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Island Maps: Caribbean Islands, Greek Islands, Pacific Islands …

Arctic OceanAtlantic Ocean (North)North of the equatorAtlantic Ocean (South)South of the equatorAssorted (A – Z)Found in a variety of bays, channels, lakes, rivers, seas, straits, etc.Caribbean SeaFound in a variety of bays, channels, lakes, rivers, seas, straits, etc.Greek IslesIndian OceanMediterranean SeaPacific Ocean (north)north of the equatorPacific Ocean (South)south of the equatorOceania and the South Pacific Islands Trending on WorldAtlas

This page was last updated on August 26, 2015.

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Island Maps: Caribbean Islands, Greek Islands, Pacific Islands …

Hawaiian Islands | Go Hawaii

Each island in the Hawaiian chain has a unique personality and offers visitors different types of experiences. If you aren’t sure which island is right for you, explore the islands by the type of experience you’d like to have whether it’s heart-pounding adventures, total relaxation or something in-between.

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Hawaiian Islands | Go Hawaii

Careers | Islands Restaurants

Careers At Islands

It all starts with our people. We hire only the hardest working and most ambitious to serve under the Islands banner. Our commitment to you is to make your career goals a reality. In short, we are looking for people with a passion for the restaurant industry and dedication to providing outstanding guest service.

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Careers | Islands Restaurants

Island Maps: Caribbean Islands, Greek Islands, Pacific …

Arctic OceanAtlantic Ocean (North)North of the equatorAtlantic Ocean (South)South of the equatorAssorted (A – Z)Found in a variety of bays, channels, lakes, rivers, seas, straits, etc.Caribbean SeaFound in a variety of bays, channels, lakes, rivers, seas, straits, etc.Greek IslesIndian OceanMediterranean SeaPacific Ocean (north)north of the equatorPacific Ocean (South)south of the equatorOceania and the South Pacific Islands Trending on WorldAtlas

This page was last updated on August 26, 2015.

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Island Maps: Caribbean Islands, Greek Islands, Pacific …

The Hawaiian Islands | Hawaii.com

Aloha, e komo mai

The Hawaiian Islands are one of the most geographically isolated places on earth, over 2,400 miles and nearly 4,000 km to the closest landmass, which is California, USA. Born of a volcanic hotspot rising from the sea floor of the Pacific Ocean, the Hawaiian archipelago formed nearly 75 million years ago, with the eldest islands of the chain long since eroded and submerged beneath the seas surface to the northwest and the youngest of the islands still forming beneath the seas surface to the south east.

This unique history of formation and isolation has given rise to breathtaking and extraordinary wonders. Perfect white sand beaches, abundant reefs, towering waterfalls, lush valleys, snow-capped mountains and fiery hot volcanic cauldrons captivate the hearts of those who visit as well as those who call this beautiful place home. A special culture has evolved from the unique natural environment of these islands. Native Hawaiians are the host culture here, and the values of Aloha have laid the foundation for the Hawaii we have today. Since the 1700s, peoples of various cultures have been arriving on these shores, bringing their foods, their music and their ways of life.

Today Hawaii is a bold showcase for farm-to-table fusion cuisine, culturally conscious fashion and innovation. Visitors will find themselves spoiled for options between romantic boutique getaways and family friendly five star resorts. High-end retailers have put Hawaii on the map of world-class shopping destinations, and Hawaiis passionate chefs have created a foodie frenzy here. As far forward as Hawaii has evolved, those looking for a walk back in time can still find Old Hawaii tucked away off the beaten paths. And the ancient stories still exist in the lovely hula hands of dancers who have given themselves as keepers of the culture.

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The Hawaiian Islands | Hawaii.com

Islands (band) – Wikipedia

IslandsBackground informationOriginMontreal, Quebec, CanadaGenresIndie rock, indie pop, art rockYears active2005presentLabelsANTI-, Rough Trade, Tomlab, Manque MusicAssociated actsThe Unicorns, Th’ Corn Gangg, Small Is Beautiful, Juiced Elfers, Human Highway, Sister Suvi, The Magic, American Tomahawk, Mister Heavenly, Evan Gordon and the Sad ClownsWebsiteislandsareforever.comMembersNicholas ThorburnEvan GordonGeordie GordonAdam HalfertyPast membersJim GuthrieAaron HarrisKate PerkinsMike FeuerstackJamie ThompsonPatrice AgbokouPatrick GregoireSebastian ChowAlexander ChowLuc Laurent

Islands is an indie rock band formed in 2005 in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, and currently based in Los Angeles, California.

Following the abrupt breakup of The Unicorns in 2004, members Nicholas Thorburn and Jamie Thompson simultaneously formed Islands and hip-hop group Th’ Corn Gangg, and recorded Islands’ debut album, Return to the Sea during 2005. The album was recorded at Breakglass Studio and Thompson’s bedroom in Montreal, Canada, and was produced by audio engineer/record producer Mark Lawson.

Return to the Sea was re-mastered in England for the European version of the album, and was released there by Rough Trade Records on April 3, 2006. In North America, the album was released on the upstart label Equator Records on April 4, 2006. The cover of the album is a painting by Caspar David Friedrich titled The Wreck of the Hope. The album features numerous guest appearances, including members of Arcade Fire and Wolf Parade.

The band played various shows around the US and Canada throughout mid-late 2005, followed by an opening slot for Metric on their early 2006 tour. After Return to the Sea was released in April 2006, the band embarked on their first full headlining tour, playing small clubs around the US and Canada throughout May. They were joined by Cadence Weapon and Why? on the first half of the tour, and Cadence Weapon and Busdriver on the second. The band generally received critical acclaim for their live shows, which sometimes ended with the band leading the audience out of the venue “pied piper style” and onto the surrounding streets.

On May 28, 2006, it was announced that Thompson was leaving the band. Islands decided to continue on without Thompson, and a European tour was scheduled, and further recordings confirmed. The band later emerged the following month for two surprise appearances in Montreal, performing with a new lineup including new drummer Aaron Harris and multi-instrumentalist Kate Perkins, before departing for Europe the following week.

During subsequent tour dates in Iceland, the United States, Canada and the United Kingdom, the band premiered several new songs which appeared on their second album, Arm’s Way, which was released on Los Angeles-based ANTI- Records on May 20, 2008.

On June 19, 2009, it was announced that the entire band except for Thorburn had left the group. The new lineup included brothers Evan and Geordie Gordon, and a returning Thompson. Islands’ third album, Vapours, was released September 22, 2009 on ANTI-. The band extensively toured the record in North America with Jemina Pearl and Toro Y Moi.[1] During the spring of 2010, Islands toured Europe, playing shows in Northern and Western Europe throughout March and April.

In an interview with Exclaim!, Nick Thorburn explained that the overhauled lineup was a product of his desire to try new things. “That’s important to me to be able to constantly try new things. That’s why this record’s largely informed by electronic stuff like drum machines, sequencing, and programming, which really scales it back from the last record.” [2] Thompson once again left the band prior to the summer 2010 tour, and was again replaced by Aaron Harris.

Following Vapours’ release, Thorburn formed the band Mister Heavenly with Man Man’s Honus Honus and Modest Mouse’s Joe Plummer.[3] The trio released their debut album, Out of Love, on Sub Pop Records in 2011.

On October 25, 2011, ANTI- announced Islands’ fourth record, A Sleep & a Forgetting, which was released February 14, 2012. In a statement, Thorburn explained, I left New York after the end of a relationship and came to Los Angeles. There was a piano where I was staying and thats where I wrote these songs. This record deals with loss, with memory and forgetting and with dreaming. I started writing it on Valentines Day and its coming out on Valentines Day.[4] Drums on the record were played by Luc Laurent, who officially joined the band in November 2011 after his band Pepper Rabbit broke up. The song “Hallways” from the album was featured in a commercial for Dell and the Microsoft Surface tablet.

On July 9, 2013, Thorburn revealed Ski Mask, Islands’ fifth record, and the first with new drummer Adam Halferty. That same day, the band premiered the lead single, “Wave Forms”. The album was released on September 17, 2013, followed by a number of tours across US, Canada, & Europe, including an appearance Primavera Sound Fest in Barcelona.[5]

During the summer of 2015, Islands simultaneously recorded two records: Should I Remain Here, At Sea? a spiritual successor to the band’s debut album, Return to the Sea and Taste, a “more electronic” album “buoyed by drum machines, programming and vintage synths.”[6] The albums were released on May 13, 2016 via the band’s own Manqu label, reaching #21 and #23 on the Billboard Heatseeker charts, respectively.[7]

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Islands (band) – Wikipedia

The Hawaiian Islands | Hawaii.com

Aloha, e komo mai

The Hawaiian Islands are one of the most geographically isolated places on earth, over 2,400 miles and nearly 4,000 km to the closest landmass, which is California, USA. Born of a volcanic hotspot rising from the sea floor of the Pacific Ocean, the Hawaiian archipelago formed nearly 75 million years ago, with the eldest islands of the chain long since eroded and submerged beneath the seas surface to the northwest and the youngest of the islands still forming beneath the seas surface to the south east.

This unique history of formation and isolation has given rise to breathtaking and extraordinary wonders. Perfect white sand beaches, abundant reefs, towering waterfalls, lush valleys, snow-capped mountains and fiery hot volcanic cauldrons captivate the hearts of those who visit as well as those who call this beautiful place home. A special culture has evolved from the unique natural environment of these islands. Native Hawaiians are the host culture here, and the values of Aloha have laid the foundation for the Hawaii we have today. Since the 1700s, peoples of various cultures have been arriving on these shores, bringing their foods, their music and their ways of life.

Today Hawaii is a bold showcase for farm-to-table fusion cuisine, culturally conscious fashion and innovation. Visitors will find themselves spoiled for options between romantic boutique getaways and family friendly five star resorts. High-end retailers have put Hawaii on the map of world-class shopping destinations, and Hawaiis passionate chefs have created a foodie frenzy here. As far forward as Hawaii has evolved, those looking for a walk back in time can still find Old Hawaii tucked away off the beaten paths. And the ancient stories still exist in the lovely hula hands of dancers who have given themselves as keepers of the culture.

Read more:

The Hawaiian Islands | Hawaii.com

Seven Islands State Birding Park Tennessee State Parks

PUBLIC NOTICE: Effective November 18, the Seven Islands Loop Trail will be closed until August 18, 2018 due to construction of an ADA Trail and Pedestrian Bridge at Seven Islands State Birding Park. We appreciate your patience as we work to make theSeven Islandsmore accessibleto all visitors, while providingnew ways to enjoy the park’s unique features.

The diverse natural landscape of aquatic and grassland habitats makes Seven Islands State Birding Park a premier birding destination with more than 190 species of birds sighted. The park encompasses 416acres along the French Broad River in Knox County, approximately 19 miles east of Knoxville. This peninsula of land features more than eight miles of natural trails, rolling hills and views of the Smoky Mountains. In addition to being a wildlife refuge popular for hiking and wildlife observation, the park is a research and educational facility for schools and other groups and a demonstration area for land use and habitat management techniques. Songbirds, hawks and waterfowl can be seen along the meadow trails and several old barns are a favorite refuge for Barn Owls. For paddlers and anglers, there is a small canoe/kayak launch that provides access to the French Broad River.

The lands comprising the Seven Islands State Birding Park were acquired in 2002 as a wildlife refuge through a cooperative effort of the Seven Islands Foundation, a non-profit land conservancy, and the Knox County Parks and Recreation Department. The vision, goals and objectives of the Seven Island Foundation included preservation of this property as a wildlife sanctuary and refuge. The state of Tennessee will continue to manage this as a state park for native flora and fauna and low impact, non-consumptive, outdoor activities for enjoyment of the wildlife diversity and natural beauty of Seven Islands. Seven Islands became the 56th Tennessee State Park in July 2013.

In addition to preserving Seven Islands natural resources, future planning and management at the park puts a new focus on improving ADA accessibility. We are currently working on upgrading our restroom facilities, and parking areas, as well as adding more benches, and renovating our existing trails to improve accessibility. One project in progress, is the creation of an ADA trail that will take visitors to a fully accessible pedestrian bridge crossing the French Broad River to Newman’s Island. This is an exciting project, and we are looking forward to providing a safe and satisfying experience for all visitors.

Dogs are permitted in the park. They must be on a leash at all times, and we do ask that you clean up after them.

Looking for a trail map? Click the link below to see a list of the maps available at this park. The page includes all the trail maps we have available, organized by park. We have free and paid options that provide you the details you need to have your next great adventure in Tennessee.

VIEW MAPS

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Seven Islands State Birding Park Tennessee State Parks

Island – Wikipedia

Manhattan, U.S. is home to over 1.6 million people.

An island or isle is any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water.[2] Very small islands such as emergent land features on atolls can be called islets, skerries, cays or keys. An island in a river or a lake island may be called an eyot or ait, and a small island off the coast may be called a holm. A grouping of geographically or geologically related islands is called an archipelago, such as the Philippines, for example.

An island may be described as such, despite the presence of an artificial land bridge; examples are Singapore and its causeway, and the various Dutch delta islands, such as IJsselmonde. Some places may even retain “island” in their names for historical reasons after being connected to a larger landmass by a land bridge or landfill, such as Coney Island and Coronado Island, though these are, strictly speaking, tied islands. Conversely, when a piece of land is separated from the mainland by a man-made canal, for example the Peloponnese by the Corinth Canal or Marble Hill in northern Manhattan during the time between the building of the United States Ship Canal and the filling-in of the Harlem River which surrounded the area, it is generally not considered an island.

There are two main types of islands in the sea: continental and oceanic. There are also artificial islands.

Greenland is the world’s largest island, with an area of over 2.1 million km2, while Australia, the world’s smallest continent, has an area of 7.6 million km2, but there is no standard of size which distinguishes islands from continents,[5] or from islets.[6] There is a difference between islands and continents in terms of geology. Continents sit on continental lithosphere which is part of tectonic plates floating high on Earth’s mantle. Oceanic crust is also part of tectonic plates, but it is denser than continental lithosphere, so it floats low on the mantle. Islands are either extensions of the oceanic crust (e.g. volcanic islands) or geologically they are part of some continent sitting on continental lithosphere (e.g. Greenland). This holds true for Australia, which sits on its own continental lithosphere and tectonic plate.

Continental islands are bodies of land that lie on the continental shelf of a continent.[7] Examples are Borneo, Java, Sumatra, Sakhalin, Taiwan and Hainan off Asia; New Guinea, Tasmania, and Kangaroo Island off Australia; Great Britain, Ireland, and Sicily off Europe; Greenland, Newfoundland, Long Island, and Sable Island off North America; and Barbados, Falklands and Trinidad off South America.

A special type of continental island is the microcontinental island, which is created when a continent is rifted. Examples are Madagascar and Socotra off Africa, the Kerguelen Islands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, and some of the Seychelles.

Another subtype is an island or bar formed by deposition of tiny rocks where water current loses some of its carrying capacity. This includes:

Islets are very small islands.

Oceanic islands are islands that do not sit on continental shelves. The vast majority are volcanic in origin, such as Saint Helena in the South Atlantic Ocean.[8] The few oceanic islands that are not volcanic are tectonic in origin and arise where plate movements have lifted up the ocean floor above the surface. Examples are Saint Peter and Paul Rocks in the Atlantic Ocean and Macquarie Island in the Pacific.

One type of volcanic oceanic island is found in a volcanic island arc. These islands arise from volcanoes where the subduction of one plate under another is occurring. Examples are the Aleutian Islands, the Mariana Islands, and most of Tonga in the Pacific Ocean. The only examples in the Atlantic Ocean are some of the Lesser Antilles and the South Sandwich Islands.

Another type of volcanic oceanic island occurs where an oceanic rift reaches the surface. There are two examples: Iceland, which is the world’s second largest volcanic island, and Jan Mayen. Both are in the Atlantic.

A third type of volcanic oceanic island is formed over volcanic hotspots. A hotspot is more or less stationary relative to the moving tectonic plate above it, so a chain of islands results as the plate drifts. Over long periods of time, this type of island is eventually “drowned” by isostatic adjustment and eroded, becoming a seamount. Plate movement across a hot-spot produces a line of islands oriented in the direction of the plate movement. An example is the Hawaiian Islands, from Hawaii to Kure, which continue beneath the sea surface in a more northerly direction as the Emperor Seamounts. Another chain with similar orientation is the Tuamotu Archipelago; its older, northerly trend is the Line Islands. The southernmost chain is the Austral Islands, with its northerly trending part the atolls in the nation of Tuvalu. Tristan da Cunha is an example of a hotspot volcano in the Atlantic Ocean. Another hot spot in the Atlantic is the island of Surtsey, which was formed in 1963.

An atoll is an island formed from a coral reef that has grown on an eroded and submerged volcanic island. The reef rises to the surface of the water and forms a new island. Atolls are typically ring-shaped with a central lagoon. Examples are the Line Islands in the Pacific and the Maldives in the Indian Ocean.

Approximately 45,000 tropical islands with an area of at least 5 hectares (12 acres) exist.[9] Examples formed from coral reefs include Maldives, Tonga, Samoa, Nauru, and Polynesia.[9] Granite islands include Seychelles and Tioman and volcanic islands such as Saint Helena.

The socio-economic diversity of tropical islands ranges from the Stone Age societies in the interior of Madagascar, Borneo, and Papua New Guinea to the high-tech lifestyles of the city-islands of Singapore and Hong Kong.[10]

International tourism is a significant factor in the economy of many tropical islands including Seychelles, Sri Lanka, Mauritius, Runion, Hawaii, and the Maldives.

Almost all of the Earth’s islands are natural and have been formed by tectonic forces or volcanic eruptions. However, artificial (man-made) islands also exist, such as the island in Osaka Bay off the Japanese island of Honshu, on which Kansai International Airport is located. Artificial islands can be built using natural materials (e.g., earth, rock, or sand) or artificial ones (e.g., concrete slabs or recycled waste).[11][12] Sometimes natural islands are artificially enlarged, such as Vasilyevsky Island in the Russian city of St. Petersburg, which had its western shore extended westward by some 0.5km in the construction of the Passenger Port of St. Petersburg.[13]

Artificial islands are sometimes built on pre-existing “low-tide elevation”, a naturally formed area of land which is surrounded by and above water at low tide but submerged at high tide. Legally it is not an island and has no territorial sea of its own.[14]

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Island – Wikipedia

Island in Pigeon Forge – Family Fun Center & Entertainment …

The Island in Pigeon Forge is your one stop in Pigeon Forge for affordable family fun all night and day! Explore our terrific new shopping and entertainment complex with more than sixty retail and specialty shops, a number of popular restaurants and eateries, rides and games, dancing fountains, live music, attractions and much more.

Come visit The Island in Pigeon Forge. Its a beautiful, new, clean, safe and walkable shopping and entertainment complex with many affordable choices for entertainment, dining, shopping and lodging. So much is FREE, and ALL is affordable!

Whether youre visiting Pigeon Forge for a wedding, reunion or family vacation, The Island in Pigeon Forge is the premier family fun and entertainment destination in the Smoky Mountains. Eat, shop, play and stay at The Island in Pigeon Forge!

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Island in Pigeon Forge – Family Fun Center & Entertainment …

River Islands Golf Club Welcome to River Islands Golf Club!

East Tennessees #1 Golf Course and Premier Daily Fee Golf Club was created to rival the countrys most prestigious golf clubs, bringing world class, daily fee golf to Tennessee. Conveniently located in Kodak, Tennessee ideally situated between Knoxville and the Great Smoky Mountains River Islands Golf Club is spectacularly set on over 175 acres of breathtaking views where bald eagles soar high above the river otters playing along the river banks. Featuring a true, links style, Arthur Hills design, River Islands has been a must play course in Tennessee since it opened in 1991.

The course covers over 7,000 yards and takes you over sweeping knolls, into lush valleys, below sharp bluffs, and across a flowing river dotted with islands. With brand newMiniVerde greensand beautiful Zoysia fairways, River Islands offers a challenging yet beautiful experience.

The course travels along the edge of the French Broad River with three islands in the middle of the river serving as focal points of the course. The championship layout and manicured conditions make River Islands a consistently superb playing experience.

River Islands hosts one of the most extensive practice facilities in the area, providing quality PGA instruction.Youll also enjoy our Clubhouse, offeringspecial events including golf outings.

Attentive service and a commitment to excellence are the hallmarks of River Islands Golf Club, which is dedicated to offering players of all levels a total golf experience in keeping with the rich traditions of the worlds greatest game. Discover for yourself why River Islands Golf Club is truly a round to remember.

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River Islands Golf Club Welcome to River Islands Golf Club!

Island – Wikipedia

Manhattan, U.S. is home to over 1.6 million people.

An island or isle is any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water.[2] Very small islands such as emergent land features on atolls can be called islets, skerries, cays or keys. An island in a river or a lake island may be called an eyot or ait, and a small island off the coast may be called a holm. A grouping of geographically or geologically related islands is called an archipelago, such as the Philippines, for example.

An island may be described as such, despite the presence of an artificial land bridge; examples are Singapore and its causeway, and the various Dutch delta islands, such as IJsselmonde. Some places may even retain “island” in their names for historical reasons after being connected to a larger landmass by a land bridge or landfill, such as Coney Island and Coronado Island, though these are, strictly speaking, tied islands. Conversely, when a piece of land is separated from the mainland by a man-made canal, for example the Peloponnese by the Corinth Canal or Marble Hill in northern Manhattan during the time between the building of the United States Ship Canal and the filling-in of the Harlem River which surrounded the area, it is generally not considered an island.

There are two main types of islands in the sea: continental and oceanic. There are also artificial islands.

Greenland is the world’s largest island, with an area of over 2.1 million km2, while Australia, the world’s smallest continent, has an area of 7.6 million km2, but there is no standard of size which distinguishes islands from continents,[5] or from islets.[6] There is a difference between islands and continents in terms of geology. Continents sit on continental lithosphere which is part of tectonic plates floating high on Earth’s mantle. Oceanic crust is also part of tectonic plates, but it is denser than continental lithosphere, so it floats low on the mantle. Islands are either extensions of the oceanic crust (e.g. volcanic islands) or geologically they are part of some continent sitting on continental lithosphere (e.g. Greenland). This holds true for Australia, which sits on its own continental lithosphere and tectonic plate.

Continental islands are bodies of land that lie on the continental shelf of a continent.[7] Examples are Borneo, Java, Sumatra, Sakhalin, Taiwan and Hainan off Asia; New Guinea, Tasmania, and Kangaroo Island off Australia; Great Britain, Ireland, and Sicily off Europe; Greenland, Newfoundland, Long Island, and Sable Island off North America; and Barbados, Falklands and Trinidad off South America.

A special type of continental island is the microcontinental island, which is created when a continent is rifted. Examples are Madagascar and Socotra off Africa, the Kerguelen Islands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, and some of the Seychelles.

Another subtype is an island or bar formed by deposition of tiny rocks where water current loses some of its carrying capacity. This includes:

Islets are very small islands.

Oceanic islands are islands that do not sit on continental shelves. The vast majority are volcanic in origin, such as Saint Helena in the South Atlantic Ocean.[8] The few oceanic islands that are not volcanic are tectonic in origin and arise where plate movements have lifted up the ocean floor above the surface. Examples are Saint Peter and Paul Rocks in the Atlantic Ocean and Macquarie Island in the Pacific.

One type of volcanic oceanic island is found in a volcanic island arc. These islands arise from volcanoes where the subduction of one plate under another is occurring. Examples are the Aleutian Islands, the Mariana Islands, and most of Tonga in the Pacific Ocean. The only examples in the Atlantic Ocean are some of the Lesser Antilles and the South Sandwich Islands.

Another type of volcanic oceanic island occurs where an oceanic rift reaches the surface. There are two examples: Iceland, which is the world’s second largest volcanic island, and Jan Mayen. Both are in the Atlantic.

A third type of volcanic oceanic island is formed over volcanic hotspots. A hotspot is more or less stationary relative to the moving tectonic plate above it, so a chain of islands results as the plate drifts. Over long periods of time, this type of island is eventually “drowned” by isostatic adjustment and eroded, becoming a seamount. Plate movement across a hot-spot produces a line of islands oriented in the direction of the plate movement. An example is the Hawaiian Islands, from Hawaii to Kure, which continue beneath the sea surface in a more northerly direction as the Emperor Seamounts. Another chain with similar orientation is the Tuamotu Archipelago; its older, northerly trend is the Line Islands. The southernmost chain is the Austral Islands, with its northerly trending part the atolls in the nation of Tuvalu. Tristan da Cunha is an example of a hotspot volcano in the Atlantic Ocean. Another hot spot in the Atlantic is the island of Surtsey, which was formed in 1963.

An atoll is an island formed from a coral reef that has grown on an eroded and submerged volcanic island. The reef rises to the surface of the water and forms a new island. Atolls are typically ring-shaped with a central lagoon. Examples are the Line Islands in the Pacific and the Maldives in the Indian Ocean.

Approximately 45,000 tropical islands with an area of at least 5 hectares (12 acres) exist.[9] Examples formed from coral reefs include Maldives, Tonga, Samoa, Nauru, and Polynesia.[9] Granite islands include Seychelles and Tioman and volcanic islands such as Saint Helena.

The socio-economic diversity of tropical islands ranges from the Stone Age societies in the interior of Madagascar, Borneo, and Papua New Guinea to the high-tech lifestyles of the city-islands of Singapore and Hong Kong.[10]

International tourism is a significant factor in the economy of many tropical islands including Seychelles, Sri Lanka, Mauritius, Runion, Hawaii, and the Maldives.

Almost all of the Earth’s islands are natural and have been formed by tectonic forces or volcanic eruptions. However, artificial (man-made) islands also exist, such as the island in Osaka Bay off the Japanese island of Honshu, on which Kansai International Airport is located. Artificial islands can be built using natural materials (e.g., earth, rock, or sand) or artificial ones (e.g., concrete slabs or recycled waste).[11][12] Sometimes natural islands are artificially enlarged, such as Vasilyevsky Island in the Russian city of St. Petersburg, which had its western shore extended westward by some 0.5km in the construction of the Passenger Port of St. Petersburg.[13]

Artificial islands are sometimes built on pre-existing “low-tide elevation”, a naturally formed area of land which is surrounded by and above water at low tide but submerged at high tide. Legally it is not an island and has no territorial sea of its own.[14]

See the rest here:

Island – Wikipedia

Island – Wikipedia

Manhattan, U.S. is home to over 1.6 million people.

An island or isle is any piece of sub-continental land that is surrounded by water.[2] Very small islands such as emergent land features on atolls can be called islets, skerries, cays or keys. An island in a river or a lake island may be called an eyot or ait, and a small island off the coast may be called a holm. A grouping of geographically or geologically related islands is called an archipelago, such as the Philippines, for example.

An island may be described as such, despite the presence of an artificial land bridge; examples are Singapore and its causeway, and the various Dutch delta islands, such as IJsselmonde. Some places may even retain “island” in their names for historical reasons after being connected to a larger landmass by a land bridge or landfill, such as Coney Island and Coronado Island, though these are, strictly speaking, tied islands. Conversely, when a piece of land is separated from the mainland by a man-made canal, for example the Peloponnese by the Corinth Canal or Marble Hill in northern Manhattan during the time between the building of the United States Ship Canal and the filling-in of the Harlem River which surrounded the area, it is generally not considered an island.

There are two main types of islands in the sea: continental and oceanic. There are also artificial islands.

Greenland is the world’s largest island, with an area of over 2.1 million km2, while Australia, the world’s smallest continent, has an area of 7.6 million km2, but there is no standard of size which distinguishes islands from continents,[5] or from islets.[6] There is a difference between islands and continents in terms of geology. Continents sit on continental lithosphere which is part of tectonic plates floating high on Earth’s mantle. Oceanic crust is also part of tectonic plates, but it is denser than continental lithosphere, so it floats low on the mantle. Islands are either extensions of the oceanic crust (e.g. volcanic islands) or geologically they are part of some continent sitting on continental lithosphere (e.g. Greenland). This holds true for Australia, which sits on its own continental lithosphere and tectonic plate.

Continental islands are bodies of land that lie on the continental shelf of a continent.[7] Examples are Borneo, Java, Sumatra, Sakhalin, Taiwan and Hainan off Asia; New Guinea, Tasmania, and Kangaroo Island off Australia; Great Britain, Ireland, and Sicily off Europe; Greenland, Newfoundland, Long Island, and Sable Island off North America; and Barbados, Falklands and Trinidad off South America.

A special type of continental island is the microcontinental island, which is created when a continent is rifted. Examples are Madagascar and Socotra off Africa, the Kerguelen Islands, New Caledonia, New Zealand, and some of the Seychelles.

Another subtype is an island or bar formed by deposition of tiny rocks where water current loses some of its carrying capacity. This includes:

Islets are very small islands.

Oceanic islands are islands that do not sit on continental shelves. The vast majority are volcanic in origin, such as Saint Helena in the South Atlantic Ocean.[8] The few oceanic islands that are not volcanic are tectonic in origin and arise where plate movements have lifted up the ocean floor above the surface. Examples are Saint Peter and Paul Rocks in the Atlantic Ocean and Macquarie Island in the Pacific.

One type of volcanic oceanic island is found in a volcanic island arc. These islands arise from volcanoes where the subduction of one plate under another is occurring. Examples are the Aleutian Islands, the Mariana Islands, and most of Tonga in the Pacific Ocean. The only examples in the Atlantic Ocean are some of the Lesser Antilles and the South Sandwich Islands.

Another type of volcanic oceanic island occurs where an oceanic rift reaches the surface. There are two examples: Iceland, which is the world’s second largest volcanic island, and Jan Mayen. Both are in the Atlantic.

A third type of volcanic oceanic island is formed over volcanic hotspots. A hotspot is more or less stationary relative to the moving tectonic plate above it, so a chain of islands results as the plate drifts. Over long periods of time, this type of island is eventually “drowned” by isostatic adjustment and eroded, becoming a seamount. Plate movement across a hot-spot produces a line of islands oriented in the direction of the plate movement. An example is the Hawaiian Islands, from Hawaii to Kure, which continue beneath the sea surface in a more northerly direction as the Emperor Seamounts. Another chain with similar orientation is the Tuamotu Archipelago; its older, northerly trend is the Line Islands. The southernmost chain is the Austral Islands, with its northerly trending part the atolls in the nation of Tuvalu. Tristan da Cunha is an example of a hotspot volcano in the Atlantic Ocean. Another hot spot in the Atlantic is the island of Surtsey, which was formed in 1963.

An atoll is an island formed from a coral reef that has grown on an eroded and submerged volcanic island. The reef rises to the surface of the water and forms a new island. Atolls are typically ring-shaped with a central lagoon. Examples are the Line Islands in the Pacific and the Maldives in the Indian Ocean.

Approximately 45,000 tropical islands with an area of at least 5 hectares (12 acres) exist.[9] Examples formed from coral reefs include Maldives, Tonga, Samoa, Nauru, and Polynesia.[9] Granite islands include Seychelles and Tioman and volcanic islands such as Saint Helena.

The socio-economic diversity of tropical islands ranges from the Stone Age societies in the interior of Madagascar, Borneo, and Papua New Guinea to the high-tech lifestyles of the city-islands of Singapore and Hong Kong.[10]

International tourism is a significant factor in the economy of many tropical islands including Seychelles, Sri Lanka, Mauritius, Runion, Hawaii, and the Maldives.

Almost all of the Earth’s islands are natural and have been formed by tectonic forces or volcanic eruptions. However, artificial (man-made) islands also exist, such as the island in Osaka Bay off the Japanese island of Honshu, on which Kansai International Airport is located. Artificial islands can be built using natural materials (e.g., earth, rock, or sand) or artificial ones (e.g., concrete slabs or recycled waste).[11][12] Sometimes natural islands are artificially enlarged, such as Vasilyevsky Island in the Russian city of St. Petersburg, which had its western shore extended westward by some 0.5km in the construction of the Passenger Port of St. Petersburg.[13]

Artificial islands are sometimes built on pre-existing “low-tide elevation”, a naturally formed area of land which is surrounded by and above water at low tide but submerged at high tide. Legally it is not an island and has no territorial sea of its own.[14]

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Island – Wikipedia

Island Maps: Caribbean Islands, Greek Islands, Pacific …

Arctic OceanAtlantic Ocean (North)North of the equatorAtlantic Ocean (South)South of the equatorAssorted (A – Z)Found in a variety of bays, channels, lakes, rivers, seas, straits, etc.Caribbean SeaFound in a variety of bays, channels, lakes, rivers, seas, straits, etc.Greek IslesIndian OceanMediterranean SeaPacific Ocean (north)north of the equatorPacific Ocean (South)south of the equatorOceania and the South Pacific Islands Trending on WorldAtlas

This page was last updated on August 26, 2015.

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| Islands Restaurants

Islands has been a San Diego favorite for more than 25 years. With ten locations throughout the county, you can find the best burger in San Diego in your own neighborhood. Relax with family and friends while enjoying awesome surf videos, ice cold beer, mai tais and delicious burgers, like the Hawaiian Burger with fresh grilled pineapple. Great sports viewing on large HD TVs in a fun atmosphere. Visit Islands for Happy Hour during the week from 3pm to 6:30pm for great deals in the bar.

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| Islands Restaurants

Island Maps: Caribbean Islands, Greek Islands, Pacific …

Arctic OceanAtlantic Ocean (North)North of the equatorAtlantic Ocean (South)South of the equatorAssorted (A – Z)Found in a variety of bays, channels, lakes, rivers, seas, straits, etc.Caribbean SeaFound in a variety of bays, channels, lakes, rivers, seas, straits, etc.Greek IslesIndian OceanMediterranean SeaPacific Ocean (north)north of the equatorPacific Ocean (South)south of the equatorOceania and the South Pacific Islands Trending on WorldAtlas

This page was last updated on August 26, 2015.

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Island Maps: Caribbean Islands, Greek Islands, Pacific …

Ethereum Price Forecast: ETH Surges 20% After Bitcoin Futures Settle

Ethereum News Update
All this week, a dark cloud hung over cryptocurrency markets. It was caused by the first batch of Bitcoin futures contracts coming due…and investors having no idea what to expect from the fallout.

But then the contract was settled. The world continued spinning on its axis, and the sun still rose in the east. Nothing much had changed. (Source: “Milestone: Cboe’s First Bitcoin Futures Contract Expired Today,” CoinDesk, January 17,.

The post Ethereum Price Forecast: ETH Surges 20% After Bitcoin Futures Settle appeared first on Profit Confidential.

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Ethereum Price Forecast: ETH Surges 20% After Bitcoin Futures Settle

Will Cryptocurrencies Recover? Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple and Litecoin

The crypto carnage has come to a halt for the time being, and everyone is busy assessing the damage done. The top digital currencies—Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple, and Litecoin—are showing an uptick after suffering severe damage over the last few days. Although it has brought some relief to see green on the screen, the question now is: Will cryptocurrencies recover to their previous highs? Will Bitcoin go back up together with the other top digital coins?

To answer these questions, let us first recap the main events that led to this bloodbath.

Last week, it was reported that South Korea planned to ban its domestic crypto exchanges in the wake of rising investor interest from all.

The post Will Cryptocurrencies Recover? Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple and Litecoin appeared first on Profit Confidential.

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Will Cryptocurrencies Recover? Bitcoin, Ethereum, Ripple and Litecoin


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