world ‘ s longest cable car and Guinness ‘ 4 records , Ba Na cable car , Viet nam – Video



world ' s longest cable car and Guinness ' 4 records , Ba Na cable car , Viet nam
dodinhthanh video / world ' s longest cable car and Guinness ' 4 records / cap treo dai nhat the gioi va dat 4 ky luc Guinness nhat The gioi , cap treo Ba Na , Da nang , Viet nam / World…

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world ‘ s longest cable car and Guinness ‘ 4 records , Ba Na cable car , Viet nam – Video

Worlds largest cricket bat claim staked by UAE

It is another feather in Dubai's cap as OSN celebrated the start of the ICC Cricket World Cup 2015 with a Guinness World Record attempt. The 32-metre long and four-metre wide cricket bat, created by the leading pay TVnetwork for in a bid to clinch the Guinness World Record for the largest cricket bat, was displayed on Monday at the ICC Academy in Dubai. As tall as an eight to 10-storey building …

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Worlds largest cricket bat claim staked by UAE

IBM creates world's smallest magazine cover

IBM has unveiled the worlds smallest magazine cover at the USA Science and Engineering Festival in Washington, DC. Certified by the Guinness Book of World Records, the micro magazine is a reproduction of the cover of the March 2014 issue of National Geographic Kids and is many times smaller than a grain of salt at just 11 14 micrometers. Why, you ask? The tiny cover was created to demonstrate potential of a new nano-scale manufacturing technology, as well to encourage young peoples interest in science and technology.

The tiny publication has nothing to do with breaking into the magazines-for-microbes market. Its creation is part of an effort by IBM to deal with Moores Law, the famous observation that number of transistors on an integrated circuit doubles every two years. Thats held true for decades, but IBM says that as chips grow ever smaller Moore’s Law is close to reaching its limits, as can be seen in the example of processor clock speeds not increasing by much for the past five years.

IBM sees the possible solution to this barrier in materials other than silicon and new types of transistors as the basis for new electronics. However, that creates its own problems because using these new materials and working on tinier scales requires new ways of fabricating them. Until now, the standard technique has been using an electron beam to create prototype circuits in a technique called e-beam lithography. This works, but its expensive, slow, and needs a lot of equipment.

The heatable silicon tip is 100,000 times smaller than a sharpened pencil point

What IBM wanted was something cheaper, faster, and more compact. It had to be able to fabricate prototypes of new components quickly, and had to work on scales below 30 nanometers. To give some idea of this scale, one nanometer is 80,000 times smaller than the diameter of a human hair.

IBMs solution was called nanopatterning or nanomilling. Taking a page from the ancient Egyptians, who used to chisel hieroglyphics in stone, IBM researchers decided that instead of printing circuits as with an electron beam, theyd chisel them out using a tiny, heatable silicon tip with a sharp apex that’s 100,000 times smaller than the tip of a sharpened pencil. As the tip, heated to 1000 C (1,832 F), moves over the surface of a tiny sheet of polymer, it acts like a 3D printer that chisels away material by local evaporation. This also makes it a much more compact machine that fits on a tabletop and can print items in minutes that an electron beam would take hours to accomplish due to e-lithographys complex processing and imaging steps.

With our novel technique we can achieve very a high resolution at 10 nanometers at greatly reduced cost and complexity,” says Dr. Armin Knoll, a physicist at IBM Research. “In particular by controlling the amount of material evaporated, we can also produce 3D relief patterns at the unprecedented accuracy of merely one nanometer in a vertical direction. Now its up to the imagination of scientists and engineers to apply this technique to real-world challenges.

But what has this to do with magazines? IBM and National Geographic Kids magazine decided to show the capabilities of the new nano-chisel in a way that might also spark the enthusiasm of young people. After running a poll that let kids select which cover to use, IBM used the tool to print the cover on a sheet of polymer, which measures 11 14 micrometers. Thats small enough for 2,000 to fit on a grain of salt and to get into the Guinness Book of World Records.

National Geographic Kids magazine subscribers loved this cover, so it makes sense that a broader audience would vote it as their favorite of 2014 as well,” says Rachel Buchholz, vice president and editor of National Geographic Kids. “And by helping to set this Guinness World Records title, they’re learning about science while having fun, which is what Kids is all about.

Developed at IBM, the chisel technology is now on the market and Swiss company SwissLitho has obtained a license to make nanopatterning tools under the brand NanoFrazor, the first of which was recently delivered to McGill Universitys Nanotools Microfab in Canada, where it was used to make a nano-sized map of Canada measuring 30 micrometers long.

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IBM creates world's smallest magazine cover

Liberty Insurance expected to replace Guinness as hurling sponsors

Guinness will remain as a proud partner of the GAA and Croke Park stadium. Photograph: Ross Land/Getty Images

Guinness has ended its 18-year association with the All-Ireland Hurling Championship but will remain a proud partner of the GAA.

A new deal with American company Liberty Insurance is expected to be announced in the coming weeks to add to the deals already in place with Etihad and Centra under in the multi-sponsor model adopted by the GAA.

Liberty Insurance took over the existing business remaining from the sale of Quinn Insurance and have invested heavily in marketing and advertising in the Irish market, including sponsoring The Late Late Show.

Liberty were mentioned as a possible sponsor of Cork GAA before the Rebels agreed a deal with Chill Insurance.

The GAA announced that Guinness will become proud partner to both the GAA and Croke Park Stadium, where they hold the pouring rights for the venues bars and restaurants.

Commenting on the new agreement, GAA commercial and stadium director Peter McKenna said: There is no doubt that the GAA has benefited enormously from the marketing expertise of one of the worlds most creative companies. We appreciate that all sponsorship has a natural time span, and we are pleased to be taking our association with Guinness in a new direction.

The end to the Guinness sponsorship of the All-Ireland Hurling Championship comes against the backdrop of a proposed ban on drinks companies sponsoring sporting events.

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Liberty Insurance expected to replace Guinness as hurling sponsors

Things are looking up: Record astronomy lesson

NASA / Chris Gunn

A full-scale model of the James Webb Space Telescope was on display from March 8-10 at the South by Southwest Interactive Festival in Austin, Texas.

By Megan GannonSpace.com

With their eyes turned up at the Texas night sky, NASA and 526 space fans in Austin have set a new Guinness World Record for the largest outdoor astronomy lesson.

Guinness World Records

About 529 people attended the South by Southwest festival (SXSW) presentation on NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope and astronomy on March 10, 2013, setting a new Guinness World Record.

The huge group gathered on the lawn of the Long Center for the Performing Arts at the South by Southwest (SXSW) festival on March 10 to learn about how astronomers use light and color to understand cosmic objects, from the moon to distantgalaxies.

“Astronomy awakens the natural curiosity and awe in all of us,” Frank Summers, an astrophysicist from the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, said in a statement. “Many people think that astronomy and physics is only complicated math equations. They don’t recognize how natural it is and how much they already know.”

Summers and Dan McCallister, an education specialist at STScI, used colored filter glasses to show how light can be broken down into its different wavelengths. They explained how certain wavelengths are selected for specific studies of an astronomical object. In the background of the lesson was a full-scale model of NASA’s next giant space observatory, theJames Webb Space Telescope, which is the size of a tennis court and as tall as a four-story building. The real space observatory is slated to launch in 2018.

Guinness World Records

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Things are looking up: Record astronomy lesson

NASA Helps Make Guinness World Record for Largest Astronomy Lesson at SXSW

Newswise Looking up through hundreds of colored filters and spectral glasses, 526 people shattered the record for the Largest Astronomy Lesson. Under the Texas night sky, students were instructed on the lawn of the Long Center for the Performing Arts at the South by Southwest (SXSW) festival in Austin on Sunday, March 10, 2013.

In the spirit of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education Coalition outreach at SXSW, NASA, the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), and Northrop Grumman organized the record-breaking event which was arbitrated by the Guinness World Records organization. In breaking this record, instructors aimed to shine light on the importance of astronomy with the full-scale model of the James Webb Space Telescope as their backdrop.

During the lesson, Frank Summers, an astrophysicist, and Dan McCallister, an education specialist, both from STScI, Baltimore, Md., demonstrated how astronomers use light and color to uncover the secrets of the cosmos. The lesson, prepared by STScI’s Office of Public Outreach, explained how astronomers use light and color to gain information about objects nearby like the Moon and asteroids to young galaxies that are billions and billions of light-years away, and the importance of observing in wavelengths across the electromagnetic spectrum (the full range of light waves possible).

“Astronomy awakens the natural curiosity and awe in all of us,” said Summers. “Many people think that astronomy and physics are only complicated math equations. They don’t recognize how natural it is and how much they already know.”

Participants used glasses that break light up into the different colors of the rainbow, as well as colored filter glasses to see first hand how light can be broken down into its different wavelengths. The instructors showed how looking at a particular color can be a combination of different wavelengths of light. They also showed how different filters are used to select certain colors for specific studies of an astronomical object.

Working with the crowd, experts like Alberto Conti, astrophysicist and Webb telescope innovation scientist at STScI, explained how astronomy is more than just pretty pictures. “Astronomy tries to answer the questions that everyone wonders about like, ‘How did we get here?’ Astronomy showcases the physical laws of nature,” said Conti. “It shows all of the processes. You can learn a lot about physics and nature by studying it.”

Previously, the record for the Largest Astronomy Lesson was held in Mexico with the record of 458 participants, organized by Juarez Competitiva, set on Oct. 14, 2011.

Guinness World Records (GWR) is the global authority on record-breaking achievements. First published in 1955, the annual Guinness World Record book has become one of the biggest-selling copyright titles of all time, selling 120 million copies to date in 22 languages and in more than 100 countries. GWR is also available on a number of platforms including GWR global television, digital media, and online record processing services.

The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore, Md., is operated for NASA by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., (AURA) in Washington, D.C. STScI conducts science operations for the Hubble Space Telescope and is the science and mission operations center for the James Webb Space Telescope.

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NASA Helps Make Guinness World Record for Largest Astronomy Lesson at SXSW

Stig Severinsen – Guinness World Record – Longest Freedive Under Ice (236 feet) – in SPEEDOS! – Video



Stig Severinsen – Guinness World Record – Longest Freedive Under Ice (236 feet) – in SPEEDOS!
Stig Severinsen, PhD in Medicine breaks the Guinness World Record for the longest freedive under ice on a single breath of air – (72 meters/236 feet) in Speedos! Guinness World Record Validation: http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com Learn more about freediving, safety, breathing techniques and mind control here: http://www.breatheology.comFrom:breatheologyViews:3 0ratingsTime:03:19More inSports

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Stig Severinsen – Guinness World Record – Longest Freedive Under Ice (236 feet) – in SPEEDOS! – Video

New Dean of Science has high hopes for his faculty

Selena Phillips-Boyle

CHECKMATE The man who solved checkers is setting his sights on the Faculty of Science

Artificial intelligence has been the focus of Jonathan Schaeffers research during his past 28 years at the University of Alberta, but his new role as Dean of Science will rely solely on his own intelligence.

The Board of Governors appointed Schaeffer to the position last week, which will commence July 1 for a five-year term.

Schaeffer succeeds Gregory Taylor, who had held the position since 2003. The incoming dean has been heavily involved in the Department of Computing Science, where he has served as both professor and chair of the department. For the past four years, he has also held the positions of Vice-Provost and Associate Vice-President (Information Technology) at the U of A.

Schaeffer said he developed a strong appreciation for the Faculty of Science as a whole during his term as the Chair of Computing Science in 2005. When he became a part of the annual faculty evaluation process, he was able to see more of the work being done by a variety of scientists, ranging from physicists to psychologists.

You just started reading their annual reports and went, Wow, look what this guy is doing, and My god, this guy if he does that, he could change the world, Schaeffer said.

It was all just really exciting and it made me appreciate what a fabulous faculty we have here in sciences.

His own research in the area of computer science has earned him international recognition, as well as numerous awards.

One accomplishment that broke the Guinness Book of World Records was Chinook: first computer to win a game of checkers in a human world championship.

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New Dean of Science has high hopes for his faculty