Transcranial magnetic stimulation – Mayo Clinic

Overview

Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) is a noninvasive procedure that uses magnetic fields to stimulate nerve cells in the brain to improve symptoms of depression. TMS is typically used when other depression treatments haven't been effective.

This treatment for depression involves delivering repetitive magnetic pulses, so it's called repetitive TMS or rTMS.

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In transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS), an electromagnetic coil placed against the scalp creates a magnetic field that stimulates certain areas of the brain.

During an rTMS session, an electromagnetic coil is placed against your scalp near your forehead. The electromagnet painlessly delivers a magnetic pulse that stimulates nerve cells in the region of your brain involved in mood control and depression. It's thought to activate regions of the brain that have decreased activity in depression.

Though the biology of why rTMS works isn't completely understood, the stimulation appears to impact how the brain is working, which in turn seems to ease depression symptoms and improve mood.

There are different ways to perform the procedure, and techniques may change as experts learn more about the most effective ways to perform treatments.

Depression is a treatable condition, but for some people, standard treatments aren't effective. Repetitive TMS is typically used when standard treatments such as medications and talk therapy (psychotherapy) don't work.

Repetitive TMS is a noninvasive form of brain stimulation used for depression. Unlike vagus nerve stimulation or deep brain stimulation, rTMS does not require surgery or implantation of electrodes. And, unlike electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), rTMS doesn't cause seizures or require sedation with anesthesia.

Generally, rTMS is considered safe and well-tolerated. However, it can cause some side effects.

Side effects are generally mild to moderate and improve shortly after an individual session and decrease over time with additional sessions. They may include:

Your doctor can adjust the level of stimulation to reduce symptoms or may recommend that you take an over-the-counter pain medication before the procedure.

Serious side effects are rare. They may include:

More study is needed to determine whether rTMS may have any long-term side effects.

Before having rTMS, you may need a:

These evaluations help make sure that rTMS is safe and a good option for you.

Tell your doctor or mental health provider if:

Repetitive TMS isn't invasive, doesn't require anesthesia and can be performed on an outpatient basis. You don't need to arrange for someone to drive you home after treatment unless, for the first treatment, you prefer a driver until you get a sense of how you'll feel afterward.

Before considering treatment, check with your health insurance company to see whether rTMS is covered. Your policy may not cover it.

Repetitive TMS is usually done in a doctor's office or clinic. It requires a series of treatment sessions to be effective. Generally, sessions are carried out daily, five times a week for four to six weeks.

Before treatment begins, your doctor will need to identify the best place to put the magnets on your head and the best dose of magnetic energy for you. Your first appointment typically lasts about 60 minutes.

Most likely, during your first appointment:

Once the coil placement and dose are identified, you're ready to begin. Here's what to expect during each treatment:

You can return to your normal daily activities after your treatment. Typically, between treatments, you can expect to work and drive.

If rTMS works for you, your depression symptoms may improve or go away completely. Symptom relief may take a few weeks of treatment.

The effectiveness of rTMS may improve as researchers learn more about techniques, the number of stimulations required and the best sites on the brain to stimulate.

After completion of an rTMS treatment series, standard care for depression such as medication and psychotherapy may be recommended as ongoing treatment.

It's not yet known if maintenance rTMS sessions will benefit your depression. This involves continuing treatment when you are symptom-free with the hope that it will prevent the return of symptoms.

However, if your depression improves with rTMS, and then later you have another episode of symptoms, your rTMS treatment can be repeated. This is called re-induction. Some insurance companies will cover re-induction.

If your symptoms improve with rTMS, discuss ongoing or maintenance treatment options for your depression with your doctor.

Explore Mayo Clinic studies testing new treatments, interventions and tests as a means to prevent, detect, treat or manage this disease.

Nov. 27, 2018

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Transcranial magnetic stimulation - Mayo Clinic

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