Artificial Intelligence: The Pros, Cons, and What to Really Fear

For the last several years, Russia has been steadily improving its ground combat robots. Just last year,Kalashnikov, the maker of the famous AK-47 rifle,announced it would builda range of products based on neural networks, including a fully automated combat module that promises to identify and shoot at targets.

According to Bendett,Russia delivered a white paperto the UN saying that from Moscow’s perspective,it would be inadmissible to leave UASwithout anyhuman oversight. In other words, Russia always wants a human in the loop and to be the one to push the final button to fire that weapon.

Worth noting: “A lot of these are still kind of far-out applications,” Bendett said.

The same can be said for China’s more military-focused applications of AI, largely in surveillance and UAV operations for the PLA,said Elsa Kania, Technology Fellow at the Center for a New American Security. Speaking beside Bendett at the Genius Machines event in March, Kania said China’s military applications appear to beat a a fairly nascent stage in its development.

That is to say: There’snothing to fear about lethal AI applications yet unless you’re an alleged terrorist in the Middle East. For the rest of us, we have our Siris, Alexas, Cortanas and more, helping us shop, search, listen to music,and tag friends in images on social media.

Until the robot uprising comes, let us hope there will always be clips ofthe swearing Atlas Robot from Boston Dynamics available online whenever we need a laugh. It may be better to laugh before these robots start helping each other through doorwaysentirely independent of humans. (Too late.)

Read this article:

Artificial Intelligence: The Pros, Cons, and What to Really Fear

Related Post

Comments are closed.