NASA Administrator Charles Bolden’s inspirational talk at Questacon March 2014 – Video



NASA Administrator Charles Bolden's inspirational talk at Questacon March 2014
Tidbinbilla Deep space tracking Station, NASA and Questacon are proud to present Dr Charles Bolden, Administrator of NASA, presenting a public lecture at Que…

By: QuestaconNSTC

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NASA Administrator Charles Bolden’s inspirational talk at Questacon March 2014 – Video

Transits and Observations of Venus – Video



Transits and Observations of Venus
In this LASP Public Lecture from April 4, 2012, Dr. Kevin McGouldrick details the history of transits and observations of the planet Venus. Samuel Langhorne Clemens (Mark Twain), born in 1835, a year in which the famed Comet Halley made a once every 76-year re-appearance in our skies, once remarked that he had come in with the comet, and would go out with it. A hundred years of improvement in health care and life expectancy later, children born this year may be able to say that they had come in with a transit and will go out with one. On June 5, 2012, for the last time in 105 years, until December of 2117, the planet Venus will pass directly between Earth and the Sun, in an event called a transit. Here in Colorado, the Sun will set with Venus still silhouetted against its surface. In this talk, two months before this event, LASP's Dr. Kevin McGouldrick takes the opportunity to spotlight the pivotal role that observations of the planet Venus mdash;with special emphasis on those of previous transits mdash;have played in the development of our current scientific world view. He also describes the vital role that future explorations and study of the planet Venus, as a small part of a bigger picture sometimes called “Comparative Planetology,” must play in the future of scientific exploration. twitter.com http://www.facebook.comFrom:LASP CUBoulderViews:574 5ratingsTime:43:44More inScience Technology

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Transits and Observations of Venus – Video

Cosmic Train Wrecks – Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics – Video


18-01-2012 15:16 “Observatory Nights” public lecture series from the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics Lauranne Lanz, CfA Five billion years from now, our Milky Way galaxy will collide with the Andromeda galaxy. This will be an era of both destruction and creation as the galaxies lose their separate identities and merge into one.. December 15, 2011

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Cosmic Train Wrecks – Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics – Video