Faroe Islands – Wikipedia

“Faeroes” redirects here. It is not to be confused with Fr or Fair Isle.

Coordinates: 6200N 0647W / 62.000N 6.783W / 62.000; -6.783

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2011census

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The Faroe Islands (; Faroese: Froyar pronounced[fja]; Danish: Frerne, pronounced[fn]), sometimes called the Faeroe Islands, is an archipelago between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic, about halfway between Norway and Iceland, 320 kilometres (200 miles) north-northwest of Scotland. The islands are an autonomous country within the Kingdom of Denmark.[8][9][10] Their area is about 1,400 square kilometres (541 square miles) with a population of 50,322 in October 2017.[3]

The Faroes’ terrain is rugged, and the islands have a subpolar oceanic climate (Cfc): windy, wet, cloudy, and cool. Despite this island group’s northerly latitude, temperatures average above freezing throughout the year because of the Gulf Stream.

Between 1035 and 1814, the Faroes were part of the Hereditary Kingdom of Norway. In 1814, the Treaty of Kiel granted Denmark control over the islands, along with two other Norwegian island possessions: Greenland and Iceland. The Faroe Islands have been a self-governing country within the Kingdom of Denmark since 1948.[11]

The Faroese have control of most domestic matters. Areas that remain the responsibility of Denmark include military defence, policing and the justice department, currency, and foreign affairs.[12] However, as they are not part of the same customs area as Denmark, the Faroe Islands have an independent trade policy and can establish trade agreements with other states. The islands also have representation in the Nordic Council as members of the Danish delegation. The Faroe Islands also have their own national teams competing in certain sports.

In Faroese, the name appears as Froyar. Oyar represents the plural of oy, older Faroese for “island”. Due to sound changes, the modern Faroese word for island is oyggj. The first element, fr, may reflect an Old Norse word fr (sheep), although this analysis is sometimes disputed because Faroese now uses the word seyur (from Old Norse saur) to mean “sheep”. Another possibility is that the Irish monks, who settled the island around 625, had already given the islands a name related to the Gaelic word fearrann, meaning “land” or “estate”. This name could then have been passed on to the Norwegian settlers, who then added oyar (islands).[13] The name thus translates as either “Islands of Sheep” or “Islands of Fearrann”.

In Danish, the name Frerne contains the same elements, though erne is the definite plural of (island).

In English, it may be seen as redundant to call them the Faroe Islands, since the oe comes from an element meaning “island”. The name is also sometimes spelled “Faeroe”.[14][15] Most notably in the Shipping Forecast, where the waters around the islands are called Faeroes.

Archaeological evidence shows settlers living on the Faroe Islands in two successive periods prior to the arrival of the Norse, the first between 300 and 600 AD and the second between 600 and 800 AD.[16] Scientists from the University of Aberdeen have also found early cereal pollen from domesticated plants, which further suggests people may have lived on the islands before the Vikings arrived.[17] Archaeologist Mike Church noted that Dicuil (see below) mentioned what may have been the Faroes. He also suggested that the people living there might have been from Ireland, Scotland or Scandinavia, possibly with groups from all three areas settling there.[18]

A Latin account of a voyage made by Brendan, an Irish monastic saint who lived around 484578, includes a description of insulae (islands) resembling the Faroe Islands. This association, however, is far from conclusive in its description.[19]

Dicuil, an Irish monk of the early 9th century, wrote a more definite account. In his geographical work De mensura orbis terrae he claimed he had reliable information of heremitae ex nostra Scotia (“hermits from our land of Ireland/Scotland”) who had lived on the northerly islands of Britain for almost a hundred years until the arrival of Norse pirates.[20]

Norsemen settled the islands c. 800, bringing Old West Norse, which evolved into the modern Faroese language. According to Icelandic sagas such as Freyjar Saga, one of the best known men in the island was Trndur Gtu, a descendant of Scandinavian chiefs who had settled in Dublin, Ireland. Trndur led the battle against Sigmund Brestursson, the Norwegian monarchy and the Norwegian church.

The Norse and NorseGael settlers probably did not come directly from Scandinavia, but rather from Norse communities surrounding the Irish Sea, Northern Isles and Outer Hebrides of Scotland, including the Shetland and Orkney islands. A traditional name for the islands in Irish, Na Scigir, possibly refers to the (Eyja-)Skeggjar “(Island-)Beards”, a nickname given to island dwellers.

According to the Freyinga saga, more emigrants left Norway who did not approve of the monarchy of Harald Fairhair (ruled c. 872 to 930). These people settled the Faroes around the end of the 9th century.[21] Early in the 11th century, Sigmundur Brestisson (9611005) whose clan had flourished in the southern islands before invaders from the northern islands almost exterminated it escaped to Norway. He was sent back to take possession of the islands for Olaf Tryggvason, King of Norway from 995 to 1000. Sigmundur introduced Christianity, forcing Trndur Gtu to convert or face beheading and, though Sigmundur was subsequently murdered, Norwegian taxation was upheld. Norwegian control of the Faroes continued until 1814, although, when the Kingdom of Norway (8721397) entered the Kalmar Union with Denmark, it gradually resulted in Danish control of the islands. The Reformation reached the Faroes in 1538. When the union between Denmark and Norway dissolved as a result of the Treaty of Kiel in 1814, Denmark retained possession of the Faroe Islands; Norway itself was joined in a union with Sweden.

In 1816, the Faroe Islands became a county in the Danish Kingdom.[22]

As part of Mercantilism, Denmark maintained a monopoly over trade with the Faroe Islands and forbade their inhabitants trading with others (e.g. the geographically close Britain). The trade monopoly in the Faroe Islands was abolished in 1856, after which the area developed as a modern fishing nation with its own fishing fleet. The national awakening from 1888 initially arose from a struggle to maintain the Faroese language and was thus culturally oriented, but after 1906 it became more political with the foundation of political parties of the Faroe Islands.

On 12 April 1940 British troops occupied the Faroe Islands, shortly after the German invasion of Denmark on 9 April 1940. In 19421943 the British Royal Engineers, under the leadership of Lt. Col. William Law MC, built the only airport in the Faroe Islands, Vgar Airport. Control of the islands reverted to Denmark following the war, but Danish rule had been undermined, and Iceland’s independence served as a precedent for many Faroese.

The Faroese independence referendum, 1946 resulted in 50.73% in favor of independence to 49.27% against.[23] The Faroe Islands subsequently declared independence on 18 September 1946; however, this declaration was annulled by Denmark on 20 September on the grounds that a majority of the Faroese voters had not supported independence and King Christian X of Denmark dissolved the Faroese Lgting on 24 September.[24][25] The dissolution of the Lgting was on 8 November followed by the Faroese parliamentary election of 1946 in which the parties in favour of full independence received a total of 5,396 votes while the parties against received a total of 7,488 votes.[26] As a reaction to the growing self-government and independence movements, Denmark finally granted the Faroe Islands home-rule with a high degree of local autonomy on 30 March 1948.[24]

In 1973 the Faroe Islands declined to join Denmark in entering the European Economic Community (later absorbed into the European Union). The islands experienced considerable economic difficulties following the collapse of the fishing industry in the early 1990s, but have since made efforts to diversify the economy. Support for independence has grown and is the objective of the Republican Party.

The Faroe Islands are an island group consisting of 18 major islands about 655 kilometres (407mi) off the coast of Northern Europe, between the Norwegian Sea and the North Atlantic Ocean, about halfway between Iceland and Norway, the closest neighbours being the Northern Isles and the Outer Hebrides of Scotland. Its coordinates are 6200N 0647W / 62.000N 6.783W / 62.000; -6.783.

Distance from the Faroe Islands to:

The islands cover an area of 1,399 square kilometres (540sq.mi) and have small lakes and rivers, but no major ones. There are 1,117 kilometres (694mi) of coastline.[27] The only significant uninhabited island is Ltla Dmun.

The islands are rugged and rocky with some low peaks; the coasts are mostly cliffs. The highest point is Slttaratindur in northern Eysturoy, 882 metres (2,894ft) above sea level.

The Faroe Islands are dominated by tholeiitic basalt lava, which was part of the great Thulean Plateau during the Paleogene period.[28]

The climate is classed as subpolar oceanic climate according to the Kppen climate classification: Cfc, with areas having a tundra climate, especially in the mountains, although some coastal or low-lying areas can have very mild-winter versions of a tundra climate. The overall character of the islands’ climate is influenced by the strong warming influence of the Atlantic Ocean, which produces the North Atlantic Current. This, together with the remoteness of any source of warm airflows, ensures that winters are mild (mean temperature 3.0 to 4.0C or 37 to 39F) while summers are cool (mean temperature 9.5 to 10.5C or 49 to 51F).

The islands are windy, cloudy and cool throughout the year with an average of 210 rainy or snowy days per year. The islands lie in the path of depressions moving northeast, making strong winds and heavy rain possible at all times of the year. Sunny days are rare and overcast days are common. Hurricane Faith struck the Faroe Islands on 5 September 1966 with sustained winds over 100mph (160km/h) and only then did the storm cease to be a tropical system.[29]

The climate varies greatly over small distances, due to the altitude, ocean currents, topography and winds. Precipitation varies considerably throughout the archipelago. In some highland areas, snow cover can last for months with snowfalls possible for the greater part of the year (on the highest peaks, summer snowfall is by no means rare), while in some sheltered coastal locations, several years pass without any snowfall whatsoever. Trshavn receives frosts more often than other areas just a short distance to the south. Snow is also seen at a much higher frequency than on outlying islands nearby. The area receives on average 49 frosts a year.[30]

The collection of meteorological data on the Faroe Islands began in 1867.[31] Winter recording began in 1891, and the warmest winter occurred in 201617 with an average temperature of 6.1C.[32]

A collection of Faroese marine algae resulting from a survey sponsored by NATO,[citation needed] the British Museum (Natural History) and the Carlsberg Foundation, is preserved in the Ulster Museum (catalogue numbers: F3195F3307). It is one of ten exsiccatae sets.

The natural vegetation of the Faroe Islands is dominated by arctic-alpine plants, wildflowers, grasses, moss and lichen. Most of the lowland area is grassland and some is heath, dominated by shrubby heathers, mainly Calluna vulgaris. Among the herbaceous flora that occur in the Faroe Islands is the cosmopolitan marsh thistle, Cirsium palustre.[36]

Although there are no trees native to the Faroe Islands, limited species were able to be successfully introduced to the region, including the Black Cottonwood, also known as the California Poplar (Populus trichocarpa)

A few small plantations consisting of plants collected from similar climates such as Tierra del Fuego in South America and Alaska thrive on the islands.

The bird fauna of the Faroe Islands is dominated by seabirds and birds attracted to open land like heather, probably because of the lack of woodland and other suitable habitats. Many species have developed special Faroese sub-species: common eider, Common starling, Eurasian wren, common murre, and black guillemot.[37] The pied raven was endemic to the Faroe Islands, but has now become extinct.

Only a few species of wild land mammals are found in the Faroe Islands today, all introduced by humans. Three species are thriving on the islands today: mountain hare (Lepus timidus), brown rat (Rattus norvegicus), and the house mouse (Mus musculus). Apart from these, there once was a local domestic sheep breed, the Faroe sheep (depicted on the coat of arms), a variety of feral sheep survived on Ltla Dmun until the mid-19th century.[38]

Grey seals (Halichoerus grypus) are common around the shorelines.[citation needed] Several species of cetacea live in the waters around the Faroe Islands. Best known are the long-finned pilot whales (Globicephala melaena), which are still hunted by the islanders in accordance with longstanding local tradition.[39] Killer whales (Orcinus orca) are regular visitors around the islands.

The domestic animals of the Faroe Islands are a result of 1,200 years of isolated breeding. As a result, many of the islands’ domestic animals are found nowhere else in the world. Faroese domestic breeds include Faroe pony, Faroe cow, Faroe sheep, Faroese goose, and Faroese duck.

The Faroese government holds executive power in local government affairs. The head of the government is called the Lgmaur (“Law person”) and serves as a premier. Any other member of the cabinet is called a landsstrismaur (“national committee man”) or landsstriskvinna (“national committee woman”). The Faroese parliament the Lgting (“Law assembly”) dates back to Viking times and is believed to be one of the oldest parliaments in the world. The parliament currently has 33 members.[40]

In contemporary times, elections are held at municipal, national (Lgting) and Danish (Folketing) levels. Until 2007, there were seven electoral districts, each comprising a ssla, while Streymoy was divided into a northern and southern part (Trshavn region). However, on 25 October 2007, changes were made such that the entire country is one electoral district, giving each vote equal weight.

Administratively, the islands are divided into 30 municipalities (kommunur) within which there are 120 or so settlements.

Traditionally, there are also the six sslur (similar to the British “shire”: Noroyar, Eysturoy, Streymoy, Vgar, Sandoy, and Suuroy). Although today ssla technically means “police district”, the term is still commonly used to indicate a geographical region. In earlier times, each ssla had its own assembly, the so-called vrting (“spring assembly”).

The Faroe Islands have been under Norwegian/Danish control since 1388. The 1814 Treaty of Kiel terminated the Danish-Norwegian union, and Norway came under the rule of the King of Sweden, while the Faroe Islands, Iceland and Greenland remained Danish possessions. From ancient times the Faroe Islands had a parliament (Lgting) which was abolished in 1816, and the Faroe Islands were to be governed as an ordinary Danish amt (county), with the Amtmand as its head of government. In 1851, the Lgting was reinstated, but, until 1948, served mainly as an advisory body.

The islands are home to a notable independence movement that has seen an increase in popularity within recent decades. At the end of World War II, some of the population favoured independence from Denmark, and on 14 September 1946 an independence referendum was held on the question of secession. It was a consultative referendum; the parliament was not bound to follow the people’s vote. This was the first time that the Faroese people had been asked whether they favoured independence or wanted to continue within the Danish kingdom.

The result of the vote was a narrow majority in favour of secession, but the coalition in parliament could not reach agreement on how this outcome should be interpreted and implemented; and because of these irresoluble differences, the coalition fell apart. A parliamentary election was held a few months later, in which the political parties that favoured staying in the Danish kingdom increased their share of the vote and formed a coalition. Based on this, they chose to reject secession. Instead, a compromise was made and the Folketing passed a home-rule law that went into effect in 1948. The Faroe Islands’ status as a Danish amt was thereby brought to an end; the Faroe Islands were given a high degree of self-governance, supported by a financial subsidy from Denmark to recompense expenses the islands have on Danish services.

At present, the islanders are about evenly split between those favouring independence and those who prefer to continue as a part of the Kingdom of Denmark. Within both camps there is a wide range of opinions. Of those who favour independence, some are in favour of an immediate unilateral declaration of independence. Others see it as something to be attained gradually and with the full consent of the Danish government and the Danish nation. In the unionist camp there are also many who foresee and welcome a gradual increase in autonomy even while strong ties with Denmark are maintained.

As of 2011[update], a new draft Faroese constitution is being drawn up. However the draft has been declared by the Danish Prime Minister, Lars Lkke Rasmussen, as incompatible with Denmark’s constitution and if the Faroese political parties wish to continue with it then they must declare independence.[41]

As explicitly asserted by both treaties of the European Union, the Faroe Islands are not part of the European Union. The Faroes are not grouped with the EU when it comes to international trade; for instance, when the EU and Russia imposed reciprocal trade sanctions on each other over the War in Donbass in 2014, the Faroes began exporting significant amounts of fresh salmon to Russia.[42] Moreover, a protocol to the treaty of accession of Denmark to the European Communities stipulates that Danish nationals residing in the Faroe Islands are not considered Danish nationals within the meaning of the treaties. Hence, Danish people living in the Faroes are not citizens of the European Union (though other EU nationals living there remain EU citizens). The Faroes are not covered by the Schengen Agreement, but there are no border checks when travelling between the Faroes and any Schengen country (the Faroes have been part of the Nordic Passport Union since 1966, and since 2001 there have been no permanent border checks between the Nordic countries and the rest of the Schengen Area as part of the Schengen agreement).[43]

The Faroe Islands are not a fully independent country, but they do have political relations directly with other countries through agreement with Denmark. The Faroe Islands are a member of some international organisations as though they were an independent country.

The Faroe Islands are a member of several international sports federations like UEFA, FIFA in football[44] and FINA in swimming[45] and EHF in handball[46] and have their own national teams. The Faroe Islands have their own telephone country code, Internet country code top-level domain, banking code and postal country code.

The Faroe Islands make their own agreements with other countries regarding trade and commerce. When the EU embargo against Russia started in 2014, the Faroe Islands were not a part of the embargo because they are not a part of EU, and the islands had just themselves experienced a year of embargo from the EU including Denmark against the islands; the Faroese prime minister Kaj Leo Johannesen went to Moscow to negotiate the trade between the two countries.[10] The Faroese minister of fisheries negotiates with the EU and other countries regarding the rights to fish.[47]

The vast majority of the population are ethnic Faroese, of Norse and Celtic descent.[48] Recent DNA analyses have revealed that Y chromosomes, tracing male descent, are 87% Scandinavian.[49]The studies show that mitochondrial DNA, tracing female descent, is 84% Celtic.[50]

There is a gender deficit of about 2,000 women owing to migration.[51] Three hundred women from the Philippines and Thailand, recruited as wives because of the Faroes’ gender imbalance, make up the largest ethnic minority in the Faroes.[51]

The total fertility rate of the Faroe Islands is currently one of the highest in Europe.[52] The fertility rate is 2.409 children born per woman (2015 est.).[53]

The 2011 census shows that of the approximately 48,600 inhabitants of the Faroe Islands (17,441 private households in 2011), 43,135 were born in the Faroe Islands, 3,597 were born in the other two countries of the Kingdom of Denmark (Denmark or Greenland), and 1,614 were born outside the Kingdom of Denmark. People were also asked about their nationality, including Faroese. Children under 15 were not asked about their nationality. 97% said that they were ethnic Faroese, which means that many of those who were born in either Denmark or Greenland consider themselves as ethnic Faroese. The other 3% of those older than 15 said they were not Faroese: 515 were Danish, 433 were from other European countries, 147 came from Asia, 65 from Africa, 55 from the Americas, 23 from Russia.[54]The Faroe Islands have people from 77 different nationalities.

If the first inhabitants of the Faroe Islands were Irish monks, then they must have lived as a very small group of settlers. Later, when the Vikings colonised the islands, there was a considerable increase in the population. However, it never exceeded 5,000 until the 19th century. Around 1349, about half the population perished in the Black Death plague.

Only with the rise of the deep-sea fishery (and thus independence from agriculture in the islands’ harsh terrain) and with general progress in the health service was rapid population growth possible in the Faroes. Beginning in the 19th century, the population increased tenfold in 200 years.

At the beginning of the 1990s, the Faroe Islands entered a deep economic crisis leading to heavy emigration; however, this trend reversed in subsequent years to a net immigration. This has been in the form of a population replacement as young Faroese women leave and are replaced with Asian/Pacific brides.[55]In 2011, there were 2,155 more men than women between the age of 0 to 59 in the Faroe Islands.[56]

The Faroese population is spread across most of the area; it was not until recent decades that significant urbanisation occurred. Industrialisation has been remarkably decentralised, and the area has therefore maintained quite a viable rural culture. Nevertheless, villages with poor harbour facilities have been the losers in the development from agriculture to fishing, and in the most peripheral agricultural areas, also known as toyggjar “Outer Islands”, there are few young people. In recent decades, the village-based social structure has nevertheless been placed under pressure, giving way to a rise in interconnected “centres” that are better able to provide goods and services than the badly connected periphery. This means that shops and services are now relocating en masse from the villages into the centres, and slowly but steadily the Faroese population is concentrating in and around the centres.

In the 1990s, the government abandoned the old national policy of developing the villages (Bygdamenning), and instead began a process of regional development (kismenning). The term “region” referred to the large islands of the Faroes. Nevertheless, the government was unable to press through the structural reform of merging small rural municipalities to create sustainable, decentralised entities that could drive forward regional development. As regional development has been difficult on the administrative level, the government has instead invested heavily in infrastructure, interconnecting the regions.

In general, it is becoming less valid to regard the Faroes as a society based on separate islands and regions. The huge investments in roads, bridges and sub-sea tunnels (see also Transport in the Faroe Islands) have bound the islands together, creating a coherent economic and cultural sphere that covers almost 90% of the population. From this perspective it is reasonable to regard the Faroes as a dispersed city or even to refer to it as the Faroese Network City.[citation needed]

Faroese is spoken in the entire area as a first language. It is difficult to say exactly how many people worldwide speak the Faroese language, because many ethnic Faroese live in Denmark, and few who are born there return to the Faroes with their parents or as adults.

The Faroese language is one of the smallest of the Germanic languages. Written Faroese (grammar and vocabulary) is most similar to Icelandic and to their ancestor Old Norse, though the spoken language is closer to Norwegian dialects of Western Norway. Faroese is the first official language of the island while Danish, the second, is taught in schools and can be used by the Faroese government in public relations.[1]

Faroese language policy provides for the active creation of new terms in Faroese suitable for modern life.

According to the Freyinga saga, Sigmundur Brestisson brought Christianity to the islands in 999. However, archaeology at a site in Toftanes, Leirvk named Bnhstoftin (English: prayer-house ruin) and over a dozen slabs from lansgarur in the small island of Skvoy which in the main display encircled linear and outline crosses, suggest that Celtic Christianity may have arrived at least 150 years earlier.[57] The Faroe Islands’ Church Reformation was completed on 1 January 1540. According to official statistics from 2017, 80.2% of the Faroese population are members of the state church, the Church of the Faroe Islands (Flkakirkjan), a form of Lutheranism.[58] The Flkakirkjan became an independent church in 2007; previously it had been a diocese within the Church of Denmark. Faroese members of the clergy who have had historical importance include Venceslaus Ulricus Hammershaimb (18191909), Frrikur Petersen (18531917) and, perhaps most significantly, Jkup Dahl (18781944), who had a great influence in ensuring that the Faroese language was spoken in the church instead of Danish. Participation in churches is more prevalent among the Faroese population than among most other Scandinavians.

In the late 1820s, the Christian Evangelical religious movement, the Plymouth Brethren, was established in England. In 1865, a member of this movement, William Gibson Sloan, travelled to the Faroes from Shetland. At the turn of the 20th century, the Faroese Plymouth Brethren numbered thirty. Today, around 10% of the Faroese population are members of the Open Brethren community (Brrasamkoman). About 3% belong to the Charismatic Movement. There are several charismatic churches around the islands, the largest of which, called Keldan (The Spring), has about 200 to 300 members. About 2% belong to other Christian groups. The Adventists operate a private school in Trshavn. Jehovah’s Witnesses also have four congregations with a total of 121 members. The Roman Catholic congregation has about 170 members and falls under the jurisdiction of Denmark’s Roman Catholic Diocese of Copenhagen. The municipality of Trshavn has an old Franciscan school.

There are also around fifteen Bah’s who meet at four different places. The Ahmadiyyas established a community in the Faroe Islands in 2010. Unlike Denmark, Sweden and Iceland with Forn Sir, the Faroes have no organised Heathen community.

The best-known church buildings in the Faroe Islands include Trshavn Cathedral, Olaf II of Norway’s Church and the Magnus Cathedral in Kirkjubur; the Vesturkirkjan and the Maria Church, both of which are situated in Trshavn; the church of Fmjin; the octagonal church in Haldrsvk; Christianskirkjan in Klaksvk; and also the two pictured here.

In 1948, Victor Danielsen (Plymouth Brethren) completed the first Bible translation into Faroese from different modern languages. Jacob Dahl and Kristian Osvald Vider (Flkakirkjan) completed the second translation in 1961. The latter was translated from the original Biblical languages (Hebrew and Greek) into Faroese.

According to the 2011 Census, there were 33,018 Christians (95.44%), 23 Muslims (0.07%), 7 Hindus (0.02%), 66 Buddhists (0.19%), 12 Jews (0.03%), 13 Baha’i (0.04%), 3 Sikhs (0.01%), 149 others (0.43%), 85 with more than one belief (0.25%), and 1,397 with no religion (4.04%).[59]

The levels of education in the Faroe Islands are primary, secondary and higher education. Most institutions are funded by the state; there are few private schools in the country. Education is compulsory for 9 years between the ages of 7 and 16.[60]

Compulsory education consists of seven years of primary education and two years of lower secondary education; it is public, free of charge, provided by the respective municipalities, and is called the Flkaskli in Faroese. The Flkaskli also provides optional preschool education as well as the tenth year of education that is a prerequisite to get admitted to upper secondary education. Students that complete compulsory education are allowed to continue education in a vocational school, where they can have job-specific training and education. Since the fishing industry is an important part of country’s economy, maritime schools are an important part of Faroese education. Upon completion of the tenth year of Flkaskli, students can continue to upper secondary education which consists of several different types of schools. Higher education is offered at the University of the Faroe Islands; a part of Faroese youth moves abroad to pursue higher education, mainly in Denmark. Other forms of education comprise adult education and music schools. The structure of the Faroese educational system bears resemblances with its Danish counterpart.[60]

In the 12th century, education was provided by the Catholic Church in the Faroe Islands.[61] The Church of Denmark took over education after the Protestant Reformation.[62]Modern educational institutions started operating in the last quarter of the nineteenth century and developed throughout the twentieth century. The status of the Faroese language in education was a significant issue for decades, until it was accepted as a language of instruction in 1938.[63] Initially education was administered and regulated by Denmark.[63] In 1979 responsibilities on educational issues started transferring to the Faroese authorities, a procedure which was completed in 2002.[63]

The Ministry of Education, Research and Culture has the jurisdiction of educational responsibility in the Faroe Islands.[64] Since the Faroe Islands is a constituent country of the Danish Realm, education in the Faroe Islands is influenced and has similarities with the Danish educational system; there is an agreement on educational cooperation between the Faroe Islands and Denmark.[63][65][66] In 2012 the public spending on education was 8.1% of GDP.[67] The municipalities are responsible for the school buildings for children’s education in Flkasklin from age 1st grade to 9th or 10th grade (age 7 to 16).[68] In November 2013 1,615 people, or 6.8% of the total number of employees, were employed in the education sector.[67] Of the 31,270 people aged 25 and above 1,717 (5.5%) have gained at least a master’s degrees or a Ph.D., 8,428 (27%) have gained a B.Sc. or a diploma, 11,706 (37.4%) have finished upper secondary education while 9,419 (30.1%) has only finished primary school and have no other education.[69] There is no data on literacy in the Faroe Islands, but the CIA Factbook states that it is probably as high as in Denmark proper, i.e. 99%.[70]

The majority of students in upper secondary schools are women, although men represent the majority in higher education institutions. In addition, most young Faroese people who relocate to other countries to study are women.[71] Out of 8,535 holders of bachelor degrees, 4,796 (56.2%) have had their education in the Faroe Islands, 2,724 (31.9%) in Denmark, 543 in both the Faroe Islands and Denmark, 94 (1.1%) in Norway, 80 in the United Kingdom and the rest in other countries.[72] Out of 1,719 holders of master’s degrees or PhDs, 1,249 (72.7% have had their education in Denmark, 87 (5.1%) in the United Kingdom, 86 (5%) in both the Faroe Islands and Denmark, 64 (3.7%) in the Faroe Islands, 60 (3.5%) in Norway and the rest in other countries (mostly EU and Nordic).[72] Since there is no medical school in the Faroe Islands, all medical students have to study abroad; as of 2013[update], out of a total of 96 medical students, 76 studied in Denmark, 19 in Poland, and 1 in Hungary.[73]

Economic troubles caused by a collapse of the Faroese fishing industry in the early 1990s brought high unemployment rates of 10 to 15% by the mid-1990s.[74] Unemployment decreased in the later 1990s, down to about 6% at the end of 1998.[74] By June 2008 unemployment had declined to 1.1%, before rising to 3.4% in early 2009.[74] In December 2014[75] the unemployment was 3.2%. Nevertheless, the almost total dependence on fishing and fish farming means that the economy remains vulnerable. One of the biggest private companies of the Faroe Islands is the salmon farming company Bakkafrost, which is the largest of the four salmon farming companies in the Faroe Islands[76] and the eighth biggest in the world.[77]

Petroleum found close to the Faroese area gives hope for deposits in the immediate area, which may provide a basis for sustained economic prosperity.[78]

13% of the Faroe Islands’ national income comes as economic aid from Denmark.[79] This corresponds to roughly 5% of GDP.[citation needed]

Since 2000, the government has fostered new information technology and business projects to attract new investment. The introduction of Burger King in Trshavn was widely publicized as a sign of the globalization of Faroese culture. It remains to be seen whether these projects will succeed in broadening the islands’ economic base. The islands have one of the lowest unemployment rates in Europe, but this should not necessarily be taken as a sign of a recovering economy, as many young students move to Denmark and other countries after leaving high school. This leaves a largely middle-aged and elderly population that may lack the skills and knowledge to fill newly developed positions on the Faroes. Nonetheless, in 2008 the Faroes were able to make a $52 million loan to Iceland to help with that country’s banking woes.[80]

On 5 August 2009, two opposition parties introduced a bill in the Lgting to adopt the euro as the national currency, pending a referendum.[81]

By road, the main islands are connected by bridges and tunnels. Government owned Strandfaraskip Landsins provides public bus and ferry service to the main towns and villages. There are no railways.

By air, Scandinavian Airlines and the government owned Atlantic Airways both have scheduled international flights to Vgar Airport, the islands’ only airport. Atlantic Airways also provides helicopter service to each of the islands. All civil aviation matters are controlled from the Civil Aviation Administration Denmark.

By sea, Smyril Line operates a regular international passenger, car and freight service linking the Faroe Islands with Seyisfjrur, Iceland and Hirtshals, Denmark.[82]

Because of the rocky terrain in the Faroe Islands, its road transport system was not[when?] as extensive as in other places of the world. This situation has now changed, and the infrastructure has been developed extensively. Some 80 percent of the population of the islands is connected by tunnels through the mountains and between the islands, bridges and causeways that link the three largest islands and three other larger and smaller islands to the northeast together. While the other two large islands to the south of the main area, Sandoy and Suuroy, are connected to the main area with ferries, the small islands Koltur and Stra Dmun have no ferry connection, only helicopter service. Other small islandsMykines in the west, Kalsoy, Svnoy and Fugloy in the north, Hestur west of Streymoy, and Nlsoy east of Trshavnhave smaller ferries and some of these islands even have helicopter service.

In February 2014 all the political parties of the Lgting agreed on making two subsea tunnels, one between Streymoy and Eysturoy (the Eysturoyartunnilin) and one between Streymoy and Sandoy (Sandoyartunnilin). The plan is that both tunnels should open in 2021 and they will not be private.[83] The work to dig the Eysturoy-tunnel started on 1 March 2016 above the village of Hvtanes near Trshavn.[84]

The culture of the Faroe Islands has its roots in the Nordic culture. The Faroe Islands were long isolated from the main cultural phases and movements that swept across parts of Europe. This means that they have maintained a great part of their traditional culture. The language spoken is Faroese and it is one of three insular North Germanic languages descended from the Old Norse language spoken in Scandinavia in the Viking Age, the others being Icelandic and the extinct Norn, which is thought to have been mutually intelligible with Faroese. Until the 15th century, Faroese had a similar orthography to Icelandic and Norwegian, but after the Reformation in 1538, the ruling Norwegians outlawed its use in schools, churches and official documents. Although a rich spoken tradition survived, for 300 years the language was not written down. This means that all poems and stories were handed down orally. These works were split into the following divisions: sagnir (historical), vintr (stories) and kvi (ballads), often set to music and the medieval chain dance. These were eventually written down in the 19th century.

Faroese written literature has only really developed in the past 100200 years. This is mainly because of the islands’ isolation, and also because the Faroese language was not written down in a standardised format until 1890. The Danish language was also encouraged at the expense of Faroese. Nevertheless, the Faroes have produced several authors and poets. A rich centuries-old oral tradition of folk tales and Faroese folk songs accompanied the Faroese chain dance. The people learned these songs and stories by heart, and told or sung them to each other, teaching the younger generations too. This kind of literature was gathered in the 19th century and early 20th century. The Faroese folk songs, in Faroese called kvi, are still in use although not so large-scale as earlier. Some of the Faroese folk songs have been used by the Faroese Viking metal band Tr, i.e., Ormurin Langi.[85]

The first Faroese novel, Bbelstorni by Regin L, was published in 1909; the second novel was published 18 years later. In the period 1930 to 1940 a writer from the village Sklavk on Sandoy island, Hein Br, published three novels: Lognbr (1930), Fastatkur (1935) and Fegar fer (English title: The old man and his sons) (1940). Fegar fer has been translated into several other languages. Martin Joensen from Sandvk wrote about life on Faroese fishing vessels; he published the novels Fiskimenn (1946)[86] and Ta lsir landi (1952).

Well-known poets from the early 20th century are among others the two brothers from Trshavn: Hans Andrias Djurhuus (18831951)[87] and Janus Djurhuus (18811948),[88] other well known poets from this period and the mid 20th century are Poul F. Joensen (18981970),[89] Regin Dahl (19182007)[90] and Tummas Napoleon Djurhuus (192871).[91] Their poems are popular even today and can be found in Faroese song books and school books. Jens Pauli Heinesen (19322011), a school teacher from Sandavgur, was the most productive Faroese novelist, he published 17 novels. Steinbjrn B. Jacobsen (19372012), a schoolteacher from Sandvk, wrote short stories, plays, children’s books and even novels. Most Faroese writers write in Faroese; two exceptions are William Heinesen (190091) and Jrgen-Frantz Jacobsen (190038).

Women were not so visible in the early Faroese literature except for Helena Patursson (18641916), but in the last decades of the 20th century and in the beginning of the 21st century female writers like Ebba Hentze (born 1933) wrote children’s books, short stories, etc. Guri Helmsdal published the first modernistic collection of poems, Ltt lot, in 1963, which at the same time was the first collection of Faroese poems written by a woman.[92] Her daughter, Rakel Helmsdal (born 1966), is also a writer, best known for her children’s books, for which she has won several prizes and nominations. Other female writers are the novelists Oddvr Johansen (born 1941), Bergtra Hanusardttir (born 1946) and novelist/children’s books writers Marianna Debes Dahl (born 1947), and Slrun Michelsen (born 1948). Other modern Faroese writers include Gunnar Hoydal (born 1941), Hanus Kamban (born 1942), Jgvan Isaksen (born 1950), Janes Nielsen (born 1953), Troddur Poulsen and Carl Jhan Jensen (born 1957). Some of these writers have been nominated for the Nordic Council’s Literature Prize two to six times, but have never won it. The only Faroese writer who writes in Faroese who has won the prize is the poet Ri Patursson (born 1947), who won the prize in 1986 for Lkasum.[93]

In the 21st century, some new writers had success in the Faroe Islands and abroad. Brur Oskarsson (born 1972) is a children’s book writer and illustrator; his books won prizes in the Faroes, Germany and the West Nordic Council’s Children and Youth Literature Prize (2006). Though not born in the Faroe Islands, Matthew Landrum an American poet and editor for the Structo magazine, has written a collection of poems about the Islands. Sissal Kampmann (born 1974) won the Danish literary prize Klaus Rifbjerg’s Debutant Prize (2012), and Rakel Helmsdal has won Faroese and Icelandic awards; she has been nominated for the West Nordic Council’s Children and Youth Literature Prize and the Children and Youth Literature Prize of the Nordic Council (representing Iceland, wrote the book together with and Icelandic and a Swedish writer/illustrator). Marjun Syderb Kjelns (born 1974) had success with her first novel Skriva sandin for teenagers; the book was awarded and nominated both in the Faroes and in other countries. She won the Nordic Children’s Book Prize (2011) for this book, White Raven Deutsche Jugendbibliothek (2011) and nominated the West Nordic Council’s Children and Youth Literature Prize and the Children and Youth Literature Prize of the Nordic Council (2013).[94]

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Faroe Islands – Wikipedia

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