IBM creates world's smallest magazine cover

IBM has unveiled the worlds smallest magazine cover at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington, DC. Certified by the Guinness Book of World Records, the micro magazine is a reproduction of the cover of the March 2014 issue of National Geographic Kids and is many times smaller than a grain of salt at just 11 14 micrometers. Why, you ask? The tiny cover was created to demonstrate potential of a new nano-scale manufacturing technology, as well to encourage young peoples interest in science and technology.

The tiny publication has nothing to do with breaking into the magazines-for-microbes market. Its creation is part of an effort by IBM to deal with Moores Law, the famous observation that number of transistors on an integrated circuit doubles every two years. Thats held true for decades, but IBM says that as chips grow ever smaller Moore’s Law is close to reaching its limits, as can be seen in the example of processor clock speeds not increasing by much for the past five years.

IBM sees the possible solution to this barrier in materials other than silicon and new types of transistors as the basis for new electronics. However, that creates its own problems because using these new materials and working on tinier scales requires new ways of fabricating them. Until now, the standard technique has been using an electron beam to create prototype circuits in a technique called e-beam lithography. This works, but its expensive, slow, and needs a lot of equipment.

The heatable silicon tip is 100,000 times smaller than a sharpened pencil point

What IBM wanted was something cheaper, faster, and more compact. It had to be able to fabricate prototypes of new components quickly, and had to work on scales below 30 nanometers. To give some idea of this scale, one nanometer is 80,000 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair.

IBMs solution was called nanopatterning or nanomilling. Taking a page from the ancient Egyptians, who used to chisel hieroglyphics in stone, IBM researchers decided that instead of printing circuits as with an electron beam, theyd chisel them out using a tiny, heatable silicon tip with a sharp apex that’s 100,000 times smaller than the tip of a sharpened pencil. As the tip, heated to 1000 C (1,832 F), moves over the surface of a tiny sheet of polymer, it acts like a 3D printer that chisels away material by local evaporation. This also makes it a much more compact machine that fits on a tabletop and can print items in minutes that an electron beam would take hours to accomplish due to e-lithographys complex processing and imaging steps.

With our novel technique we can achieve very a high resolution at 10 nanometers at greatly reduced cost and complexity,” says Dr. Armin Knoll, a physicist at IBM Research. “In particular by controlling the amount of material evaporated, we can also produce 3D relief patterns at the unprecedented accuracy of merely one nanometer in a vertical direction. Now its up to the imagination of scientists and engineers to apply this technique to real-world challenges.

But what has this to do with magazines? IBM and National Geographic Kids magazine decided to show the capabilities of the new nano-chisel in a way that might also spark the enthusiasm of young people. After running a poll that let kids select which cover to use, IBM used the tool to print the cover on a sheet of polymer, which measures 11 14 micrometers. Thats small enough for 2,000 to fit on a grain of salt and to get into the Guinness Book of World Records.

National Geographic Kids magazine subscribers loved this cover, so it makes sense that a broader audience would vote it as their favorite of 2014 as well,” says Rachel Buchholz, vice president and editor of National Geographic Kids. “And by helping to set this Guinness World Records title, they’re learning about science while having fun, which is what Kids is all about.

Developed at IBM, the chisel technology is now on the market and Swiss company SwissLitho has obtained a license to make nanopatterning tools under the brand NanoFrazor, the first of which was recently delivered to McGill Universitys Nanotools Microfab in Canada, where it was used to make a nano-sized map of Canada measuring 30 micrometers long.

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IBM creates world's smallest magazine cover

Leafs best Red Wings in Winter Classic shootout

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — The Toronto Maple Leafs particularly enjoyed a picturesque but cold and snowy outdoor hockey game that probably broke an all-time attendance record.

Left winger Joffrey Lupul and center Tyler Bozak scored in a shootout to give Toronto a 3-2 win over the Detroit Red Wings on Wednesday afternoon at Michigan Stadium in the 2014 Winter Classic.

The game was expected to break the hockey attendance record of 104,173, which was also set at Michigan Stadium on Dec. 11, 2010, at the Big Chill at the Big House college game between Michigan and Michigan State. There were 105,491 tickets sold Wednesday.

“I don’t know if we set the official Guinness (World Records) ticket record, but I know we set our own (NHL) record,” NHL commissioner Gary Bettman said.

The old NHL record was 71,217, set in the 2008 Winter Classic at Ralph Wilson Stadium outside of Buffalo.

Bettman added that because of the weather, it took some fans 2 1/2 hours to get to Ann Arbor from Detroit. The cities are about 45 miles apart. Bettman said some fans didn’t arrive until the second period.

The game was played in a steady snowfall, and the temperature was a little above 10 degrees with a below-zero wind chill. Both goalies regularly had their water bottles replaced because the water was freezing. Due to the snow, the ice surface was shoveled during breaks more than usual.

“It was a little chilly out there, but it got warmer during the game,” Maple Leafs coach Randy Carlyle said. “I spent 18 years in Winnipeg, so I know cold.”

Left winger James van Riemsdyk and Bozak scored for Toronto (21-16-5) in the first 60 minutes. Maple Leafs goaltender Jonathan Bernier stopped 41 shots.

“Obviously, we needed the two points. We kind of had to stay focused,” Bernier said. “We wanted to have a fun game, but we were able to come out of it with two points.”

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Leafs best Red Wings in Winter Classic shootout

World's 7 most dangerous and remote islands

Bishop Rock stands at the end of Britain’s Isles of Scilly. Guinness World Records regards it as the world’s smallest island with a building on it. The inhabitants of North Sentinel Island in the Indian Ocean’s Bay of Bengal are not known for hospitality. An aerial view is probably as close as you’ll ever get. Rockall is the tip of an extinct volcano reaching 65 feet above sea level off Ireland.

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

(CNN) — Idiotic TV shows and all the latest apps bumming you out on the 21st century? Ready for some “me time” on the world’s remotest islands?

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World's 7 most dangerous and remote islands

World's 7 most remote islands

Bishop Rock stands at the end of Britain’s Isles of Scilly. Guinness World Records regards it as the world’s smallest island with a building on it. The inhabitants of North Sentinel Island in the Indian Ocean’s Bay of Bengal are not known for hospitality. An aerial view is probably as close as you’ll ever get. Rockall is the tip of an extinct volcano reaching 65 feet above sea level off Ireland.

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

Isolated islands

STORY HIGHLIGHTS

(CNN) — Idiotic TV shows and all the latest apps bumming you out on the 21st century? Ready for some “me time” on the world’s remotest islands?

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World's 7 most remote islands

Jon Huntsman: GOP Is ‘Devoid Of A Soul,’ Needs ‘Strong Dose Of Libertarianism’ – Video



Jon Huntsman: GOP Is 'Devoid Of A Soul,' Needs 'Strong Dose Of Libertarianism'
Jon Huntsman: GOP Is 'Devoid Of A Soul,' Needs 'Strong Dose Of Libertarianism' http://www.mediaite.com TJ Walker is the #1 rated Daily Internet-only liberal news video pundit (viewed at http://www.tjwalker.com and http Walker is also a regular contributor to Forbes.com, Daily Kos, and the Reuters Insider Network. Walker is also a USA Today, Wall Street Journal, Business Week best-selling author. A frequent network news analyst, Walker has made more than 1000 national TV and radio guest appearances on CBS, ABC, Fox News Channel, MSNBC, CNN, Bloomberg TV, Al Jazeera, NBC, Fox Business, Russia Today, HLN, TrueTV, Comedy Central, Sirius and NPR. In 2009, Walker entered the Guinness Book Of World Records for most talk show appearances ever in a 24 hour period. (www.mediatrainingworldwide.com) http

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Jon Huntsman: GOP Is ‘Devoid Of A Soul,’ Needs ‘Strong Dose Of Libertarianism’ – Video

New Dean of Science has high hopes for his faculty

Selena Phillips-Boyle

CHECKMATE The man who solved checkers is setting his sights on the Faculty of Science

Artificial intelligence has been the focus of Jonathan Schaeffers research during his past 28 years at the University of Alberta, but his new role as Dean of Science will rely solely on his own intelligence.

The Board of Governors appointed Schaeffer to the position last week, which will commence July 1 for a five-year term.

Schaeffer succeeds Gregory Taylor, who had held the position since 2003. The incoming dean has been heavily involved in the Department of Computing Science, where he has served as both professor and chair of the department. For the past four years, he has also held the positions of Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President (Information Technology) at the U of A.

Schaeffer said he developed a strong appreciation for the Faculty of Science as a whole during his term as the Chair of Computing Science in 2005. When he became a part of the annual faculty evaluation process, he was able to see more of the work being done by a variety of scientists, ranging from physicists to psychologists.

You just started reading their annual reports and went, Wow, look what this guy is doing, and My god, this guy if he does that, he could change the world, Schaeffer said.

It was all just really exciting and it made me appreciate what a fabulous faculty we have here in sciences.

His own research in the area of computer science has earned him international recognition, as well as numerous awards.

One accomplishment that broke the Guinness Book of World Records was Chinook: first computer to win a game of checkers in a human world championship.

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New Dean of Science has high hopes for his faculty

Medical legend present to see his grandson graduate med school

HOUSTON (KTRK) — Among the graduation ceremonies this weekend was a special one. Two-hundred and sixteen students received their degrees in medicine from UT Health Medical School. And one famous Houstonian was there to see his grandson follow in his footsteps and become a doctor — legendary heart surgeon Dr. Denton Cooley.

They are the grandsons of Dr. Cooley, one of the most famous heart surgeons in history, and Peter Kaldis and Charlie Fraser are medical students at UT Health Medical School.

“He’s brilliant, he’s very witty and he’s very fun to be around,” said Fraser.

Kaldis remembered how his grandfather’s name would often come up in class.

“The surgeon would ask for the ‘my scissors’ and they’d go in and do a story about these scissors. These are called ‘my scissors’ because Dr. Cooley would ask for ‘my scissors’ and he designed these not knowing that I was his grandson,” said Kaldis.

And when other med students would find out who they were.

“Most of them say it’s pretty cool,” said Fraser.

“I remember being little and looking in the Guinness Book of World Records and seeing there’s my grandfather’s name!” said granddaughter Laura Fraser.

Of the five Cooley children and 16 grandchildren, nine are in the medical field. His daughter, Dr. Weezie Davis, is an ophthalmologist and Peter’s mother.

“I’d love to watch him operate, although I would get a little faint and I’d have to sit down from time to time. But he encouraged me, if he hadn’t encouraged me to go to medical school I probably wouldn’t had enough courage to do it,” said Dr. Davis.

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Medical legend present to see his grandson graduate med school