Credit Card-Sized Super Computer That Powers AI Such As Robots And Drones Unveiled By Nvidia – Forbes


Forbes
Credit Card-Sized Super Computer That Powers AI Such As Robots And Drones Unveiled By Nvidia
Forbes
A supercomputer the size of a credit card that can power artificial intelligence (AI) such as robots, drones and smart cameras has been unveiled by computer graphics firm Nvidia. Revealed at an event in San Francisco, the super intelligent yet tiny
Nvidia Jetson TX2: Credit card-sized supercomputer looks to fuel AI developmentThe INQUIRER
Nvidia shows off Jetson supercomputerFudzilla (blog)
Nvidia Unveils Jetson TX2: Pocket-Sized Supercomputer Doubles TX1 Performance, Powers Drones With AI, And MoreTech Times

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Credit Card-Sized Super Computer That Powers AI Such As Robots And Drones Unveiled By Nvidia – Forbes

The clock is ticking on getting your pet licensed – WOWT

The countdown is on to register your pet. Failure to do so will have consequences.

If you live in Omaha or Sarpy County and don’t register your pet by Wednesday, March 15, you’re in violation and you can face a late fee.

Your pet has to have a current rabies vaccination in order to obtain his license. However don’t avoid licensing if your pet is due and you can’t get in to see your veterinarian before Wednesday. You can license him this week and avoid the penalty. You’ll then have 30 days to get your rabies vaccination.

Simply send in your license payment and information through the mail, postmarked by March 15. Or bring it to the shelter, or renew on line just as you would if his vaccination was current.

To license online, grab your licensing statement. It shows your animal’s ID number and license number. Go to the Humane Societys website. Once you plug the numbers in, you can pay by credit card and you’re done. It’s easy, you’ll have immediate confirmation and you don’t have to stand in line.

If you are licensing a pet for the first time you can do that online too. Just follow the cues for a new license no matter how you license your payment will be processed on time and your information will be updated, you just won’t get your permanent license satus until you provide proof of rabies. Then, once your pet is vaccinated, your vet can send the records or you can bring them in to the shelter.

Remember a license is one of the best ways to ensure that if your dog or cat gets out, you can get him back. Licenses can be tracked across county and state lines.

And by uploading your license yearly you update your contact information so you can be reached if your animal ends up a stray. It’s smart, it’s peace of mind, and it’s the law.

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The clock is ticking on getting your pet licensed – WOWT

Police warn of criminals cloning credit cards using stolen information – ABC Action News

We all know our credit card information is under constant attack, but according to law enforcement, more criminals are using that information to make physical, fraudulent credit cards.

“The criminals who have bee doing this for a while, it’s actually really easy,” Detective Tim White, with the Hillsborough County Sheriff’s Office Economic Crime Division, said. They’re able to buy the different mechanisms to make the cards and to re-code the mag-strip that’s on the back of the card.”

Law enforcement just arrested 34-year-old Joandy Jimenez of Miami with 20 counterfeit cards at a gas station on Gunn Highway. He was using the cards to fill an illegal bladder with as much gasoline as he could.

According to White, the criminals can re-code old credit cards or prepaid debit cards. Some criminals have the ability to print brand new cards.

“They may even print a fake number on the front of it,” he said.

White says some clerks are checking to see if numbers match after the card is swiped and new chip technology is making counterfeiting more difficult.

He says the most popular ways for criminals to get your information is through unsecured wifi connections, unprotected websites and skimmers at gas stations and ATMs.

He said the best way to keep from becoming a victim is to check your credit card and bank activity daily.

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Police warn of criminals cloning credit cards using stolen information – ABC Action News

Paytm to continue free uploading of money – Business Standard

IANS | New Delhi March 10, 2017 Last Updated at 15:22 IST

Doing a quick U-turn in about 24 hours, digital payments firm Paytm on Friday suspended the two per cent charge it announced for adding money using credit cards.

“We are suspending the two per cent charge on credit cards for adding money to wallet, keeping users’ convenience in mind. We will introduce new features to prevent credit card misuse in adding money,” Paytm said in a blog post here on Friday.

With an intent to prevent the misuse of transfer to bank facility at 0 per cent, Paytm had earlier applied a refundable fee of two per cent on add-money through credit cards.

“At the same time, we are conscious that this move caused inconvenience to a large segment of our users, including those who are using their credit card for genuine transactions,” it said.

The withdrawal of the two per cent charge apparently came in view of losing out to competition after mobile wallet major MobiKwik on Thursday announced that it would continue to offer free uploading of money.

“In order to popularise the government’s vision of a cashless society, we at MobiKwik have decided not to charge two per cent on credit card recharges so that more people can transact online without having to worry about additional charges,” MobiKwik founder and CEO Bipin Preet Singh said on Thursday.

Paytm had announced the two per cent charge, starting March 8.

For those who were charged, the amount was to be refundable in the form of a gift voucher to be used for recharging phones, paying bills, etc. through the Paytm wallet, it also said earlier.

Paytm had announced the charges because some users started funding their wallet with their credit cards and transferring it to the bank all for free.

–IANS

mm/in/vt

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

Doing a quick U-turn in about 24 hours, digital payments firm Paytm on Friday suspended the two per cent charge it announced for adding money using credit cards.

“We are suspending the two per cent charge on credit cards for adding money to wallet, keeping users’ convenience in mind. We will introduce new features to prevent credit card misuse in adding money,” Paytm said in a blog post here on Friday.

With an intent to prevent the misuse of transfer to bank facility at 0 per cent, Paytm had earlier applied a refundable fee of two per cent on add-money through credit cards.

“At the same time, we are conscious that this move caused inconvenience to a large segment of our users, including those who are using their credit card for genuine transactions,” it said.

The withdrawal of the two per cent charge apparently came in view of losing out to competition after mobile wallet major MobiKwik on Thursday announced that it would continue to offer free uploading of money.

“In order to popularise the government’s vision of a cashless society, we at MobiKwik have decided not to charge two per cent on credit card recharges so that more people can transact online without having to worry about additional charges,” MobiKwik founder and CEO Bipin Preet Singh said on Thursday.

Paytm had announced the two per cent charge, starting March 8.

For those who were charged, the amount was to be refundable in the form of a gift voucher to be used for recharging phones, paying bills, etc. through the Paytm wallet, it also said earlier.

Paytm had announced the charges because some users started funding their wallet with their credit cards and transferring it to the bank all for free.

–IANS

mm/in/vt

(This story has not been edited by Business Standard staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)

IANS

http://bsmedia.business-standard.com/_media/bs/wap/images/bs_logo_amp.png 177 22

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Paytm to continue free uploading of money – Business Standard

Lawsuit: Mug shot website posts incomplete records so sister site can solicit ‘takedown’ fees – Chicago Tribune

Peter Gabiola thought he was on the right track in 2013. He was out of prison and had been off parole for retail theft for more than a year when he started a new job with a Buffalo Grove sales and marketing firm.

But about an hour after he started, someone at the business Googled his name and saw that he was listed as being on parole. The company fired him immediately, he said.

The Illinois Department of Corrections had removed his records from its website. Commercial website Mugshots.com, however, still featured the information.

After having two more job offers rescinded, Gabiola typed his name into Google himself, saw his page on Mugshots.com, and contacted another site, Unpublisharrest.com, to try to get it taken down. He said the site, which only offers its service for Mugshots.com, told him it would cost $15,000 to attempt to scrub the information with no guarantee that his profile would be removed.

Decades ago, booking photos taken after someone is accused of, though not necessarily found guilty of, a crime had a shelf life, remaining available only if someone kept a newspaper clipping or was willing to visit the public library to scroll through microfilm.

But in the internet age, mug shots culled from public law enforcement endure on the web. The sites argue that people have the right to know whether, say, their son’s baseball coach has been arrested. Mugshots.com says it’s merely republishing arrest information from publicly available government records, so the First Amendment immunizes it from liability.

However, the growing business of charging consumers money to wipe the slate clean is drawing scrutiny across the country.

Illinois and some other states prohibit companies that publish mug shots from soliciting or accepting fees to remove or correct information about criminal records, equating that business model to extortion. Some credit card companies have policies prohibiting the use of their cards on mug shot removal sites.

A cottage industry of reputation-management websites has sprung up, offering comprehensive removal services so people whose mug shots are published don’t have to go through the time-consuming and expensive process of contacting each site individually to get them removed.

Gabiola is a lead plaintiff in a federal lawsuit seeking class-action status against Mugshots.com. The lawsuit alleges the site posts incomplete records so, in turn, Unpublisharrest.com, which the suit claims is a sister site, can solicit “takedown” fees from people desperate for a more wholesome digital footprint.

The lawsuit, filed last year, seeks $1,000 for each class member, plus punitive damages, and aims to force Mugshots.com to remove class members’ photos. It seeks to represent, among others, anyone from Illinois whose information has been published on the site since Nov. 21, 2011, and anyone from other states whose information has been published since Nov. 21, 2012.

About 43,500 inmates currently are housed in Illinois prisons, and the experience of ex-inmates like Gabiola has drawn the attention of state Attorney General Lisa Madigan. She has intervened in Gabiola’s case against Mugshots.com, saying the state “has a substantial interest in protecting citizens against financial exploitation” that “preys upon the stigma associated with being arrested, convicted or imprisoned.”

Mugshots.com and Unpublisharrest.com “used photographs from the most humiliating moments in people’s lives to shake them down for money,” Madigan’s office said in a November court filing, characterizing Mugshots.com’s business model as an “extortionate practice” that a 2014 state law prohibits and the First Amendment doesn’t protect.

“They run a commercial enterprise built to obtain money from people whose notoriety consists solely of having a criminal record,” the attorney general’s office said in a court filing.

Mug shot websites are on the radars of other states as well.

At least seven states have mug shot-related legislation pending, according to the National Conference of State Legislatures, which tracks legislative efforts. Florida has introduced legislation similar to the Illinois law, though past Sunshine State efforts have failed.

Website critics say the industry can undermine former inmates’ job prospects, particularly at a time when a widening swath of the public backs reforms to make it easier for former prisoners to find work as a path to rehabilitation.

But First Amendment rights for even unpopular speakers must be protected, a lawyer for Mugshots.com said.

“These are perilous times for the First Amendment,” said David Ferrucci, a lawyer representing Mugshots.com. “We need to defend everybody’s First Amendment rights.”

Like Madigan, the lawyers who filed the lawsuit against Mugshots.com aren’t convinced by the First Amendment argument.

“Freedom of the press does not include the right to use incorrect or wrong information to profit off of the worst moment of another person’s life,” said Stuart Clarke, an attorney with Chicago law firm Berton N. Ring. “The First Amendment is not a blanket protection for everything you do.”

Gabiola, 53, who no longer lives in the Chicago area, said in a recent interview that it has been difficult for him to find a job and housing because Mugshots.com incorrectly still shows him as being on parole.

He said he just lost a job he held for four months, supervising crews that clean rail cars holding chemicals. When he was being considered for the job, he was asked whether he had ever been convicted of a felony, confirmed that he had, and still got the job, he said. His boss, however, recently Googled him and saw his inaccurate listing on Mugshots.com.

“It’s like I’m a month away from homelessness constantly, and it’s because of these websites,” Gabiola said. “At the very least, the information on the website should be accurate because they’re only making it harder for people that are really at the bottom of the barrel in society.”

Mugshots.com argues in a court filing that Gabiola’s reputation is damaged by the fact that he was arrested and convicted of multiple crimes. It also said that because he and other plaintiffs haven’t paid any fees, they haven’t been damaged by the removal service that is at the heart of the lawsuit.

“Mr. Gabiola, for example, does not complain that he was never on parole, only that he currently is not and his criminal record on the website is not up to date,” the company said. “However, a website publisher has no obligation to update.”

Mugshots.com said constitutional privileges to republish information from a public record “is not lost simply because the information has become stale, or is incomplete.”

“No one would reasonably suggest that republication of O.J. Simpson’s arrest photos from the Nicole Brown Simpson murder case would not be protected by the First Amendment simply because the arrest photo is more than 20 years old and Simpson was ultimately acquitted of the charges,” it said in a filing.

It took issue with the “extortion” characterization. Extortion generally means seeking payment before not after publishing information, the company said.

It also said Unpublisharrest.com is a website separate from Mugshots.com that offers licensing rights to the public to control specific information in the Mugshots.com database.

Mugshots.com is owned and operated by Julkisuudessa in Nevis, West Indies, according to its website. The Better Business Bureau lists Unpublisharrest.com as an alternate business name for Mugshots.com.

Gabiola said inaccurate information is more likely to compel arrestees to pay to have the information removed, and it implies that people on the website are dangerous regardless of whether they’re rehabilitated.

“I committed the crimes, yes, but I did my time,” he said.

Illinois residents have the right to prevent the unauthorized use of their personal identities for commercial purposes, even when the information comes from government documents that might be published in other contexts, such as in newspapers, the attorney general’s office said.

Unpublisharrest.com says on its website and in court filings that the removal service is no longer available to Illinois residents, which Madigan called a “tacit admission” that its business model is illegal.

But the state law might have unintended consequences.

“The irony of the mug shots act is that it makes it impossible for any individual to remove arrest records from a website,” said Ferrucci, the lawyer representing Mugshots.com. “If the goal is to make it easier to hide histories from potential employers, the Illinois mug shots act makes that impossible.”

Unpublisharrest.com isn’t the only company in the space. New York-based EraseMugshots.com recently announced the opening of a second office, in Chicago. However, the company says it’s not affiliated with any mug shot websites.

The website advertises that it searches more than 300 mug shot websites, compiles a list of online publications from which information should be removed, and then gets it taken down within 72 hours.

People with arrest records who try to take care of the problem themselves might not realize that they could be on many mug shot websites, said Bryan Powers, an EraseMugshots.com manager. After they’re removed from one, others might move up higher on Google search results, he said.

“It’s like a whack-a-mole situation,” Powers said.

He said his site might charge anywhere from $100 to thousands of dollars, depending on factors such as the uniqueness of a name, where the customer lives, and the length of his or her arrest record, he said. Powers declined to say how many people work for his company in Chicago.

Separate from the lawsuit against Mugshots.com, Bluhm Legal Clinic at Northwestern University’s law school is trying to get the names of almost 20 exonerated people off of mug shot websites, said Samuel Tenenbaum, clinical associate professor of law.

Among them are Terrill Swift and Jacques Rivera, who spent 15 years and 21 years, respectively, in prison for crimes they didn’t commit.

Swift, 39, whose effort to get his photo removed from Mugshots.com was reported by the Chicago Tribune in 2012, said it’s a “bad reminder” for his photo to still be on the site five years later. The site, accessed Friday afternoon, has photos of Swift, who was wrongly convicted of rape and murder, though it also displays a video of him after he was exonerated and lists links to related stories.

“We’ve been exonerated,” Swift said. “They should do the right thing and take our pictures off those websites.”

As of Friday afternoon, Rivera, 51, was still shown as being in custody for murder. He was exonerated and released from prison in 2011.

Ferrucci, the lawyer for Mugshots.com, said the site features stories about exonerations every Sunday and removes exonerees free of charge if they contact the site and provide documentation.

However, Tenenbaum said: “We contacted them. They wouldn’t do it.”

byerak@chicagotribune.com

Twitter @beckyyerak

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Lawsuit: Mug shot website posts incomplete records so sister site can solicit ‘takedown’ fees – Chicago Tribune

We Need A Moore’s Law For Government – Investor’s Business Daily

You would need almost three of these 1985 Cray 2 supercomputers to equal the processing power of an iPhone. So if technology can keep getting smaller and more efficient, why can’t government?

Big Government: This week, IBM showed that it could cram data into a single atom, part of the private sector’s never-ending quest to make things smaller and more efficient. If only government would follow this model.

IBM Research announced on Wednesday that it was able to put a holmium atom a rare earth element on top of a magnesium oxide surface, and with “a pulse of electric current from the magnetized tip of scanning tunneling microscope … flip the orientation of the atom’s field between a 0 or 1,” according to the journal Nature, which published the findings.

Right now, the device can store just two bits of data, and it has to be kept at a temperature close to absolute zero. But when this technology is inevitably scaled up and made commercially viable, it will drastically shrink storage sizes, since today it takes 100,000 atoms to store a single bit of data on a hard drive.

IBM (IBM) figures that with this technology, a device the size of a credit card could hold all 32 million songs contained in the iTunes library.

There’s no telling when such devices would be commercialized, but what IBM’s breakthrough tells us about the free market and about government is instructive.

Scientific breakthroughs like this occur because the private sector relentlessly pushes for greater efficiency. In the case of computing technology, it’s resulted in “Moore’s Law,” named after Gordon Moore, who in 1965 noticed that the number of circuits that could be crammed onto an integrated circuit had been doubling every two years.

The result is nothing short of remarkable. The pocket-size iPhone, for example, has more than 2.7 times the processing power of the 1985 Cray Supercomputer, which took up, according to the brochure published at the time, “a mere 16 square feet of floor space.”

This drive for efficiency occurs everywhere in a free-market economy from warehouses manned by robots, to the way McDonald’s prepares its food, to the state-of-the-art navigation systems UPS trucks use to minimize delivery times.

But while the free market ceaselessly pushes things to get smaller and more efficient, the federal government continues to get bigger and less efficient.

Between 1985 and today, for example, the size of the federal government doubled, even after accounting for inflation, at a time when the U.S. population has increased by 34%.

That’s just the spending side. Regulations have continued to pile up as well, without any concern about how they interact or overlap or reduce efficiency.

The result of this endless government growth has been a slower-growing private economy. From 1960 to 1988, real GDP increased at an average rate of 3.6%. In the years since, it has increased at an average rate of 2.5%. Since the last recession, the average real growth in GDP was less than 2.1%.

Can anyone honestly say that a bigger, more intrusive federal government has helped the economy, improved prosperity, or made things faster, better and more efficient?

President Trump came into office promising to “drain the swamp” of Washington, D.C. A better goal would be for him to follow IBM’s lead and try to shrink the swamp until it becomes atomic sized.

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We Need A Moore’s Law For Government – Investor’s Business Daily

Firefox 52 Brings New ESR Version, Security Upgrades, And WebAssembly Support – Tom’s Hardware

Mozilla released version 52 of Firefox, which brings new security features, as well as support for WebAssembly, a low-level programming language for the web. The new version of Firefox also coincides with a new Firefox Extended Support Release (ESR), which means the Tor Browser will soon benefit from all the security features that have been added to Firefox over the past year, including the browsers new sandboxing architecture.

Firefox 52 brought quite a few new features, especially in the security department.

WebAssembly

One of the most important features added to Firefox 52 is support for WebAssembly, a low-level programming language that can make web apps run at near-native speed.

This will make WebAssembly especially more useful for browser games, advanced web apps, and software libraries. Mozilla has been one of the primary developers of the language, as it wanted to offer a standardized alternative to Googles Native Client API, which boasts similar performance. The organization seems to have succeeded in that goal, as WebAssembly should soon be adopted by all the major browsers.

Strict Secure Cookies

Firefox 52 also supports Strict Secure Cookies, a policy that forbids HTTP websites from setting cookies with the secure attribute.

(Non-) Security Warnings

Google and Mozilla have promised for many months a new This connection is not secure warning that will appear in login boxes on pages that use HTTP, rather than HTTPS.

Both Google and Mozilla will progressively ramp up their warnings until all HTTP web pages are greeted by big red notifications that they are not secure. However, for now, the two companies are only warning about pages that require passwords or credit card information.

An Untrusted Connection error will also appear when Firefox 52 users visit a website whose certificate is chained to a root certificate that still uses the SHA-1 algorithm (such as those imported by the user). All the major browser vendors have had plans to deprecate SHA-1 for a couple of years now. With Google researchers proving that a collision attack on SHA-1 is now practical, there are even more reasons to avoid connections based on SHA-1 algorithms. However, for now, Mozilla will still allow users to bypass this warning.

Improved Multi-process, Sync Support

The multi-process architecture has also been enabled for Windows users that use touchscreen devices. The browser also got an enhanced sync feature to enable users to send and open tabs from one device to another.

Dropping NPAPI, Battery Status API Support

Support for the Netscape Plugin API (NPAPI) has been removed for virtually all plugins with the exception of Flash. Mozilla also removed support for the Battery Status API, which could have been used by some services to fingerprint users, thus significantly reducing privacy on the web.

Along with the regular release of Firefox 52, Mozilla also announced a new Firefox ESR, which has caught up with the features of the latest mainstream version of Firefox.

The ESR version is a release of Firefox that only receives security patches for almost a year (seven Firefox releases, to be exact). That means it falls behind in supporting new features as they appear in the regular versions of Firefox. This is usually a good thing for enterprise users, but also for certain organizations such as the Tor Project, which build the Tor Browser on top of Firefox ESR.

New features tend to introduce new bugs and it also takes time to validate them and to make sure they dont break anything. Therefore, something like Firefox ESR is more appealing to the Tor Project. However, sometimes staying almost a year behind is not that good, especially when the main browser introduces significant security improvements.

One of the major security improvements weve seen last year in Firefox is the switch to a better sandboxing architecture, which separates the UI and the content in a different process. That should make it harder for JavaScript exploits that may live inside a web page to make modifications to the browser itself.

As Firefox has kept seeing more and more exploits against it due to the fact that it doesnt have as good of a sandboxing architecture as Chrome does, the Tor Project has started to build its own sandboxing. However, the hardened version of the Tor Browser is only available on Linux for now, and its still in the alpha stage. The Tor browser should still benefit from Mozillas own sandboxing, especially on Windows.

This year, Firefox should continue to receive security upgrades, but it wont be until Firefox 59 (the next ESR version) that the Tor Browser will be able to implement them as well.

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Firefox 52 Brings New ESR Version, Security Upgrades, And WebAssembly Support – Tom’s Hardware

Credit Card-Sized Super Computer That Powers AI Such As Robots … – Forbes


Forbes

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Credit Card-Sized Super Computer That Powers AI Such As Robots … – Forbes