A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)

Special Effects by Richard Alonzo …. art department key artist: Stan Winston Studio Chris Baer …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Christian Beckman …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio David Beneke …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Christopher Bergschneider …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio George Bernota …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Darin Bouyssou …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Emery Brown …. electronic controller: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Thomas Brown …. special effects technician Greg Bryant …. special effects technician Jeffrey P. Buccacio Jr. …. art department key artist: Stan Winston Studio (as Jeff Buccacio) Greg Burgan …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Theresa Burkett …. hair and fabrication technician: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio Connie Cadwell …. hair and fabrication technician: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio Sebastien Caillabet …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio A. Robert Capwell …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio (as Rob Capwell) Laurie Charchut …. production accountant: Stan Winston Studio John Cherevka …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Randy Cooper …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio (as Randall Cooper) Gil Correa …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Richard Cory …. special effects technician Ken Culver …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Glenn Derry …. electronic controller: “Teddy” and “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Kim Derry …. special effects technician Rob Derry …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Robert DeVine …. special effects Dawn Dininger …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Chas Dupuis …. production assistant: Stan Winston Studio John Eaves …. key concept artist: Stan Winston Studio Jeff Edwards …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Mike Elizalde …. key animatronic designer: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Christian Eubank …. special effects technician (as Chris Eubank) Cory Faucher …. special effects shop foreman (as Corwyn Faucher) Pete Fenlon …. puppet master: Stan Winston Studio Eric Fiedler …. key animatronic designer: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Scott R. Fisher …. special effects set foreman (as Scott Fisher) John Fleming …. special effects technician Rick Galinson …. key animatronic designer: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Mark Goldberg …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Dave Grasso …. art department key artist: Stan Winston Studio (as David ‘Ave’ Grasso) Josh Gray …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Laura Grijalva …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Chris Grossnickle …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio John Hamilton …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Richard Haugen …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio (as Rich Haugen) Eric Hayden …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Keith Haynes …. special effects technician Matt Heimlich …. animatronic designer: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio Kurt Herbel …. electronic controller: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Brent Heyning …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio James Hirahara …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Grady Holder …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Hiroshi ‘Kan’ Ikeuchi …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Craig A. Israel …. special dental effects (as Craig A. Israel D.D.S.) Clark James …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Robert Johnston …. special effects technician Kathy Kane-Macgowan …. hair supervisor: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio Hiroshi Katagiri …. art department key artist: Stan Winston Studio Rodrick Khachatoorian …. electronic controller: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio David Kindlon …. key animatronic designer: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Jay King …. special effects technician (as Jay B. King) Jeffrey Knott …. special effects technician Richard J. Landon …. animatronic designer: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio (as Richard Landon) Michael Lantieri …. special effects supervisor Edward Lawton …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio (as Ed Lawton) Elan Lee …. puppet master: Stan Winston Studio Russell Lukich …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio (as Russell Lukich) Lindsay MacGowan …. effects supervisor: Stan Winston Studio (as Lindsay Macgowan) Shane Mahan …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Mark Maitre …. art department key artist: Stan Winston Studio Bob Mano …. animatronic designer: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio Bob Mano …. puppeteer Keith Marbory …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Gary Martinez …. electronic controller: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Jason Matthews …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Robert Maverick …. hair and fabrication technician: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio Tony McCray …. mold department supervisor: Stan Winston Studio Mark ‘Crash’ McCreery …. key concept artist: Stan Winston Studio Bud McGrew …. animatronic designer: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio Paul Mejias …. art department key artist: Stan Winston Studio Jimmy Mena …. special effects technician David Merritt …. model department supervisor: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Andrew Meyers …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Michelle Millay …. art department key artist: Stan Winston Studio Scott Millenbaugh …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Joel Mitchell …. special effects technician Tony Moffett …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Kevin Mohlman …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio David Monzingo …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio (as Dave Monzingo) Brian Namanny …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Sylvia Nava …. hair and fabrication technician: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio Steve Newburn …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Niels Nielsen …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Michael Ornelaz …. hair supervisor: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio Joey Orosco …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Thomas Ovenshire …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Tom Pahk …. special effects shop supervisor Lyndel Pedersen …. production assistant: Stan Winston Studio Ralph Peterson …. special effects technician Brian Poor …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Jeff Pyle …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Justin Raleigh …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Christian Ristow …. key animatronic designer: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Brian Roe …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio (as Brian Roe) Jim Rollins …. special effects technician (as James Rollins) Rob Rosa …. production assistant: Stan Winston Studio Amanda Rounsaville …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Thomas Rush …. special effects technician Evan Schiff …. electronic controller: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Alan Scott …. effects supervisor: Stan Winston Studio (as J. Alan Scott) Kimberly Scott …. production accountant: Stan Winston Studio William Shourt …. special effects shop foreman Aaron Sims …. key concept artist: Stan Winston Studio Maria Smith …. hair and fabrication technician: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio Sean Stewart …. puppet master: Stan Winston Studio Scott Stoddard …. art department coordinator: Stan Winston Studio Christopher Swift …. key concept artist: Stan Winston Studio Valek Sykes …. animatronic technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio Agustin Toral …. special effects technician Annabelle Troukens …. assistant: Stan Winston, Stan Winston Studio Ted Van Dorn …. model department technician: “Mecha”, Stan Winston Studio (as Ted Van Doorn) Chris Vaughan …. hair and fabrication technician: “Teddy”, Stan Winston Studio A.J. Venuto …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Mark Viniello …. key technician: Stan Winston Studio Jordan Weisman …. puppet master: Stan Winston Studio Steven Scott Wheatley …. special effects technician Stan Winston …. animatronics designer Stan Winston …. robot character designer Katie Wright …. assistant: Stan Winston, Stan Winston Studio Dana Yuricich …. model sculptor Larry Zelenay …. special effects technician Chuck Zlotnick …. production photographer: Stan Winston Studio James Bomalick …. special effects technician (uncredited) Jim Charmatz …. special effects (uncredited) Chris Cunningham …. special effects (uncredited) Steve Fink …. special effects makeup (uncredited) Anthony Francisco …. concept designer (uncredited) Steve Grantowitz …. assistant: Tara Crocitto (uncredited) Jerry Macaluso …. additional effects (uncredited) Patrick Magee …. special effects crew (uncredited) Tim Martin …. special effects crew (uncredited) Gary Pawlowski …. moldmaker: Stan Winston Studio (uncredited) Jason Scott …. special effects: Stan Winston Studio (uncredited) Mayumi Shimokawa …. vehicle construction technician: TransFX (uncredited) Phil Weisgerber …. design engineer (uncredited)

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A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001)

A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001) – Rotten Tomatoes

From the collective minds of Kubrick and Spielberg comes this lavish epic about a little robot boy who is brought into a young couples life. Based on a short story by a writer I admit I’ve never heard of, yet the idea could easily be mistaken for work from the brains of Arthur C. Clarke, Isaac Asimov or Philip K. Dick.

Lets begin, this film gave me a headache, not a bad headache, more of a problematic headache. I was stuck and didn’t know what to think. The film is a massive story betwixt two ideas or genres almost, on one hand you have the first half of a film that centres around the human angst and emotion of trying to adapt to adopting a robot child. The pain of a mother who’s child is at deaths door from disease, and the decision by her husband to offer her a brand new state of the art robot child that for the first time can learn and express love for its owner.

The second half of the film then changes completely, gone is the sentiment and powerful family bound plot as we enter into a more seedy grim world. One could almost say the film adopts many visual concepts from other sci-fi films/genres, which do work on their own, but maybe not together with this story.

The story is enthralling and draws you in…but oh so many questions arise Mr Spielberg, where to begin!. Once we leave the comfort of the family orientated first part of the film we pretty much straight away hit the Flesh Fair. Now this really did seem too harsh for me, a completely disjoined idea that harks back to a ‘Mad Max’ type world. Why would people of the future act like this towards simple machines? the whole sequence looked like some freaky red neck carnival. It also seemed like a huge setup for not very much, just a few minutes of carnage, was all that fan fair really required?.

This lead me to the question of why do this to old, lost, outdated Mecha’s? (the term for robots in this film which sounds a bit Japanese to me). Now surely these robots cost a lot to make, much time, effort, design etc…went into creating them, so surely destroying them is a complete waste. Wouldn’t fixing them up for simple labour tasks like cleaning or whatever, be more useful? maybe selling them on? and even if you did have to shut them down, just do it more humanly, why the need for all the violence?. The whole sequence just didn’t seem sensible really, and it was thought up by Spielberg!.

Eventually we get to Rouge City, where is this suppose to be? why not use a real city?. Again the whole concept seemed out of place, the city seemed much more futuristic than everything else we have seen, plus the architecture was truly odd. The huge tunnel bridges with a woman’s gaping open mouth as the opening? it seemed very ‘Giger-esq’ to me, quite sexual too, kids film anyone?. Then you had buildings shaped like women’s boobs and legs etc…geez!. Its here we meet ‘Gigolo Joe’ who is superbly played by Jude Law I can’t deny, but really at the end of the day, was he needed at all?. He is a nice character, very likeable but virtually bordering on a cartoon character, and why the need for the tap dancing?.

The makeup was very good for the Mecha characters, simple yet effective for both Law and Osment. Kudos to Osment of course for his portrayal of the robot ‘David’, I honestly can say its probably the best performance for a robot I’ve ever seen. Brilliant casting too I might add, Osment can act but his looks are half the battle won right there, he has this almost perfect plastic looking young face, its all in the eyes I think.

Speaking of characters how can I not mention the star of the film, ‘Teddy’. Now this little guy was adorable, I still find myself wanting my own Teddy *whimpers*. Every scene this little fellow was in I loved, I loved to see him waddle around and assist David in his simple electronic voice. I found myself caring for all the characters in this film but especially Teddy, he was just awesome. Sure he seemed to have some kind of infinite power source but that made him even cooler damn it!. What really broke my heart was we don’t know what happens to lill Teddy, we see him at the end but what becomes of him?? what Steven WHAT??!!. I loved that lill guy *sniff*.

As you near the end of the film and its multiple ongoing finales you literately get submerged in questions. 2000 years pass from the time David is trapped under the sea and his rescue (the ferris wheel didn’t crush the helicopter/sub thingy??), in that time the planet has gone from global warming jungles to a MASSIVE ice age? I mean a REALLY HEAVY ice age. Now I’m no scientist but that doesn’t seem right. I might quickly add, in the future why are all the skyscrapers in New York in tatters? as if they’ve been burnt out?. Sure the bottom of them has been flooded but they look like skeletons! as if a nuke hit them, eh?.

The we get to the evolved Mecha’s (or ‘Close Encounter’ aliens). How would these robots evolve into these angelic liquid-like creatures?? I don’t get it, if the human race became extinct tomorrow would computers evolve into alien-like creatures?. Sure these robots can fix themselves and update themselves but that far? really?. Then you gotta ask yourself why would they be digging up old human remains? they know humans created them, OK they might not understand why but does that matter?. They clearly have highly advanced technology so why don’t they travel space and look for new similar intelligent life?. Why bother with the human race, of which many despised them anyway, treated them like crap.

This then leads onto the resurrection part of the story. I still can’t quite work out why David’s mother would only live for one day when brought back. There is an explanation from the advanced Mecha’s but I couldn’t follow it. Again we then have all manner of plot issues…why his mother doesn’t recall her husband or son when she wakes, she doesn’t question why David is there, she’s disorientated but doesn’t question anything. She doesn’t seem to remember anything like the fact she was probably an old lady when she was last awake, and she doesn’t ask to go outside! they stay inside the whole time. You could say the advanced Mecha fixed it so she wouldn’t recall anything so not to jeopardize the situation, but when she wakes she acts as if nothing happened and its just a new day.

Where the plot really gets silly is the fact this is all possible simply because Teddy kept some strands of cut hair from David’s mother about 2000 years prior. Where on earth did he keep these hairs? its not like he has pockets, and what’s more…why did he keep the strands of hair??!!. On top of that, and again I’m no scientist, but surely you’d need the roots of human hair for the DNA, not just cut strands, no?.

Now there are a lot of whines in there but unfortunately there are a lot of plot issues in the film. I won’t and can’t say its a bad film, its a truly fantastic bit of sci-fi with some lovely design work and visuals, but there are problems along the way. First half is a decent sci-fi story similar to ‘Bicentennial Man’, second half is really a rehashed rip off of the classic ‘Pinocchio’ tale set in the future.

The film garnered a lot of interest due to the involvement of Kubrick and Spielberg admittedly but its still a wonderful bit of work. Part sci-fi but all fairytale in the end, the film slowly becomes more of a children’s tale the deeper you go, the narration nails that home if you think about it. The very end is kinda tacked on and doesn’t feel correct, true, you can see they had trouble ending the film and a weepy ending was required so they made one. But god damn it works *sniff*.

The final sequence of David lying besides his motionless mother still brings a lump to my throat as I type this now. We then see Teddy join them on the bed and just sit down to watch over them both, like a guardian. Does David actually die here? does he voluntarily switch himself off somehow? again…what happens to Teddy? I’m not sure. But as the score swells and the lights dim, you can’t help but wipe away a tear.

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A.I. Artificial Intelligence (2001) – Rotten Tomatoes

David Friedman – Legal Systems Very Different From Ours …

Full credit to the Seasteading Institute. Source: http://www.seasteading.org/2009/11/da…

David Friedman’s website: http://daviddfriedman.com

At the 2009 Seasteading Conference, David D. Friedman customized his academic seminar entitled Legal Systems Very Different from Our Own as the basis for his presentation, narrowing in on the two possible high-level legal situations for a seastead: one arising from existence inside the territorial waters of an existing state, and one emergent of a clearly independent existence out on the high seas.

There are theoretically endless legal configurations possible, but it can be difficult for residents of ostensibly monolegal systems countries in which only one system of legality applies to all citizens in all places to imagine how polylegalities could arise and be of benefit to a seastead. Friedman uses examples from history and the actuality of legal process in modern life (particularly tort law versus criminal law in the United States) to demonstrate that polylegal states have been far from marginal in human societies and may strongly inform the formation of certain seasteading configurations.

Friedman’s perspective draws from a staggeringly colorful variety of historical legal systems and anthropological situations, from modern gypsies to saga-period Iceland to classical Athens, and many more. Will the first Seasteads arise first from, as David Friedman puts it, “a sort of a collection of different kinds of nuts” in a polylegal agglomeration, or from situations far more homogenous and uniform? Listen to his talk and envision the possibilities!

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David Friedman – Legal Systems Very Different From Ours …

Gene Therapy Delivery: What Can be Accomplished with Existing Vector Technology? – Video



Gene Therapy Delivery: What Can be Accomplished with Existing Vector Technology?
Moderator: Joshua Schimmer, M.D., Managing Director Senior Research Analyst, Piper Jaffray Speakers: David Kirn, M.D., CEO Co-Founder, 4D Molecular Therapeutics Richard Lawn, Ph.D., …

By: Alliance for Regenerative Medicine

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Gene Therapy Delivery: What Can be Accomplished with Existing Vector Technology? – Video

Paris 2012 Presentation – Capacity building and tools – Video



Paris 2012 Presentation – Capacity building and tools
http:/internationalforum.bmj.com Speakers: a) David Galler, Director of Clinical Leadership, Ko Awatea, Centre for Health System Innovation and Improvement, Counties Manukau District Health…

By: International Forum on Quality and Safety in Healthcare

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Paris 2012 Presentation – Capacity building and tools – Video

Healthcare Price Transparency: Changing the Way Providers Sell Services – Video



Healthcare Price Transparency: Changing the Way Providers Sell Services
In this video David Newman, PhD, JD, executive director of the Health Care Cost Institute, explores why price transparency will change the way providers sell healthcare services. While consumer…

By: Healthcare Financial Management Association

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Healthcare Price Transparency: Changing the Way Providers Sell Services – Video