...34567...1020...


Peterson leads by example on young team – The Sheridan Press

SHERIDAN At the end of last season, all of the players for the Sheridan College mens basketball team cleaned out their lockers and moved to a new school and played for a new team, leaving Hayden Peterson as the lone returning General.

Peterson and transfer Marcus Stephens are the only players that have been through a full season of college basketball. The rest of the team is made up of freshmen.

With Peterson being one of the few college veterans, he took on a leadership role for the Generals. Peterson said he is not a vocal leader but tries to lead by example.

The team had some struggles early on. Peterson said players needed tounderstand they are no longer the main player. Every player was the guy on their team in high school but needed to figure out what role they have on their new team. Players have figured out their roles for the Generals, leading to team success.

From where we started to where we are now is a huge jump and I think a lot of people did not even think we would be where we are now, Peterson said. We have definitely improved and still have a ways to go.

Head coach Cody Ball said Peterson is a player he completely trusts to understand the game plan and know the scouting report. Peterson remembered all the different ways the Generals guarded a ball screen last season.

There are multiple ways a ball screen can be guarded, it is all dependent on the opposing team and game situation.

This trust has led to Peterson receiving the toughest defensive assignment in each game. Against Laramie County Community College, Peterson was assigned to guard Edward Oliver in the second half and not let him catch the ball. Oliver had 16 points in the first half. Peterson held Oliver to 3 points and helped change the momentum in the game, Ball said. SC went on to win 96-74.

Throughout the season, Peterson has also been tasked with guarding post players that have at least a six-inch height advantage, sometimes more. Ball said Peterson is a tough player that will not back down from anyone.

Hayden [Peterson] is the kind of kid every coach wants on his team, Ball said. He is not a problem at all off the court, he is a 4.0 student. He is a kid you can tell him guard their best player regardless of position.

Peterson said his role on the team also includes helping space the floor, going after every ball, playing hard and making shots.

Whatever it is I am down for it; I just want to win, Peterson said,

The Generals have lost their last two games and hosts Western Wyoming Community College Feb. 1. WWCC is undefeated in Region IX North play. SC lost 103-84 on the road to WWCC Jan. 11.

Peterson said the Generals played with WWCC for most of the game in Rock Springs.

The team was within four or five points until the final few minutes when fouling to close the gap allowed WWCC to pull away, Ball said.

The trip to Rock Springs is the longest road trip for the Generals in conference play. WWCC has to make the trip this time and, hopefully, the team can find a way to win the game and take down a top 10 team in the nation, he said.

The first meeting was the first game SC played without freshman guard Brett Thompson, who averaged 18 points per game in his 17 games played this season. Thompson is out for the season with an injury.

Ball said the team had a string of bad luck with Thompson being injured and players missing games because of family emergencies and suspensions. The Generals need to work on closing out games and reducing turnovers committed.

SC hosts WWCC Saturday with the womens game at 2 p.m. and the mens game at 4 p.m.

Link:

Peterson leads by example on young team - The Sheridan Press

Peterson Companies Acquires The Shops at Stonewall in Gainesville – Prince William Living

Provided by Peterson Companies

Peterson Companies has acquired The Shops at Stonewall, a 322,000 square foot Wegmans-anchored shopping center in Gainesville, for $82.6 million.

The center is currently 100% occupied. It is co-anchored by several prominent national retailers, including Bed Bath & Beyond, Ross Dress for Less, Michaels and Dicks Sporting Goods. The centers service-based tenants include Novant Health, SunTrust and Expedia CruiseShipCenters. Dining options include Moes Southwest Grill, Dunkin, Jersey Mikes and The Bone BBQ, among others.

Paul Weinschenk is President of Peterson Companies Retail Division. The acquisition of The Shops at Stonewall afforded us the opportunity to expand our footprint. We are very familiar with the market, given our twenty-plus-year history of developing retail, office and residential communities in Gainesville, he said. This high quality asset in a highly desirable Northern Virginia submarket is consistent with our investment strategy.

The 36-acre site is located on Lee Highway / U.S. Route 29 with 48,000 cars passing by daily. The property has an exceptionally strong demographic base, with average household incomes of $134,000 and a growing population.

The seller was represented by R. William Kent, Executive Vice President and Ryan Sciullo, Senior Vice President with CBREs Washington, D.C. office.

Go here to see the original:

Peterson Companies Acquires The Shops at Stonewall in Gainesville - Prince William Living

Filmmakers Discuss THE RISE OF JORDAN PETERSON On Tom Needham’s SOUNDS OF FILM – Broadway World

Canadian filmmakers, Patricia Marcoccia and Maziar Ghaderi, discuss their documentary, THE RISE OF JORDAN PETERSON, on Tom Needham's THE SOUNDS OF FILM this Thursday on WUSB. The show is also going to featuring the music of composer Thomas Newman, who is nominated for an Academy Award this year for Best Original Score.

THE RISE OF JORDAN PETERSON provides an intimate glimpse into the life and mind of Jordan Peterson, the academic and best-selling author who captured the world's attention with his criticisms of political correctness and his life-changing philosophy on discovering personal meaning.

Referred to by many as the most influential public intellectual in the western world, University of Toronto psychology professor Jordan Peterson skyrocketed to fame after he published a controversial viral video about political correctness in 2016. Within 2 years, he sold over 3 million copies of his self-help book, 12 Rules For Life, and became simultaneously branded by some as an academic rockstar selling out theatres around the world.

THE RISE OF JORDAN PETERSON intimately traces the transformative period of Peterson's life while visiting rare moments with his family, friends and foes who share their own versions of the Jordan Peterson story.

Patricia Marcoccia is a Toronto-based director, producer, editor and cinematographer nominated for best emerging filmmaker at the Golden Sheaf Awards. Maziar Ghaderi is a multimedia artist, director and producer that works with visual media and interactive technology.

In addition, THE SOUNDS OF FILM, will be featuring the film music of Thomas Newman, who is nominated for an Oscar for his score for 1917. The show will be featuring some his memorable music from movies like FINDING NEMO, SHAWSHANK REDEMPTION, WALL-E and many others.

THE SOUNDS OF FILM is the nation's longest running film and music themed radio show. For the past 30 years, the program has delivered a popular mix of interviews and music to listeners all over Long Island, parts of Connecticut and streaming live worldwide on the internet. Past people interviewed for the show include Don McLean, Nile Rodgers, Jimmy Webb, William H. Macy, Cheech & Chong, Hal Hartley, Carter Burwell, Laurie Anderson and Billy Joel.

Read the original post:

Filmmakers Discuss THE RISE OF JORDAN PETERSON On Tom Needham's SOUNDS OF FILM - Broadway World

Breaking News – All-New Series "Coyote Peterson: Brave the Wild" Premieres on Animal Planet Feb. 9 at 9PM ET/PT – The Futon Critic

ALL-NEW SERIES "COYOTE PETERSON: BRAVE THE WILD" PREMIERES ON ANIMAL PLANET FEB. 9 AT 9PM ET/PT

-Special Sneak Peek Episode to Premiere out of Puppy Bowl XIV on Sunday, Feb. 2-

Passionate about inspiring a whole new generation of animal enthusiasts, Coyote Peterson, host of the much-loved Brave Wilderness channel on YouTube (15.5MM subscribers), travels to all new destinations around the globe to share incredible animal experiences with the most fascinating, bizarre, and iconic animals on earth in his all-new Animal Planet series, COYOTE PETERSON: BRAVE THE WILD which premieres Sunday, Feb. 9 at 9 PM ET/PT. A special first-look at the series will premiere out of Puppy Bowl XIV on Sunday, Feb. 2 at 5PM ET/PT.

In COYOTE PETERSON: BRAVE THE WILD, Coyote brings the animal kingdom up close for the next wave of explorers in an entertaining way, while promoting compassion and welfare for the natural world. Together with wildlife biologist Mario Aldecoa and his crew, Coyote shares their breathtaking adventures with Animal Planet's audiences and his "Coyote Pack" across all platforms.

This season, Coyote travels to Australia's Devil Ark conservatory to reveal the history behind the critically endangered Tasmanian devil and discovers the manpower needed to conserve this species; to Brazil where Coyote encounters the Yacare Caiman, a cousin of the crocodile, and swims alongside the animal to study its perfect-predator behavior as jaguars and capybara lurk from the shoreline; and the swamplands of Texas to search for a giant alligator snapping turtle known as Raphael, among other destinations.

For more COYOTE PETERSON: BRAVE THE WILD, fans can also head to Animal Planet GO, YouTube, and Facebook to experience an all new mid-form series, Coyote Peterson: Brave The Wild Untamed, where audiences can hear from Coyote and his crew, first-hand, as they break down some of the most intense moments from season one.

Through the Brave Wilderness channel on YouTube, Coyote has hosted various adventure series including, the 2015 Emmy Award-winning "Breaking Trail", "Beyond the Tide", "On Location", "Dragon Tales" and the upcoming Universal Pictures "Jurassic World Explorers" digital franchise set to debut November 18 exclusively on YouTube. His first book, Coyote Peterson's Brave Adventures: Wild Animals in a Wild World! (Mango Media - 2017), was #1 Bookscan in Juvenile Non-fiction; and his upcoming second book, Coyote Peterson: The King of Sting! (Little, Brown Books for Young Readers), was published last year.

COYOTE PETERSON: BRAVE THE WILD is produced for Animal Planet by Wilderness Productions where Coyote Peterson and Mark Vins serve as executive producers; David Casey is showrunner and executive producer. For Animal Planet, Fay Yu is executive producer and Valerie Moss is associate producer.

About Wilderness Productions

Based out of Columbus, Ohio, Wilderness Productions was founded by show host Coyote Peterson and director Mark Vins. From adventures in the field filming with wild animals, to long hours in post-production, the duo and their fearless team of filmmakers are dedicated to making animal conservation and education entertaining for the next generation of explorers. Through the Brave Wilderness Channel, a No. 1 destination for animal enthusiasts on YouTube with 2.3 billion lifetime views, their goal is to promote a genuine compassion and welfare for the natural world through the curiosity it provokes. Follow Coyote and his crew at Brave Wilderness channel on YouTube and on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram (@CoyotePeterson).

About Animal Planet

Animal Planet, one of Discovery, Inc.'s great global brands, is dedicated to creating high quality content with global appeal delivering on its mission to keep the childhood joy and wonder of animals alive by bringing people up close in every way. Available to 360 million homes in more than 205 countries and territories, Animal Planet combines content that explores the undeniable bonds forged between animals and humans, optimized across all screens around the world. In the U.S., Animal Planet audiences can enjoy their favorite programming anytime, anywhere through the Animal Planet Go app which features live and on-demand access. For more information, please visit http://www.animalplanet.com.

About Discovery

Discovery, Inc. (Nasdaq: DISCA, DISCB, DISCK) is a global leader in real life entertainment, serving a passionate audience of superfans around the world with content that inspires, informs and entertains. Discovery delivers over 8,000 hours of original programming each year and has category leadership across deeply loved content genres around the world. Available in 220 countries and territories and in nearly 50 languages, Discovery is a platform innovator, reaching viewers on all screens, including TV Everywhere products such as the GO portfolio of apps; direct-to-consumer streaming services such as Eurosport Player and MotorTrend OnDemand; digital-first and social content from Group Nine Media; a landmark natural history and factual content partnership with the BBC; and a strategic alliance with PGA TOUR to create the international home of golf. Discovery's portfolio of premium brands includes Discovery Channel, HGTV, Food Network, TLC, Investigation Discovery, Travel Channel, MotorTrend, Animal Planet, and Science Channel, as well as OWN: Oprah Winfrey Network in the U.S., Discovery Kids in Latin America, and Eurosport, the leading provider of locally relevant, premium sports and Home of the Olympic Games across Europe. For more information, please visit https://corporate.discovery.com and follow @DiscoveryIncTV across social platforms.

Read the rest here:

Breaking News - All-New Series "Coyote Peterson: Brave the Wild" Premieres on Animal Planet Feb. 9 at 9PM ET/PT - The Futon Critic

49ers’ one-year turnaround has ties to Gophers – Minneapolis Star Tribune

The 49ers are heading to Super Bowl LIV with three former Gophers as central figures in the teams reconfigured efforts to break a string of injury-ravaged seasons in which San Francisco went 17-47 from 2015 to last season.

Plymouth native Ben Peterson, in whats believed to be a unique title and job description among NFL teams, was hired last February as head of player health and performance, overseeing athletic training, functional performance, nutrition and strength and conditioning.

Dustin Perry, who recommended Peterson to General Manager John Lynch, was promoted to head strength coach. And then Shea Thompson was hired away from the Bengals to be Perrys assistant.

All three of those guys were at the University of Minnesota in 2012-13, said Cal Dietz, head strength coach of the Gophers hockey teams. Ben was my intern while working on his PhD. Dustin and Shea were working as strength coaches for the football team. They must be doing something right out there.

Indeed.

After going 4-12 with the fourth-highest number of games lost to injury (105) a year ago, the 49ers enjoyed good health during their 8-0 start. Injuries did mount during the 5-3 finish, but things improved in time for the 49ers to wallop the Vikings and Packers with a postseason pair of 17-point shiners en route to Sundays matchup with Kansas City.

Peterson wasnt looking for an NFL job when Lynch and coach Kyle Shanahan lured him from the NHLs Philadelphia Flyers 11 months ago. But, in their opinion, he was the ideal candidate for a newly created position that would bring multiple departments together under one person.

Teams typically draw lines between departments, said Dietz, whos also an Olympics strength coach and a decorated speaker in his field. Its usually, We do this. You do that. Ben looks at all the data and makes them work together.

Peterson, a 2003 graduate of Robbinsdale Armstrong, was a 6-7, 310-pound offensive tackle for one season at Northwestern.

He was practicing one day and had just finished his block, said Petersons dad, Wayne, a pastor who 35 years ago founded St. Barnabas Lutheran Church in Plymouth. He was getting up when Noah Herron, the running back who went on to play for the Packers, caught Ben on the side of helmet with his knee.

The first concussion of Petersons career was enough to end it. But Peterson stayed on as a student assistant the next three years.

In 2009, he worked as a strength coach for the Twins Class A team in Beloit. Then he went to the University of Minnesota to get his masters degree and Ph.D. in kinesiology.

We wrote a book together, said Dietz, referring to the book Triphasic Training: A systemic approach to elite speed and explosive strength performances.

I had the concept for the book for 10-12 years, but I cant write. Bens writing skills were off the charts. When I explained my system, Ben picked it up faster than anybody. I handed him a bunch of my bar napkins and grease board photos, and he produced a book.

Peterson got a job in sales with Catapult Sports, a world leader in GPS tracking systems designed to improve athletic performance.

Bens Ph.D. dissertation was something to do with oxygen levels and hockey players, Wayne said. He knew his stuff. The Philadelphia Flyers were one of the first teams in the United States to buy from Catapult. The Flyers created a position called director of sports science and hired Ben.

Wayne laughs and mentions his daughter-in-law, the former Michelle Maunu.

The irony is Ben gets a job with an NHL club even though hes never played hockey in his life, Wayne said. And his wife was the captain of the Gophers hockey team.

It wasnt long before the 49ers became interested in the advancements in sports science in general and Peterson in particular.

Bens ability to look at data and create stuff is pretty impressive, Dietz said.

How so?

It might sound crazy, but he sees things that cant be seen, Dietz said. Its the things that dont appear in the data, the human part of this, that he can see and make better decisions on for what a player needs that particular day. It sounds a little bit mystical, but its things that others cant see.

Read this article:

49ers' one-year turnaround has ties to Gophers - Minneapolis Star Tribune

Mother and Son Alumni Share Connection as Chargers, Passion for Learning – University of New Haven News

Beth Peterson 89 MBA was a professor at the University of New Haven at the same time that her son, Chad Peterson 18, was a student, and they are now colleagues at Electric Boat.

January 31, 2020

By Renee Chmiel, Office of Marketing and Communications

When Charles "Chad Peterson 18 was pursuing his bachelors degree in mechanical engineering, he often saw a familiar face among the Universitys professors: that of his mother, Beth Peterson 89 MBA.

"Professors at the University, like my mom, deeply care about their students, Chad said. "Some of them have even become lifetime mentors.

Teaching as an adjunct professor in the Universitys physics department enabled Beth to spend time with her son while he was in school, and to get to know his professors and roommates.

"I was so proud that he chose the University of New Haven," she said. "He said it was his first choice because liked the vibe and the small class sizes. Hes carrying on the Charger tradition."

Chad collaborated with Chong Qiu, Ph.D., an assistant professor of chemistry who later became the first University of New Haven professor to be awarded a National Science Foundation Early Career Award for his groundbreaking work as part of his Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship (SURF) project.

The interactions and experiences he had during SURF and throughout his time as a Charger fueled his passion for more.

"I love helping people learn, and a big part of that comes from all the passionate teachers Ive had, Chad said.

Although mother and son no longer run into each other at the University, their paths have crossed again this time at Electric Boat, where Beth and Chad work as engineers.

Beth, who also owns a business as well as several manufacturing facilities with her husband, Charles Peterson Sr., says she felt the University prepared her and her son to excel in the field of engineering.

"While completing my MBA, I learned about many aspects of the engineering industry, she said. "I learned the importance of operations and efficiency to make companies more profitable, as well as program and project management, scheduling, and budgets. The MBA has helped me succeed throughout my career.

View original post here:

Mother and Son Alumni Share Connection as Chargers, Passion for Learning - University of New Haven News

Miles adds to KU coaching staff – News – The Ottawa Herald

Kansas head football coach Les Miles is rounding out his coaching staff for the 2020 season with two recent hirings.

Miles promoted Emmett Jones to passing game coordinator/wide receivers coach. His contract been extended through February 2022.

Jordan Peterson has been added to the staff as the safeties coach.

Miles said Jones has been an intregal part of his staff in his first year at KU.

Emmett has played a vital role in the development of our wide receivers and we look forward to their continued growth this season, Miles said. This promotion was well deserved and will be beneficial to our overall offensive scheme.

In his first season with the Jayhawks in 2019, the wide receiving unit saw significant growth under Jones, bringing in 235 receptions for 2,778 yards and 25 touchdowns. Jones influence helped the Kansas offense to its best season since 2009, averaging 377.3 yards per game.

Jones coached juniors Andrew Parchment and Stephon Robinson Jr. to breakout seasons, as the duo ranked in the top-20 in Kansas single-season receiving yards. The duos combined 1,558 receiving yards were the most since 2016, while Robinson Jr.s eight receiving touchdowns are tied for the fourth most in KU single-season history, and the most since 2009. Parchment and Robinson were also the first pair of KU wide receivers to combine for 15 touchdowns in a season since 2009.

Peterson comes to Kansas with 10 years experience and has coached in five bowl games.

He is an excellent teacher and has strong recruiting ties in Texas, an area that is vital to us, Miles said. A rising star in the coaching profession and a true family man, Jordan is a great fit for what we are looking for in our program.

Peterson served as the defensive coordinator/safeties coach at New Mexico in 2019, where he oversaw the entire defense and held all duties associated with mentoring the Lobos safeties. Peterson was hired to coach the New Mexico safeties in 2017, before being promoted to defensive coordinator and safeties coach in 2019.

In his first two seasons at New Mexico, Peterson guided the safeties unit to lead the team in tackles, with Jake Rothschiller and Stanley Barnwell Jr. recording 76 tackles in 2018.

Before his time at New Mexico, Peterson coached at Fresno State for five seasons, from 2012-16, helping the Bulldogs to three consecutive bowl games and a 2014 Mountain West Championship game appearance and a 2013 Mountain West title. He served a variety of positions with Fresno State, coaching both the secondary and outside linebackers. He also has served as recruiting coordinator and a special teams coach.

Peterson was secondary coach at Fresno State during the 2012 when Fresno State went 9-4 and was ranked second nationally in pass defense and fourth in pass efficiency defense. He also mentored safety Phillip Thomas to Mountain West Defensive Player of the Year honors in 2012.

Peterson got his start in coaching as a graduate assistant coach at Texas A&M in 2010 and 2011. That followed a four-year playing career with the Aggies, where he made 81 tackles and broke up 15 passes. He also forced two fumbles, recovered one fumble and picked off four passes. He returned one of those passes 48 yards for a touchdown against New Mexico. He was a two-time All-Big 12 Academic First Team selection, and he was a CoSIDA Academic All-Region selection in 2008.

Peterson received his bachelors degree in sport management from Texas A&M in 2009 along with his masters in education curriculum and instruction in 2010. He graduated from Lexington High School in Central Texas, where he earned first-team all-state honors as a defensive back and honorable mention honors as a quarterback his senior year. He was named Texas Prep Xtra Central Texas MVP.

Read more from the original source:

Miles adds to KU coaching staff - News - The Ottawa Herald

‘I take full responsibility’: Former Nampa teacher sentenced to 17 years in prison in lewd conduct case – KTVB.com

NAMPA, Idaho A former Nampa Spanish teacherwas sentenced Wednesday to 17 years in prison after pleading guilty in October to one count of lewd conduct with a child under 16.

Keith Odell Peterson, 71, was arrested in April on a $500,000 bond following an investigation by Nampa police. The victim in the case, who was not a student of Petersons, told officers Peterson inappropriately touched him on multiple occasions for nearly two years.

Initially, Peterson faced an additional count of sexual battery of a minor. But that charge was dismissed as part of a plea agreement, which Peterson accepted Oct. 23, according to the Idaho online courts repository. He is eligible for parole after serving seven years in prison.

The victim and his parents spoke at Wednesdays Canyon County Courthouse hearing, where they explained the abuse and its impact on their family to District Judge Christopher S. Nye.

RELATED: Former Nampa teacher arrested for lewd conduct

The victims mother said she and her husband met Peterson who often went by his middle name, Odell through their church in the 1990s and forged a decades-long friendship between their two families.

She told the court Peterson evolved into a grandfather-like figure to her teenage son when her own father passed away. Peterson took the boy to sporting events at Boise State University, movies, shopping and dinner.

Peterson also helped with homework and allowed the victim to drive his truck without a license, according to the victim. There, the 71-year-old would grope the boys genitals as he drove sometimes with other people in the car.

Grandpas dont treat anyone the way you treated our son, the victims mother said through tears. Youve put our son and family through so much hell, heartache and sadness. I trusted you. I believed you were taking care of my son.

RELATED: 'Offenders dont just groom children': Boise victims' advocate says sex offenders also target families

The victim, now 17, said Peterson started inappropriately touching him when he was 15 years old. The abuse came after years of grooming and gifts.

He said Peterson apologized at first and told the boy it wouldnt happen again, but it did on several occasions. The victim said he didnt tell anyone because he was scared and ashamed.

I kept trying to tell him No, the victim said. Eventually, I gave up on saying No and just let it continue.

The victim said he even considered taking his own life as an escape from Peterson. He felt depressed and couldnt concentrate, causing his grades to drop significantly.

It was only after his parents recommended counseling that the abuse came to light after the victims first session, launching the investigation by Nampa police.

RELATED: 11 new child porn charges added against former Idaho budget director

In a recorded phone call with officers, the victim said he was able to get Peterson to admit to inappropriately touching and stalking him.

Im a survivor of sexual abuse, the youth said. You took two years of my life. It is finally time for you to be served justice and to be held accountable for the actions that you have done to me and all of your other victims.

After the family spoke, Peterson addressed them directly and apologized for his actions. He also apologized to his wife, who sat in tears directly behind him.

Peterson said he appreciated their friendship and hoped the family could forgive him one day.

I take full responsibility for what I have done. Im the adult, Peterson said. Im deeply sorry.

RELATED: Former Eagle High coach pleads guilty to sex with student

Peterson taught Spanish in the Nampa School District several years ago, and because of his past access to children, police at the time were concerned there may be more victims, according to an Idaho Press report from May. But Petersons attorney said no additional allegations have been made against his client in nearly 30 years.

Court records state Peterson was granted withheld judgement in a 1991 case where he had inappropriate sexual contact with a different victim, whose age wasnt specified in the criminal complaint.

At the time, Peterson was sentenced to 180 days suspended jail time and two years of probation, court records state. Since he successfully completed his probation and has fully complied with all terms and provisions, the battery charge was dismissed in 1998.

More here:

'I take full responsibility': Former Nampa teacher sentenced to 17 years in prison in lewd conduct case - KTVB.com

Bail denied for man charged in connection with death of Baltimore businesswoman – WBAL TV Baltimore

VIDEO PUTS HIM AT THE SCENE OF THE CRIME. THE RELEASE OF SURVEILLANCE VIDEO AT 29-YEAR-OLD TERRANCE PETERSON TO TURN HIMSELF IN. IT IN COURT MONDAY, HIS DEFENSE ATTORNEY TOLD THE JUDGE HER CLIENT DID NOT WANT TO PARTICIPATE IN A VIDEO BAIL REVIEW. THE JUDGE STILL DECIDED TO CONDUCT THE COURT HEARING. SEVERAL TIMES PETERSON ATTEMPTED TO SPEAK AND HIS ATTORNEY WARNED AGAINST IT SAYING THAT MIGHT IMPACT HIS CASE. PETERSON DID GET TO SAY HE IS A GRADUATE OF HAGERSTOWN COMMUNITY COLLEGE. ACCORDING TO A COURT CHARGING DOCUMENT, PETERSON IS CHARGED FOR HIS INVOLVEMENT IN THE MURDER OF 36-YEAR-OLD CARMEN RODRIGUEZ. POLICE ACCUSE HIM OF ENTERIN HER STORE. KIM, GROCERY AND DELI LOCATED ON KENWOOD AVENUE IN EAST BALTIMORE DECEMBER 22. BUYING SOME ITEMS AND THEN RETURNING TO THE CAR. POLICE SAY SURVEILLANCE VIDEO CAPTURED HIS MOVEMENTS AND THOSE OF A PASSENGER WHO WAS DRESSED IN A BLACK HOODIE ENTERED THE STORE AND WENT TO THE COUNTER WITH A HAND GUN. THAT SUSPECTS HELD THE VICTIM AT GUNPOINT WHILE THE CASH REGISTER WAS BEING EMPTIED. BEFORE LEAVING THE SUSPECT FIRED ONE SHOT, STRIKING RODRIGUEZ IN THE HEAD. THE SUSPECT THEN RETUNED TO THE GAS RETURNED TO THE VEHICLE AND FLED. POLICE SAY RODRIGUEZ WAS SHOT IN FRONT OF HER CHILDREN. AMONG THE CHARGES PETERSON IS FACING FIRST DEGREE MURDER ARM -- MURDER, ARMED ROBBERY, CONSPIRACY TO COMMIT ARMED ROBBERY AND WEAPONS VIOLATIONS. HE WENT TO POLICE JANUARY 9 , AFTER INVESTIGATORS RELEASED VIDEO OF THE CRIME. HE TOLD POLICE HE WANTED TO TURN HIMSELF IN BECAUSE HE HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH IT AND WANTED TO CLEAR HIS NAME. HE ALSO SAID HE WAS ALL OVER THE VIDEO, BUT HAD NOTHING TO DO WITH NOTHING. ALSO ACCORDING TO THE CHARGING DOCUMENT, INVESTIGATORS LINKED THE CAR TO PETERSON SAYING IT WAS LOANED TO HIM BY A DEALERSHIP PRIOR TO THE MURDER. BETWEEN 2014 AND 2019 FOR ASSAULT, ARMED ROBBERY AND ROBBERY. HIS NEXT COURT APPEARANCE IS FEBRUARY 4. POLICE ARE STILL LOOKING FOR THE SECOND SUS

Bail denied for man charged in connection with death of Baltimore businesswoman

Updated: 5:44 PM EST Jan 13, 2020

Bail has been denied for the man who is implicated in the murder of an east Baltimore businesswoman.Terrance Peterson, 29, is charged in connection with the murder and robbery of Carmen Rodriguez inside her east Baltimore deli.The judge mentioned Peterson's serious past and called him a danger to the community. Peterson denied any involvement in the December murder, but police said surveillance video put him at the scene of the crime.The release of surveillance video led Peterson to turn himself in, but in court Monday, his defense attorney told the judge her client did not want to participate in a video bail review. The judge still decided to conduct the court hearing.Several times, Peterson attempted to speak, and his attorney warned against it, saying that might impact his case. Peterson did get to say he is a graduate of Hagerstown Community College.According to a court charging document, police accuse Peterson of entering Rodriguez's store, Kim Grocery and Deli located on Kenwood Avenue in east Baltimore on Dec. 22, buying some items and then returning to the car. Police said surveillance video captured his movements and those of a passenger, who was dressed in a black hoodie, entered the store and went to the counter with a handgun. According to the court document, that suspect held Rodriguez at gunpoint while the cash register was being emptied. Before leaving, the shooter fired one shot, striking Rodriguez in the head. The shooter then returned to the vehicle and fled.Police said Rodriguez was shot in front of her children. Among the charges Peterson is facing are first-degree murder, armed robbery, conspiracy to commit armed robbery and weapons violations. He went to police Thursday after investigators released video of the crime. Charging document shows Peterson told police "he wanted to turn himself in because he had nothing to do with it and wanted to clear his name." He also said, "He was all over the video, but had nothing to do with nothing."Also, according to the charging document, investigators linked the car to Peterson, saying it was loaned to him by a dealership prior to the murder. Peterson has three prior convictions from 2014 to 2019 for assault, armed robbery and robbery. Peterson's next court appearance is Feb. 4. Police are still looking for the second person of interest.

Bail has been denied for the man who is implicated in the murder of an east Baltimore businesswoman.

Terrance Peterson, 29, is charged in connection with the murder and robbery of Carmen Rodriguez inside her east Baltimore deli.

The judge mentioned Peterson's serious past and called him a danger to the community. Peterson denied any involvement in the December murder, but police said surveillance video put him at the scene of the crime.

The release of surveillance video led Peterson to turn himself in, but in court Monday, his defense attorney told the judge her client did not want to participate in a video bail review. The judge still decided to conduct the court hearing.

Several times, Peterson attempted to speak, and his attorney warned against it, saying that might impact his case. Peterson did get to say he is a graduate of Hagerstown Community College.

According to a court charging document, police accuse Peterson of entering Rodriguez's store, Kim Grocery and Deli located on Kenwood Avenue in east Baltimore on Dec. 22, buying some items and then returning to the car. Police said surveillance video captured his movements and those of a passenger, who was dressed in a black hoodie, entered the store and went to the counter with a handgun.

According to the court document, that suspect held Rodriguez at gunpoint while the cash register was being emptied. Before leaving, the shooter fired one shot, striking Rodriguez in the head. The shooter then returned to the vehicle and fled.

Police said Rodriguez was shot in front of her children.

Among the charges Peterson is facing are first-degree murder, armed robbery, conspiracy to commit armed robbery and weapons violations. He went to police Thursday after investigators released video of the crime.

Charging document shows Peterson told police "he wanted to turn himself in because he had nothing to do with it and wanted to clear his name." He also said, "He was all over the video, but had nothing to do with nothing."

Also, according to the charging document, investigators linked the car to Peterson, saying it was loaned to him by a dealership prior to the murder.

Peterson has three prior convictions from 2014 to 2019 for assault, armed robbery and robbery. Peterson's next court appearance is Feb. 4. Police are still looking for the second person of interest.

See the article here:

Bail denied for man charged in connection with death of Baltimore businesswoman - WBAL TV Baltimore

Permits for in-law flats and other ADUs are down but interest remains high – OregonLive

Whats causing the dip in permits issued for a second, smaller home sharing a city lot with an existing house?

Longtime small housing advocate Kol Peterson studied data from the City of Portland and found permits for accessory dwelling units (ADUs) decreased in 2019.

He thinks the decline was the result of a flurry of interested homeowners applying for a permit, before the rules changed in 2018, to benefit from fee-waiver incentives with no restrictions on short-term rentals.

Some of permits were used to build in 2019, creating an artificial acceleration of ADU activity resulting in a boom of ADU permits, Peterson explains on AccessoryDwellings.org, an online resource that posts case studies and updates on ADUs, which is still a rare form of housing.

Portland ADU permits issued from 1995-2020 as reported by Kol Peterson

Seven ADU permits were issued by the city in 1995 followed by small increases until 2011 when the city approved 93 permits. That number more than doubled to 206 by 2014 then quadrupled to 376 in 2015.

By 2016, there were almost six times as many permits issued 545 before the total fell to 511 in 2017 and 488 in 2018.

Last year, issued permits dropped to 315.

Permits for self-contained, smaller second homes are down but interest remains high.

So far, about 2,487 legal ADUs have been built in Portland, with another 652 under inspection.

A Portland Homeowner Report released recently by Pro.com found that 84 percent of Portland homeowners who participated in the survey believe ADUs make homes more appealing to potential buyers.

In Portland, the most popular ADUs are living spaces for elderly relatives, adult children and family friends, and as income-producing apartments to rent (36 percent each), according to the Pro.com survey.

More developers are including a flexible living space with a separate entrance a home within a home that grants privacy to a member of a multi-genational family or tenant who helps pay the mortgage.

The gen suite was first popularized by the Lennar Corp., which introduced its NextGen floor plan in 2011 after the recession and foreclosure crisis, when extended families moved back in together to save on housing costs.

The Regional Multiple Listing Service (RMLS) added a new search field that allows real estate agents, appraisers, buyers and sellers to quickly find Oregon residential properties with a second, separate dwelling.

Architects and designers are increasingly being hired to plan space- and energy-efficient guest homes and manufacturers are building prefabricated micro units to sit on foundations in backyards.

Homeowners add an apartment wing to an existing house, carve out space from underused rooms inside the residence or convert an unfinished basement or structurally sound garage into new living quarters.

Or they can erect a second story to the garage or standalone, stick-framed structure on the property.

These are not the DIY basement conversions of 20 years ago, but highly specialized projects, says Matt Williams, founder and CEO of Pro.com, which has a team of construction experts who work with architects, designers and engineers to build custom ADUs.

He says his clients are motivated to leverage their land to increase its value, use and enjoyment.

Population growth and thicker density also create a need and desire for separate living spaces and ADUs are one solution, Williams says, especially for people with a low mortgage or who like their location but need more space or want to rent out an apartment for added income.

Some owners plan to live in the small house and rent out the larger house to reduce expenses while staying in their neighborhood.

A rental dwelling allows them to fund their retirement and age in place, if the unit has been designed without steps and with universal features that aid people with limited mobility.

Williams company offers a free, detailed estimate and visualization services to let property owners see what an ADU project could look like inside and out. Clients can also order a customizable prefab structure to fit a space and Pro.com can construct it.

In Seattles Lake Washington area, Pro.com built a new, two-story ADU behind a house where there were two asphalt parking spaces. Construction costs were $140,000.

The Pro.com survey also found that 76 percent of respondents did not know Portlands laws governing ADUs.

Peterson is hoping to help. He has taught more than 2,000 people about the ADU development process in full-day workshops and has organized a half dozen Build Small, Live Large: Portlands Accessory Dwelling Unit Tours.

He says more municipalities on the West coast from Vancouver, BC, to every city in California allow homeowners to slice up urban lots to shelter family members or a caregiver, or draw in extra income.

Small, standalone new homes are expensive $210,000 on average for 800 square feet of living space, says Peterson but they can be models of efficiency with a compact footprint and high-performance insulation and heating and cooling systems.

ADUs are considered the least expensive type of housing that can be built in Portland if the land is already owned and if it qualifies for a waiver of the citys expensive system development fees, which can mount up to $22,500.

As of 2018, the waiver cannot be used by people who want to use the ADU as a short-term rental in the first 10 years.

Peterson says that an 800-square-foot second home rented longterm at $1,800 a month could bring in $21,600 a year and pay for itself in 10 years, then continue to generate income.

He encourages potential landlords to find out how their jurisdiction assesses ADUs for property tax evaluations. There will also be increases in utility costs, periodic vacancies and maintenance expenses.

Financial motivation is only part of the calculation, he says. There are also social benefits for the family.

An in-law suite could allow an aging parent to be close to family rather than spending what could be $72,000 a year for assisted living, says Peterson, who interviewed hundreds of sources for his book, Backdoor Revolution-The Definitive Guide to ADU Development.

Critics dont like ADUs added density and parking issues as well as the decrease in gardens, trees and creature habitats. Privacy can be intruded upon when single- or second-story windows look into the neighbors house or backyard.

Advocates say ADUs provide infill housing opportunities in neighborhoods with existing utilities and services like roads, sewers and schools near employment, retail centers and transit corridors.

Carlos Rafael

A detached, accessory dwelling unit (ADU) in the Foster-Powell neighborhood that Propel Studio Architecture was designed as a modern Airbnb. Carlos Rafael Carlos Rafael

To learn more, Peterson and Propel Studio Architecture are organizing a free Design Week Portland event, ADU Open Doors, from 4 p.m.-8 p.m. on April 23-24, in which owners invite people to tour their ADU (register to showcase an ADU or attend at propelstudio.com/adu-open-doors-2020).

Peterson will also be holding a full-day ADU Academy workshop on April 24 ($359 or $319 by April 24, accessorydwellings.org/academy/)

--Janet Eastman | 503-294-4072

jeastman@oregonian.com | @janeteastman

Subscribe to Oregonian/OregonLive newsletters and podcasts for the latest news and top stories

In the comprehensive book "Backdoor Revolution: The Definitive Guide to ADU Development" ($25 print, $15 digital), author Kol Peterson offers design ideas he endorses after visiting well-planned small houses, talking with people who specialize in accessory dwelling units (ADUs), and reading books and websites about small-space planning, including books by Sarah Susanka.

Second, smaller homes sharing a city lot are the only housing form typically developed by homeowners, says Peterson, who has a master's degree in environmental planning from Harvard's Graduate School of Design.

Still, he cautions against DIY design for complex, ground-up construction.

Since these second dwellings infill a residential property, their design and placement need to be customized. Peterson says hes never seen two that look alike.

Legal, comfortable second homes, however, do have some features in common. Here are Petersons insights:

Visit link:

Permits for in-law flats and other ADUs are down but interest remains high - OregonLive

Minnesota Rep. Collin Peterson: Abortion ‘didn’t used to be a partisan issue’ – City Pages

Last week, more than 200 members of Congress asked the Supreme Court of the United States to reconsider these two landmark cases in the form ofa brief organized by the anti-abortion group Americans United for Life.

This all came about ostensibly because of a restrictive 2014 Louisiana abortion law thats being held on ice until it can have its own day in court. That statute would require abortion providers to have admitting privileges at hospitals within 30 miles of where they operate. If the Supreme Court allows it to take effect, providers say it would effectively shutter all but one clinic in the state.

Pro-choice advocates see this as an undue burden on reproductive health care providers, which is exactly the kind of thing Roe and Casey were trying to prevent. The brief filed Thursday respectfully suggests that in light of the Louisiana case, the court again take up the issue of whether Roe and Casey should be reconsidered and, if appropriate, overruled.

Time took a look at the 207 names attached to the brief and reported that of the 39 senators and 168 House members who signed on, 97 percent are men. A few of those names should sound familiar to us in particular: U.S. Reps. Tom Emmer, Jim Hagedorn, Collin Peterson, and Pete Stauber.

The reps' support is no surprise if you know their backgrounds. Emmer is a former state rep and conservative talk radio host and has long been vocally against abortion rights. On his 2020 campaign website, Stauber has promised to support life from conception to natural death and always be a strong and constant voice for the right to life.

Hagedorn has bragged about co-sponsoring a number of anti-abortion bills, including the straightforward Defund Planned Parenthood Act and No Taxpayer Funding for Abortion Act. (Neither Emmer, Stauber, nor Hagedorn responded to interview requests.)

Peterson distinguishes himself as one of two Democrats to sign onto the brief. (The other is House Rep. Dan Lipinski of Illinois). It wouldnt be the first time hes bucked party lines on split issues. Most recently, he got a lot of bafflement and heat from his own party for voting against impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump.

When asked for comment, Peterson sent City Pages a very brief statement:

What people dont seem to remember is that being pro-life didnt used to be a partisan issue, he said. I signed onto this amicus brief because I am pro-life.

As Time points out, the Pew Research Center found that 61 percent of Americans (and52 percent of Minnesotans,back in 2014)believe abortion should be legal in "all/most cases." But that hasnt stopped 2019 from being a banner year for laws designed to make it harder to get them. That includes six states that attempted to outright ban abortion as early as six weeks into the pregnancy before most people know theyre pregnant.

The Louisiana case will be the first major abortion case the Supreme Court will hear since Trump nominees Neil Gorsuch and Brett Kavanaugh were confirmed.

Read more from the original source:

Minnesota Rep. Collin Peterson: Abortion 'didn't used to be a partisan issue' - City Pages

‘Ive got five, and Im going to hit:’ Man standing trial in deadly shooting in York – York Daily Record

Edwin Joey Pacheco-Ruiz planned to spend time alone with his girlfriend on May 28, 2017.

Willie "Homer" Peterson III, 29, of York.(Photo: Submitted)

He had dropped his son off in a custody exchange, and the couple decided to go out for a drink. Thats when he saw a man in the street who was flagging him down. So Pacheco-Ruiz pulled over and let him into the backseat of his SUV, a Chevrolet Equinox LT.

That was a mistake. A huge mistake, Senior Deputy Prosecutor Dave Maisch said on Monday in the York County Judicial Center. And it cost Joey his life.

The man, referring to bullets, stated, Ive got five, and Im going to hit. Pacheco-Ruiz begged the person whom he referred to as Homer not to shoot. But it was to no avail, prosecutors said.

Pacheco-Ruiz fell into his girlfriends lap. She tried to steer the SUV from the front-passenger seat but lost control of the vehicle, crashing into a home on East Princess and Lexington streets in York.

Two days later, Pacheco-Ruiz died at York Hospital. He was 29.

More than 2 1/2 years later, Willie Homer Peterson III, 29, of York, is standing trial this week in the York County Court of Common Pleas on charges of first- and third-degree murder. Hes arguing that a key witness erroneously identified him.

RELATED: Homicides in York County: Here's who was killed in 2019, and how many remain unsolved

Common Pleas Judge Maria Musti Cook is presiding over the trial, which is set to continue on Tuesday. Peterson is being held without bail in York County Prison.

READ: York County murderer must pay more than $4 million to woman's estate, federal judge rules

In his opening statement, Maisch said Pacheco-Ruizs girlfriend told law enforcement that the shooter's namewas Homer. She later picked him out of an eight-person photo lineup.

Meanwhile, Peterson went on the lam for aboutthree months.

CHECK OUT: 'This defendant will never leave prison alive:' Man sentenced to life in prisonfor deadly stabbing in York

But Tom Kelley, Petersons attorney, said in his opening statement that the case was based on an improper and suggestive identification procedure.

No forensic evidence, he said, ties his client to the crime.

Lucille Bishop, Pacheco-Ruizs girlfriend, initially told police that the gunman's name was Omar. But that morphed into Homer after she spoke to LaCresha Cole-Carter, the mother of Pacheco-Ruizs child, Kelley said.

Cole-Carter showed Bishop a Facebook photo of Peterson before she identified him in the lineup.

Kelley said Cole-Carter "absolutely abhors" his client.

You have to pay attention to every single little detail about how this thing snowballed into an avalanche that sucked that man right into this courtroom, Kelley said. They have got the wrong guy.

Contact Dylan Segelbaum at 717-771-2102.

In this file photo from May 28, 2017, Edwin "Joey" Pacheco-Ruiz's SUV is seen after it crashed into a home on East Princess and Lexington streets in York. Willie "Homer" Peterson III is standing trial this week in the York County Court of Common Pleas on charges of first- and third-degree murder in Pacheco-Ruiz's death.(Photo: Gordon Rago, York Daily Record)

Read or Share this story: https://www.ydr.com/story/news/crime/2020/01/13/willie-peterson-iii-standing-trial-first-degree-murder-york-county/4453444002/

View original post here:

'Ive got five, and Im going to hit:' Man standing trial in deadly shooting in York - York Daily Record

29-Year-Old Terrance Peterson Charged In The Fatal Shooting Of Baltimore Mother Carmen Rodriguez At Kims Deli – CBS Baltimore

BALTIMORE (WJZ) Police have charged 29-year-old Terrance Peterson in relation to the fatal shooting of Carmen Rodriguez on Dec. 22 at her Patterson Park store, Kims Deli.

Peterson turned himself in to police Thursday. Police are still looking for another suspect in the case.

Terrance Peterson

Rodriguez, a 36-year-old mother of four including a 5-month-old baby, was shot in the head and killed in front of her children.

I dont want my wife to be another number. Thats the point. Something needs to be done, her husband Derrick Galan told WJZs Paul Gessler Thursday.

READ MORE:

Police released surveillance footage Thursday of a person of interest in Rodriguezs death. Commissioner Michael Harrison said Friday releasing the video did help police one of the suspects.

Person of Interest in Carmen Rodriguezs death

She gave them the money. Why would he shoot her? Thats what I dont understand. He saw the kids, said Galan.

Carmen Rodriguez

The couple was together for nine years and have owned the store for 15 years. It was the first time they were robbed.

The ATF offered a $5,000 reward for information leading to an arrest in the case.

The store hasnt been reopened since the shooting. Instead, its turned into a memorial for Rodriguez.

Police did not say whether Peterson was the alleged shooter or alleged getaway driver.

A vigil to remember Rodriguez is scheduled to take place at 5:30 p.m. on January 22, the one-month anniversary of her death. The vigil will begin in the public square by the Enoch Pratt Free Librarys Patterson Park branch; participants are set to then walk to City Hall with candles to call for healing and justice for those affected by violence.

See the article here:

29-Year-Old Terrance Peterson Charged In The Fatal Shooting Of Baltimore Mother Carmen Rodriguez At Kims Deli - CBS Baltimore

Player of the Week: Nick Peterson – The Bridgton News

As a senior, Nick Peterson knows what it takes to besuccessful in indoor track & field. And, he is willing to share thatknowledge to help his fellow Lakers find success.

Nick met the qualifying mark in the long jump and triplejump last year so we are confident he will be a strong performer this year,Lake Region Coach Mark Snow said. More rewardingly for us has been hisleadership and help at practice. He often looks out for what is needed for asuccessful practice and is supportive of his teammates.

In recognition of his strong work ethic, determination,commitment and good sportsmanship, Nick is this weeks Boosters and HancockLumber Player of the Week. Each week, a Lake Region athlete is recognized forhis/her dedication (does more than what is asked), work ethic, coachability andacademic good standing. Recipients receive a specially-designed t-shirt,sponsored by Hancock Lumber.

Name: Nick Peterson

Year in School: Senior

Hometown: Naples

Parents: Kathie and Everett Peterson

Sports you play: Indoor track & field, baseball

School organizations: ASTRA, National Honor Society

School honors: National Honor Society

Q. Why did you choose to compete in indoor track &field? To be with friends and because I love competing.

Q. What is the most difficult part of track & field? Ifeel like the most difficult part for me is making sure not to think too much.

Q. What do you enjoy the most about the sport? I think whatdraws me to track the most is that youre competing against yourself more thananyone else. I only focus on beating my own personal records and times. Its alot of fun to just focus on improving yourself.

Q. What do you feel you need to work on and why? I need towork to continue improving every day.

Q. Why is teamwork important? Even though we competeseparately, its always important to help out your teammates whether it isholding their (starting) blocks or just giving advice.

Q. What is the biggest impact your coach(es) have had onyou? Coach Snow absolutely loves the sport and shows that by trying to watchand help out with everyones events. When I am competing in long jump, healways tries his best to watch all of my jumps and give me advice throughout.He showed me that just being there to support and have confidence in someonegoes a long way.

Q. How do you want people to view you as an athlete? I wantto be viewed as someone who always tries their best and enjoys what they do.Q. Ten years from now, when you look back onyour high school sports career, what do you think you will remember most? Iwill remember all the friendships that I formed

Read more here:

Player of the Week: Nick Peterson - The Bridgton News

Lehi and the Fragrant Highway | Dan Peterson – Patheos

Notes taken from, and/or inspired by, a reading ofGordon Darnell Newby,A History of the Jews of Arabia: From Ancient Times to Their Eclipse under Islam(Columbia, SC: University of South Carolina Press, 1988), 10-11:

The Via Odorifera (the Fragrant Highway) brought not only the Arabian aromatics; it was the conduit for trade goods from Asia and Africa. At times, as during the period of Hellenistic ascendancy, for example, these goods were borne on ships up the Red Sea, but that waterway is treacherous, as the numerous shipwrecks, both ancient and modern, will testify. The domestication of the camel (Camelus dromedarius) and the development of the North Arabian camel saddle meant that goods could be transported by ships of the desert.

The Fragrant Highway seems to be the route taken by Lehi and his party from Jerusalem through Arabia to the land of Bountiful, which was probably located in modern-day Oman. The domestication of camels in the region, incidentally, had occurred well before the time of Lehi.

The trade routes for the aromatics and eastern goods generally went around the perimeter of Arabia, skirting the empty desert areas, starting in the eastern part of the peninsula in modern Oman and proceeding along the southern edge to modern Yemen, picking up goods on the way, and then north along the western edge to end up in Syria or Egypt.

Lehis party, of course, would have gone the opposite direction, from Jerusalem (in Greater Syria) by Yemen to Oman.

The domestication of the camel also brought about a profound change in Arabian society. The camel became not only the pack animal of choice; it was also the main means of military transportation. There were few roads in the Arabian desert, and these would often become covered with sand. For the camels, this was ideal; it covered the stones that would hurt their tender feet. For wheeled vehicles, chariots and the like, it meant that the land was impassable. Camel cavalry was mobile and well adapted to the environment.

It was the difficult remoteness of Arabia that made it an excellent place of refuge and that may have encouraged Lehi to choose it. Besides, the Assyrians and Babylonians always came from the north to the west of Palestine was the sea, to its east was a forbidding desert, and their only realistic means of approaching from the south would have required them to first cross the Nafud Desert so it made sense for someone trying to get out of their way to go roughly southward.

Originally posted here:

Lehi and the Fragrant Highway | Dan Peterson - Patheos

Jordan Peterson and the Cult of Genius – The Good Men Project

Over the past year and a half, Peterson has gained notoriety through his open hostility toward trans rights and feminism as well as his characterization of universities as tools for indoctrinating students into what he terms neo-Marxism.

January 10, 2020 by Evidence Network Leave a Comment

By Jennifer Garrison

Like it or not, University of Toronto professor Jordan Peterson is a cultural sensation. Over the past year and a half, Peterson has gained notoriety through his open hostility toward trans rights and feminism as well as his characterization of universities as tools for indoctrinating students into what he terms neo-Marxism.

He has throngs of online followers. A column in the New York Times noted hes been called the most influential public intellectual in the Western world, and academics regularly write columns seeking to discredit him.

I am an academic, but this is not one of those columns. Instead, I think we need to question our incessant need to talk about Peterson in the first place. Our obsession with Peterson reveals a larger cultural problem that threatens to cripple our universities: our adoration of the individual masculine genius.

This cult of genius comes at the expense of a vibrant intellectual life and thriving democracies in North America.

Petersons success is built on the fact that he was deemed to be a part of that special and highly nebulous category of genius a term (much like expert) that is almost exclusively reserved for men. In a recent interview, Petersons former colleague explains that Peterson was hired and promoted precisely on these grounds: he sometimes appeared to be in the thrall of his ideas and would not, or could not, constrain himself and self-monitor what he was saying. That was OK. He was eccentric.

In universities, we often take eccentric along with bad behaviour as a mark of genius: we ignore complaints about intolerance or sexual harassment because geniuses are above the rules. We really like geniuses. We hire and promote them and students want to study under them.

One problem with genius is that it is something one is rather than something one does. The concept implies that academic work is not, in fact, a form of work. When we only care if a university has its fair share of geniuses, we devalue and label as more feminine other forms of academic labour from teaching to administration to less trendy research.

In fact, the majority of teaching in North American universities is now done by contract faculty (the majority of whom tend to be women): PhD-holding subject experts who are paid per-course. If they are lucky enough to be teaching a full course load every semester, they might earn around $28,000 for working in excess of 40 hours a week.

Permanent faculty, on the other hand, are often overloaded with administrative work, such as curriculum planning and advising students. A recent study has shown that this work, too, falls largely to female faculty members keeping them from engaging in innovative teaching and ground-breaking research.

This emphasis on genius also threatens to destroy entire fields of study, particularly the softer disciplines in the Humanities (e.g., Art, English, History, etc.) since genius is typically reserved primarily for the more male-dominated STEM fields. Politicians, administrators, many members of the public, and Jordan Peterson himself regularly deride the Humanities as frivolous. (Ever heard a joke about an English major being a barista-in-training?)

On the contrary, the Humanities are vitally important in an increasingly polarized society because they help us to understand, analyze, and critique differences in human communication and culture. And (for the practical-minded) Humanities majors do get satisfying jobs. Their skills are in demand in the corporate world and they may actually have more career success than Business majors.

We need to reject this cult of the masculine genius. If we want a thriving intellectual culture, we need to start valuing all academic labor and forms of inquiry. Its not just better for universities themselves; its better for building a more tolerant and democratic society.

In order to shift this culture, we need to demand that politicians and administrators value and economically support a diversity of voices inside universities.

If we want a strong democracy and intellectual culture, lets forget genius. Instead, lets build stronger universities.

This post was previously published on Evidencenetwork.ca and is republished here under a Creative Commons license CC BY-ND 4.0.

Have you read the original anthology that was the catalyst for The Good Men Project? Buy here: The Good Men Project: Real Stories from the Front Lines of Modern Manhood

All Premium Members get to view The Good Men Project with NO ADS.

Need more info? A complete list of benefits is here.

Photo credit: Istockphoto.com

Go here to read the rest:

Jordan Peterson and the Cult of Genius - The Good Men Project

Death and Transfiguration | Dan Peterson – Patheos

We were out to dinner with friends again last night, (at their request) at the La Jolla Groves. Excellent food, once again.

Tonight, we went out for a quick bite with another couple of friends. (Hey! How am I supposed to maintain my slim, youthful physique while eating out so often?) She is a very serious violinist (masters degree level) and so, after dinner, we attended a performance at BYU by the BYU Philharmonic Orchestra.

Under the baton of Kory Katseanes, who was my assistant zone leader while I was serving as a missionary in Interlaken, Switzerland, they played the Carnival Overture (Op. 92), byAntonn Dvok, andTill Eulenspiegels Merry Pranks(Op. 28,Till Eulenspiegels lustige Streiche), by Richard Strauss.

Introducing the second work, Kory spoke briefly of Strausss great tone poemTod und Verklrung (Death and Transfiguration). He mentioned an apparently commonly told story that I had never heard, according to which, when Richard Strauss lay dying in 1949 (exactly 60 years after writing Tod und Verklrung), he said to his daughter-in-law: Funny thing, Alice, dying is just the way I composed it inDeath and Transfiguration. Some say that he actually set to music the white light commonly mentioned in near-death experiences.

Strauss explained the underlying idea of Tod und Verklrung in an 1894 letter:

It was six years ago that it occurred to me to present in the form of a tone poem the dying hours of a man who had striven towards the highest idealistic aims, maybe indeed those of an artist. The sick man lies in bed, asleep, with heavy irregular breathing; friendly dreams conjure a smile on the features of the deeply suffering man; he wakes up; he is once more racked with horrible agonies; his limbs shake with fever as the attack passes and the pains leave off, his thoughts wander through his past life; his childhood passes before him, the time of his youth with its strivings and passions and then, as the pains already begin to return, there appears to him the fruit of his lifes path, the conception, the ideal which he has sought to realize, to present artistically, but which he has not been able to complete, since it is not for man to be able to accomplish such things. The hour of death approaches, the soul leaves the body in order to find gloriously achieved in everlasting space those things which could not be fulfilled here below.

In a note written to accompany a performance of Tod und Verklrung at the Kennedy Center in Washington DC, musicologist Peter Laki comments on the piece and on the 1894 letter as follows:

The stages of the heros last hours, as Strauss described them in his letter, are somewhat analogous to the phases of anger, denial, and acceptance found in Elisabeth Kbler-Rosss famous (and, of course, much later) book on dying.

Following the intermission, the BYU Philharmonic Orchestra came out again. This time, they performed Ludwig van Beethovens Violin Concerto in D Major for Violin and Orchestra (Op. 61), accompanyingan apparently well-known fiddler hes appeared several times on Sesame Street by the name ofItzhak Perlman. Mr. Perlman was, I have to say in all fairness, pretty good. Seeing how easily he played the Beethoven piece, though, Ive concluded that fiddling cant really be all that hard. I would be able to master it in a week or two, Im sure. If I cared to try.

More:

Death and Transfiguration | Dan Peterson - Patheos

NFL rumors: Why Eric Bieniemy might be the ideal coach for Giants mentality, according to Adrian Peterson – NJ.com

Giants general manager Dave Gettleman has a painfully simple philosophy when it comes to how Super Bowls are won.

I really believe that as much as the style of play evolves, there are basic truths, Gettleman said Tuesday. You have to run the ball, you have to stop the run, you have to rush the passer. If you are seriously deficient in any one of those three areas, it makes it tough.

Introducing Giants Extra: Sign up for a free trial now. Get exclusive news, behind-the-scenes observations and the ability to text directly with reporters

While the Giants offensive line remains a work in progress, building an offense around running back Saquon Barkley -- fresh off his second consecutive 1,000-yard rushing season to open his career -- seems to be Gettlemans vision for what the teams next head coach will install.

If that is the case, if running the football is paramount, Kansas City Chiefs offensive coordinator Eric Bieniemy -- who will interview for the Giants coaching job Saturday -- might be the ideal man for the job, according to Washington running back Adrian Peterson.

He had everything we need for that week written on the whiteboard, Peterson said, via The Athletic. "On both sides, and we used to go over it, and you were able to see it in intensive detail. Its like, man; he is really like making sure that we are dialed in, and we know exactly whats going on. So the running back group, and the fullback group we are in sync. We have no excuse to eff up.

Peterson rushed for 1,000 yards in each of his four seasons under Bieniemys tutelage from 2007-'10 and became one of the NFLs most prolific backs. Might Barkley similarly benefit from working with Bieniemy, a standout running back at the University of Colorado and nine-year pro?

Even though he rushed for 1,589 yards and 11 touchdowns in his career, Bieniemy understands the need for balance in a successful offense, as evident in the playbook hes had input in under Andy Reid built around quarterback Patrick Mahomes generational skillset.

People look at me sideways because Im a running back, and they think I always want to run the ball," Bieniemy told Yahoo! Sports. "No. I understand the importance of the passing game and I understand the importance of making sure were pushing the ball down the field.

The Chiefs only rushed for 98 rushing yards per game, but finished sixth in total offense and fifth in scoring offense en route to a 12-4 finish.

Widely viewed as one of the NFLs brightest offensive minds, a strong leader and a rising head coaching candidate, Bienemy could be the latest branch of Reids coaching tree to see success as a head coach.

John Harbaugh won a Super Bowl with the Baltimore Ravens and has a team capable of making it to Miami next month. Matt Nagy led the Chicago Bears to an NFC North championship last season. Ron Rivera guided the Carolina Panthers to a Super Bowl and multiple NFC Championship Games. Brad Childress took the Vikings to the championship round, as well.

Earlier this week, Reid offered Bieniemy a ringing endorsement as he embarked on the interview circuit.

I think he would be tremendous," Reid told reporters this week in Kansas City. "I dont know the team, but there is a team out there that could really use him. Being the leader of men that he is, youre not going to find people better than that in that category. Hes a sharp offensive mind on top of that.

Get Giants text messages from reporters: Cut through the clutter of social media and text directly with the Giants beat writers. Plus, exclusive news and analysis every day. Sign up now for a free trial.

Matt Lombardo may be reached at MLombardo@njadvancemedia.com. Follow him on Twitter @MattLombardoNFL

Read more from the original source:

NFL rumors: Why Eric Bieniemy might be the ideal coach for Giants mentality, according to Adrian Peterson - NJ.com

Peterson: Change on the way | News, Sports, Jobs – Daily Mining Gazette

Ive never claimed to a be a seer of the future. Or even a modern day Nostradamus.

But I do believe that there are changes coming on the sports scene in 2020.

High school football figures to be the most obvious area for changes.

Shrinking enrollment at many Michigan schools has led to the increasing number of programs adopting 8-man football.

Munising, for one, has already opted to go that route this coming season.

And it seems almost certain that Lake Linden-Hubbell will have to take a very close look at doing the same. The Lakes were the smallest school in the state to sponsor 11-man football last season.

Both schools in question have proud traditions on the gridiron. The Lakes, in particular, traditionally operated a competitive program without a great number of players.

Former coach Ron Warner molded a Hall of Fame career with usually under 20 players on his roster.

Current LLHS skipper Andy Crouch has had to get by with even fewer numbers in keeping the program in the upper echelon of small schools.

This past season saw the Lakes reach the second round of the playoffs with a senior-dominated squad. I cant see a freshmen-sophomore team and I could be wrong be able to play varsity ball.

A lack of opponents is an obvious problem, for one.

The rest of our local schools with 11-man football appear to be healthy, although Houghton is going to need stability in the coaching ranks.

I believe Finlandia University also faces decisions in keeping its 16-sport program alive and kicking

With an enrollment of barely 700 students, the Lions are facing teams in every sport with enrollment numbers five or six times larger.

Thats especially true in football, where the numbers are overwhelmingly in favor of the opponents.

Becoming affiliated with the MIAA two years ago will likely help in the near future. But FU is facing league teams with traditions going back at least 70 or 80 years. Thats a large factor to overcome.

The basketball situation at Michigan Tech could also change, but in a positive way.

Its possible that former Tech player Jake Witt may return to school in the near future.

MTU fans can envision a scenario with Witt joining Houghton High star Brad Simonsen in the lineup. Simonsen, who has already committed to Tech, is a top shelf talent.

Personally, I can see a lineup with those two joining Dawson Bilski, the sharp-shooting guard from North Central Highs great program.

But as I said, predicting the future has never been my forte.

Continued here:

Peterson: Change on the way | News, Sports, Jobs - Daily Mining Gazette

"He’s A Heck Of A Coach": Players Give Their Thoughts On Redskins Head Coach Ron Rivera – Redskins.com

Head coach Ron Rivera stood in front of a packed conference room with everyones attention focused solely on him.

Rivera spoke for about 25 minutes, and much of what he said was directed at the Redskins organization as a whole. He talked about creating a player-centered culture based on discipline and using a collaborative effort to move toward what is best for the Redskins future. He made it clear that no one will work for the organization if they dont have the discipline to give everything they have.

But the majority of his opening statement was not directed at the Washington media, the staff or even the executives in attendance. He looked directly at the three players sitting in the front row -- Adrian Peterson, Derrius Guice and Jonathan Allen -- and said, Do it the way we teach you, do it the way we ask. You do it that way, the success will be yours.

Judging by what the players have said about their new head coach, theyre ready to follow Rivera's lead.

It felt good. That what you want from a head coach, expressing that its on the players, Peterson said after Riveras press conference. Coaches put you in the right situation, but at the end of the day, players have to execute and have the mindset.

Here is the original post:

"He's A Heck Of A Coach": Players Give Their Thoughts On Redskins Head Coach Ron Rivera - Redskins.com


...34567...1020...