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Growth in the Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2021 trends … – satPRnews (press release)

Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2021

This Nanomedicine market research is an intelligence report with meticulous efforts undertaken to study the right and valuable information. The data which has been looked upon is done considering both, the existing top players and the upcoming competitors. Business strategies of the key players and the new entering market industries are studied in detail. Well explained SWOT analysis, revenue share and contact information are shared in this report analysis.

Download sample pages of this report:http://tinyurl.com/y7bs9wea

Data integration and capabilities are analyzed to support the findings and study the predicted geographical segmentations. Various key variables and regression models were considered to calculate the trajectory of Nanomedicine market. Detailed analysis is explained and given importance to with best working models.

Geographically, the segmentation is done into several key regions like North America, Middle East & Africa, Asia Pacific, Europe and Latin America. The production, consumption, revenue, shares in mill UDS, growth rate of Nanomedicine market during the forecast period of 2017 to 2021 is well explained.

The ongoing market trends of Nanomedicine market and the key factors impacting the growth prospects are elucidated. With increase in the trend, the factors affecting the trend are mentioned with perfect reasons. Top manufactures, price, revenue, market share are explained to give a depth of idea on the competitive side.

Each and every segment type and their sub types are well elaborated to give a better idea about this market during the forecast period of 2017 to 2021 respectively.

Download sample pages of this report:http://tinyurl.com/y7bs9wea

About Us: Key Market Insights is a stand-alone organization with a solid history of advancing and exchanging market research reports and logical surveys delivered by our numerous transnational accomplices, which incorporate both huge multinationals and littler, more expert concerns.

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Growth in the Global Nanomedicine Market 2017-2021 trends … – satPRnews (press release)

New report shares details about Europe’s nanomedicine market – WhaTech

The global nanomedicine market size was estimated at USD XX billion in 2017. Technological advancements coupled with relevant applications in early disease diagnosis, preventive intervention, and prophylaxis of chronic as well as acute disorders is expected to bolster growth in this market.

Nanotechnology involves the miniaturization of larger structures and chemicals at nanometric scale which has significantly revolutionized drug administration, thus influencing adoption of the technology through to 2022.

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Expected developments in nanorobotics owing to the rise in funding from the government organizations is expected to induce potential to the market. Nanorobotics engineering projects that are attempting to target the cancer cells without affecting the surrounding tissues is anticipated to drive progress through to 2022.

Ability of the nanotechnology to serve in diagnostics as well as the therapeutic sector at the same time as a consequence of its characteristic principle to is anticipated to augment research in this sector. Furthermore, utilization of DNA origami for healthcare applications is attributive for the projected growth.

The global nanomedicine market is segmented based on modality, application, indication, and region. Based on application, it is classified into drug delivery, diagnostic imaging, vaccines, regenerative medicine, implants, and others.

On the basis of indication, it is categorized into oncological diseases, neurological diseases, urological diseases, infectious diseases, ophthalmological diseases, orthopedic disorders, immunological diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and others. Based on modality, it is bifurcated into treatments and diagnostics.

This report studies sales (consumption) of Nanomedicine in Europe market, especially in Germany, UK, France, Russia, Italy, Benelux and Spain, focuses on top players in these countries, with sales, price, revenue and market share for each player in these Countries, the top player covering Affilogic LTFN Bergmannstrost Grupo Praxis Biotechrabbit Bracco Materials Research?Centre Carlina technologies ChemConnection CIC biomaGUNE CIBER-BBN Contipro Cristal Therapeutics DTI Endomagnetics Fraunhofer ICT-IMM Tecnalia Tekniker GIMAC IMDEA Istec CNR SwedNanoTech Vicomtech VITO NV

The global market is driven by emerging technologies for drug delivery, increase in adoption of nanomedicine across varied applications, rise in government support & funding, growth in need for therapies with fewer side effects, and cost-effectiveness of therapies. However, long approval process and risks associated with nanomedicine (environmental impacts) restrain the market growth.

In addition, increase in out-licensing of nanodrugs and growth of healthcare facilities in emerging economies are anticipated to provide numerous opportunities for the market growth.

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New report shares details about Europe’s nanomedicine market – WhaTech

What is nanomedicine? – Definition from WhatIs.com

Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology (the engineering of tiny machines) to the prevention and treatment of disease in the human body. This evolving discipline has the potential to dramatically change medical science.

Established and near-future nanomedicine applications include activity monitors, chemotherapy, pacemakers, biochips, OTC tests, insulin pumps, nebulizers, needleless injectors, hearing aids, medical flow sensors and blood pressure, glucose monitoring and drug delivery systems.

Here are a few examples of how nanomedicine could transform common medical procedures:

The most advanced nanomedicine involves the use of nanorobots as miniature surgeons. Such machines might repair damaged cells, or get inside cells and replace or assist damaged intracellular structures. At the extreme, nanomachines might replicate themselves, or correct genetic deficiencies by altering or replacing DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules.

Visit link:

What is nanomedicine? – Definition from WhatIs.com

Nanomedicine Lab

Advanced Healthcare Materials, 2017, in press

Nature Communications, 2017, in press

Advanced Materials, 2017, in press

Nanoscale Horizons, 2017, in press

EMBO Molecular Medicine, 2017, 9(6): 733-736

Nature Nanotechnology, 2017, 12: 288290

Nanoscale, 2017, 9(14): 4642-4645

Nature Biomedical Engineering, 2017, 1: 0063

BioRxiv, posted online Jan. 18, 2017

Chem, 2017, 2(3): 322325

View post:

Nanomedicine Lab

Are nano drug delivery and telehealth solutions a deadly combo for disease? – EPM Magazine

by Alexander Myskiw DataArt

23 August 2017

10:16

Incorporating telehealth solutions into new drug delivery technologies like nanomedicines can potentially give pharmaceuticals the edge they need to win the fight against disease.

Creating drug delivery systems that utilise telehealth solutions like smartphone technologies, Bluetooth, IoT, wearable technologies, and AI would help pharmaceutical companies save money in clinical trials by reducing the financial burden caused by poor medical adherence and provide better patient outcomes through real-time data analysis. Telehealth solutions provide physicians and clinical trial scientists direct access to their patient, and can provide them with valuable data that will improve their performance and the patients health. Access to real-time patient health data is an opportunity for pharmaceutical companies to develop a range of smart drug delivery systems that could potentially change the way an estimated 50% of the population deal with their chronic diseases.

With large numbers living with some form of chronic disease, pharmaceutical companies must incorporate telehealth tech into their drug delivery systems to collect real-time data and use the data to improve patient treatment, clinical trial outcomes and apply the data for further research.

The drug delivery systems available in todays market are honestly not that impressive. A Bluetooth-enabled inhaler, smart automatic injectors, and smart pills are definitely technologies that benefit patient care but lack innovative pizzazz. Bluetooth technology was first introduced in mobile phones in 2000. It has taken 17 years to implement the data-gathering technology into an inhaler/auto injector, often at times requiring user actions like downloading from an SD card. I am surprised it has taken this long for pharma to get where it is today, but there is truly hope on the horizon, with recent advancements in nanotechnology.

The future of pharmaceuticals and population health lies in the utilisation of telehealth solutions like the Internet of Nano Things (IoNT), wearables, smartphones and the latest drug delivery tech likesmart nanoplatforms, nanoparticles/nanomedicines, and nanosensors. These recent technological advancements in drug delivery should change the way we understand and cure diseases.

Northwestern University has developed a nanoplatform that can assess the effectiveness of nanomaterials in regulating gene expression. The nanoplatform allows scientists to observe nanomedicines and particle behaviour in an in vivo setting. Theres no doubt that the relationship between nanomedicines and IoNT is inevitable however there are issues like patient health risks and security that must be taken into account.

Whenever the internet is involved, the issue of security should be raised. Are nanomedicines saving patients lives, while also putting them at risk of body hacking? Although programmable particles are sending signals from within the patients body and providing beneficial information for the doctor/scientist, the idea that a signal can be hacked is a horrific reality. Nanoparticle manipulation is possible by gaining access to the particles using ultrasound and electromagnetic field waves making hacking feasible but extremely difficult and complex. The next question is what happens to the nanoparticles after treatment? Will they pose a later threat and become an access point for hackers?

Nanomedicines, after entering the human body, travel throughout reaching the organs, the bloodstream, the lungs and even crossing the semi-permeable membranes into cells delivering the drugs to exactly the right place at the right time. Their disbursement depends on size and programming. Nanoparticles are metal-based, carbon-based, composites, and dendrimers, and are excreted from the body via faeces and urine. The liver and spleen can also decompose them, however up to 30% can remain in the body for an extended period of time and potentially become an access point for hacking.

Combining telehealth solutions and nanomedicines will benefit the populations health by presenting effective treatments for chronic and deadly pathologies and provide scientists and doctors previously unattainable data for analysis. This previously elusive data has become available thanks to Northwestern Universitys Nanoplatform, which successfully provides imaging of the nanomedicines effectiveness on the MGMT gene, a chemo-resistant cancer gene. This data has already provided a better understanding of the nanomedicines mechanics and provided researchers with the best time, after treatment with nanomedicines, to administer chemotherapy.

Nanoparticles appear to be a solution that can improve the health of the population, however there are still potential risks for patients. Although most nanoparticles are tested in labs and in vitro, a few potential health risks have been observed. Risks like the creation of a protein corona (a shifting population of different molecules) can influence the immune defence system and mistakenly allow the corona to penetrate good non-targeted tissues. The clumping of protein molecules can also be linked to multiple pathologies, including amyloidosis. Some nanoparticles have also been linked to genetic mutations, DNA damage, and chromosomal alterations, however they are rarely attributed to all three at once. It is quite clear that more research and testing is required to truly understand the future of nanomedicine and its effects on the human body.

Nanomedicines target a specific area within the body, can delay activation and have the potential to relay real-time data for analysis. Scientists and doctors can finally have a real-time view of their treatments and understand the pathology and its interaction with the medicines, leading to data that will help the healthcare industry save lives, defeat disease, and save money. The benefits in combining telehealth solutions with nano drug delivery systems is evident and it is the colossal leap forward that the industry has been looking for in the never-ending fight with diseases like cancer.

by Alexander Myskiw DataArt

23 August 2017

10:16

View original post here:

Are nano drug delivery and telehealth solutions a deadly combo for disease? – EPM Magazine

Nanomedicine Lab

Advanced Healthcare Materials, 2017, in press

Nature Communications, 2017, in press

Advanced Materials, 2017, in press

Nanoscale Horizons, 2017, in press

EMBO Molecular Medicine, 2017, 9(6): 733-736

Nature Nanotechnology, 2017, 12: 288290

Nanoscale, 2017, 9(14): 4642-4645

Nature Biomedical Engineering, 2017, 1: 0063

BioRxiv, posted online Jan. 18, 2017

Chem, 2017, 2(3): 322325

See the original post:

Nanomedicine Lab

What is nanomedicine? – Definition from WhatIs.com

Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology (the engineering of tiny machines) to the prevention and treatment of disease in the human body. This evolving discipline has the potential to dramatically change medical science.

Established and near-future nanomedicine applications include activity monitors, chemotherapy, pacemakers, biochips, OTC tests, insulin pumps, nebulizers, needleless injectors, hearing aids, medical flow sensors and blood pressure, glucose monitoring and drug delivery systems.

Here are a few examples of how nanomedicine could transform common medical procedures:

The most advanced nanomedicine involves the use of nanorobots as miniature surgeons. Such machines might repair damaged cells, or get inside cells and replace or assist damaged intracellular structures. At the extreme, nanomachines might replicate themselves, or correct genetic deficiencies by altering or replacing DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules.

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What is nanomedicine? – Definition from WhatIs.com

Nanomedicinal products: a survey on specific toxicity and side effects – Dove Medical Press

Walter Brand,1,* Cornelle W Noorlander,1,* Christina Giannakou,2,3 Wim H De Jong,2 Myrna W Kooi,1 Margriet VDZ Park,2 Rob J Vandebriel,2 Irene EM Bosselaers,4 Joep HG Scholl,5 Robert E Geertsma2

1Centre for Safety of Substances and Products, 2Centre for Health Protection, National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM), Bilthoven, 3Department of Toxicogenomics, Maastricht University, Maastricht, 4Section Pharmacology, Toxicology and Pharmacokinetics, Medicines Evaluation Board (CBG-MEB), Utrecht, 5Research & Analysis Department, Netherlands Pharmacovigilance Centre Lareb, s-Hertogenbosch, the Netherlands

*These authors contributed equally tothis work

Abstract: Due to their specific properties and pharmacokinetics, nanomedicinal products (NMPs) may present different toxicity and side effects compared to non-nanoformulated, conventional medicines. To facilitate the safety assessment of NMPs, we aimed to gain insight into toxic effects specific for NMPs by systematically analyzing the available toxicity data on approved NMPs in the European Union. In addition, by comparing five sets of products with the same active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in a conventional formulation versus a nanoformulation, we aimed to identify any side effects specific for the nano aspect of NMPs. The objective was to investigate whether specific toxicity could be related to certain structural types of NMPs and whether a nanoformulation of an API altered the nature of side effects of the product in humans compared to a conventional formulation. The survey of toxicity data did not reveal nanospecific toxicity that could be related to certain types of structures of NMPs, other than those reported previously in relation to accumulation of iron nanoparticles (NPs). However, given the limited data for some of the product groups or toxicological end points in the analysis, conclusions with regard to (a lack of) potential nanomedicine-specific effects need to be considered carefully. Results from the comparison of side effects of five sets of drugs (mainly liposomes and/or cytostatics) confirmed the induction of pseudo-allergic responses associated with specific NMPs in the literature, in addition to the side effects common to both nanoformulations and regular formulations, eg, with liposomal doxorubicin, and possibly liposomal daunorubicin. Based on the available data, immunotoxicological effects of certain NMPs cannot be excluded, and we conclude that this end point requires further attention.

Keywords: adverse effects, drug safety, immunotoxicity, nanomedicine, nanotoxicology, pharmacovigilance

This work is published and licensed by Dove Medical Press Limited. The full terms of this license are available at https://www.dovepress.com/terms.php and incorporate the Creative Commons Attribution – Non Commercial (unported, v3.0) License. By accessing the work you hereby accept the Terms. Non-commercial uses of the work are permitted without any further permission from Dove Medical Press Limited, provided the work is properly attributed. For permission for commercial use of this work, please see paragraphs 4.2 and 5 of our Terms.

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Nanomedicinal products: a survey on specific toxicity and side effects – Dove Medical Press

What is nanomedicine? – Definition from WhatIs.com

Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology (the engineering of tiny machines) to the prevention and treatment of disease in the human body. This evolving discipline has the potential to dramatically change medical science.

Established and near-future nanomedicine applications include activity monitors, chemotherapy, pacemakers, biochips, OTC tests, insulin pumps, nebulizers, needleless injectors, hearing aids, medical flow sensors and blood pressure, glucose monitoring and drug delivery systems.

Here are a few examples of how nanomedicine could transform common medical procedures:

The most advanced nanomedicine involves the use of nanorobots as miniature surgeons. Such machines might repair damaged cells, or get inside cells and replace or assist damaged intracellular structures. At the extreme, nanomachines might replicate themselves, or correct genetic deficiencies by altering or replacing DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) molecules.

See the rest here:

What is nanomedicine? – Definition from WhatIs.com

Nanomedicine Lab

Advanced Healthcare Materials, 2017, in press

Nature Communications, 2017, in press

Advanced Materials, 2017, in press

Nanoscale Horizons, 2017, in press

EMBO Molecular Medicine, 2017, 9(6): 733-736

Nature Nanotechnology, 2017, 12: 288290

Nanoscale, 2017, 9(14): 4642-4645

Nature Biomedical Engineering, 2017, 1: 0063

BioRxiv, posted online Jan. 18, 2017

Chem, 2017, 2(3): 322325

More here:

Nanomedicine Lab

Lungs in space: research project could lead to new lung therapeutics – Phys.Org

August 15, 2017

Space travel can cause a lot of stress on the human body as the change in gravity, radiation and other factors creates a hostile environment. While much is known about how different parts of the body react in space, how lungs are affected by spaceflight has received little attention until now, say researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Houston Methodist Research Institute.

That will change, though, once their research project, which aims to grow lungs in space, reaches the International Space Station. UTMB and HMRI researchers say what they learn from the study could have real implications for astronauts, as well as those still on Earth, and could lead to future therapeutics.

“We know a lot about what happens in space to bones, muscle, the heart and the immune system, but nobody knows much about what happens to the lungs,” said Joan Nichols, a professor of Internal Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology, and associate director for research and operations for the Galveston National Laboratory at UTMB. “We know that there are some problems with lungs in space flight, but that hasn’t been closely looked into. We hope to find out how lung cells react to the change in gravity and the extreme space environment, and then that can help us protect astronauts in space, as well as the lungs of regular people here on Earth.”

This investigation represents the third of four collaborative projects currently active at the HMRI’s Center for Space Nanomedicine. The center, directed by Alessandro Grattoni, chairman and associate professor of the Department of Nanomedicine at HMRI, focuses on the investigation of nanotechnology-based strategies for medicine on Earth and in space. The research is supported by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, NASA and HMRI.

Scientists from UTMB and HMRI prepared bioreactor pouches that include lung progenitor and stem cells and pieces of lung scaffolding. The scaffolding is the collagen and elastin frame on which lung cells grow. Space X successfully launched the payload containing these pouches Aug. 14 on its 12th Commercial Resupply Services mission (CRS-12) from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida and is expected to arrive at the International Space Station Aug. 16. Once on the ISS, the cells are expected to grow on the scaffold in a retrofitted bioreactor.

Once the lung cells have returned to Earth, researchers will look for the development of fibrosis, the structure of the tissues and the response of immune cells, among other changes and damage that could occur to the lung cells. Lung injuries have been found to accelerate in space, and it is through close study of those cells that therapeutics hopefully could be developed.

Nichols and Dr. Joaquin Cortiella, a professor and director of the Lab of Tissue Engineering and Organ Regeneration at UTMB, have successfully grown lungs in their lab in Galveston, but now they will see if astronauts can do the same in zero gravity. Jason Sakamoto, affiliate professor and former co-chair of the Department of Nanomedicine at HMRI, has applied his novel organ decellularization process and nanotechnology-based delivery systems to support this overall lung regeneration effort.

“We have experience working with the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space to study our nanotechnologies in action on the International Space Station,” Grattoni said. “However, we are extremely excited to be a part of this clinical study, since it may play a pivotal role in how we approach future space travel in terms of preserving astronaut health. What we learn during this fundamental experiment could lead to science-fiction-like medical advancements, where organ regeneration becomes a reality in both deep space and here on Earth.”

Researchers at HMRI will take the results from UTMB and work on developing therapeutics that could help astronauts, as well as people on Earth.

“This exploration will provide fundamental insight for the collaborative development of cell-based therapies for autoimmune diseases, hormone deficiencies and other issues,” Grattoni said.

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Abba Zubair, M.D., Ph.D, believes that cells grown in the International Space Station (ISS) could help patients recover from a stroke, and that it may even be possible to generate human tissues and organs in space. He just …

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Lungs in space: research project could lead to new lung therapeutics – Phys.Org

Global Nanomedicine Market Research Report 2016 satPRnews – satPRnews (press release)

Global Nanomedicine Market Research Report 2016

2016 Global Nanomedicine Market Report is a professional and in-depth research report on the worlds major regional market conditions of the Nanomedicine industry, focusing on the main regions (North America, Europe and Asia) and the main countries (United States, Germany, Japan and China).

Download sample pages of this report: https://goo.gl/cBLFx6

The report firstly introduced the Nanomedicine basics: definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain overview; industry policies and plans; product specifications; manufacturing processes; cost structures and so on. Then it analyzed the worlds main region market conditions, including the product price, profit, capacity, production, capacity utilization, supply, demand and industry growth rate etc. In the end, the report introduced new project SWOT analysis, investment feasibility analysis, and investment return analysis.

The report includes six parts, dealing with: 1.) basic information; 2.) the Asia Nanomedicine industry; 3.) the North American Nanomedicine industry; 4.) the European Nanomedicine industry; 5.) market entry and investment feasibility; and 6.) the report conclusion.

Download sample pages of this report: https://goo.gl/cBLFx6

About Us:

Key Market Insights is a stand-alone organization with a solid history of advancing and exchanging market research reports and logical surveys delivered by our numerous transnational accomplices, which incorporate both huge multinationals and littler, more expert concerns.

Contact:

sales@kminsights.com

+1 (888) 278-7681

Visit link:

Global Nanomedicine Market Research Report 2016 satPRnews – satPRnews (press release)

Growth in Nanomedicine market-2017 trends, forecasts, analysis – satPRnews (press release)

The report firstly introduced the Nanomedicine basics: definitions, classifications, applications and industry chain overview; industry policies and plans; product specifications; manufacturing processes; cost structures and so on. Then it analyzed the worlds main region market conditions, including the product price, profit, capacity, production, capacity utilization, supply, demand and industry growth rate etc. In the end, the report introduced new project SWOT analysis, investment feasibility analysis, and investment return analysis.

Download sample pages of this report: http://www.kminsights.com/request-sample-1892

Nanomedicine is a branch of medicine that applies the knowledge and tools of nanotechnology to the prevention and treatment of disease. Nanomedicine involves the use of nanoscale materials, such as biocompatible nanoparticles and nanorobots, for diagnosis, delivery, sensing or actuation purposes in a living organism.

The ongoing market trends of Nanomedicine market and the key factors impacting the growth prospects are elucidated. With increase in the trend, the factors affecting the trend are mentioned with perfect reasons. Top manufactures, price, revenue, market share are explained to give a depth of idea on the competitive side.

Each and every segment type and their sub types are well elaborated to give a better idea about this market during the forecast period of 2017respectively.

Download sample pages of this report: http://www.kminsights.com/request-sample-1892

About Us: Key Market Insights is a stand-alone organization with a solid history of advancing and exchanging market research reports and logical surveys delivered by our numerous transnational accomplices, which incorporate both huge multinationals and littler, more expert concerns.

Contact: sales@kminsights.com +1 (888) 278-7681

Originally posted here:

Growth in Nanomedicine market-2017 trends, forecasts, analysis – satPRnews (press release)

Preclinical research using 1 Tesla desktop MRI – News-Medical.net

An interview with Dr. Ichio Aoki, National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology.

I’m an MR imaging scientist in the preclinical field. I’m a team leader of the functional and molecular imaging team at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) in QST.

QST National Institutes for Quantum and Radiological Science and Technology is a new organization, which was launched in April 2016. QST has an imaging research section as well as a synchrotron, and nuclear fusion and high-power laser development sections.

My role at QST is to develop new magnetic resonance imaging technologies and contrast agents in the preclinical field.

Advanced Anatomical and Functional MRI from AZoNetwork on Vimeo.

The predominant theme of our research is to develop new in vivo imaging technologies that can recognize disease, evaluate the benefits of therapies, and discover new diagnostic biomarkers for preclinical applications.

We are working to develop advanced anatomical and functional MRI to reveal the brain function, and to develop functional contrast agents and nanoprobes that can visualize and characterize brain or tumor function, microstructure, and pathologies.

We are focusing on three research fields:

The reason for purchasing ICON is simple: that is for the development of contrast agents and the preclinical applications.

Almost seven years ago, we developed a nano-micelle-based gadolinium contrast agent with Prof. Kataoka. Although the contrast agent had excellent T1 reactivity at low-fields, it lost the contrast capability at 7Tesla.

Most of nanoparticle-based contrast agents have both high T1 and T2 reactivity. It means that low-field MRI can have better contrast. Therefore, we considered the 1Tesla MRI system.

There are two reasons for choosing the ICON system at NIRS. First, compatibility with the 7Tesla system. We have some data servers for preclinical MRI. The compatibility of the ICON data is important for us.

The second reason is to do with accuracy. The resonance frequency as a permanent magnet depends on the room temperature. ICON with ParaVision software can perform a frequency correction automatically.

In addition, quantitative mapping requires very high accuracy of measurements such as exact 180-degree RF power, special homogeneity, and sharp slicing. I confirmed that the ParaVision software has high accuracy, with anatomical imaging as well as with quantitative mapping.

High-field MRI has great signal-to-noise ratio, therefore, it has many advantages for micro-imaging, BOLD-based functional MRI, MR spectroscopy, and multinuclear imaging. Especially, 7Tesla MRI can provide unbelievable SNR for mouse brain imaging and tumor microstructure.

Nanoparticles in MRI For Improving Contrast Agents from AZoNetwork on Vimeo.

On the other hand, 1Tesla ICON system can provide high-contrast imaging with contrast agents and it is very easy to use. It is also important that the contrast is similar to that of clinical MRI scanners.

For example, with our manganese with calcium phosphate micelle, we used 7Tesla system for MR angiography and MR spectroscopy and ICON system for T1-weighted MRI. I believe that it is the optimal combination for the application.

I always discuss with many researchers and recommend optimal systems for their research purposes. Also, I talk with MR technologists Nitta-san and Ozawa-san and animal technologists Shibata-san and Hayashi-san for improvement of our research environment. I’d like to continue the study of functional and responsive contrast agent development such as manganese, nitroxyl radicals, and diagnostic agents using micelle, nanogels, and liposomes.

In addition, I have two plans for the near future. First, development of safer contrast agents. We believe that we can provide good contrast with the use of gadolinium.

Secondly, we call it a companion nano-imaging. Many kinds of nanomedicine have great advantages, particularly to reduce side effects. However, it is known that the drug accumulation into the focus have big dispersion. I believe that nanoparticle-based contrast agents can act as a predictive marker for nanomedicine, this will allow us to estimate the therapeutic effect before administration.

We will launch an alliance soon for next-generation MR imaging and contrast agent development. I hope that the alliance will provide an open innovation platform in Japan forboth academia and industry.

Team leader at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) April 2007 Present

Senior Scientist at the NIRS October 2006 March 2007.

Before that he was a visiting scientist and visiting associate at the NIRS between December 2005 and September 2006.

He spent 2 years as an Assistant Professor at the Department of Medical Informatics at the Meiji University of Oriental Medicine from April 2004 to March 2006.

Has been a visiting Fellow and special volunteer at the National Institutes of Health from April 2000 to July 2003.

Sponsored Content Policy: News-Medical.net publishes articles and related content that may be derived from sources where we have existing commercial relationships, provided such content adds value to the core editorial ethos of News-Medical.Net which is to educate and inform site visitors interested in medical research, science, medical devices and treatments.

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Preclinical research using 1 Tesla desktop MRI – News-Medical.net

Lungs in space: research project could lead to new lung therapeutics – Phys.Org

August 15, 2017

Space travel can cause a lot of stress on the human body as the change in gravity, radiation and other factors creates a hostile environment. While much is known about how different parts of the body react in space, how lungs are affected by spaceflight has received little attention until now, say researchers at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and Houston Methodist Research Institute.

That will change, though, once their research project, which aims to grow lungs in space, reaches the International Space Station. UTMB and HMRI researchers say what they learn from the study could have real implications for astronauts, as well as those still on Earth, and could lead to future therapeutics.

“We know a lot about what happens in space to bones, muscle, the heart and the immune system, but nobody knows much about what happens to the lungs,” said Joan Nichols, a professor of Internal Medicine and Microbiology and Immunology, and associate director for research and operations for the Galveston National Laboratory at UTMB. “We know that there are some problems with lungs in space flight, but that hasn’t been closely looked into. We hope to find out how lung cells react to the change in gravity and the extreme space environment, and then that can help us protect astronauts in space, as well as the lungs of regular people here on Earth.”

This investigation represents the third of four collaborative projects currently active at the HMRI’s Center for Space Nanomedicine. The center, directed by Alessandro Grattoni, chairman and associate professor of the Department of Nanomedicine at HMRI, focuses on the investigation of nanotechnology-based strategies for medicine on Earth and in space. The research is supported by the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space, NASA and HMRI.

Scientists from UTMB and HMRI prepared bioreactor pouches that include lung progenitor and stem cells and pieces of lung scaffolding. The scaffolding is the collagen and elastin frame on which lung cells grow. Space X successfully launched the payload containing these pouches Aug. 14 on its 12th Commercial Resupply Services mission (CRS-12) from NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida and is expected to arrive at the International Space Station Aug. 16. Once on the ISS, the cells are expected to grow on the scaffold in a retrofitted bioreactor.

Once the lung cells have returned to Earth, researchers will look for the development of fibrosis, the structure of the tissues and the response of immune cells, among other changes and damage that could occur to the lung cells. Lung injuries have been found to accelerate in space, and it is through close study of those cells that therapeutics hopefully could be developed.

Nichols and Dr. Joaquin Cortiella, a professor and director of the Lab of Tissue Engineering and Organ Regeneration at UTMB, have successfully grown lungs in their lab in Galveston, but now they will see if astronauts can do the same in zero gravity. Jason Sakamoto, affiliate professor and former co-chair of the Department of Nanomedicine at HMRI, has applied his novel organ decellularization process and nanotechnology-based delivery systems to support this overall lung regeneration effort.

“We have experience working with the Center for the Advancement of Science in Space to study our nanotechnologies in action on the International Space Station,” Grattoni said. “However, we are extremely excited to be a part of this clinical study, since it may play a pivotal role in how we approach future space travel in terms of preserving astronaut health. What we learn during this fundamental experiment could lead to science-fiction-like medical advancements, where organ regeneration becomes a reality in both deep space and here on Earth.”

Researchers at HMRI will take the results from UTMB and work on developing therapeutics that could help astronauts, as well as people on Earth.

“This exploration will provide fundamental insight for the collaborative development of cell-based therapies for autoimmune diseases, hormone deficiencies and other issues,” Grattoni said.

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Lungs in space: research project could lead to new lung therapeutics – Phys.Org

siRNA Treatment for Brain Cancer Stops Tumor Growth in Mouse Model – Technology Networks

Early phase Northwestern Medicine research published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences has demonstrated a potential new therapeutic strategy for treating deadly glioblastoma brain tumors.

The strategy involves using lipid polymer-based nanoparticles to deliver molecules to the tumors, where the molecules shut down key cancer drivers called brain tumor-initiating cells (BTICs).

BTICs are malignant brain tumor populations that underlie the therapy resistance, recurrence and unstoppable invasion commonly encountered by glioblastoma patients after the standard treatment regimen of surgical resection, radiation and chemotherapy, explained the studys first author, Dou Yu, MD, PhD, research assistant professor of Neurological Surgery.

Using mouse models of brain tumors implanted with BTICs derived from human patients, the scientists injected nanoparticles containing small interfering RNA (siRNA) short sequences of RNA molecules that reduce the expression of specific cancer-promoting proteins directly into the tumor. In the new study, the strategy stopped tumor growth and extended survival when the therapy was administered continuously through an implanted drug infusion pump.

This major progress, although still at a conceptual stage, underscores a new direction in the pursuit of a cure for one of the most devastating medical conditions known to mankind, said Yu, who collaborated on the research with principal investigator Maciej Lesniak, MD, Michael J. Marchese Professor of Neurosurgery and chair of the Department of Neurological Surgery.

Glioblastoma is particularly difficult to treat because its genetic makeup varies from patient to patient. This new therapeutic approach would make it possible to deliver siRNAs to target multiple cancer-causing gene products simultaneously in a particular patients tumor.

In this study, the scientists tested siRNAs that target four transcription factors highly expressed in many glioblastoma tissues but not all. The therapy worked against classes of glioblastoma BTICs with high levels of those transcription factors, while other classes of the cancer did not respond.

This paints a picture for personalized glioblastoma therapy regimens based on tumor profiling, Yu said. Customized nanomedicine could target the unique genetic signatures in any specific patient and potentially lead to greater therapeutic benefits.

The strategy could also apply to other medical conditions related to the central nervous system not just brain tumors.

Degenerative neurological diseases or even psychiatric conditions could potentially be the therapeutic candidates for this multiplexed delivery platform, Yu said.

Before scientists can translate this proof-of-concept research to humans, they will need to continue refining the nanomedicine platform and evaluating its long-term safety. Still, the findings from this new research provide insight for further investigation.

Nanomedicine provides a unique opportunity to advance a therapeutic strategy for a disease without a cure. By effectively targeting brain tumor-initiating stem cells responsible for cancer recurrence, this approach opens up novel translational approaches to malignant brain cancer, Lesniak summed up.

This article has been republished frommaterialsprovided by Northwestern University. Note: material may have been edited for length and content. For further information, please contact the cited source.

Reference

Dou Yu, Omar F. Khan, Mario L. Suv, Biqin Dong, Wojciech K. Panek, Ting Xiao, Meijing Wu, Yu Han, Atique U. Ahmed, Irina V. Balyasnikova, Hao F. Zhang, Cheng Sun, Robert Langer, Daniel G. Anderson, Maciej S. Lesniak. Multiplexed RNAi therapy against brain tumor-initiating cells via lipopolymeric nanoparticle infusion delays glioblastoma progression. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 2017; 201701911 DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1701911114

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siRNA Treatment for Brain Cancer Stops Tumor Growth in Mouse Model – Technology Networks

Targeting tumours: IBBME researchers investigate biological barriers to nanomedicine delivery – U of T Engineering News

For cancer patients, understanding the odds of a treatments success can be bewildering. The same drug, applied to the same type of cancer, might be fully successful on one persons tumour and do nothing for another one. Physicians are often unable to explain why.

Now, U of T Engineering researchers are beginning to understand one of the reasons.Abdullah Syed and Shrey Sindhwani, both PhD candidates,and their colleagues at the Institute of Biomaterials & Biomedical Engineering (IBBME) have created a technology to watch nanoparticles traveling into tumours revealing barriers that prevent their delivery to targets and the variability between cancers.

The biggest thing weve noticed is that nanoparticles face multiple challenges posed by the tumour itself on their way to cancer cells, says Sindhwani, an MD-PhD student in the Integrated Nanotechnology & Biomedical Sciences Laboratory of Professor Warren Chan (IBBME). Syed and Sindhwani co-published their findings online June 22, and on the cover of the Journal of the American Chemical Society. So the treatment might work for a while or worse, theres just enough of the drug for the cancer to develop resistance. This could be prevented if we can figure out the ways in which these barriers stop delivery and distribution of the drug throughout the cancer.

Tiny nanoparticles offer great hope for the treatment of cancer and other disease because of their potential to deliver drugs to targeted areas in the body, allowing more precise treatments with fewer side effects. But so far the technology hasnt lived up to its promise, due to delivery and penetration problems.

To dismantle this roadblock, the two graduate students searched for a way to better view the particles journey inside tumours. They discovered that the tough-to-see particles could be illuminated by scattering light off their surfaces.

The sensitivity of our imaging is about 1.4 millionfold higher, says Syed. First, we make the tissue transparent, then we use the signal coming from the particles to locate them. We shine a light on the particles and it scatters the light. We capture this scattering light to learn the precise location of the nanoparticles.

It was already understood that nanoparticles were failing to accumulate in tumours, thanks to a meta-analysis of the field done by Chans group. But the researchers have developed technologies to look at nanoparticle distribution in 3D, which provides a much fuller picture of how the particles are interacting with the rest of the tumour biology. The goal is to use this technology to gather knowledge for developing mathematical principles of nanoparticle distribution in cancer, similar to the way principles exist for understanding the function of the heart, says Syed.

And because each tumour is unique, this technology and knowledge base should help future scientists to understand the barriers to drug delivery on a personalized basis, and to develop custom treatments.

The next step is to understand what in cancers biology stops particles from fully penetrating tumours and then to develop ways to bypass cancers defences.

But the technology is also useful for diseases other than cancer. With the help of Professor Jennifer Gommerman, an researcher in the Department of Immunology who studies multiple sclerosis (MS), Syed and Sindhwani captured 3D images of lesions in a mouse model mimicking MS using nanoparticles.

This is going to be very valuable to anyone trying to understand disease or the organ system more deeply, says Sindhwani. And once we understand barriers that dont allow drugs to reach their disease site, we can start knocking them down and improving patient health adds Syed.

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Targeting tumours: IBBME researchers investigate biological barriers to nanomedicine delivery – U of T Engineering News

Medication for the unborn baby – Medical Xpress

August 8, 2017 Empas multicellular model, which is mimicking the placental barrier: a core of connective tissue cells, surrounded by trophoblast cells. Credit: Empa

An Empa team has succeeded in developing a new three-dimensional cell model of the human placental barrier. The “model organ” can quickly and reliably deliver new information on the intake of substances, such as nano-particles, by the placental barrier and on any possible toxic effects for the unborn child. This knowledge can also be used in the future for the development of new approaches to therapy during pregnancy.

During its development, the foetus is extremely susceptible to toxic substances. Even the tiniest doses can cause serious damage. In order to protect the unborn child,one of the tasks of the placenta is to act as a barrier to “filter out” harmful substances, while at the same time providing the foetus with the nutrients it needs. In recent years, however, evidence has increasingly suggested that the placental barrier is not 100 percent effective and that nano-particles are actually able to penetrate it.

Nano-particles are being used in ever more varied areas of our lives. They are used, for example, in sun creams to protect against sunburn; they are used in condiments to stop them getting lumpy; they are used to make outdoor clothing waterproof and they are likely to be used in the future to transport medicines to their rightful destinations in the body . “At the moment, pregnant women are not being exposed to problematic amounts of nano-particles, but in the future that could well happen due to the ever increasing use of these tiny particles,” suggests Tina Buerki of the “Department of Particles-Biology Interactions.”

In order to ensure the safe development of nano-particles in the most diverse areas of application, their absorption mechanism at the placental barrier and their effect on the mother, foetus and placenta itself must be looked at more closely. It is the size, charge, chemical composition and shape of the nano-particles that could have an influence on whether they actually penetrate the placental barrier and, if so, in what way they are able to do so. At the moment, however, this research is only in its infancy. Since the function and structure of the human placenta is unique, studies undertaken on pregnant mammals are problematic and often inconclusive. Traditional models of the human placental barrier are either very time consuming to construct, or are extremely simplified.

A 3-D model of the human placental barrier

Tests of this nature are best carried out on donated placentas that become available after childbirth by Caesarean section. The organs are connected as quickly as possible to a perfusion system and this ensures the tissue is provided with nutrients and oxygen. This model is, indeed, the most accurate, i.e. the most clinically relevant. It is, however, very technically demanding and, moreover,restricted to a perfusion time window of six to eight hours. Against that, such placentas can be used to reliably test the ability of any given nano-particle to penetrate the placental barrier. The model does not, however, yield any information on the mechanism used by the particle to penetrate this complex organ.

Researchers are therefore tending to fall back on the use of simple cell cultures and other modelling systems. An individual cell, possibly taken from the epithelium and subsequently cultivated and propagated in a petri dish, is perfectly suited to a whole range of different experiments. However, researchers cannot be certain that the cells in the petri dish will ultimately behave like those in the human body. The new model that the Empa team under Tina Buerki described in the scientific journal Nanoscale at the end of last year is, by contrast, three-dimensional and consists of more than one cell type. The cells exist in a tissue-like environment analogous to the placenta and can be experimented on for a longer period of time.

Golden test candidate

In order to create the model, the research team used the “hanging drop” technology developed by Insphero AG. This technology allows models to be created without “scaffolding,” which can hinder free access of the nano-particles to the cells in the subsequent transport tests. Rather than introducing the cells in a flat petri dish, a special device, in which the cells in the hanging drops combine to form spherical micro-tissue, is used. The resulting micro-tissue mimics the human placenta much more closely than cells cultivated on a “rigid” culture dish. Experiments can be carried out much more quickly using the 3-D model than with the real placenta and, significantly, on the most widely differing types of nano-particle. In this way, those nano-particles that show potentially toxic effects or demonstrate desirable transport behaviour can be efficiently pre-selected and the results verified using a real placenta.

The model has already proved itself in a second study, which the team has just published in the scientific journal Nanomedicine. Buerki’s team has come up with an absorption mechanism for gold particles that could be used in a range of medicinal applications. The Empa team looked at gold particles of various sizes and different surface modifications. In accordance with the results of other studies, the researchers discovered that small gold particles were able to penetrate the placental barrier more easily. In addition, fewer particles passed through the barrier if they were carrying polyethylene glycol (PEG) on their surfaces. These are chain-forming molecules that almost completely envelope the particles. PEG is often used in medicine to allow particles and other small structures to travel “incognito” in the body, thus preventing them being identified and removed by the immune system. “It therefore appears possible to control the movement of nano-particles through the placenta by means of their properties,” Buerki explains.

Medicines for pregnant women that do not harm the child

Empa’s research team is keen to further develop this 3-D model in the future. The team is hoping to augment the model using a dynamic component. This would, for example, mean introducing the micro-tissue in a micro-fluid system able to simulate blood circulation in the mother and child. Another approach would be to combine the model of the placenta with other models. “With the model of a foetus, for example,” Buerki suggests. In this way, complex organ interactions could also be incorporated and it would be possible, for example, to discover whether the placenta releases foetus-damaging substances as a reaction to certain nano-particles.

“With these studies, we are hoping to lay the foundations for the safe but nevertheless effective use of nano-medicines during pregnancy,” Buerki continued. If we understand the transport mechanisms of nano-materials through the placental barrier well enough, we believe we can develop new carrier systems for therapeutic agents that can be safely given to pregnant women. This is because many women are forced to take medicines even during pregnancy patients suffering from epilepsy or diabetes, for example, or patients that have contracted life-threatening infections. Nano-carriers must be chosen which are unable to penetrate the placental barrier. It is also possible, for example, to provide such carriers with “address labels,” which ensure that the medicine shuttle is transported to the correct organ i.e. to the diseased organ and is unable to penetrate the placenta. This would allow the medicine to be released first and foremost into the mother. Consequently, the amounts absorbed by the foetus or embryoand therefore the risk to the unborn child are significantly reduced.

Explore further: New placenta model could reveal how birth defect-causing infections cross from mom to baby

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Medication for the unborn baby – Medical Xpress

‘Nanomedicine’: Potentially revolutionary class of drugs are made-in … – CTV News

It’s rare for researchers to discover a new class of drugs, but a University of Calgary microbiology professor recently did so — by accident and now hopes to revolutionize autoimmune disease treatment.

In 2004, Dr. Pere Santamaria and his research lab team at the Cumming School of Medicine conducted an experiment to image a mouse pancreas, using nanoparticles coated in pancreatic proteins.

The work didnt go as planned.

Our experiment was a complete failure, he recently told CTV Calgary. We were actually quite depressed, frustrated about the outcome of that.

But the team was surprised to discover the nanoparticles had a major effect on the mice: resetting their immune systems.

The team realized that, by using nanoparticles, they can deliver disease-specific proteins to white blood cells, which will then go on to reprogram the cells to actively suppress the disease.

Whats more, the nanoparticles stop the disease without compromising the immune system, as current treatments often do.

Santamarias team believes nanomedicine drugs can be modified to treat all kinds of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases, including Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis.

Convinced that nanomedicine has the potential to disrupt the pharmaceutical industry, Santamaria founded a company to explore the possibilities, called Parvus Therapeutics Inc.

This past spring, Novartis, one of the worlds largest pharmaceutical companies, entered into a license and collaboration agreement with Parvus to fund the process of developing nanomedicine.

Under the terms of the agreement, Parvus will receive research funding to support its clinical activities, while Novartis receives worldwide rights to use Parvus technology to develop and commercialize products for the treatment of type 1 diabetes.

Its a good partnership, Santamaria said in a University of Calgary announcement. Bringing a drug to market requires science as well as money.

Santamaria cant say how long it might be before nanomedicine can be used to create human therapies, but he says everyone involved is working aggressively to make it happen.

With a report from CTV Calgarys Kevin Fleming

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‘Nanomedicine’: Potentially revolutionary class of drugs are made-in … – CTV News

UCalgary researcher signs deal to develop nanomedicines for treatment of Type 1 diabetes – UCalgary News

When Dr. Pere Santamaria arrived in Calgary in 1992 to join the Cumming School of Medicine, he never could have imagined he would make a groundbreaking discovery that would lead to a spinoff company. When I arrived, I found out that the grant money I was expecting hadnt come through, says Santamaria, a professor in the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Infectious Diseases and member of the Snyder Institute for Chronic Diseases. So I had an empty lab with no research assistants and no salary. I had to beg my supervisor to give me $10,000 to start my research.

Despite the rocky start, Santamaria has achieved something many scientists dream of making a discovery that has practical applications for health care. Santamarias discovery revolves around the use of nanoparticles coated in proteins to treat autoimmune and inflammatory disorders.

They can be modified for different diseases, such as Type 1 diabetes, multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis without compromising the entire immune system, Santamaria explains. Instead, they basically work to reset the immune system.

Nanomedicines unique mechanism has the potential to disrupt the pharmaceutical industry entirely. Developing a new class of drugs is rare. With the assistance of Innovate Calgary, Santamaria started a company, Parvus Therapeutics Inc., to represent the technology and explore ways of bringing it to market. Announced in April 2017, Parvus entered into an exclusive deal with the Swiss pharma giant Novartis, hopefully leading to the development and commercialization of Parvuss nanomedicine to treat Type 1 diabetes.

Its a good partnership, Santamaria says. Bringing a drug to market requires science as well as money.

Supporting commercialization should be a top priority for all research, he continues. Our biggest responsibility is to the patients and making sure they have access to the medicine they need. With that in mind, Santamaria shares his insight for other researchers who may be interested in bringing their discoveries from the lab bench to the market.

If youre interested in investigating spin-out opportunities, get in touch with Innovate Calgary, which offers mentors, coaching, business skill development programs, intellectual property services and other back-office support.

Throughout the years, Santamarias work has been funded by numerous organizations, including Diabetes Canada, the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR) and the Diabetes Association, Foothills.He is a member of the Snyder Institute and associate member of the Hotchkiss Brain Institute.Santamaria named his company Parvus from the Greek word meaning small.

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UCalgary researcher signs deal to develop nanomedicines for treatment of Type 1 diabetes – UCalgary News


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