry should be stranded ashore. Youll have to read on to find out, ya lousy landlubber.

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All the Pirates of the Caribbean Movies Ranked - Collider.com

Camus readies sea-aged Caribbean Expedition Cognac | Beverage Industry News – just-drinks.com

Camus Cognac has lined up the release of a Cognac that has spent almost 50 days at sea before spending a year maturing further in the Caribbean.

A total of 4,500 bottles of Camus Caribbean Expedition will be available later this year

Camus Caribbean Expedition was first mooted at the end of 2018. The family-owned Cognac producer arranged for ten barrels of the French spirit to be transported by sailboat across the Atlantic to the Foursquare distillery on Barbados.

The journey lasted 45 days.

Despite initially expecting 5,000 bottles from the project, Camus said today a total of 4,500 individually-numbered bottles will go on sale in September. Carrying a price of EUR109 (US$123) each, Camus Caribbean Expedition, which has an abv of 45.3%, will be offered in an online presale from 1 to 27 September. Any remaining units will then go to selected specialist spirits retailers.

"The unique maturation of Camus Caribbean Expedition Cognac is the result of two distinctive steps highly influencing its aromatic profile, happening over the course of a year-and-a-half between the Atlantic Ocean and the island of Barbados," the company said today. "The continuous shaking and stirring of the Cognac inside the barrel, caused by the movement of the ship while sailing, amplified the contact between each molecule of the liquid and the wood staves ... .

"This experiment clearly shows a more significant aromatic evolution of the liquid left for one year in Barbados due to the higher temperature and humidity of tropical climate responsible for accelerating normal esterification processes. The array of flavours obtainedthrough this process represents an exclusive primacy in the history of Cognac."

Earlier this year, Camus confirmed the departure of CMO Jean-Dominque Andreu.

How the spirits category can ride out the coronavirus storm - Click here for a just-drinks comment

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Camus readies sea-aged Caribbean Expedition Cognac | Beverage Industry News - just-drinks.com

Everybody Profits From Nonprofit Caribbean Tourism Bodies – South Florida Caribbean News

A joint editorial by Frank J. Comito, CEO and Director General, Caribbean Hotel and Tourism Association (CHTA); and Brian D. Frontin, President, Caribbean Society of Hotel Association Executives (CSHAE) and CEO, Trinidad Hotels, Restaurants & Tourism Association (THRTA)

MIAMI The nonprofit tourism associations of the Caribbean are integral to the regions recovery and to the sustained profitability of the tourism and hospitality sector. And, during these difficult Coronavirus Disease (COVID-19) times it is even more important to support these vital development-driver institutions if we are to emerge from the pandemic more quickly and in the best economic shape.

Moving beyond this pandemic well-prepared for the new realities of global tourism requires governments to collaborate closely with the private sector, speaking with one voice through their national associations and the Caribbean Hotel and Tourism Association (CHTA) on hurdling the barriers lining the path back to profitability.

We know from experience with hurricanes and health crisis situations that when the business community and governments work in a unified way they are able to accelerate the return to full employment, restoring tax revenue, rebuilding dynamic business, and enhancing education, health and other government services.

The most important thing the business community can do is to support its local and regional hotel and tourism associations by being as collaborative and engaged as possible on a variety of issues which affect their bottom line and the well-being of the communities where they operate.

Nonprofit organizations are societys biggest (little-known) change agents, especially the business-led NGOs like ours, marshaling and leveraging resources at the local, regional and international levels.

Their historic contributions to the economies and development of the Caribbean region are considerable, working tirelessly for decades on advocacy, training and education, research, marketing, beautification, environmental protection, energy efficiency, product development and community enhancements.

One can easily state that through the dedicated volunteer business leadership of these nonprofit organizations, businesses and governments throughout the Caribbean have flourished.

Today, however, the very survival and future viability of many of these organizations is in question.

Leadership, beacons of guidance, providing answers, support and advice through crises are provided by national and regional associations to help businesses make it through the storms and create a path towards recovery.

We have received plaudits for the important benefits accruing from membership of CHTA and national associations which shone brightly over the past 100 days as tourism stakeholders, in many instances working in step with governments, have worked on response, mitigation and recovery.

The rapid Caribbean-wide response of CHTA to the crisis was made possible by national tourism associations assembling data from countries and territories, which were fed to member groups directly to support local efforts or through such avenues as the resilience series of webinars launched by CHTA.

The value of our membership associations has been proven so often that we may be suffering from our own success as destinations and resorts appear to be taking our collective efforts for granted. Our biggest challenge as nonprofit organizations is to get many more in the business community to realize that we are their insurance policy. But we need them to pay the correct premium for this insurance coverage.

We are supported by voluntary contributions and only about half of the private sector in most jurisdictions actually come to the table to help make the difference in their own industry often because they dont know the extent of what the organizations do for them, but also unfortunately because some businesses simply dont see supporting the collective as part of their responsibility, but are willing to freely accept the benefits to their businesses which these associations bring about, thanks to the dedicated leadership and support of some of their fellow businesses. This simply is not fair play.

Those who are disengaged dont seem to realize theyre hurting themselves and that its absolutely essential, especially during crises like the one we have now, to come to the table and lend talent and resources for the benefit not only of their own properties, but for all the Caribbean enterprises, because as we know all too well, in small island states, a rising tide raises all boats. At the minimum, a modest financial dues investment should be committed.

Every association in the Caribbean is financially strapped, but we in regional and national organizations are being asked on a daily basis to do far more with fewer resources during the toughest of times. Without the urgent support of industry stakeholders, some of these long-standing national hotel and tourism associations may soon be forced to close their doors.

Such closures would be lamentable because we are all in this together, not just those in the major breadwinner of the region, tourism, but also the majority of private sector concerns linked to the sector.

Banks, insurance companies, telecommunications firms, wholesalers, shipping firms and service providers are among the many industry players whose success has been built through tourism.

Decades of development work by the regions 33 national hotel and tourism associations and CHTA have contributed to their collective success. Now, in this time of incredible vulnerability, as best they can, we need these businesses, along with all tourism-related businesses, to support our nonprofit organizations and associations.

After all, this would be a business imperative not an act of charity because they will be investing in the recovery of the most important revenue producer of the region. The return on their investment in tourism associations will help to reignite tourism faster, which will more readily accrue benefits to these businesses in the medium to long term.

The pandemic lockdowns have allowed our associations to make our industry smarter and stronger by intensifying training in the sector with heightened hygiene and health and safety guidelines. Our training modules are now being carefully studied by the private sector another benefit produced by nonprofits that helps corporations.

CHTA has focused a lot of effort on improving and honing health, safety and environmental standards collaboratively with the Caribbean Public Health Agency (CARPHA), the Caribbean Tourism Organization (CTO), the Organization of Eastern Caribbean States Commission (OECSC), and the Jamaica-based Global Tourism Resiliency and Crisis Management Centre (GTRCMC) during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Such initiatives will help countries and territories rebound and recover faster, while building consumer confidence, and confidence in our own employees as they adhere to protocols that can keep them safe as well.

Importantly, this coordinated skills boosting will build confidence in travelers as word gets out that the Caribbean is really helping to mitigate or remove altogether health and safety risks.

The point is, tourism is everybodys business and for everybodys benefit: governments benefit because they generate tax revenue from our generation of business for the economy and many jobs and spin-off businesses are created, broadening tourisms impact even further.

Those businesses which have benefited so richly from tourism can look at ways of supporting their local national hotel and tourism associations and CHTA, because tourism generates a tremendous value that enhances the health, wealth, environment and well-being of all our people.

We applaud those businesses and their dedicated owners, operators, managers and supervisors in the region who have invested leadership, time and money into making these institutions possible.

We challenge those who have not stepped up to the plate, at a minimum, with the remittance of a small annual dues investment, to do so. Time and time again, whether theyve realized it or not, our nonprofit organizations have been there for them and it is not only long overdue, it is fair play and simply good business for them to step up in this time of tremendous need for their own benefit, if nothing else.

Standing by and watching nonprofit tourism associations struggle or fail is just bad business.

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Everybody Profits From Nonprofit Caribbean Tourism Bodies - South Florida Caribbean News

This Canadian airline wants to start flying travelers to the Caribbean in the middle of a pandemic – The Points Guy

OWG is a new airline that wants to fly Canadians to the Caribbean

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Editorial Note: Opinions expressed here are the authors alone, not those of any bank, credit card issuer, airlines or hotel chain, and have not been reviewed, approved or otherwise endorsed by any of these entities.

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This Canadian airline wants to start flying travelers to the Caribbean in the middle of a pandemic - The Points Guy

Latin America & The Caribbean – Weekly Situation Update (29 June-5 July 2020) As of 6 July 2020 – Brazil – ReliefWeb

KEY FIGURES

2.8M CONFIRMED COVID-19 CASES IN LATIN AMERICA & THE CARIBBEAN AS OF 5 JULY

COLLAPSING TOURISM THREATENING REGIONAL ECONOMIES

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) reports that Latin America and the Caribbean, home to many tourism-dependent economies, will suffer an unprecedented economic shock due to the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on tourism. Tourism in the Caribbean accounts for 50 to 90 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP) and employment in some countries, according to the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

While Central and South America are comparatively less reliant on tourism, some countries will also feel the downturn - from 2014 to 2018, tourism accounted for an average of 16 per cent of economic output and employment in Mexico and 10 per cent of GDP and employment in Uruguay, Argentina and Chile.

IDB predicts that the drop in tourism in the region due to the pandemic could be from 40 to 70 per cent.

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Latin America & The Caribbean - Weekly Situation Update (29 June-5 July 2020) As of 6 July 2020 - Brazil - ReliefWeb

You could move to Barbados and work there remotely for a year thanks to a new incentive – Insider – INSIDER

If you can work from anywhere, would you stay where you are?

As much of the world has taken to working remotely because of the coronavirus pandemic, many employees are no longer tied to where their offices are.

Barbados is banking on the idea that many people will choose a tropical paradise over their current digs.

Imagine working from here. LU LIN/Shuttershock

Barbados Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley said last week that the Caribbean country was planning to introduce a "12-month Barbados Welcome Stamp" that would allow visitors to stay for up to a year and work remotely.

Mottley said the stamp would allow "persons to come and work from here overseas, digitally so, so that persons don't need to remain in the countries in which they are" but beyond that, information is scarce. A representative for Barbados Tourism Marketing told Insider that "details on the visa are still being finalized by the Government of Barbados."

The idea is that as short-term travel becomes increasingly difficult, a 12-month stamp would make the trip more worthwhile. It would also bring much-needed tourism dollars to the island.

Mottley said on June 26 that Barbados planned to reopen to tourists on July 12, this Sunday, when some air travel is expected to resume.

"We will continue to take a risk-based approach to the protection of our country, our people and our visitors," Mottley said.

It's important to note, however, that nonessential travel is still discouraged in many places, including the US, where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has warned against it.

The island is a British Commonwealth nation. Styve Reineck/Shutterstock

A recent press release from Barbados Tourism Marketing said visitors from high-risk countries (more than 10,000 new cases in the past seven days) were "strongly encouraged" to take a COVID-19 test within 72 hours of their departure. Travelers from low-risk spots (with fewer than 100 cases in the past week) could take the test up to a week before departure.

Travelers who didn't take a test before their arrival will have to take one when they land, then quarantine at their expense until they receive the results, which could take about two days. Should they test positive, "they will be placed in isolation where they will receive care from the Ministry of Health and Wellness," the press release said.

Visitors will also have to fill out an online embarkation/disembarkation form related to their health and face temperature checks at the airport, the press release said.

According to data from Johns Hopkins University, Barbados had 98 confirmed COVID-19 cases and seven deaths as of Wednesday.

While it's still unclear when this welcome stamp might launch, Mottley said: "The government is committed to working with you on the promotion of new concepts like the 12-month Barbados Welcome Stamp, being able to open our borders to persons traveling and making it as hospitable as ever for all of us."

Representatives for the Barbados Government Information Service did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

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You could move to Barbados and work there remotely for a year thanks to a new incentive - Insider - INSIDER

Work from home in Barbados: Caribbean island plans a Barbados Welcome Stamp to let tourists work there remotely for 12 months – The Scotsman

LifestyleTravelWork from home in Barbados: Caribbean island plans a Barbados Welcome Stamp to let tourists work there remotely for 12 months

Monday, 13th July 2020, 4:56 pm

The Barbados government has announced a new idea for helping its tourism industry while giving UK residents the chance to escape the new daily routine of working from home.

The Caribbean island says it will give British nationals who work remotely the chance to make Barbados their home for a year, under a new Barbados Welcome Stamp scheme.

Prime Minister Mia Mottley came up with the idea with the aim of increasing the country's GDP and boost the tourism industry on the island.

When will the scheme start?

The scheme is in the first stages of development and therefore hasn't been finalised yet.

Mottley has also not yet revealed when the scheme will be open for applicants, so those who are interested will need to keep their eyes peeled.

However, Barbados will start welcoming international travellers from Sunday 12 July.

Those who choose to visit the island will have to undergo mandatory tests for Covid-19 upon arrival and will need to isolate until the test results are provided.

How would the scheme work?

The initiative would allow international arrivals to live on the island while working remotely at their current jobs.

Prime Minister Mia Mottley said the Barbados Welcome Stamp scheme would allow persons to come and work from here overseas, digitally so, so that persons dont need to remain in the countries in which they are.

However those who wish to make Barbados their permanent home, will have to do so in another way, as the scheme only permits you to remain on the island for 12 months.

How has Barbados handled the coronavirus crisis?

If you love the idea of spending your work days on the beach, rather than the sofa, but are worried about the safety aspects of living in Barbados, here are some reassuring facts:

The number of coronavirus cases and fatalities is extremely low in comparison to that of the UK, with only 98 recorded infections and seven deaths.

Safety measures currently in place to protect the country, include mandatory face masks for all incoming visitors as well as coronavirus testing at the airports.

Barbados has now relaxed some of its restrictions and lifted its curfews.

It is now allowing social events with up to 500 people, as well as spectator sporting events, however it has introduced social distancing rules whereby people must remain at least three feet apart.

The UK government included Barbados in its list of approved nations announced last week, meaning that tourists arriving in the UK from the Carribean island would not need to go into a 14 day quarantine.

Prime Minister Mottley said in a statement, "You don't need to work in Europe, or the US or Latin America if you can come here and work for a couple months at a time; go back and come back.

"The government is committed to working with you on the promotion of new concepts like the 12-month Barbados Welcome Stamp, being able to open our borders to persons travelling and making it as hospitable as ever for all of us, and making it available for Barbadians from every walk of life to believe that for special occasions, or just for so, that they can come out and be a part of this wonderful exercise."

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Work from home in Barbados: Caribbean island plans a Barbados Welcome Stamp to let tourists work there remotely for 12 months - The Scotsman

No, nobody knows if the cruise you have booked will actually sail – Royal Caribbean Blog

The one question readers are asking is if their upcoming cruise in 2020 or 2021 will sail, and the simple answer is no one knows.

While Royal Caribbean currently plans toresume operations on September 16th, 2020, the cruise line has pushed back its date cruises will restart a number of times, which leaves many wondering if their cruise they have booked will happen.

While the "TL;DR" answer is "no one knows", here is a look at why no one knows and what we should be looking for to get a better idea of when cruises might restart.

So many people with cruises booked that have not been cancelled yet want to know what are the chances their cruise will happen.

The most commonly asked question I have seen in the last few months is what are the odds a sailing will be able to go, but unfortunately no one knows because there is not enough information available and too many variables to make such a prediction.

Since Royal Caribbean started its global suspension of cruises in March, the cruise line has taken a "wait and see" approach to cruises resuming. They have periodically cancelled about a month worth of cruises at a time, and evaluate the ever-changing situation to determine if more cruises need to be cancelled.

Royal Caribbean Senior Vice President of Sales and Trade Support & ServiceVicki Freed said recently with the current climate,"things can change rather quickly," and that, "we all have to take it day by day."

At this point, there is not nearly enough information available to have insight into what Royal Caribbean (or any cruise line) is looking for in order to resume sailings.

While it stands to reason the further out your cruise is, the more time you have for the global health situation to improve, it is impossible to quantify or wager a guess as to which sailings may or may not occur.

Simply put, no one knows when exactly cruises will be able to resume sailings because the public does not have a list of milestones for Royal Caribbean to reach to start up again.

This much is clear: in order for cruises to resume, some obvious tasks need to be completed.

This is not the complete list of what Royal Caribbean (or any cruise line) must do, but they are some of the critical steps.

The first step to starting up again is to come up with a plan of action to keep crew and guests safe, and Royal Caribbean announced this step is underway.

Announced last week, theHealthy Sail Panel is a group of public health experts that will create a list of recommendations that will include things like enhanced embarkation screening, temperature screenings at the pier, testing options for guests and crew.

The panel's initial findings are expected by late August, and further work and refinement to come in the months after.

Once Royal Caribbean receives the recommendations, they will incorporate them into a new set of policies for the cruise line.

After Royal Caribbean crafts its new policy, it will need to submit them to theUnited States Centers for Disease Control (CDC) for approval.

Currently, cruise lines are under a 100-day No Sail Order that extends through the end of July, although that could be extended.

Government restrictions and warnings have been chiefly responsible for the decision of all cruise lines to suspend operations and subsequently remain idle. Until the CDC signs off, cruising seems unlikely.

Even if cruises were allowed to resume immediately, many foreign ports of call remain closed to cruise traffic and/or Americans.

Royal Caribbean's ships must make at least one stop in a foreign port to satisfy thePassenger Vessel Services Act, which requires foreign flagged vessels to stop outside the United States. Essentially, it means Royal Caribbean cannot offer "cruises to nowhere".

While some Caribbean and European ports are beginning to open their borders again, cruise lines need much greater access to start back up again.

It may seem like the elephant in the room to not talk about, but the pandemic status likely needs to no longer be a major health crisis.

It is debatable to what extent the situation needs to improve, but the cruise industry is looking for the risks associated with operating to be substantially less.

Part of this will be achieved via the Health Sail Panel's recommendations, but a reduction in cases around the world would help ease concerns across the board.

When do you think cruises will resume? Share your best guessin the comments!

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No, nobody knows if the cruise you have booked will actually sail - Royal Caribbean Blog

Pirates of the Caribbean Jewelry Removed Amid Controversy – GameRant

A collector site known as Worthpoint has removed a piece of controversial Pirates of the Caribbean jewelry in the shape of a noose from its site.

Since the end of May with the push of the Black Lives Matter movement, it seems like more and more companies are starting to be held accountable for actions that would be widely considered racist and insensitive. For example, Twitch recently received heavy backlash following a tone-deaf Black Lives Matter video that centered, confusingly enough, around white content creators. Now Disney is receiving similar backlash for a seemingly insensitive product it sold not this year, but 14 years ago.

ThePirates of the Caribbean franchise is no stranger to controversy these days. Following the accusations of domestic abuse by ex-wife Amber Heard, Disney made the decision to remove Johnny Depp from the upcoming movies. Since then, many fans have speculated whether or not Jack Sparrow will have any reference or involvement with the franchise going forward.

RELATED: Kirby Gets Fancy Jewelry Line

Now thePirates franchise may start to come under fire again for a piece of jewelry Disney sold alongside the release ofPirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest. TMZ originally pointed out the piece in question: a 14k gold-plated 20-inch long necklace that featured a noose pendant.

It's quite possible that this obviously insensitive piece of jewelry would have gone unnoticed had it not been featured on the collector site Worthpoint. Worthpoint is a site that catalogs price points for different collectibles and allows for collectors to sell through eBay. Worthpoint has since removed the necklace from its site after being contacted by TMZ.

It's still a mystery as to why this necklace was even made by Disney in the first place. It was originally launched as part of a pirate-themed line up of jewelry from Disney Couture featuring things like flintlock pistols, skulls, and cutlasses. Even though there are a couple of instances of main characters in thePirates series facing the gallows, it seems hard to imagine a world where this product was in the planning stage and no one thought of the racist implications behind it.

While there has been no statement about the necklace from Disney, that doesn't mean it isn't discussing the future of thePirates of the Caribbeanfranchise. Recently it was announced that Margot Robbie would be taking the lead in upcoming series reboot. Hopefully, Disney will do better about the products it decides to launch alongside these movies than it has in the past.

MORE: Final Fantasy 7 Remake Reveals Pricey Aerith Jewelry

Source: Worthpoint (via TMZ)

Ubisoft Giving Watch Dogs 2 Free to Everyone After Server Issues

When not writing for GameRant, Kyle spends his time streaming, writing short stories, and playing Dungeons & Dragons.

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Pirates of the Caribbean Jewelry Removed Amid Controversy - GameRant

7 Careers For People Who Want to Live in the Caribbean – South Florida Caribbean News

Imagine living in the Caribbean and waking up to the fantastic weather and breathtaking scenery every day. It may sound like a fantasy, but its a reality for numerous people. You can do it, too! But what career option will allow you to live this life? Here are careers that would enable you to live in the Caribbean.

Hospitality is a top industry in the Caribbean since people love to go to the area for vacation. If you want to live in a permanent vacation environment, you could do worse than working toward a career in hospitality. Find a job in a hotel, for example, and ensure that guests have a stay that enhances their entire Caribbean experience. If you want a college degree, you can study hospitality management. A degree might help you land your dream job, earn higher pay, and set you apart from others competing for the same jobs.

When people come to the area, they need someone to show them around. They wont know where to go or what to look at if someone doesnt help them. You can become the person to point out the most amazing landmarks and day trips. You will not only get to experience the journey with your tour group every day, but youll also get the opportunity to meet many interesting people from all over the world. Some tour companies will even provide training and teach you everything youll need to know.

You arent the only one who wants to live in the Caribbean. Many other people are looking at properties. Some may need to stay in an apartment for a year or two for temporary work. Other people may want a vacation home. Still others may want a permanent residence. By starting a business, you can be the person to help connect people with their dream home in their dream location.

People get sick and injured everywhere in the world, even in a place as beautiful as the Caribbean. They need nurses and doctors just like anywhere else in the world. You can work in different clinics or hospitals or even start your own practice. Many people assume they must complete their medical training before they move, but thats not true. There is even a medical school in the Caribbean, so you dont have to wait until after your training is finished to make a move.

Many people arent able to go to the Caribbean to learn about what is happening in that part of the world. Too often, people dont even care if someone doesnt bring it to their attention. Go to the Caribbean to become a journalist. You can write about your experiences while in the area for different travel blogs and travel magazines. You can also write on topics that affect the area, such as politics and natural disasters. Get a degree in English or Journalism to help establish yourself. You may even choose to start your own travel blog to develop a following.

Tourists in the Caribbean are going to eat out and go out for drinks more often than at home. They will probably tip better than at home. They are on vacation, after all! You can work in the restaurant industry as a server, cook, hostess, or bartender. You may even get to enjoy some of the best establishments in the country for yourself.

The Caribbean is a group of islands. That means theres a lot of water in the area and a lot of marine life. You can do your part to help the animals in the air by working as a marine biologist. As a marine biologist, you will learn how to best protect wildlife and keep the oceans clean. You may even get the opportunity to go diving to see the beauty underwater for yourself. Look into different marine biology programs at your local college or at a college in the Caribbean.

If you have adventure in your blood, you should pick a career that could take you to fun places. All of these careers can bring you to the Caribbean. Once you are done in the Caribbean, who knows where your career will take you next?

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7 Careers For People Who Want to Live in the Caribbean - South Florida Caribbean News

A Guide to the Caribbean Islands Reopening this Summer – Cond Nast Traveler

We'd all love to lay out on a beach right nowand no one does beaches better than the Caribbean. But more than toes in the sand, what the Caribbean and its economies need right now are tourist dollars. According to the Inter-American Development Bank, 14 of the 15 most tourism-dependent nations in the world are in the Caribbean, with Aruba, Antigua and Barbuda, and the Bahamas in the top three spots. But as many of these island nations and territories reopen to kick start their economies, health and safety questions for travelers remain: Do you need to take a COVID-19 test before arriving? How are hotels and resorts stepping up cleaning efforts? Will you be able to rent snorkel equipment? And, importantly, do you have to wear a face mask on the beach?

To help you sift from all the information out there, we broke down exactly what to expect if you're heading to the Caribbean in the coming months, for every destination with a reopening plan. Note that not everyone is rushing to welcome travelers back: you won't find the Cayman Islands, Guadeloupe, or Curaao belowas they don't plan on open their borders anytime soon.

Read on for what to know about visiting the Caribbean this summer. And as you plan your visits, remember to keep checking in on local government and tourism board sites, as coronavirus updates come often.

This dual-island country officially reopened its borders, and its international airport on Antigua, on June 1. (As of publishing, American is flying the only route from the U.S., with a daily flight from Miami.) Visitors have two options when it comes to Antigua and Barbuda's mandatory coronavirus testing: you can pay $100 for free test at the airport upon arrival and quarantine in your hotel for about 24 hours until you get the results; or you can quarantine at your hotel or rental for the first 14 days of your stay.

You'll have to wear a mask in all public places, and when interacting with others outside your family circlebut you won't have to wear them at beaches or pools where social distancing is possible, Colin James, head of the country's tourism board told the Telegraph. At beach bars, stools will be removed and tables will be at last six feet apart; and, for now, local restaurants outside of hotels will be restricted to takeout. All hotels and villas are also being certified by the local government to ensure they're following local health and cleaning guidelines. Check back on the government's COVID-19 site for continuing updates.

Aruba is reopening its border in stages. First, on July 1, European, Canadian, and Caribbean tourists (with the exception of the those from the Dominican Republic and Haiti) will be able to visit. Then, on July 10, that will extend to U.S. travelers. No date has been announced for travelers from countries not mentioned above. Like a number of U.S. airlines, Aruba is requiring visitors to both complete a health questionnaire and upload negative COVID-19 PCR test results, within 72 hours of arriving, as part of a new embarkation and disembarkation (ED) card process. (You can also prepay for a COVID-19 test upon arrival at Queen Beatrix International Airport.) Once you've filled out that ED card and received approval to visit, you're set to fly.

As for the experience on the ground, masks are not required, but are requested in situations where social distancing is difficult. Hotels have installed plexiglass barriers at front desks, and many are offering contactless check-in. Outdoor restaurants have been open since late May, restaurants with seating inside (as well as spas) opened June 1, and bars and nightclubs opened on June 10. The island has also instituted a Health & Happiness Codeessentially a certification that shows that a tour operator, water activities coordinator, car rental company, or spa is complying with suggested safety guidelines.

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A Guide to the Caribbean Islands Reopening this Summer - Cond Nast Traveler

When Will the Caribbean Be Back in Full Swing? – TravelPulse

As it stands now, travel advisors are on the fence as to when the Caribbean will again be fully back in business. The one thing thats certain, they say, is that nothing is certain.

Earlier this season, we all seemed to think the Caribbean would be the place where we could send our displaced travelers from Europe, said Becky Lukovic of Bella Travel Planning, an affiliate of Travel Experts. However, with the current COVID-19 situation in the U.S., some islands are changing their travel restrictions often, giving many advisors pause in even recommending them or booking them, lest our travelers suddenly be unable to travel to their destination.

Further exacerbating the situation is that even if the island is open for U.S. tourists to visit, the resort openings may be significantly behind the border opening dates, she added.

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For a full recovery, Lukovic believes that several things need to happen. First, the numbers of COVID cases in the U.S. will have to decrease enough for the islands to welcome our travelers. Second, the public in the U.S. and other countries need to be willing to travel in order for the resorts to be able to financially afford to open, she said.

Third, there needs to be some sort of stability in the entry requirements for each island. When the entry requirements change as quickly as they been in the past few weeks, its a gamble to plan travel there.

As a case in point, Holly Lombardo of Classic Travel Advisors, an affiliate of Travel Experts, relayed a travel scenario illustrating the challenges the Caribbean and its visitors face.

Lombardos clients canceled a trip to Greece on June 2 for travel in July because of the border closure. On June 26, I suggested St. Barts as a tropical alternative since it has just opened to the U.S. on June 2, she said, adding that entry requirements included arrival with a negative COVID-19 within 72 hours or alternatively taking a test on the island within 24 hours.

On June 28, Lombardo booked nonrefundable flights from Atlanta connecting through St Martin after researching that St Martin would open to the U.S. on July 1.

On June 29, Lombardo booked the prepaid non-refundable hotel stay in St Barts for arrival a week later, on July 7.

On July 3, St Martin announced it changed its mind and it would now not be allowing [travelers from] the U.S. in until July 15, she said. The hotel refused to refund monies [of] $12,000, [but] I was able to get the last two seats on a connection via San Juan on Tradewinds instead arriving on July 8 rather than July 7, which resulted in one lost hotel night for the clients and $2,500 in lost and higher-priced airfare.

Then, on July 7, St Barts announced new entry requirements, which would take effect on July 10, requiring that travelers must arrive with negative COVID-19 tests that were administered within 72 hoursand with no option to wait until you arrive to have it done, Lombardo said.

On July 8, her clients were almost denied boarding by Delta because of the announcement by St Barts, which Lombardo said she thought was simply a case of employees misreading the Timatic, which verifies passenger travel document requirements.

Meanwhile, the clients were able to get the COVID-19 tests completed at the San Juan International Airport, arriving in St. Barts with negative results in hand.

You can see how this is an absolute mess. Literally, I thought to myself, I may stop selling any 2020 departures, she said. It may not be worth the liability and the heart palpitations!

Approximately one-third of Lombardos business is generated from Caribbean bookings. Because Im an Atlanta-based agent, travelers can easily get to the Caribbean for three- to five-night getaways, she said. All but one of my March/April/May/June/July/ bookings were canceled by clients or refunded by hotels due to closures. Not one person has rebooked yet. They have kicked the tires and asked for extensions of rebooking deadline dates.

Those clients with future-stay credits generally are feeling more comfortable with the possibility of first and second quarters of 2021, Lombardo said.

Prior to the pandemic, Time For Travel was having a huge year for Caribbean bookings, said its president, Sarah Kline. The Caribbean was hot, and the demand was higher than ever, adding that its about 50/50 in terms of clients who rebooked versus canceled.

For James Berglie of Be All Inclusive, about 80 to 85 percent of our clients rebooked versus canceled.

He predicts a full Caribbean recovery will take years. My guess would be two to three years, he said. Travel will slowly return as people become more comfortable in the post quarantine world, but that will take time. The availability of a daily nonstop will be a huge determinant depending on the market guests are coming from.

Noting that clients always prefer nonstops, in a post -quarantine world I think it will be even more important to some people, as they want to lessen the time in planes and traveling. For us in Baltimore, that means Jamaica, Punta Cana, Aruba and Cancun.

For Kline, weve had the most demand for Riviera Maya and Jamaica for 2020, but for 2021 clients seem to want less crowded destinations and weve had more requests for Antigua, Saint Lucia, Turks and Caicos and Costa Rica.

Not surprisingly, agents contend that Caribbean destinations that fare the best will be those with the most effective health and safety protocols.

Generally speaking, it will be a destination where the government and resorts work together to have good health protocols in place across the board and supervision of some sort to make sure those protocols are uniformly followed, said Claire Schoeder of Elevations Travel.

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When Will the Caribbean Be Back in Full Swing? - TravelPulse

Address ‘unprecedented’ impact of coronavirus on Latin America and the Caribbean, urges Guterres – UN News

The UN brief revealsthat several countries in the region, are now among those with the highest per capita infection rates worldwide and shines a light on how the crisis is impacting vulnerable groups, includingindigenous communities and women.

The most vulnerable populations and individuals are once again being hit the hardest, Secretary-General Antnio Guterres said in a video message on the pandemics effect throughout a zone grappling with fragmented health services even before the coronavirus.

The UN chief emphasized the impact of the coronavirus on women across the region, who make up the majority of the workforce and now bear the brunt of additional caregiving. He highlighted the plight of older persons and individuals with disabilities, who are at greater risk; and indigenous peoples, those of African descent, migrants and refugees, who suffering disproportionately.

It is projected that there will be a 9.1 per cent contraction in gross domestic product (GDP), which will be the largest in a century.

While stressing the need to do everything possible to limit the spread of the virus and tackle the health effects of the pandemic, Mr. Guterres noted that we must also address the unprecedented social and economic impacts.

The policy brief underlines an array of urgent and longer-term steps for better recovery, including the prioritization of distance learning and continued child-centered services to mitigate education interruptions.

Governments within the region are also being asked to do more to reduce poverty, food insecurity and malnutrition, such as by providing basic emergency income and anti-hunger grants.

Mr. Guterres also flagged the urgent need for greater international support.

I have called for a rescue and recovery package equivalent to more than 10 per cent of the global economy, reminded the UN chief, underscoring the need of the international community to provide liquidity, financial assistance and debt relief for Latin America and the Caribbean.

Latin American and Caribbean countries and in particular small island developing States should not be excluded from global assistance, he asserted. The international multilateral response needs to be extended to middle-income countries.

Broader structural challenges must be addressed to build back better and transform the regions development model.

Against the backdrop of pervasive inequality, accessible and comprehensive welfare systems must be developed, fair taxation systems created, decent jobs promoted, environmental sustainability strengthened, and social protection mechanisms reinforced, according to the UN chief.

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Address 'unprecedented' impact of coronavirus on Latin America and the Caribbean, urges Guterres - UN News

You could move to Barbados and work there remotely for a year thanks to a new incentive – Insider – INSIDER

If you can work from anywhere, would you stay where you are?

As much of the world has taken to working remotely because of the coronavirus pandemic, many employees are no longer tied to where their offices are.

Barbados is banking on the idea that many people will choose a tropical paradise over their current digs.

Imagine working from here. LU LIN/Shuttershock

Barbados Prime Minister Mia Amor Mottley said last week that the Caribbean country was planning to introduce a "12-month Barbados Welcome Stamp" that would allow visitors to stay for up to a year and work remotely.

Mottley said the stamp would allow "persons to come and work from here overseas, digitally so, so that persons don't need to remain in the countries in which they are" but beyond that, information is scarce. A representative for Barbados Tourism Marketing told Insider that "details on the visa are still being finalized by the Government of Barbados."

The idea is that as short-term travel becomes increasingly difficult, a 12-month stamp would make the trip more worthwhile. It would also bring much-needed tourism dollars to the island.

Mottley said on June 26 that Barbados planned to reopen to tourists on July 12, this Sunday, when some air travel is expected to resume.

"We will continue to take a risk-based approach to the protection of our country, our people and our visitors," Mottley said.

It's important to note, however, that nonessential travel is still discouraged in many places, including the US, where the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has warned against it.

The island is a British Commonwealth nation. Styve Reineck/Shutterstock

A recent press release from Barbados Tourism Marketing said visitors from high-risk countries (more than 10,000 new cases in the past seven days) were "strongly encouraged" to take a COVID-19 test within 72 hours of their departure. Travelers from low-risk spots (with fewer than 100 cases in the past week) could take the test up to a week before departure.

Travelers who didn't take a test before their arrival will have to take one when they land, then quarantine at their expense until they receive the results, which could take about two days. Should they test positive, "they will be placed in isolation where they will receive care from the Ministry of Health and Wellness," the press release said.

Visitors will also have to fill out an online embarkation/disembarkation form related to their health and face temperature checks at the airport, the press release said.

According to data from Johns Hopkins University, Barbados had 98 confirmed COVID-19 cases and seven deaths as of Wednesday.

While it's still unclear when this welcome stamp might launch, Mottley said: "The government is committed to working with you on the promotion of new concepts like the 12-month Barbados Welcome Stamp, being able to open our borders to persons traveling and making it as hospitable as ever for all of us."

Representatives for the Barbados Government Information Service did not immediately respond to Insider's request for comment.

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You could move to Barbados and work there remotely for a year thanks to a new incentive - Insider - INSIDER

Latin America & The Caribbean – Weekly Situation Update (29 June-5 July 2020) As of 6 July 2020 – Brazil – ReliefWeb

KEY FIGURES

2.8M CONFIRMED COVID-19 CASES IN LATIN AMERICA & THE CARIBBEAN AS OF 5 JULY

COLLAPSING TOURISM THREATENING REGIONAL ECONOMIES

The Inter-American Development Bank (IDB) reports that Latin America and the Caribbean, home to many tourism-dependent economies, will suffer an unprecedented economic shock due to the impact of the COVID-19 crisis on tourism. Tourism in the Caribbean accounts for 50 to 90 per cent of gross domestic product (GDP) and employment in some countries, according to the International Monetary Fund (IMF).

While Central and South America are comparatively less reliant on tourism, some countries will also feel the downturn - from 2014 to 2018, tourism accounted for an average of 16 per cent of economic output and employment in Mexico and 10 per cent of GDP and employment in Uruguay, Argentina and Chile.

IDB predicts that the drop in tourism in the region due to the pandemic could be from 40 to 70 per cent.

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Latin America & The Caribbean - Weekly Situation Update (29 June-5 July 2020) As of 6 July 2020 - Brazil - ReliefWeb

How has Cuba managed to flatten the curve? – CNN

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How has Cuba managed to flatten the curve? - CNN

Pirates of the Caribbean Jewelry Removed Amid Controversy – GameRant

A collector site known as Worthpoint has removed a piece of controversial Pirates of the Caribbean jewelry in the shape of a noose from its site.

Since the end of May with the push of the Black Lives Matter movement, it seems like more and more companies are starting to be held accountable for actions that would be widely considered racist and insensitive. For example, Twitch recently received heavy backlash following a tone-deaf Black Lives Matter video that centered, confusingly enough, around white content creators. Now Disney is receiving similar backlash for a seemingly insensitive product it sold not this year, but 14 years ago.

ThePirates of the Caribbean franchise is no stranger to controversy these days. Following the accusations of domestic abuse by ex-wife Amber Heard, Disney made the decision to remove Johnny Depp from the upcoming movies. Since then, many fans have speculated whether or not Jack Sparrow will have any reference or involvement with the franchise going forward.

RELATED: Kirby Gets Fancy Jewelry Line

Now thePirates franchise may start to come under fire again for a piece of jewelry Disney sold alongside the release ofPirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man's Chest. TMZ originally pointed out the piece in question: a 14k gold-plated 20-inch long necklace that featured a noose pendant.

It's quite possible that this obviously insensitive piece of jewelry would have gone unnoticed had it not been featured on the collector site Worthpoint. Worthpoint is a site that catalogs price points for different collectibles and allows for collectors to sell through eBay. Worthpoint has since removed the necklace from its site after being contacted by TMZ.

It's still a mystery as to why this necklace was even made by Disney in the first place. It was originally launched as part of a pirate-themed line up of jewelry from Disney Couture featuring things like flintlock pistols, skulls, and cutlasses. Even though there are a couple of instances of main characters in thePirates series facing the gallows, it seems hard to imagine a world where this product was in the planning stage and no one thought of the racist implications behind it.

While there has been no statement about the necklace from Disney, that doesn't mean it isn't discussing the future of thePirates of the Caribbeanfranchise. Recently it was announced that Margot Robbie would be taking the lead in upcoming series reboot. Hopefully, Disney will do better about the products it decides to launch alongside these movies than it has in the past.

MORE: Final Fantasy 7 Remake Reveals Pricey Aerith Jewelry

Source: Worthpoint (via TMZ)

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When not writing for GameRant, Kyle spends his time streaming, writing short stories, and playing Dungeons & Dragons.

Originally posted here:

Pirates of the Caribbean Jewelry Removed Amid Controversy - GameRant


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