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NeoPhotonics and Inphi Complete the First Successful Interoperability Demonstration of 400ZR Over 120km – Business Wire

SAN JOSE, Calif.--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Inphi Corporation (NYSE: IPHI), a leader in high-speed data movement interconnects, and NeoPhotonics Corporation (NYSE: NPTN), a leading developer of silicon photonics and advanced hybrid photonic integrated circuit-based lasers, modules and subsystems for bandwidth-intensive, high speed communications networks, today announced that the companies completed the industrys first interoperability demonstration of OIF 400ZR Implementation Agreement compliant coherent transceivers, operating successfully across the C-Band over 120km of optical fiber. Transceiver pairs consisting of Inphis COLORZ II QSFP-DD with its Canopus 7nm Coherent DSP and NeoPhotonics 400ZR ClearLightTM OSFP were successfully linked. Both 400ZR coherent optics transceivers carried error-free traffic over a typical data center interconnect (DCI) link configuration (amplified over 120km of fiber) at several wavelengths across the C-Band using Arista 7060 data center switches.

The successful interoperation of NeoPhotonics and Inphi 400ZR transceivers demonstrates the availability of interoperable coherent transceivers for the 400ZR ecosystem, a key step in enabling the next generation of DCI links. 400ZR pluggable transceiver modules significantly reduce the cost and power consumption of DCIs by eliminating the transport network equipment layer.

We are very excited about the successful interoperable demonstration with NeoPhotonics to bring pluggable 400G coherent optics into the data center, said Josef Berger, AVP of Marketing, Optical Interconnect at Inphi. This demonstration proves the readiness to deliver the flexibility of high bandwidth DWDM connectivity between data centers with the ability to rapidly scale capacity and meet our customers demands for standards-based pluggable coherent solutions.

NeoPhotonics has worked closely with Inphi to combine their Canopus DSP with our high-performance laser and coherent optics into a standards-based ClearLight OSFP and QSFP-DD transceiver modules that can meet the needs of our hyper-scale customers, said Marc Stiller, Vice President of Coherent Modules for NeoPhotonics. Supporting the interoperable CFEC standard, as defined by OIF, has been a critical part of our design effort, and were very pleased to announce this milestone as we continue to work with customers to implement this game-changing technology.

Inphis COLORZ II is the industry first 400ZR QSFP-DD pluggable coherent transceiver that enables large cloud operators to connect metro data centers at a fraction of the cost of traditional coherent transport systems as well as enable switch and router companies to offer the same density for both coherent DWDM and client optics in the same chassis. For end users looking for performance beyond 400ZR, Inphis Canopus 7nm coherent DSP is an industry first, offering a multitude of reach and data rate options for metro and long haul performance.

NeoPhotonics ClearLight 400ZR transceiver family, including QSFP-DD and OSFP for Cloud and Ethernet applications and the CFP2 form factor for telecom networks, offers industry leading coherent optical transmission performance in low power, pluggable form factors compatible with switch and router platforms. These modules utilize NeoPhotonics industry leading coherent optical components including its Silicon Photonics Coherent Optical Subassembly (COSA) and low power consumption, ultra-narrow linewidth Nano-ITLA tunable laser. These components further enable operation over the full 6THz Super-C transmission window.

About Inphi

Inphi Corporation is a leader in high-speed data movement. We move big data -- fast, throughout the globe, between data centers, and inside data centers. Inphi's expertise in signal integrity results in reliable data delivery, at high speeds, over a variety of distances. As data volumes ramp exponentially due to video streaming, social media, cloud-based services, and wireless infrastructure, the need for speed has never been greater. That's where we come in. Customers rely on Inphi's solutions to develop and build out the Service Provider and Cloud infrastructures, and data centers of tomorrow. To learn more about Inphi, visit http://www.inphi.com or connect with Inphi on Twitter or Linkedin.

About NeoPhotonics

NeoPhotonics is a leading developer and manufacturer of lasers and optoelectronic solutions that transmit, receive and switch high-speed digital optical signals for Cloud and hyper-scale data center internet content provider and telecom networks. The Companys products enable cost-effective, high-speed over distance data transmission and efficient allocation of bandwidth in optical networks. NeoPhotonics maintains headquarters in San Jose, California and ISO 9001:2015 certified engineering and manufacturing facilities in Silicon Valley (USA), Japan and China. For additional information visit http://www.neophotonics.com.

Legal Notice Regarding Forward-Looking Statements

This press release includes statements that qualify as forward-looking statements under the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995, including anticipated performance of NeoPhotonics products. Readers are cautioned that these forward-looking statements involve risks and uncertainties and are only predictions based on the companys current expectations, estimates and projections. The actual company results and the timing of events could differ materially from those anticipated in such forward-looking statements as a result of these risks, uncertainties and assumptions. Certain risks and uncertainties that could cause the companys results to differ materially from those expressed or implied by such forward-looking statements as well as other risks and uncertainties relating to the companys business, are described more fully in the Companys Annual Report on Form 10-K for the year ended December 31, 2019 and its Quarterly Report on Form 10-Q for the quarter ended March 31, 2020, filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

2020 NeoPhotonics Corporation. All rights reserved. NeoPhotonics and the red dot logo are trademarks of NeoPhotonics Corporation. All other marks are the property of their respective owners.

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NeoPhotonics and Inphi Complete the First Successful Interoperability Demonstration of 400ZR Over 120km - Business Wire

The Tech Analyst Who Screamed Buy TSM at $50! – Yahoo Finance

I just recorded the video segment of the Top Stock Picks of the Week and my investment idea was Micron (MU), the megalodon of memory.

In the video, I shared some of my Friday note to Zacks Ultimate members where I described the tectonic shift that just happened in the semiconductor industry, causing earthquakes and tsunamis in the geology of three stocks: Intel (INTC), Advanced Micro Devices (AMD), and Taiwan Semiconductor (TSM).

The bulk of that report follows below -- where I explain the seismic shift and why INTC was down 16% Friday while AMD was up an equal amount -- but what I forgot I wanted to do in today's video was give a big shout to my colleague Dan Laboe.

Dan has been extremely bullish on Taiwan Semi (aka TSMC) all year and produced several pieces of content on the company throughout the Coronavirus Crash and subsequent rally in the March through May period -- when shares were still trading near $50.

He saw their go-to foundry business as a cash machine, where unique chip designers like NVIDIA (NVDA), AMD and Apple would simply contract TSM's advanced semi fab facilities to build their hardware with state-of-the-art 7-nanometer transistor technology.

In May, here were several of his reports and insights in articles and in his excellent video blog, The 4th Revolution...

So if you were really listening to Dan in May, you would have been buying TSM shares near $50.

I was listening, but not really, seeing TSM's $270 billion market cap as a headwind since it traded at over 6 times forward sales estimates -- vs Intel's $250 billion trading near 3X sales.

And most Wall Street analysts weren't that bullish either, probably for the same valuation concerns that ignored the shifts that were actually occurring in major semiconductor industry trends.

As recently as July 10, Susquehanna reiterated their "Sell" rating and $40 price target on TSM shares.

How wrong we were to miss the gold mine unfolding for TSM -- that only a few analysts saw, like Matt Bryson at Wedbush (more on his April initiation coming up), and Dan.

And last Thursday's Intel quarterly report delivered the proof (as you'll see in my story below) when CEO Bob Swan had to admit they were as much as one year behind on their internal roadmap for developing their own 7nm technology in-house.

But even before the shocking 10% rally in TSM on Friday -- and another 10% rally today -- Dan was out early last week reiterating his bullish views on TSM with these reports...

When a tech stock gumshoe like Dan has this much conviction on an investment idea, it pays to find out why.

So stick with Dan and give him a thumbs up on his Fourth Revolution videos! (link to Zacks YouTube archives)

In addition to Dan's excellent research, here was an investment bank view where the analyst employs a detailed revenue and earnings model...

Wedbush analyst Matt Bryson initiated coverage of Taiwan Semiconductor (TSM) with an Outperform rating. In his April 27 research report, the analyst cited numerous secular drivers that should result in more demand for semiconductor capacity, including growth in AI related applications.

Bryson also sees both China's desire for semiconductor independence and Intel's recent struggles to advance its manufacturing as trends that should push relatively faster growth for foundries and particularly advanced process node capacity, including 7nm and 5nm.

He believes TSMC's market share and technological leadership in the foundry space position it to be the primary beneficiary of these trends. While acknowledging that U.S. trade and technology IP policy decisions with regards to Huawei could cloud this year's visibility, the analyst expects both factors will have modest impact on TSMC's longer term prospects as it adapts to a diverse and growing global customer base including NVIDIA, Apple, and AMD.

Now here was part of my commentary to my TAZR Trader group on Friday to explain the semi seismic shift...

INTC Drops a 10NM Bomb!

Tonight, I want to focus on exactly what the heck happened with Intel that dropped its shares 16% -- and ignited an equal sized rally in AMD!

Here's what I began to write you this morning as I almost sent a Buy Alert for more Micron (MU) under $50...

The amazing storm in Semis today -- with INTC -16% and AMD +16% -- revolves around Intel's mea culpa that they are as much as one year behind on their internal roadmap to roll out significant 7nm (nanometer) technology.

This means that the leading semiconductor innovator who makes almost everything in-house will probably have to outsource to Taiwan Semi and others to meet demand next year.

In any case, it's great for NVDA as well as AMD.

And even though MU has bigger hurdles with DRAM and NAND dropping down from 10nm to 7nm, they will probably get there before Intel.

(end of my draft Buy Alert for MU)

The reason I didn't pull the trigger on more MU under $50 is because I wanted to do more homework on just when they will have more visibility on sub-10nm capability. I found some things out as they partner with a little private "chipper" named Achronix. More details to follow there.

This was very good to learn so that we know that the Taiwan Semi fab can't own everyone in the space. (TSM shares were up 10% today on this INTC semi-debacle-rotation).

So let's look at what Intel promised and how they failed to deliver, causing a rush to the competion.

You may recall in our numerous discussions of NVIDIA technology -- and most recently after their May GTC gig -- that they were pushing the envelope of nanoscale architecture in semiconductor engineering.

The essence of Moore's Law and how NVDA reinvents it is the ability to dive deeper into the nano-sphere and leverage speed with massively parallel architectures.

And the engineering teams at NVIDIA, led by visionary CEO Jensen Huang, are conducting deep R&D in their GPU chips to leverage not just video game advances, but also the bleeding edges of AI.

We know that NVIDIA has already contracted Taiwan Semi for various 7nm applications, like their new Ampere A100 GPU board for data centers with an amazing 54 billion transistors. This is the next-gen power level for exascale supercomputers and AI research.

According to the gang at TomsHardware.com in a May 14 article, "Nvidia basically couldn't make a larger GPU, as the maximum reticle size for current lithography is around 850mm square. The increase in transistor count comes courtesy of TSMC's 7nm FinFET (fin field-effect transistor) process, which AMD, Apple, and others have been using for a while now. It's a welcome and necessary upgrade to the aging 12nm process behind Volta."

And here were whispers in April that NVIDIA might be going deeper yet, courtesy of TechRadar and DigiTimes...

Nvidias reportedly ordering 5nm chips for a mystery product

By Darren Allan April 24, 2020

As it ups orders on 7nm, hopefully indicating RTX 3000 GPUs are still on track

Nvidia is making something using a 5nm process, according to the rumor mill, although its anyones guess what that hardware could be.

This comes from a DigiTimes report about how chipmaker TSMC is benefiting from a ramp-up in orders from Nvidia and AMD, and apparently part of Nvidias demands pertain to a 5nm chip.

A quick review of "nanoscale" terminology in the microscopic universe of integrated circuitry may be in order...

A micrometer, or micron, is equal to one millionth of a meter.

A nanometer is equal to one billionth of a meter.

For a vital visual reference when we're talking about the nanoscale world, here's a good graphic from Wikimedia Commons to illustrate just how small semiconductor engineering has been able to shrink itself to where transistors are 10nm (nanometers) or less, and smaller than the coronavirus...

I mentioned Thursday night that we should be buyers of AMD under $60 and we never got the chance today as it soared to nearly $70 because since it already uses TSM for 7nm fab it can fill the gaps in pc, laptop, and gaming hardware while Intel can't.

At least NVDA held it's own as the predominant data center geek with 7nm capability.

And here was the biting analysis from the chip guys at Raymond James last week after the Intel bomb...

Moore's Law Doesn't Wait for Intel

INTC noted it is developing contingency plans to begin outsourcing given the internal roadmap slip -- and our view is that outsourcing has now become inevitable. By outsourcing leading edge technology, presumably to TSMC, INTC would give up what has been its main source of competitive advantage for 50 years and compete only on architecture, which we dont think is enough to maintain the dominant market share and premium margins that are now expected.

In addition, the push out of 7nm (and the associated performance improvement) will provide further incentive for cloud customers to move to custom solutions and accelerated compute platforms from vendors such as NVDA, rather than to use products based on INTCs inferior transistors. Nonetheless, we view the roadmap missteps to be stunning failure for a company once known for flawless execution, and could well represent the end of INTCs computing dominance.

(end of RJ notes)

So where is MU in all of this? (and note that the stock symbol for Micron is similar to the international measure for a micrometer)

Well, it's complicated. This article will help explain the challenges for DRAM and NAND suppliers to go sub-10nm...

Why DRAM is stuck in a 10nm trap

By Chris Mellor -April 13, 2020

Why is DRAM confined in a 10nm semiconductor process prison when microprocessors and the like are being built using 7nm processes, with 5nm on the horizon? If DRAM could be fabricated with a 7nm process, costs per GB would go down.

However, for the next few years 7nm DRAM is fantasy, due to capacitor and other electrical limitations at the sub-10nm level.

DRAM is more expensive and more tricky to manufacture than processor silicon, due to its critical nature. It has to hold data over many logic clock cycles. So it will lag in fabrication processes.

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The Tech Analyst Who Screamed Buy TSM at $50! - Yahoo Finance

Brand Datsun and the road ahead in India – BusinessLine

As Nissan gets set to launch its compact SUV Magnite in India early next year, the interesting twist to the script is the fate of brand Datsun.

It is now well known that the Magnite was intended originally as a Datsun-branded SUV but will now sport the Nissan badge. Perhaps this could also imply the end of the road for the Datsun brand in India which was touted with much fanfare at the time of its Delhi unveiling in 2013.

Clearly, a lot of water has flowed under the bridge over the last couple of years starting with the shock arrest of Carlos Ghosn, former Chairman of Renault-Nissan, in late-2018. A series of dramatic events followed where some big names exited both companies even as relations between the partners worsened by the day.

Neither was in good shape financially either and even while speculation was rife that a divorce was inevitable (never mind that it would have been a long, tedious and expensive affair), Renault and Nissan resolved to bury the hatchet. It was not going to be easy but there was really no alternative especially when it was crystal clear that they could not afford to stay solo at a time when everyone was seeking partnerships.

It is here that the relevance of Datsun in the new global roadmap for Nissan merits deeper analysis. It was Ghosn who had resurrected the brand in an endeavour to position it as an entry-level offering in countries like India, Indonesia, Russia and South Africa.

It was difficult to question his logic considering that almost all of these markets have cost-conscious customers who Ghosn naturally presumed would be delighted to access an affordable car brand. Remember, it was the former Chairman of Renault-Nissan who was the first to salute the Tata Nanos astonishing price tag and reiterated that it was this level of frugal engineering which would help automakers in emerging markets.

Today, we begin a new chapter in the Datsun story, proclaimed Ghosn when he unveiled the Datsun GO at a glittering unveiling ceremony in Delhi seven years ago. We will offer a modern take on Datsuns core values in India and pay tribute to the brands heritage. The power of local engineering and manufacturing has been used to make this a reality, he added.

According to Ghosn, India was expected to see four million car sales by 2015 by which time Nissans contribution would be 10 new models including the Datsun line-up. We are expanding operations in India and, going forward, will use local talent to enhance our operations locally and globally, he said.

Nissan, he added, had high expectations from India and hoped to have a market share of 10 per cent, up from the present 1.2 per cent, in the mid-term. Clearly, the Datsun brand was expected to play a big role in this growth and could contribute to over 60 per cent of sales given the competitive price band it would operate in.

Ghosns leadership team that piloted the Datsun in India were equally optimistic while reiterating that the country would be the pivot of the Datsuns global drive. They touted India as fundamentally the winner of tomorrow because the mindset of its people was seen as a combination of development and respect for limited resources. Terming this a fantastic tool, this put in context why Datsun was developed in Chennai and not Japan.

Fast forward to the present and it seems almost tragic that none of these plans has worked. On the contrary, Nissans market share has been in free fall and is really nothing to write home about. The Datsun journey is a clearly forgettable saga even though its intent could never be faulted. As in the case of the Nano, the cheap car association was perhaps its biggest chink in the armour along with other issues that deterred the buyer.

For now, a lot will depend on the success of the Magnite gong forward. If the script goes according to plan and sales soar, it will be the best piece of news for Nissan as a brand at a time when it is really down though not entirely out. One more setback in India is something that the Japanese automaker just cannot afford at this point in time.

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Brand Datsun and the road ahead in India - BusinessLine

This is the Tata Aria, a Two-Door Convertible Concept from 2000 – Car Blog India

Tata Motors have become one of the most dominant and popular automakers in the Indian market today and they are also credited for making the safest cars in India. Tata Motors however, as a homegrown manufacturer, have been very experimentative with their products over the years. The Nano is a great example in this case. Or even the Sierra with which Tata made its debut all the way back in 1991. Tata has been even more experimentative with their concepts at motor shows but we bet most you havent heard or seen this amazing little concept from Tata from the year 2000.

This what you see above is the Tata Aria. Although the name came to be used in 2010 on a completely different car, the Tata Aria was a two-door, two-seater convertible concept that was showcased at the 5th Auto Expo in 2000. The car was unveiled by Ratan Tata and Bollywood actor Akshay Khanna at the Auto Expo.It really caught a lot o attention at the Expo and why wouldnt it? Just look at it. Who would have though that an Indian manufacturer like Tata could come up with such a cool looking car.

The Tata Aria convertible concept was based on the Tata Indica platform which was Indias first indigenously developed car. Ratan Tata did not reveal much about the car at the Auto Expo but he shared his vision about designing, engineering and manufacturing a car in India for the Indian market back then. We really have to admit that for a car designed in 2000, it is a really good looking car one that certainly does not look like it came out of India. The proportions on this car are perfect, the headlamps are futuristic and it even had the Tata smiley grille back then.

Also Read : Heres How Indian Cars Become Safer Over The Last 5 Years Video

Later that year, Tata Motors even revealed a coupe version of the Aria at the Geneva Motor Show and they did an equally good job with that as well. Even at the Geneva Motor Show, Tata still did not reveal much technical details about the car but only said that it will be powered by a 140PS engine if it ever made it into production, not even revealing the engine details. Imagine what a 140PS two-door Tata convertible must have been to drive like back in the day. Sadly, it never made it to production and away from the public light, it was soon forgotten too.

Also Read : Have Touchscreens and Connected Car Tech Become an Overkill in Cars?

Tata Motors is often considered to me much ahead of their time and we have other examples to prove this as well. Take the Tata Sierra, the Estate or even the Safari, all great vehicles and like nothing at the time they hailed from. In more recent years, Tata has shown a few more such crazy concepts at Auto Expos including the Tata TaMo Sportscar from 2018 and of course, the Tata Sierra EV concept from 2020. We hope to see such more great concepts from Tata Motors and we hope more of them make it to production in the future.

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This is the Tata Aria, a Two-Door Convertible Concept from 2000 - Car Blog India

New Nano Drug Candidate Kills Aggressive Breast Cancer Cells – University of Arkansas Newswire

Whit Pruitt, University Relations

Hassan Beyzavi

FAYETTEVILLE, Ark. Researchers at the University of Arkansas have developed a new nano drug candidate that kills triple negative breast cancer cells.

Triple negative breast cancer is one of the most aggressive and fatal types of breast cancer. The research will help clinicians target breast cancer cells directly, while avoiding the adverse, toxic side effects of chemotherapy.

Their study was published in June issue of Advanced Therapeutics.

Researchers led by Hassan Beyzavi, assistant professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, linked a new class of nanomaterials, called metal-organic frameworks, with the ligands of an already-developed photodynamic therapy drug to create a nano-porous material that targets and kills tumor cells without creating toxicity for normal cells.

Metal-organic frameworks are an emerging class of nanomaterials designed for targeted drug delivery. Ligands are molecules that bind to other molecules.

With the exception of skin cancers, breast cancer is the most common form of cancer in American women, said Beyzavi. As we know, thousands of women die from breast cancer each year. Patients with triple negative cells are especially vulnerable, because of the toxic side effects of the only approved treatment for this type of cancer. Weve addressed this problem by developing a co-formulation that targets cancer cells and has no effect on healthy cells.

Researchers in Beyzavis laboratory focus on developing new, targeted photodynamic therapy drugs. As an alternative to chemotherapy and with significantly fewer side effects targeted photodynamic therapy, or PDT, is a noninvasive approach that relies on a photosensitizer that, upon irradiation by light, generates so-called toxic reactive oxygen species, which kill cancer cells. In recent years, PDT has garnered attention because of its ability to treat tumors without surgery, chemotherapy or radiation.

Beyzavis laboratory has specialized in integrating nanomaterials, such as metal-organic frameworks, with PDT and other and therapies. Metal-organic frameworks significantly enhance the effectiveness of PDT.

Doctoral student Yoshie Sakamaki from Beyzavis laboratrory prepared the nanomaterials and then bio-conjugated them with ligands of the PDT drug to create nanoporous materials that specifically targeted and killed tumor cells with no toxicity in normal cells.

In addition to cancer treatment, this novel drug delivery system could also be used with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) or fluorescence imaging, which can track the drug in the body and monitor the progress of cancer treatment.

This collaborative project also included contributions from U of A research groups through Julie Stenken, professor of analytical chemistry; Yuchun Du, associate professor of biological sciences; and Jin-Woo Kim, professor of biological and agricultural engineering.

The American Cancer Society estimated 268,600 new cases of invasive breast cancer in 2019 and 41,760 deaths. Currently there are more than 3.1 million breast cancer survivors in the United States. Since 2007, breast cancer death rates have been steady in women younger than 50 but have continued to decrease in older women. This decrease is believed to be the result of earlier detection and better treatments.

Triple negative breast cancer is aggressive and lacks estrogen receptors, progesterone receptors and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, which means it cannot be treated with receptor-targeted therapy. It is difficult to treat with existing chemotherapy and often requires surgery because it quickly metastasizes throughout the body.

Cytotoxic chemotherapy is the only approved treatment for this type of breast cancer. More than 80% of women with triple negative breast cancer are treated with chemotherapy regimens that include anthracyclines, such as doxorubicin, which can cause cardiotoxicity as a serious side effect. Furthermore, chemotherapy treatment of breast cancer cell lines using either 5-FU, cisplatin, paclitaxel, doxorubicin or etoposide have shown multi-drug resistance.

Beyzavi joined the University of Arkansas in 2017 after serving as a research associate at Harvard University. Before that he was a postdoctoral awardee at Northwestern University under the co-guidance of Nobel Laureate Sir Fraser Stoddart.

About the University of Arkansas: The University of Arkansas provides an internationally competitive education for undergraduate and graduate students in more than 200 academic programs. The university contributes new knowledge, economic development, basic and applied research, and creative activity while also providing service to academic and professional disciplines. The Carnegie Foundation classifies the University of Arkansas among fewer than 2.7 percent of universities in America that have the highest level of research activity. U.S. News & World Report ranks the University of Arkansas among its top American public research universities. Founded in 1871, the University of Arkansas comprises 10 colleges and schools and maintains a low student-to-faculty ratio that promotes personal attention and close mentoring.

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New Nano Drug Candidate Kills Aggressive Breast Cancer Cells - University of Arkansas Newswire

Research Associate – SecuReFET: Secure Circuits through inherent Reconfigurable FET job with TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAT DRESDEN (TU DRESDEN) | 214467 -…

At TU Dresden, Faculty of Computer Science, Institute of Computer Engineering, the Chair of Processor Design offers a project position in a collaborative project which aims to design hardware security solutions using reconfigurable transistors to enable secure circuits as

Research Associate

(subject to personal qualification employees are remunerated according to salary group E 13 TV-L)

starting as soon as possible.

Research area:

SecuReFET: Secure Circuits through inherent Reconfigurable FET

Terms:

Balancing family and career is an important issue. The position is basically suitable for candidates seeking part-time employment as well with at least 50% of the fulltime weekly hours.

The position is limited initially for three years. The period of employment is governed by the Fixed Term Research Contracts Act (Wissenschaftszeitvertragsgesetz WissZeitVG).

The project is granted by the DFG (German Research Foundation) under the Special Priority Program on Nano Security: From Nano-Electronics to Secure Systems. The project SecuReFET will be carried out in collaboration with the NaMLab gGmbH Dresden.

Position and Requirements

At the Chair of Processor Design we have the long-term vision of shaping the way future electronic systems are to be designed.

Todays societies critically depend on electronic systems. Over the last years, the security of these systems has been at risk by a number of hardware-level attacks that circumvent software-level security mechanisms. Solutions based on classical CMOS electronics have been shown to be either cost intensive due to a high area overhead or energy inefficient. One promising alternative against such hardware level attacks are security primitives based on emerging reconfigurable nanotechnologies. Transistors based on these disruptive reconfigurable nanotechnologies, termed as Reconfigurable Field-Effect Transistors (RFETs), offer programmable p- and n-type behavior from a single device. The runtime-reconfigurable nature of these nano-electronic devices yields to an inherent polymorphic functionality at the logical abstraction. As a result, circuits made of regular RFET blocks are able to provide a large number of possible functional combinations based on the apparently same circuit representation. The manufacturers, therefore, are able to program the desired functionality after chip production. The big difference to standard CMOS electronics is, that the actual circuit or function remains hidden since they cannot be differentiated from other possible combinations by physical reverse engineering.

In SecuReFET, methodologies and circuits will be developed exploiting the inherent polymorphic property of RFETs. RFET-based security-primitives, such as Physically Unclonable Functions (PUFs) which aim to protect proprietary IP designs, will be designed, modeled, manufactured and measured. The benefit of those cells regarding their resilience against side-channel attacks and reverse engineering will be demonstrated. In addition, potential security threats stemming from the very same reconfigurable nature of the technology, such as hardware Trojans, will be investigated. Measures to mitigate those vulnerabilities by circuit as well as device-design will be explored. Furthermore, an RFET-compatible automated design-synthesis environment (EDA) for logic and physical design of secure circuits will be established based on the modified modern design rules. Finally, the developed concepts will be verified and benchmarked by means of modern security tests.

Tasks:

Requirements:

What we offer

You will join a team of enthusiastic researchers who pursue creatively their individual research agenda. Other ongoing projects at the Chair of Processor Design can be found at https://www.cfaed.tu-dresden.de/pd-about. The chair is a part of the Cluster of Excellence Center for Advancing Electronics Dresden, which offers plenty of resources and structures for career development.

Informal enquiries can be submitted to Prof. Dr. Akash Kumar, Tel +49 (351) 463 39274; Email: akash.kumar@tu-dresden.de

Applications from women are particularly welcome. The same applies to people with disabilities.

Application Procedure

Please submit your comprehensive application (in English only) including the following: motivation letter, CV, copy of degree certificate, transcript of grades (i.e. the official list of coursework including your grades) and proof of English language skills preferably via the TU Dresden SecureMail Portal https://securemail.tu-dresden.de by sending it as a single pdf document quoting the reference number PhD20-05-PD in the subject header to recruiting.cfaed@tu-dresden.de or by post to: TU Dresden, Fakultt Informatik, Institut fr Technische Informatik, Professur fr Prozessorentwurf, Prof. Akash Kumar, Helmholtzstr. 10, 01069 Dresden, Germany. The closing date for applications is 11.08.2020 (stamped arrival date of the university central mail service applies). Please submit copies only, as your application will not be returned to you. Expenses incurred in attending interviews cannot be reimbursed

__________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________Reference to data protection: Your data protection rights, the purpose for which your data will be processed, as well as further information about data protection is available to you on the website: https: //tu-dresden.de/karriere/datenschutzhinweis

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Research Associate - SecuReFET: Secure Circuits through inherent Reconfigurable FET job with TECHNISCHE UNIVERSITAT DRESDEN (TU DRESDEN) | 214467 -...

Mark McDaniel reappointed to NASA Human Exploration and Operations Advisory Committee – alreporter.com

The U.S. House of Representatives on Tuesday passed the William Mac Thornberry National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 2021 by a vote of 295 to 125. Congressman Bradley Byrne is a member of the House Armed Services Committee, which passed an earlier version of the NDAA on July 1, 2020, by a vote of 56 to 0.

The bill includes an amendment authored by Byrne authorizing $260 million to construct an additional Expeditionary Fast Transport vessel at Austal Mobile. This years NDAA is named for Ranking Member Mac Thornberry, R-Texas, who chaired the committee during the 114th and 115th Congresses.

The men and women of our Armed Services deserve our complete support, and Im pleased that the House came together in a largely bipartisan manner to give our warfighters the resources necessary to protect us, Byrne said. Both in committee and on the House floor, all Members provided input to strengthen this bill, a practice that occurs far too little in todays House. While I do not agree with everything in the bill, it remains worthy of support, and Im hopeful that some of the partisan provisions added on the House floor will be removed through compromise with the Senate.

Byrne said the additional Austal ship is important for Southwest Alabama.

Importantly for Southwest Alabama, this bill passed with my amendment to authorize the construction of an additional EPF at the Austal shipyard in Mobile, Byrne said. I appreciate my Congressional colleagues for acknowledging Austal and the EPFs importance to our national defense and for their support of the work performed by the 4,000 skilled men and women at Austal Mobile. Construction of this world-class vessel will move us even closer to the Navys goal of a 355-ship fleet.

The NDAA sets policy and authorizes funding for the entire United States military and has been passed by the House each year for the previous 59 years. The Senate is currently considering its own version of the NDAA.

Byrne pointed out several highlights from this years NDAA including that it adheres to last years bipartisan budget agreement and fully funds the Trump administrations request.

Public Service Announcement

The bill includes $740.5 billion total for National Defense Discretionary programs, including $130.6 billion for procurement of advanced weapons systems and $106.2 billion for Research Development Test and Evaluation. The bill also funds a vital nuclear modernization programs to ensure that nuclear deterrent is safe and reliable. It fully funds the B-21 bomber, a new Columbia Class submarine along with an additional attack submarine, and begins work on the W93 warhead that will be critical to meet STRATCOM Commander requirements for the sea-based deterrent.

Byrne says the NDAA also takes a tough stance on China by laying the foundation for an Indo-Pacific Deterrence Initiative to deter China, modeled on the European Deterrence Initiative. The NDAA increases funding in emergent technologies, such as AI, to maintain a technical edge against China, and starts taking financial actions to pursue Chinas graduation from the World Bank and greater transparency with Chinas debt.

Byrne said that the NDAA provides support for troops and families, including a 3 percent pay raise.

Byrne said that the bill also deals with the COVID-19 response. It ensures that the Department of Defense has the diagnostic equipment, testing capabilities, and personal protective equipment necessary to protect our Armed Forces. It requires the National Security Strategy to address the provision of drugs, biologics, vaccines and other critical medical equipment to ensure combat readiness and force health protection.

Byrne said that the NDAA includes almost $600 million above the Presidents Budget Request for science and technology and investments in critical emerging technology areas including artificial intelligence, autonomous systems and biotechnology.

The bill changed considerably on the floor of the House. Some GOP Congressmen including Mo Brooks, R-Alabama, voted for the bill in committee and against the bill on the House floor because of some of those changes. President Donald Trump has threatened to veto the bill unless changes to the bill are made before it reaches his desk.

The Senate and House versions will go to a conference committee where a compromise version will be drafted that can pass both Houses.

Byrne represents Alabamas 1st Congressional District. He is leaving Congress at the end of the year.

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Mark McDaniel reappointed to NASA Human Exploration and Operations Advisory Committee - alreporter.com

Aerostructure Equipment Industry Tremendous Growth and Shares 2019 to 2027, Noted Fact.MR – The Cloud Tribune

Fact.MR has recently published a new study titled Aerostructure Equipment Market Forecast, Trend Analysis & Competition Tracking: Global Market Insights 2019 to 2027, which comprehensively discusses the overall development across the global aerostructure equipment market. At present, the international market is driven by increased deliveries of commercial aircraft together with rising count of passengers flying each year. The bolstering status of the commercial aviation industry has been fueling higher opportunities for the global aerostructure equipment market, which is likely to continue until 2027.

According to research insights, the global aerostructure equipment market is likely to record growth at over 1.5% CAGR during the forecast period of 2019 2027. The report stresses on the fact that primary trend active across the global market will most probably impact the competitive dynamics, thereby, shifting the manufacturing of aerostructure equipment from potential players to OEMs. Based on the data acquired for the year 2018, numerous highly valued mergers and acquisitions took place in the aerostructure equipment industry as chief vendors took over other small and medium scale vendors to seize a greater portion of the market.

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Higher Shares to Be Acquired by Commercial Aircraft and Helicopters

As per the International Air Transport Association, number of passengers transported by airlines is expected to rise more than 6% within the next decade. This significant surge of air travelers would surely require the production of additional aircraft perpetually elevating the demand for aerostructure equipment. According to Boeing, an international designer and manufacturer of rotorcraft and airplanes, the passenger and freighter fleet is anticipated to expand from 21,000 to 40,000 aircraft with the inclusion of 37,000 new airplanes during the stated assessment period. With such firm development figures, it is predicted that the global aerostructure equipment market will experience improved statistics during the period between 2019 and 2027.

Expansion of Lightweight Materials Supported by Nanotechnology

It is imperative to know that apart from substantial economic values, the overall aerostructure equipment market associates huge resource consumption with one of the largest carbon footprint over the planet. As a result, the primary drivers persisting across the current aerostructure equipment research and development are focused towards the introduction of lighter structural materials together with efficient engines. Interestingly, potential nanomaterials and nano-engineering is surely strengthening the fulfilment of such goals. To be precise, various nanomaterials are already incorporated for supporting aircraft construction as filler materials that are aimed at enhancing the properties of structural polymers. Furthermore, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is receiving superior traction as fillers in polymers, especially due to its exceptional toughness and distinctive electrical properties. These developments are directly targeted towards the manufacturing of lightweight and durable aerostructure materials that is expected to drive the global aerostructure equipment market in the coming years.

Passenger Mobility across Asia Pacific Set to Heighten Market Development

Going by the records collected by the International Air Transport Association (IATA), there were close to 4.1 billion air travelers in 2017, where majority of the traffic was centered in the Asia Pacific region. Air travel is experiencing a major swell up, since people are migrating for better economic prospects; these factors are impacting the global aerostructure equipment market in a positive manner.

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The report also discourses contribution by major players operating in the global market for aerostructure equipment. Some of the prime manufacturers mentioned in the report are KUKA Systems GmbH, Broetje-Automation GmbH, Electroimpact, Inc., MTorres Diseos Industriales, Gemcor (Ascent Aerospace), REEL, SENER and a lot more.

About Fact.MR

Fact.MR is a fast-growing market research firm that offers the most comprehensive suite of syndicated and customized market research reports. We believe transformative intelligence can educate and inspire businesses to make smarter decisions. We know the limitations of the one-size-fits-all approach; thats why we publish multi-industry global, regional, and country-specific research reports.

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Aerostructure Equipment Industry Tremendous Growth and Shares 2019 to 2027, Noted Fact.MR - The Cloud Tribune

Nano Gas Sensor Market which company is the market leader and how much its sales in 2020 and what it’s expected sales for the next 5 years | Raytheon…

Los Angeles, United State: The report is a compilation of comprehensive research studies on various aspects of the global Nano Gas Sensor Market. With accurate data and highly authentic information, it makes a brilliant attempt to provide a real, transparent picture of current and future situations of the global Nano Gas Sensor market. Market participants can use this powerful tool when creating effective business plans or making important changes to their strategies. The report discusses about the growth of the global as well as regional markets. It also brings to light high-growth segments of the global Nano Gas Sensor market and how they will progress in the coming years.

The authors of report have analyzed the vendor landscape in great detail with special focus on leading players of the global Nano Gas Sensor market. The report answers critical questions of players and provides deep assessment of production, consumption, manufacturing, sales, and other vital factors. Importantly, it analyzes crucial market dynamics, including drivers, restraints, trends, and opportunities. With the help of the report, players can easily identify untapped opportunities available in the global Nano Gas Sensor market. Moreover, they will be able to gain crucial insights not only into the growth of the global Nano Gas Sensor market but also its product, application, and regional segments.

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Are you looking for thorough analysis of the competition in the global Nano Gas Sensor market? Well, this report offers just the right analysis you are looking for. Furthermore, you can ask for a customization of the report based on your requirements. The authors of the report are subject matter experts and hold strong knowledge and experience in market research. In the competitive analysis section, the report throws light on key strategies, future development plans, product portfolios, and other aspects of the business of top players. The report provides enough information and data to help readers to gain sound understanding of the vendor landscape.

Key Players Mentioned in the Global Nano Gas Sensor Market Research Report: Raytheon Company, Ball Aerospace and Technologies, Thales Group, Lockheed Martin Corporation, Environmental Sensors, Emerson, Siemens, Endress Hauser, Falcon Analytical, Agilent Technologies

Global Nano Gas Sensor Market by Type:Semiconductor Keyword, Electrochemistry Keyword, Photochemistry (IR Etc) Keyword, Other

Global Nano Gas Sensor Market by Application: Electricity Generation, Automobiles, Petrochemical, Aerospace & Defense, Medical, Biochemical Engineering, Other

The researchers authoring this report have segmented the global Nano Gas Sensor market according to type of product and application. Each segment included in the report is analyzed based on various factors such as market share, CAGR, market size, demand, and future growth potential. The segmental study provided in the report will help players to focus on key growth areas of the global Nano Gas Sensor market. The analysts have also focused on regional analysis of the global Nano Gas Sensor market. Here, growth opportunities in key regions and countries have been explored by the analysts.

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Table Content

1 Nano Gas Sensor Market Overview1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Nano Gas Sensor1.2 Nano Gas Sensor Segment by Type1.2.1 Global Nano Gas Sensor Production Growth Rate Comparison by Type 2020 VS 20261.2.2 Semiconductor Nano Gas Sensor1.2.3 Electrochemistry Nano Gas Sensor1.2.4 Photochemistry (IR Etc) Nano Gas Sensor1.2.5 Other1.3 Nano Gas Sensor Segment by Application1.3.1 Nano Gas Sensor Consumption Comparison by Application: 2020 VS 20261.3.2 Electricity Generation1.3.3 Automobiles1.3.4 Petrochemical1.3.5 Aerospace & Defense1.3.6 Medical1.3.7 Biochemical Engineering1.3.8 Other1.4 Global Nano Gas Sensor Market by Region1.4.1 Global Nano Gas Sensor Market Size Estimates and Forecasts by Region: 2020 VS 20261.4.2 North America Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.4.3 Europe Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.4.4 China Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.4.5 Japan Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.4.6 South Korea Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.5 Global Nano Gas Sensor Growth Prospects1.5.1 Global Nano Gas Sensor Revenue Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.5.2 Global Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.5.3 Global Nano Gas Sensor Production Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.6 Nano Gas Sensor Industry1.7 Nano Gas Sensor Market Trends 2 Market Competition by Manufacturers2.1 Global Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity Market Share by Manufacturers (2015-2020)2.2 Global Nano Gas Sensor Revenue Share by Manufacturers (2015-2020)2.3 Market Share by Company Type (Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3)2.4 Global Nano Gas Sensor Average Price by Manufacturers (2015-2020)2.5 Manufacturers Nano Gas Sensor Production Sites, Area Served, Product Types2.6 Nano Gas Sensor Market Competitive Situation and Trends2.6.1 Nano Gas Sensor Market Concentration Rate2.6.2 Global Top 3 and Top 5 Players Market Share by Revenue2.6.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion 3 Production and Capacity by Region3.1 Global Production Capacity of Nano Gas Sensor Market Share by Regions (2015-2020)3.2 Global Nano Gas Sensor Revenue Market Share by Regions (2015-2020)3.3 Global Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)3.4 North America Nano Gas Sensor Production3.4.1 North America Nano Gas Sensor Production Growth Rate (2015-2020)3.4.2 North America Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)3.5 Europe Nano Gas Sensor Production3.5.1 Europe Nano Gas Sensor Production Growth Rate (2015-2020)3.5.2 Europe Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)3.6 China Nano Gas Sensor Production3.6.1 China Nano Gas Sensor Production Growth Rate (2015-2020)3.6.2 China Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)3.7 Japan Nano Gas Sensor Production3.7.1 Japan Nano Gas Sensor Production Growth Rate (2015-2020)3.7.2 Japan Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)3.8 South Korea Nano Gas Sensor Production3.8.1 South Korea Nano Gas Sensor Production Growth Rate (2015-2020)3.8.2 South Korea Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020) 4 Global Nano Gas Sensor Consumption by Regions4.1 Global Nano Gas Sensor Consumption by Regions4.1.1 Global Nano Gas Sensor Consumption by Region4.1.2 Global Nano Gas Sensor Consumption Market Share by Region4.2 North America4.2.1 North America Nano Gas Sensor Consumption by Countries4.2.2 U.S.4.2.3 Canada4.3 Europe4.3.1 Europe Nano Gas Sensor Consumption by Countries4.3.2 Germany4.3.3 France4.3.4 U.K.4.3.5 Italy4.3.6 Russia4.4 Asia Pacific4.4.1 Asia Pacific Nano Gas Sensor Consumption by Region4.4.2 China4.4.3 Japan4.4.4 South Korea4.4.5 Taiwan4.4.6 Southeast Asia4.4.7 India4.4.8 Australia4.5 Latin America4.5.1 Latin America Nano Gas Sensor Consumption by Countries4.5.2 Mexico4.5.3 Brazil 5 Nano Gas Sensor Production, Revenue, Price Trend by Type5.1 Global Nano Gas Sensor Production Market Share by Type (2015-2020)5.2 Global Nano Gas Sensor Revenue Market Share by Type (2015-2020)5.3 Global Nano Gas Sensor Price by Type (2015-2020)5.4 Global Nano Gas Sensor Market Share by Price Tier (2015-2020): Low-End, Mid-Range and High-End 6 Global Nano Gas Sensor Market Analysis by Application6.1 Global Nano Gas Sensor Consumption Market Share by Application (2015-2020)6.2 Global Nano Gas Sensor Consumption Growth Rate by Application (2015-2020) 7 Company Profiles and Key Figures in Nano Gas Sensor Business7.1 Raytheon Company7.1.1 Raytheon Company Nano Gas Sensor Production Sites and Area Served7.1.2 Raytheon Company Nano Gas Sensor Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.1.3 Raytheon Company Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.1.4 Raytheon Company Main Business and Markets Served7.2 Ball Aerospace and Technologies7.2.1 Ball Aerospace and Technologies Nano Gas Sensor Production Sites and Area Served7.2.2 Ball Aerospace and Technologies Nano Gas Sensor Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.2.3 Ball Aerospace and Technologies Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.2.4 Ball Aerospace and Technologies Main Business and Markets Served7.3 Thales Group7.3.1 Thales Group Nano Gas Sensor Production Sites and Area Served7.3.2 Thales Group Nano Gas Sensor Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.3.3 Thales Group Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.3.4 Thales Group Main Business and Markets Served7.4 Lockheed Martin Corporation7.4.1 Lockheed Martin Corporation Nano Gas Sensor Production Sites and Area Served7.4.2 Lockheed Martin Corporation Nano Gas Sensor Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.4.3 Lockheed Martin Corporation Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.4.4 Lockheed Martin Corporation Main Business and Markets Served7.5 Environmental Sensors7.5.1 Environmental Sensors Nano Gas Sensor Production Sites and Area Served7.5.2 Environmental Sensors Nano Gas Sensor Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.5.3 Environmental Sensors Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.5.4 Environmental Sensors Main Business and Markets Served7.6 Emerson7.6.1 Emerson Nano Gas Sensor Production Sites and Area Served7.6.2 Emerson Nano Gas Sensor Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.6.3 Emerson Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.6.4 Emerson Main Business and Markets Served7.7 Siemens7.7.1 Siemens Nano Gas Sensor Production Sites and Area Served7.7.2 Siemens Nano Gas Sensor Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.7.3 Siemens Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.7.4 Siemens Main Business and Markets Served7.8 Endress Hauser7.8.1 Endress Hauser Nano Gas Sensor Production Sites and Area Served7.8.2 Endress Hauser Nano Gas Sensor Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.8.3 Endress Hauser Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.8.4 Endress Hauser Main Business and Markets Served7.9 Falcon Analytical7.9.1 Falcon Analytical Nano Gas Sensor Production Sites and Area Served7.9.2 Falcon Analytical Nano Gas Sensor Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.9.3 Falcon Analytical Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.9.4 Falcon Analytical Main Business and Markets Served7.10 Agilent Technologies7.10.1 Agilent Technologies Nano Gas Sensor Production Sites and Area Served7.10.2 Agilent Technologies Nano Gas Sensor Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.10.3 Agilent Technologies Nano Gas Sensor Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.10.4 Agilent Technologies Main Business and Markets Served 8 Nano Gas Sensor Manufacturing Cost Analysis8.1 Nano Gas Sensor Key Raw Materials Analysis8.1.1 Key Raw Materials8.1.2 Key Raw Materials Price Trend8.1.3 Key Suppliers of Raw Materials8.2 Proportion of Manufacturing Cost Structure8.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Nano Gas Sensor8.4 Nano Gas Sensor Industrial Chain Analysis 9 Marketing Channel, Distributors and Customers9.1 Marketing Channel9.2 Nano Gas Sensor Distributors List9.3 Nano Gas Sensor Customers 10 Market Dynamics10.1 Market Trends10.2 Opportunities and Drivers10.3 Challenges10.4 Porters Five Forces Analysis 11 Production and Supply Forecast11.1 Global Forecasted Production of Nano Gas Sensor (2021-2026)11.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Nano Gas Sensor (2021-2026)11.3 Global Forecasted Price of Nano Gas Sensor (2021-2026)11.4 Global Nano Gas Sensor Production Forecast by Regions (2021-2026)11.4.1 North America Nano Gas Sensor Production, Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)11.4.2 Europe Nano Gas Sensor Production, Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)11.4.3 China Nano Gas Sensor Production, Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)11.4.4 Japan Nano Gas Sensor Production, Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)11.4.5 South Korea Nano Gas Sensor Production, Revenue Forecast (2021-2026) 12 Consumption and Demand Forecast12.1 Global Forecasted and Consumption Demand Analysis of Nano Gas Sensor12.2 North America Forecasted Consumption of Nano Gas Sensor by Country12.3 Europe Market Forecasted Consumption of Nano Gas Sensor by Country12.4 Asia Pacific Market Forecasted Consumption of Nano Gas Sensor by Regions12.5 Latin America Forecasted Consumption of Nano Gas Sensor 13 Forecast by Type and by Application (2021-2026)13.1 Global Production, Revenue and Price Forecast by Type (2021-2026)13.1.1 Global Forecasted Production of Nano Gas Sensor by Type (2021-2026)13.1.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Nano Gas Sensor by Type (2021-2026)13.1.2 Global Forecasted Price of Nano Gas Sensor by Type (2021-2026)13.2 Global Forecasted Consumption of Nano Gas Sensor by Application (2021-2026) 14 Research Finding and Conclusion 15 Methodology and Data Source15.1 Methodology/Research Approach15.1.1 Research Programs/Design15.1.2 Market Size Estimation15.1.3 Market Breakdown and Data Triangulation15.2 Data Source15.2.1 Secondary Sources15.2.2 Primary Sources15.3 Author List15.4 Disclaimer

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Nano Gas Sensor Market which company is the market leader and how much its sales in 2020 and what it's expected sales for the next 5 years | Raytheon...

How Do CNTFETs Work, and Why Are They So Promising? – ENGINEERING.com

The structure of a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET). (Source: Arvind R. Singh, Shandong University; Reference [1].)

New technologies require faster processors, smaller integrated circuits, and less power consumption. Technology advancements such as 5G networks increase the pressure to improve smartphone battery life, spectral efficiency, and more. One potential solution is the use of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs).

A CNTFET is a nano-scaled device that can provide low-power integrated circuits with high performance and high power density. Instead of the bulk silicon material used in traditional metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs), CNTFETs use carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in between the source and the drain of a MOSFET structure. This enables higher current carrier mobility, enabling CNTFETs to provide a superior drive current density.

The first simple CNTFET, reported in 1998, was manufactured by depositing single-wall CNTs from solution onto oxidized silicon wafers. The CNTs were synthesized by laser ablation and Si wafers were prepatterned with gold or platinum electrodes. Over time, the process has improved. Previously, CNTs were laid down on the weak contacts of source and drain electrodes. Now, the improved process patterns the electrodes on top of previously laid CNTs.

The contact between metal and nanotubes can be improved by using gold, titanium and carbon with a thermal annealing step. The thermal processing leads to the formation of titanium carbide (TiC) at the metal/nanotube interface, significantly reducing the contact resistance from several megaohms to approximately 30k.

Previously, all CNTFETs were p-type (conducting positive charge carriers) because contact doping technology by the adsorption of oxygen from the atmosphere was not well understood. Later, n-type CNTFETs (conducting electrons) were developed by promoting electron conduction when CNTFETs were annealed in a vacuum. Atmospheric oxygen near the metal and nanotube contacts affects the local bending of the conduction and valence bands in the nanotube via charge transfer. The Fermi level is also near the valence band, which makes injection of holes easier. Oxygen desorption at high temperature adapts the Fermi level near the conduction band, allowing the injection of electrons. By using thermal annealing, there is no threshold voltage shift when making n-type from p-type (which is not the case during a bulk doping process).

A back gated n-type nanotube transistor can be achieved by doping the CNT with potassium vapor (see below). The process can shift the Fermi level of the tube from the valence band edge to the conduction band edge by transferring the electrons from adsorbed potassium atoms to the nanotube, thus reverting the doping from p- to n-type. An intermediate state where both electrons and holes are allowed can also be achieved, resulting in ambipolar conduction and the creation of ambipolar CNTFETs.

Schematic diagram of the potassium doping setup.

The capability to make n-type CNTFETs is important because it enables the manufacturing of CNT-based complementary logic circuits.

Like MOSFETs, CNTFETs have three terminals: source, gate and drain. When the gate is on, the current transmits from the source to the drain through a semiconducting carbon nanotube channel. The segment between the drain/source and the gate is heavily doped to provide low resistance. CNTFETs have very promising I-V and transfer characteristics.

The main features of CNTFETs include:

CNTFETs can be classified according to different criteria. When classified by current injection methods, there are two CNTFET types: Schottky barrier CNTFETs (SB-CNTFETs) that use metallic electrodes to form Schottky contacts, and CNTFETs with doped CNT electrodes that form Ohmic contacts (similar to the MOSFET design). The contact type determines the current transport mechanism and CNTFET output characteristics. In SB-CNTFETs, the current means tunneling of electrons and holes from the potential barriers at the source and drain junctions. The barrier width is controlled by the gate voltage, which thus controls the current.

The Ohmic contact CNTFET type uses the n-doped CNT as the contact. The doped source and drain regions behave just like MOSFETs. The potential barrier is formed at the middle of the channel, and the current is controlled via modulation of the barrier height (controlling the gate voltage).

CNTFETs can be fabricated as a single-wall CNT (SWCNT) channel between two electrodes, a multi-wall CNT (MWCNT), or a coaxial CNTFET. MWCNT CNTFETs have a complex structure, which limits their potential. The shells can interact with each other. In addition, only the outer shell effectively contributes to electrical transport. In coaxial geometry, the gate contact wraps all around the channel (CNT), thus providing better electrostatics and very good control of carrier transport. Metal-CNT contact type plays a crucial role in the transistor output characteristics.

There are four typical CNTFET designs: back gate CNTFETs, top gate CNTFETs, wrap-around gate CNTFETs, and suspended CNTFETs.

Back gate CNTFETs are the earliest design that uses prepatterning parallel metal strips across a silicon dioxide substrate and SWCNT arranged on top. CNTs together with metal strips (one metal strip source contact and one drain contact) create a rudimentary field-effect transistor. The silicon oxide substrate presents the gate and includes a metal contact on the back. The metal electrodes are made of metals compatible with silicon, such as titanium (Ti) or cobalt (Co). Since the side-bonding configuration has the weak van der Waals coupling of the devices to the noble metal electrodes, this CNTFET type has high contact resistance (1 M).

Side view of a CNT arranged on a silicon oxide substrate prepatterned with source and drain contacts.

Top gate CNTFET design requires a more advanced fabrication process compared to the back gate design. SWCNTs are arranged onto a silicon oxide substrate. Each CNT is located and isolated by using an atomic force or scanning electron microscope. Then, high-resolution electron-beam lithography is used to pattern source and drain contacts. The lower contact resistance is achieved via a high temperature anneal step in which adhesion between the contacts and the CNT is improved. After this step, a thin top gate dielectric is deposited on top of the nanotube using evaporation or atomic layer deposition. The final step is placing the top gate contact on the gate dielectric.

The top gate CNFET with a P++ Si wafer substrate.

The main difference between the top and back gate designs is the fabrication process. In the case of the top gate design, the CNTFET arrays on the same wafer because the gate contacts are electrically isolated from each other. A higher electrical field with a lower gate voltage can be achieved in the top gate design due to the thin gate dielectric. Because of those features, top gate CNTFETs are preferred over the back gate design, despite their complex fabrication process.

Wrap-around gate CNTFETs (or gate-all-around CNTFETs) have an improved design over the top gate device. In this design, the entire nanotube volume is gated, while with the top gate design only the CNT closer to the metal gate contact is gated. This innovation improves the CNTFET electrical performance and reduces the leakage current.

Wrap-around gate CNTFET. (Source: Wikimedia user Popproject3.)

Suspended CNTFET design avoids placing the CNT over a trench, reducing contact with the substrate oxide and thus improving device performance. Fabrication methods to suspend the CNT over trenches use catalyst particles that are transferred onto a substrate.

The drawback of this design is its limited options for gate dielectric (air or vacuum). Moreover, only short CNTs can be used as nanotubes because the longer ones will stretch in the middle and could potentially touch the metal contact (creating a short-circuit). While this type of design is not suitable for commercial use, it is convenient for researching the intrinsic properties of a clean CNT.

CNTFETs are still a new technologyone with a lot of potential for improvement. Currently, the most popular designs are back gate and top gate CNTFETs. Some semiconductor companies (such as Infineon Technology) have introduced the next-generation design of vertical CNTFETs (VCNTFETs).

A vertical CNTFET. (Source: S. J. Wind et al; Reference [4].)

The current-voltage (I-V) characteristic curves represent a transistors operating characteristicsthe relationship between the current flowing through the device and the applied voltage across its terminals. The figure that follows illustrates the drain I-V characteristics of CNTFETs. The saturation current at gate-source voltage VGS = 0.5V is approximately 6A [2]. Saturation drain current from drain I-V characteristics depends on the temperature. Drain saturation currents slightly decrease when the CNTFET is cooled down. The curve is also determined by the CNTFET conductance, width, length, mobility of carriers, and gate capacitance.

Drain current-voltage characteristics of planar CNTFET. (Source: Ram Babu; Reference [2].)

When the gate and the source voltages of SB-CNTFETs increase, the Fermi level of the CNT becomes closer to the conduction band. The band lowering effect develops barriers at CNT-metal junction. The electrons with high potential will cross the barrier and flow into the tube. The current through the nanotube is limited by the thermionic current component.

When the gate voltage VGS=0V, the current increases linearly with the drain voltage VDS (the thermionic current is linearly dependent on the drain voltage). Applying positive gate voltage induces a heavy charge on the channel, significantly increasing the tunneling through the barrier compared to the thermionic current component. The current increases almost quadratically, is highly sensitive to the drain voltage, and is controlled by manipulating the barrier height at the contacts.

CNTFETs are up-and-coming devices that provide dense, high performance, and low power circuits. CNTFET is a rapidly developing technology due to its outstanding electrical characteristics. The large Ion: Ioff, high current drive, and carbon nanotubes other properties increase the possible applications of CNTFETs in the semiconductor industry. They are the most promising alternative for conventional transistors. It is expected that with the same power consumption, they will be three times faster than silicon-based transistors.

In comparison to traditional silicon technology creating structures with minimum diameters reaching 90nm, SWCNTs have diameters between 0.4 and 5nm. Semiconducting SWCNTs have extremely high charge-carrier mobilityhigher than silicon by a factor of 200. CNTs can withstand extremely high current densities of up to 1010A/cm2 (compared to the current density of copper, approximately 107A/cm2) [3].

Semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an ideal substitute for silicon due to their exceptional carrier mobility, significant mean free path, and improved electrostatics at nanoscales. As the one-dimensional transport properties increase the gate control, simultaneously fulfilling gate leakage constraints, they also allow for a more comprehensive gate insulator choice. Thus, CNTs can overcome the short channel effects, and the valence bands and symmetry of the conduction give these devices the upper hand for additional applications. When applied in CNTEFs, CNTs can assist in providing high-speed ballistic CNTFETs.

In theory, CNTFETs have the potential to reach the terahertz regime when compared to standard semiconductor technologies. Nevertheless, this field is still at an early stage, and for the time being, researchers should remain focused on lowering the process variation.

[1] Design and Analysis of CNTFET-Based SRAM. Arvind R. Singh. Shandong University.

[2] Carbon nanotubes field-effect transistors: A review. International Journal of Electronics and Communications, Busi, Ram Babu. (2010).

[3] https://www.infineon.com/cms/en/about-infineon/press/market-news/2004/128087.html

[4] Vertical scaling of carbon Nanotube Field-effect transistors using top gate electrodes. Applied Physics Letters. May 2002. S. J. Wind et al.

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How Do CNTFETs Work, and Why Are They So Promising? - ENGINEERING.com

Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Overview, Growth Opportunities, Industry Analysis, Size, Strategies and Forecast to 2026 | Applied Materials, ASM…

Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market

LOS ANGELES, United States: The report is an all-inclusive research study of the global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment market taking into account the growth factors, recent trends, developments, opportunities, and competitive landscape. The market analysts and researchers have done extensive analysis of the global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment market with the help of research methodologies such as PESTLE and Porters Five Forces analysis. They have provided accurate and reliable market data and useful recommendations with an aim to help the players gain an insight into the overall present and future market scenario. The Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment report comprises in-depth study of the potential segments including product type, application, and end user and their contribution to the overall market size.

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In addition, market revenues based on region and country are provided in the Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment report. The authors of the report have also shed light on the common business tactics adopted by players. The leading players of the global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment market and their complete profiles are included in the report. Besides that, investment opportunities, recommendations, and trends that are trending at present in the global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment market are mapped by the report. With the help of this report, the key players of the global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment market will be able to make sound decisions and plan their strategies accordingly to stay ahead of the curve.

Competitive landscape is a critical aspect every key player needs to be familiar with. The report throws light on the competitive scenario of the global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment market to know the competition at both the domestic and global levels. Market experts have also offered the outline of every leading player of the global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment market, considering the key aspects such as areas of operation, production, and product portfolio. Additionally, companies in the report are studied based on the key factors such as company size, market share, market growth, revenue, production volume, and profits.

Key Players Mentioned in the Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Research Report: Applied Materials, ASM International, Lam Research, Wonik IPS, Meyer Burger, Centrotherm, Tempress, Plasma-Therm, S.C New Energy Technology, Jusung Engineering, KLA-Tencor(Orbotech), ULVAC, Inc, Beijing NAURA, Shenyang Piotech, Oxford Instruments, SAMCO, CVD Equipment Corporation, Trion Technology, SENTECH Instruments, NANO-MASTER

Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Segmentation by Product: Parallel Plate Type PECVD Equipment, Tube Type PECVD Equipment

Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Segmentation by Application: Semiconductor Industry, Solar Industry, Other

The Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market report has been segregated based on distinct categories, such as product type, application, end user, and region. Each and every segment is evaluated on the basis of CAGR, share, and growth potential. In the regional analysis, the report highlights the prospective region, which is estimated to generate opportunities in the global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment market in the forthcoming years. This segmental analysis will surely turn out to be a useful tool for the readers, stakeholders, and market participants to get a complete picture of the global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment market and its potential to grow in the years to come.

Key questions answered in the report:

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Table of Contents:

1 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Overview1.1 Product Overview and Scope of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment1.2 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Segment by Type1.2.1 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Growth Rate Comparison by Type 2020 VS 20261.2.2 Parallel Plate Type PECVD Equipment1.2.3 Tube Type PECVD Equipment1.3 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Segment by Application1.3.1 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Consumption Comparison by Application: 2020 VS 20261.3.2 Semiconductor Industry1.3.3 Solar Industry1.3.4 Other1.4 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market by Region1.4.1 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Size Estimates and Forecasts by Region: 2020 VS 20261.4.2 North America Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.4.3 Europe Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.4.4 China Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.4.5 Japan Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.5 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Growth Prospects1.5.1 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Revenue Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.5.2 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.5.3 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Estimates and Forecasts (2015-2026)1.6 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Industry1.7 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Trends

2 Market Competition by Manufacturers2.1 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity Market Share by Manufacturers (2015-2020)2.2 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Revenue Share by Manufacturers (2015-2020)2.3 Market Share by Company Type (Tier 1, Tier 2 and Tier 3)2.4 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Average Price by Manufacturers (2015-2020)2.5 Manufacturers Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites, Area Served, Product Types2.6 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Competitive Situation and Trends2.6.1 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Concentration Rate2.6.2 Global Top 3 and Top 5 Players Market Share by Revenue2.6.3 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion

3 Production and Capacity by Region3.1 Global Production Capacity of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Share by Regions (2015-2020)3.2 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Revenue Market Share by Regions (2015-2020)3.3 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)3.4 North America Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production3.4.1 North America Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Growth Rate (2015-2020)3.4.2 North America Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)3.5 Europe Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production3.5.1 Europe Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Growth Rate (2015-2020)3.5.2 Europe Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)3.6 China Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production3.6.1 China Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Growth Rate (2015-2020)3.6.2 China Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)3.7 Japan Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production3.7.1 Japan Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Growth Rate (2015-2020)3.7.2 Japan Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)

4 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Consumption by Regions4.1 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Consumption by Regions4.1.1 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Consumption by Region4.1.2 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Consumption Market Share by Region4.2 North America4.2.1 North America Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Consumption by Countries4.2.2 U.S.4.2.3 Canada4.3 Europe4.3.1 Europe Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Consumption by Countries4.3.2 Germany4.3.3 France4.3.4 U.K.4.3.5 Italy4.3.6 Russia4.4 Asia Pacific4.4.1 Asia Pacific Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Consumption by Region4.4.2 China4.4.3 Japan4.4.4 South Korea4.4.5 Taiwan4.4.6 Southeast Asia4.4.7 India4.4.8 Australia4.5 Latin America4.5.1 Latin America Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Consumption by Countries4.5.2 Mexico4.5.3 Brazil

5 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production, Revenue, Price Trend by Type5.1 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Market Share by Type (2015-2020)5.2 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Revenue Market Share by Type (2015-2020)5.3 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Price by Type (2015-2020)5.4 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Share by Price Tier (2015-2020): Low-End, Mid-Range and High-End

6 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Analysis by Application6.1 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Consumption Market Share by Application (2015-2020)6.2 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Consumption Growth Rate by Application (2015-2020)

7 Company Profiles and Key Figures in Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Business7.1 Applied Materials7.1.1 Applied Materials Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.1.2 Applied Materials Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.1.3 Applied Materials Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.1.4 Applied Materials Main Business and Markets Served7.2 ASM International7.2.1 ASM International Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.2.2 ASM International Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.2.3 ASM International Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.2.4 ASM International Main Business and Markets Served7.3 Lam Research7.3.1 Lam Research Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.3.2 Lam Research Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.3.3 Lam Research Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.3.4 Lam Research Main Business and Markets Served7.4 Wonik IPS7.4.1 Wonik IPS Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.4.2 Wonik IPS Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.4.3 Wonik IPS Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.4.4 Wonik IPS Main Business and Markets Served7.5 Meyer Burger7.5.1 Meyer Burger Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.5.2 Meyer Burger Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.5.3 Meyer Burger Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.5.4 Meyer Burger Main Business and Markets Served7.6 Centrotherm7.6.1 Centrotherm Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.6.2 Centrotherm Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.6.3 Centrotherm Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.6.4 Centrotherm Main Business and Markets Served7.7 Tempress7.7.1 Tempress Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.7.2 Tempress Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.7.3 Tempress Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.7.4 Tempress Main Business and Markets Served7.8 Plasma-Therm7.8.1 Plasma-Therm Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.8.2 Plasma-Therm Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.8.3 Plasma-Therm Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.8.4 Plasma-Therm Main Business and Markets Served7.9 S.C New Energy Technology7.9.1 S.C New Energy Technology Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.9.2 S.C New Energy Technology Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.9.3 S.C New Energy Technology Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.9.4 S.C New Energy Technology Main Business and Markets Served7.10 Jusung Engineering7.10.1 Jusung Engineering Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.10.2 Jusung Engineering Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.10.3 Jusung Engineering Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.10.4 Jusung Engineering Main Business and Markets Served7.11 KLA-Tencor(Orbotech)7.11.1 KLA-Tencor(Orbotech) Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.11.2 KLA-Tencor(Orbotech) Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.11.3 KLA-Tencor(Orbotech) Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.11.4 KLA-Tencor(Orbotech) Main Business and Markets Served7.12 ULVAC, Inc7.12.1 ULVAC, Inc Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.12.2 ULVAC, Inc Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.12.3 ULVAC, Inc Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.12.4 ULVAC, Inc Main Business and Markets Served7.13 Beijing NAURA7.13.1 Beijing NAURA Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.13.2 Beijing NAURA Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.13.3 Beijing NAURA Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.13.4 Beijing NAURA Main Business and Markets Served7.14 Shenyang Piotech7.14.1 Shenyang Piotech Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.14.2 Shenyang Piotech Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.14.3 Shenyang Piotech Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.14.4 Shenyang Piotech Main Business and Markets Served7.15 Oxford Instruments7.15.1 Oxford Instruments Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.15.2 Oxford Instruments Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.15.3 Oxford Instruments Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.15.4 Oxford Instruments Main Business and Markets Served7.16 SAMCO7.16.1 SAMCO Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.16.2 SAMCO Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.16.3 SAMCO Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.16.4 SAMCO Main Business and Markets Served7.17 CVD Equipment Corporation7.17.1 CVD Equipment Corporation Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.17.2 CVD Equipment Corporation Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.17.3 CVD Equipment Corporation Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.17.4 CVD Equipment Corporation Main Business and Markets Served7.18 Trion Technology7.18.1 Trion Technology Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.18.2 Trion Technology Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.18.3 Trion Technology Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.18.4 Trion Technology Main Business and Markets Served7.19 SENTECH Instruments7.19.1 SENTECH Instruments Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.19.2 SENTECH Instruments Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.19.3 SENTECH Instruments Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.19.4 SENTECH Instruments Main Business and Markets Served7.20 NANO-MASTER7.20.1 NANO-MASTER Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Sites and Area Served7.20.2 NANO-MASTER Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Product Introduction, Application and Specification7.20.3 NANO-MASTER Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Capacity, Revenue, Price and Gross Margin (2015-2020)7.20.4 NANO-MASTER Main Business and Markets Served

8 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Manufacturing Cost Analysis8.1 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Key Raw Materials Analysis8.1.1 Key Raw Materials8.1.2 Key Raw Materials Price Trend8.1.3 Key Suppliers of Raw Materials8.2 Proportion of Manufacturing Cost Structure8.3 Manufacturing Process Analysis of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment8.4 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Industrial Chain Analysis

9 Marketing Channel, Distributors and Customers9.1 Marketing Channel9.2 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Distributors List9.3 Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Customers

10 Market Dynamics10.1 Market Trends10.2 Opportunities and Drivers10.3 Challenges10.4 Porters Five Forces Analysis

11 Production and Supply Forecast11.1 Global Forecasted Production of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment (2021-2026)11.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment (2021-2026)11.3 Global Forecasted Price of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment (2021-2026)11.4 Global Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production Forecast by Regions (2021-2026)11.4.1 North America Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production, Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)11.4.2 Europe Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production, Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)11.4.3 China Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production, Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)11.4.4 Japan Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Production, Revenue Forecast (2021-2026)

12 Consumption and Demand Forecast12.1 Global Forecasted and Consumption Demand Analysis of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment12.2 North America Forecasted Consumption of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment by Country12.3 Europe Market Forecasted Consumption of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment by Country12.4 Asia Pacific Market Forecasted Consumption of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment by Regions12.5 Latin America Forecasted Consumption of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment13 Forecast by Type and by Application (2021-2026)13.1 Global Production, Revenue and Price Forecast by Type (2021-2026)13.1.1 Global Forecasted Production of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment by Type (2021-2026)13.1.2 Global Forecasted Revenue of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment by Type (2021-2026)13.1.2 Global Forecasted Price of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment by Type (2021-2026)13.2 Global Forecasted Consumption of Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment by Application (2021-2026)14 Research Finding and Conclusion

15 Methodology and Data Source15.1 Methodology/Research Approach15.1.1 Research Programs/Design15.1.2 Market Size Estimation15.1.3 Market Breakdown and Data Triangulation15.2 Data Source15.2.1 Secondary Sources15.2.2 Primary Sources15.3 Author List15.4 Disclaimer

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Plasma Enhanced CVD Equipment Market Overview, Growth Opportunities, Industry Analysis, Size, Strategies and Forecast to 2026 | Applied Materials, ASM...

Outlook on the Electrical Discharge Machines Global Market to 2027 – Featuring AAEDM, AccuteX Technologies & Beaumont Machine Among Others -…

DUBLIN, July 21, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- The "Electrical Discharge Machines (EDM) - Global Market Trajectory & Analytics" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

Amid the COVID-19 crisis, the global market for Electrical Discharge Machines (EDM) estimated at US$5.3 Billion in the year 2020, is projected to reach a revised size of US$8.4 Billion by 2027, growing at a CAGR of 6.9% over the analysis period 2020-2027. Wire Cutting EDM, one of the segments analyzed in the report, is projected to grow at a 7.3% CAGR to reach US$5.1 Billion by the end of the analysis period.

After an early analysis of the business implications of the pandemic and its induced economic crisis, growth in the Small Hole EDM segment is readjusted to a revised 6.4% CAGR for the next 7-year period. This segment currently accounts for a 24.7% share of the global Electrical Discharge Machines (EDM) market.

The U.S. Accounts for Over 27% of Global Market Size in 2020, While China is Forecast to Grow at a 10.5% CAGR for the Period of 2020-2027

The Electrical Discharge Machines (EDM) market in the U.S. is estimated at US$1.4 Billion in the year 2020. The country currently accounts for a 27.04% share in the global market. China, the world second largest economy, is forecast to reach an estimated market size of US$1.8 Billion in the year 2027 trailing a CAGR of 10.5% through 2027. Among the other noteworthy geographic markets are Japan and Canada, each forecast to grow at 3.7% and 6.2% respectively over the 2020-2027 period. Within Europe, Germany is forecast to grow at approximately 4.4% CAGR while Rest of European market (as defined in the study) will reach US$1.8 Billion by the year 2027.

Die Sinking EDM Segment Corners a 16.8% Share in 2020

In the global Die Sinking EDM segment, USA, Canada, Japan, China and Europe will drive the 5.5% CAGR estimated for this segment. These regional markets accounting for a combined market size of US$666.9 Million in the year 2020 will reach a projected size of US$968.9 Million by the close of the analysis period. China will remain among the fastest growing in this cluster of regional markets. Led by countries such as Australia, India, and South Korea, the market in Asia-Pacific is forecast to reach US$1.1 Billion by the year 2027, while Latin America will expand at a 7.2% CAGR through the analysis period. The publisher brings years of research experience to this 19th edition of our report. The 279-page report presents concise insights into how the pandemic has impacted production and the buy side for 2020 and 2021. A short-term phased recovery by key geography is also addressed.

Competitors identified in this market include, among others

Key Topics Covered:

I. INTRODUCTION, METHODOLOGY & REPORT SCOPE

II. EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1. MARKET OVERVIEW

2. FOCUS ON SELECT PLAYERS

3. MARKET TRENDS & DRIVERS

4. GLOBAL MARKET PERSPECTIVE

III. MARKET ANALYSIS

IV. COMPETITION

Total Companies Profiled: 36

For more information about this report visit https://www.researchandmarkets.com/r/ehugyl

Research and Markets also offers Custom Research services providing focused, comprehensive and tailored research.

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Outlook on the Electrical Discharge Machines Global Market to 2027 - Featuring AAEDM, AccuteX Technologies & Beaumont Machine Among Others -...

What is Nanoengineering? (with pictures)

Nanoengineering is one field of nanotechnology. Nanotechnology is an umbrella term that encompasses all fields of science that operate on the nanoscale. A nanometer is one billionth of a meter, or three to five atoms in width. It would take approximately 40,000 nanometers lined up in a row to equal the width of a human hair. Nanoengineering concerns itself with manipulating processes that occur on the scale of 1-100 nanometers.

The general term, nanotechnology, is sometimes used to refer to common products that have improved properties due to being fortified with nanoscale materials. One example is nano-improved tooth-colored enamel, as used by dentists for fillings. The general use of the term nanotechnology then differs from the more specific sciences that fall under its heading.

Nanoengineering is an interdisciplinary science that builds biochemical structures smaller than bacterium, which function like microscopic factories. This is possible by utilizing basic biochemical processes at the atomic or molecular level. In simple terms, molecules interact through natural processes, and nanoengineering takes advantage of those processes by direct manipulation.

Nanoengineering, in its infancy, has seen some early successes with using DNA as a catalyst to self-assemble simple structures. In 2006 a Brown University research team was able to grow zinc oxide nanowires of approximately 100-200 nm in length by fusing snippets of synthetic DNA to carbon nanotubes. DNA, natures manual for creating matter from the bottom up, is of particular interest in the field of nanoengineering. By assembling specific DNA code a nanoengineer can set up the conditions for the genetic code to perform tasks that result in the biochemical assembly of nanomaterials.

The implications of being able to manipulate the growth of materials from the atomic level up are enormous. Nanoengineering could potentially lead to a plethora of revolutionary materials and products that would not only benefit areas like aerospace, medicine and technology, but everyday life. Nanoengineering could lead to such practical applications as self-cleaning paint that never fades or needs waxing; planes with skins that de-ice themselves and adjust to different aerodynamic environments; and more efficient and cleaner burning fuels.

One of the most exciting aspects of nanoengineering is that it is exceptionally cost-effective, environmentally friendly (raw product is abundant), non-polluting, and requires little energy. Nanoengineering is believed to be a promising field for young scientific minds looking for a chance to ride the leading edge of a groundbreaking wave of new science heading our way. It is widely believed nanotechnology will have a greater impact on the world than the Industrial Revolution and is predicted to be a multi-billion dollar business by 2015.

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What is Nanoengineering? (with pictures)

B.S. NanoEngineering | NanoEngineering

NanoEngineeringAdmit Day Presentation

Learn more about the Nanoengineering major

The undergraduate curriculum constitutes a four-year accredited program in Engineering leading to a B.S. degree in NanoEngineering and requires completion of 185* units. The objective is to meet the standards of excellence at UC San Diego which allows students graduating with this degree to enter the industrial job market.The B.S. program in NanoEngineering is tailored to provide breadth and flexibility by taking advantage of the strength of basic sciences and other engineering disciplines at UC San Diego. The intention is to graduate nanoengineers who are multidisciplinary and can work in a broad spectrum of industries.

All NANO courses are taught only once per year, and courses are scheduled to be consistent with the curriculum. Students must follow the prescribed curriculum. Unavoidable deviation from the curriculum, for example, to participate in the Education Abroad Program, must be approved by the Undergraduate Affairs Committee prior to taking alternative courses elsewhere. Approvals are also needed for engineering courses not listed under the current selections for different engineering focus areas. Policy regarding these conditions may be obtained from the departments Student Affairs Office. All students are encouraged to visit the Student Affairs Office or visit the Department of NanoEngineering website for any clarification and updated information.

To graduate, students must complete 137 units of major work, plus the college general education requirements. Students must also maintain an overall GPA of at least 2.0, and the department requires at least a C grade in each course required for the major.

General-Education/College Requirements

For graduation, each student must satisfy general education course requirements determined by the students college, as well as the major requirements determined by the department. The six colleges at UC San Diego require widely different general education courses, and the number of such courses differs from one college to another. Each student should choose his or her college carefully, considering the special nature of the college and the breadth of general education. Learn more about the different collegeshere.

The NANO curriculum allows for forty-eight* units of general education (G.E.) requirements, which are sufficient to fulfill most but not all college requirements. Regardless of the specific college, students must develop a program that includes a total of at least forty-eight*units in the arts, humanities, and social sciences, not including subjects such as accounting, industrial management, finance, or personnel administration. Students must consult with their college to determine which G.E. courses to take.

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B.S. NanoEngineering | NanoEngineering

What does a nanotechnology engineer do? CareerExplorer

What does a Nanotechnology Engineer do?

A nanotechnology engineer seeks to learn new things that can change the face of health, science, technology, and the environment on a molecular level. They test for pollutants, create powders to enrich our foods and medicines, and study the smallest fragments of DNA. They can even manipulate cells, proteins, and other chemicals from within the body.

Nanotechnology engineers take advanced supplies and materials and turn them into something new and exciting. They may try to make a once heavy invention work better while weighing less, making the object far more efficient. They may also create new and improved ways of watching out and improving the environment by creating innovative ways to test for contaminants and pollutants in the air, ground, and water.

Nanotechnology engineers may also choose to work in the medical field creating new gadgets that can fix problems on a scale as small as the molecular level, thus changing the face of medicine forever. Those involved with bio-systems will create ways to store the tiniest amounts of DNA or other biological fragments for testing and manipulation.

Nanotechnology engineers that work with nanoelectronics will create smaller, more efficient chips, cards, and even smaller computer parts to make products that can do as much as bigger products without so much electronic waste.

Behind the scenes, these engineers must be good at paperwork and detailed description writing. They are responsible for writing extremely detailed reports describing their findings in their specific experiments.

Nanotechnology engineers work with the latest technology in scientific equipment and computers. Since all of the work in nanotechnology is microscopic, it can be expected that the workplace will involve many different high-tech microscopes that will allow the engineer to see things far smaller than are visible to the naked eye. Attention to detail is very important in this field, and the workplace facilitates that with few distractions and very focused teammates.

The workplace is most likely within a science research facility, a pharmaceutical company, or a medical supplies and equipment company, though there are many engineers who work for semiconductor manufacturing companies.

Nanotechnology Engineers are also known as:Nanotechnology and Microsystems Engineer

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What does a nanotechnology engineer do? CareerExplorer

USABC awards $2.4M contract to WPI for development of low-cost/fast-charge batteries for EV applications – Green Car Congress

The United States Advanced Battery Consortium LLC (USABC), a subsidiary of the United States Council for Automotive Research LLC (USCAR), and a collaborative organization of FCA US LLC, Ford Motor Company and General Motors, has awarded a $2.4-million contract to Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) to lead a program to develop low-cost/fast-charge batteries for electric vehicle (EV) applications.

Yan Wang, William Smith Deans Professor of Mechanical Engineering at WPI, is principal investigator of the three-year project. Other researchers are Heng Pan, associate professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at Missouri University of Science and Technology; Ming Tang, assistant professor of materials science and nanoengineering at Rice University; and Bryan Yonemoto at Microvast Inc.

The contract award, which includes a 50% cost share, funds a 36-month project that began earlier this year. The program will develop low-cost and fast-charge batteries for EV applications, building on the technology of solvent-free electrode manufacturing.

There are two key issues for electric vehicle batteries: The cost is too high, and charging takes too long. The project goal is to lower the battery cost by 15% and charge the batteries in 15 minutes by manufacturing batteries with an innovative process.

Yan Wang

Commercial lithium-ion car battery electrodes are typically made by mixing active materials that provide energy, conductive carbon, polymer binders, and solvents to create a thick mixture known as slurry. The slurry gets pasted onto a flat metal substrate, which then moves through a furnace for drying. The solvent is recovered via a complex evaporation-condensation process. Finally, rollers press the coated metal, which can be cut into pieces for assembly into batteries.

The team working on the USABC project will develop a process that sprays dry mixed materials directly onto the substrate, cutting out solvents, drying time, and equipment needed to recover solvents. The process will also tightly pack materials onto substrates, making for energy-dense, faster-charging batteries.

Tangs Rice lab will perform battery modeling to design new multilayered electrode architecture that significantly improves the rate capability of battery cells and allows them to be charged at higher rates. Microvast will assemble large-format pouch cells using layered electrodes and evaluate the electrochemical performance against the program goals

USABC is a subsidiary of the United States Council for Automotive Research LLC (USCAR). Enabled by a cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy (DOE), USABCs mission is to develop electrochemical energy storage technologies that support commercialization of hybrid, plug-in hybrid, electric and fuel cell vehicles. In support of its mission, USABC has developed mid- and long-term goals to guide its projects and measure its progress.

Founded in 1992, USCAR is the collaborative automotive technology company for FCA US LLC, Ford Motor Company and General Motors. All USCAR Member companies have joined in becoming signatories of the Responsible Raw Materials Initiative (RRMI, now part of the Responsible Minerals Initiative, RMI) Declaration of Support.

Originally posted here:

USABC awards $2.4M contract to WPI for development of low-cost/fast-charge batteries for EV applications - Green Car Congress

3D Printing Healthcare Market to Record a Robust Growth Rate for the COVID-19 Period – Cole of Duty

3D printing, also known as desktop fabrication or additive printing technology, allows manufacturers to develop objects using a digital file and various printing materials. The materials used in 3D printing include several types of polymers, metals, and ceramics.

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3D printing offers methodologies that can make manufacturing of complex designs an apparent reality. The 3D printing technology in healthcare caters to the rising demands of medical care by providing wide array of applications based on individual needs. The global 3D Printing Healthcare market was valued at $973 million in 2018, and is projected to reach $3,692 million by 2026, growing at a CAGR of 18.2% from 2019 to 2026.

The factors that drive the 3D printing healthcare market are reduction of errors, decrease in development cost & time, and the ability to build customized products. In addition, increase in scope of applications in healthcare and biomedical applications is expected to create lucrative growth opportunities. On the contrary, high cost of 3D printing and dearth of skilled labors hamper the growth of the market.

Furthermore, increase in healthcare expenditure and rise in collaborations between academic institutions, hospitals, and companies supplement the market growth. However, unfavorable reimbursement policies hinders the market growth. Conversely, emerging economies such as India, China, Mexico, Brazil, and others are anticipated to provide new opportunities for the market growth during the forecast period.

The global 3D printing healthcare market is segmented into component, technology, application, end user, and region. By component, the market is segregated into system/device, materials, and services. Depending on technology, it is categorized into droplet deposition (DD), photopolymerization, laser beam melting, electronic beam melting (EBM), and laminated object manufacturing.

The applications covered in the study include external wearable devices, clinical study devices, implants, and tissue engineering. As per end user, the market is fragmented into medical & surgical centers, pharma & biotech companies, and academic institutions. Region wise, it is analyzed across North America, Europe, Asia-Pacific, and LAMEA.

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KEY BENEFITS FOR STAKEHOLDERS

This report highlights the market dynamics to understand the global 3D printing healthcare market and capitalize on the prevailing opportunities. Quantitative analysis of the current market and forecasts would assist stakeholders to design business strategies accordingly. Porters five forces analysis examines the competitive market structure and provides a deeper understanding of the influencing factors for entry and expansion. Pin-point analysis of geographical segments offers identification of most profitable segments to capitalize on.

KEY MARKET SEGMENTS

By Componento System/Deviceo Materialso Services

By Technologyo Droplet Deposition (DD) Fused Deposition Modeling (FDM) Technology Low-temperature Deposition Manufacturing (LDM) Multiphase Jet Solidification (MJS)

o Photopolymerization Stereolithography (SLA) Continuous Liquid Interface Production (CLIP) Two-Photon Polymerization (2PP)

o Laser Beam Melting Selective Laser Sintering (SLS) Selective Laser Melting (SLM) Direct Metal Laser Sintering (DMLS)

o Electronic Beam Melting (EBM)o Laminated Object Manufacturing

By Applicationo External Wearable Deviceso Clinical Study Deviceso Implantso Tissue Engineering

By End Usero Medical & Surgical Centerso Pharmaceutical & Biotechnology Companieso Academic Institutions

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By Regiono North America U.S. Canada Mexico

o Europe Germany France Spain Italy UK Rest of Europe

o Asia-Pacific Australia Japan India China Rest of Asia-Pacific

o LAMEA Brazil Saudi Arabia South Africa Rest of LAMEA

KEY MARKET PLAYERS 3D Systems Corporation Exone Formlabs GE Materialise NV Oxferd Performance Materials, Inc. Organovo Holdings, Inc. Proto Labs SLM Solutions Group AG Stratasys Ltd.

The other players in the value chain include(profiles not included in the report):

Advanced Solutions Life Sciences Aspect Biosystem Cyfuse Biomedical K.K. Envisiontec Nano Dimension

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3D Printing Healthcare Market to Record a Robust Growth Rate for the COVID-19 Period - Cole of Duty

Lasers and sticky tape triple lithium metal battery life – Futurity: Research News

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Researchers have turned adhesive tape into a silicon oxide film that replaces troublesome anodes in lithium metal batteries.

For the Advanced Materials study, the researchers used an infrared laser cutter to convert the silicone-based adhesive of commercial tape into the porous silicon oxide coating, mixed with a small amount of laser-induced graphene from the tapes polyimide backing. The protective silicon oxide layer forms directly on the current collector of the battery.

The idea of using tape came from previous attempts to produce free-standing films of laser-induced graphene, says James Tour, chair in chemistry and a professor of computer science and of materials science and nanoengineering at Rice University.

Unlike pure polyimide films, the tape produced not only laser-induced graphene from the polyimide backing but also a translucent film where the adhesive had been. That caught the curiosity of the researchers and led to further experimentation.

The layer formed when they stuck the tape to a copper current collector and lased it multiple times to quickly raise its temperature to 2,300 Kelvin (3,680 degrees Fahrenheit). That generated a porous coating composed primarily of silicon and oxygen, combined with a small amount of carbon in the form of graphene.

In experiments, the foamy film appeared to soak up and release lithium metal without allowing the formation of dendritesspiky protrusionsthat can short-circuit a battery and potentially cause fires. The researchers note lithium metal tends to degrade fast during the batterys charge and discharge cycles with the bare current collector, but they did not observe any of those problems in anodes coated with laser-induced silicon oxide (LI-SiO).

In traditional lithium-ion batteries, lithium ions are intercalated into a graphite structure upon charging and de-intercalate as the battery discharges, says lead author Weiyin Chen, a graduate student. Six carbon atoms are used to store one lithium atom when the full capacity of graphite is used.

But in a lithium metal anode, no graphite is used, he says. The lithium ions directly shuttle from the surface of the metal anode as the battery discharges. Lithium metal anodes are considered a key technology for future battery development once their safety and performance issues are solved.

Lithium metal anodes can have a capacity 10 times higher than traditional graphite-lithium ion batteries. But lithium metal batteries that are devoid of graphite usually use excess lithium metal to compensate for losses caused by oxidation of the anode surface, Tour says.

When there is zero excess lithium metal in the anodes, they generally suffer fast degradation, producing cells with very limited cycle life, says coauthor Rodrigo Salvatierra, an academic visitor in the Tour lab. On the bright side, these anode-free cells become lighter and deliver better performance, but with the cost of a short life.

The researchers note LI-SiO tripled the battery lifetimes over other zero-excess lithium metal batteries. The LI-SiO coated batteries delivered 60 charge-discharge cycles while retaining 70% of their capacity.

Tour says that could make lithium metal batteries suitable as high-performance batteries for outdoor expeditions or high-capacity storage for short-term outages in rural areas.

Using standard industrial lasers should allow industry to scale up for large-area production. Tour says the method is fast, requires no solvents, and can be done in room atmosphere and temperature. He says the technique may also produce films to support metal nanoparticles, protective coatings, and filters.

The Air Force Office of Scientific Research supported the project.

Source: Rice University

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Lasers and sticky tape triple lithium metal battery life - Futurity: Research News

Tiny particles, big solutions – The Hindu

Over the past 15-plus weeks, how many times in a day have you furiously wiped down surfaces with disinfectants? The COVID-19 fear factor has turned scientists to research on products based around nano technology, the application of a group of few atoms. They are looking for a solution aimed at a surface coating that bonds to the material with long-term protection against germs (bacteria, viruses, fungi, protozoa).

What are these surface protectors?

They are substances that use metals such as silver and copper or biomolecules such as neem extract known for their microbial activity, or cationic (i.e positively charged) polymers in combination with chemical compounds (like ammonia plus nitrogen) that can be used as a long lasting protective coating. The compound can be sprayed on metal, glass, wood, stone, fabric, leather, and other materials and the effect can last from a week to 90 days depending on what type of surface it is used on.

Are they out in the market?

Until the pandemic, there were products for anti-bacterial application, but now the focus has shifted to viruses. For instance, Prof Ashwini Kumar Agrawal, the Head of Textile and Fibre Engineering Department at IIT Delhi, developed N9 blue nano silver in 2013, with a much higher potency than other metals and polymers to catch and kill bacteria. He has now evaluated the anti-viral properties and re-formulated the compound to work against COVID-19. He says different kinds of silver (yellow and brown) have been patented by countries including the US, China, Australia to establish the uniqueness of the metal for surface hygiene. "But the N9 blue silver can be 100 times more effective with the longest lasting protection."

Institutions (particularly the IITs) across the country are in different stages of developing these nanoparticles as surface coatings. All are awaiting validation against viruses, through field trials before they can legally mass manufacture.

The required certification needs to ideally go through government-approved labs (like ICMR, CSIR, NABL or NIV) that are currently all engaged only in research on medicinal drugs and vaccines.

Nano-products that are available

There are some products that have been tested by private labs either in India or abroad. For instance, Delhi-based start-up, Germcop has launched a disinfection service with a US manufactured and EPA-certified water-based anti-microbial product which, it is claimed, when sprayed over metallic, non-metallic, tiled and glass surfaces gives protection up to 120 days with a 99.9% killing rate in the first 10 days. Dr Pankaj Goyal, the founder, says the product is good for homes that have had a COVID positive patient home-quarantined. She is speaking to the Delhi Transport Corporation to disinfect 1,000 buses. However, the testing has been conducted in a private lab.

IIT Delhis samples were sent in April to the microbiological testing laboratory, MSL in UK. The reports are expected only by the end of the year. "The battery of lab tests will confirm the efficacy of the compound in dry state, how fast and for how long it can continue to kill the virus and if it is non-toxic and safe to use," says Prof Agrawal.

While Prof Agrawals N9 blue silver comes under the Government of Indias Nano Mission project funded by the Department of Science & Technology, another by IIT Madras, funded by the Defence Research Development Organisation, has developed a nano-coated filter for PPE kits, masks, and gloves that can be used by frontline healthcare workers. The coating filters sub-micron sized dust particles in the air. However, its practical application is also subject to field testing and is therefore, pending.

Why cant we just use regular disinfectants?

We can, but theyre not a healthy option for us or the environment, over a long term. Dr Rohini Sridhar, the COO of Apollo Hospitals in Madurai, says common disinfectants used so far in high density public places such as hospitals and clinics contain alcohol, phosphates or hypochlorite solutions, more commonly known as household bleach. "These solutions lose their function as they evaporate quickly, and break down when exposed to UV lights such as the sun, requiring the need for surfaces to be disinfected several times a day.

Are the long lasting surface protectors in use anywhere else in the world?

Following the findings from the Diamond Princess cruise ship that the coronavirus can last on surfaces up to 17 days, the development of a new disinfectant technology arose. While anti-viral coatings are undergoing clinical tests in several countries, three months ago scientists from Haifa's Institute of Technology, in Israel, claimed to have developed anti-viral polymers that could kill the coronavirus without getting diminished.

Researchers in Hong Kong University of Science & Technology also developed a new anti-microbial coating known as MAP-1 that can kill most bacteria and viruses -- including the coronavirus -- for up to 90 days.

Prof Agrawal says many countries are engaged in developing heat-sensitive polymers that respond to contamination from touch or droplets, from the time of previous epidemics of SARS. Many of those formulations have been modified during the current pandemic and sold under different brand names in Japan, Singapore, and the US. However, the surface protectors currently available in international markets are pocket-pinching.

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Tiny particles, big solutions - The Hindu

MRSEC wins major new grant from the National Science Foundation – Brandeis University

The cutting-edge research center received $18 million to develop the next generation of machines and materials.

MRSEC harnesses the power of organic matter to develop new materials and machines.

Brandeis' MRSEC program, which is developing revolutionary new types of nano-sized machines and materials, has received an $18 million, 6-year grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF).

It is the third time Brandeis has received the prestigious award. This year it was given to only 10 other universities besides Brandeis, including Columbia, Harvard and Princeton.

MRSEC, which stands for Materials Research Science and Engineering Center (MRSEC), is a long-term, nationwide effort to invent devices that are right out of a science fiction movie self-mending clothing, self-healing artificial organs, nanobots that travel through the bloodstream to wipe out cancer cells and cyborgs that move with the agility and grace of human beings.

Brandeis MRSEC researchers also recently began a long-term project to develop cures for viruses, including COVID-19.

It is extremely stimulating to be part of a sustained, well-supported team like the MRSEC that addresses grand challenges at the forefront of science, said Brandeis MRSEC director and professor of physics Seth Fraden. Brandeis is a fitting home for such a center because our small size and passionate community of researchers support a highly collaborative environment.

"The MRSEC program is a flagship program for the [NSF Division of Materials Research] and with these new awards will continue its long history of forging discoveries and fueling new technologies," the division's director, Linda Sapochak, said in a press release.

At Brandeis, Fraden and his colleagues focus on soft matter compounds like gels, liquid crystals, foams and polymers that exist somewhere between a liquid and a solid state.

They aim to endow these materials with features and abilities found in nature.

Fraden and his collaborators also work on "self-propelling" or "self-powered" liquids.

These are made from motor proteins taken from animal cells that consume chemical energy to keep on going. In the same way, these liquids move on their own without any kind of human intervention, and act like self-pumping fluids.

The MRSEC is an example of "horizontal connectivity" at Brandeis, where scientists transcend programmatic, departmental and school affiliations to work across disciplines. Some 17 Brandeis faculty, from 6 science departments, work alongside 30 graduate students, postdocs and MRSEC staff.

The MRSEC also offers a broad range of educational outreach programs for K-12 students and teachers, undergraduates, graduate students and postdocs.

As part of the NSF's Partnerships for Research and Education in Materials (PREM), MRSEC collaborates on research into cutting-edge materials with Hampton University, a historically black university in Virginia.

This 6-year, $3.6M PREM grant aims to boost diversity in the sciences by building Hampton's research capacity and increasing the recruitment, retention and graduation rates of individuals from underrepresented groups.

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MRSEC wins major new grant from the National Science Foundation - Brandeis University



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