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Philippines War on Drugs | Human Rights Watch

Tilted election playing field in Turkey; European Court of Justice confirms rights of same-sex couples; Philippine policepromoting abusers; Vietnam’s cyber security law; Nigerian military trying to smear Amnesty International; Paris names imprisoned Bahrainrights activist Nabeel Rajaban honorary citizen; Intimidation ofjournalists in the US; Brutal US treatment of refugees; and Russia’s World Cup amid Syria slaughter.

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Philippines War on Drugs | Human Rights Watch

A Brief History of the Drug War | Drug Policy Alliance

This video from hip hop legend Jay Z and acclaimed artist Molly Crabapple depicts the drug wars devastating impact on the Black community from decades of biased law enforcement.

The video traces the drug war from President Nixon to the draconian Rockefeller Drug Laws to the emerging aboveground marijuana market that is poised to make legal millions for wealthy investors doing the same thing that generations of people of color have been arrested and locked up for. After you watch the video, read on to learn more about the discriminatory history of the war on drugs.

Many currently illegal drugs, such as marijuana, opium, coca, and psychedelics have been used for thousands of years for both medical and spiritual purposes. So why are some drugs legal and other drugs illegal today? It’s not based on any scientific assessment of the relative risks of these drugs but it has everything to do with who is associated with these drugs.

The first anti-opium laws in the 1870s were directed at Chinese immigrants. The first anti-cocaine laws in the early 1900s were directed at black men in the South. The first anti-marijuana laws, in the Midwest and the Southwest in the 1910s and 20s, were directed at Mexican migrants and Mexican Americans. Today, Latino and especially black communities are still subject to wildly disproportionate drug enforcement and sentencing practices.

In the 1960s, as drugs became symbols of youthful rebellion, social upheaval, and political dissent, the government halted scientific research to evaluate their medical safety and efficacy.

In June 1971, President Nixon declared a war on drugs. He dramatically increased the size and presence of federal drug control agencies, and pushed through measures such as mandatory sentencing and no-knock warrants.

A top Nixon aide, John Ehrlichman, later admitted: You want to know what this was really all about. The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what Im saying. We knew we couldnt make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.Nixon temporarily placed marijuana in Schedule One, the most restrictive category of drugs, pending review by a commission he appointed led by Republican Pennsylvania Governor Raymond Shafer.

In 1972, the commission unanimously recommended decriminalizing the possession and distribution of marijuana for personal use. Nixon ignored the report and rejected its recommendations.

Between 1973 and 1977, however, eleven states decriminalized marijuana possession. In January 1977, President Jimmy Carter was inaugurated on a campaign platform that included marijuana decriminalization. In October 1977, the Senate Judiciary Committee voted to decriminalize possession of up to an ounce of marijuana for personal use.

Within just a few years, though, the tide had shifted. Proposals to decriminalize marijuana were abandoned as parents became increasingly concerned about high rates of teen marijuana use. Marijuana was ultimately caught up in a broader cultural backlash against the perceived permissiveness of the 1970s.

The presidency of Ronald Reagan marked the start of a long period of skyrocketing rates of incarceration, largely thanks to his unprecedented expansion of the drug war. The number of people behind bars for nonviolent drug law offenses increased from 50,000 in 1980 to over 400,000 by 1997.

Public concern about illicit drug use built throughout the 1980s, largely due to media portrayals of people addicted to the smokeable form of cocaine dubbed crack. Soon after Ronald Reagan took office in 1981, his wife, Nancy Reagan, began a highly-publicized anti-drug campaign, coining the slogan “Just Say No.”

This set the stage for the zero tolerance policies implemented in the mid-to-late 1980s. Los Angeles Police Chief Daryl Gates, who believed that casual drug users should be taken out and shot, founded the DARE drug education program, which was quickly adopted nationwide despite the lack of evidence of its effectiveness. The increasingly harsh drug policies also blocked the expansion of syringe access programs and other harm reduction policies to reduce the rapid spread of HIV/AIDS.

In the late 1980s, a political hysteria about drugs led to the passage of draconian penalties in Congress and state legislatures that rapidly increased the prison population. In 1985, the proportion of Americans polled who saw drug abuse as the nation’s “number one problem” was just 2-6 percent. The figure grew through the remainder of the 1980s until, in September 1989, it reached a remarkable 64 percent one of the most intense fixations by the American public on any issue in polling history. Within less than a year, however, the figure plummeted to less than 10 percent, as the media lost interest. The draconian policies enacted during the hysteria remained, however, and continued to result in escalating levels of arrests and incarceration.

Although Bill Clinton advocated for treatment instead of incarceration during his 1992 presidential campaign, after his first few months in the White House he reverted to the drug war strategies of his Republican predecessors by continuing to escalate the drug war. Notoriously, Clinton rejected a U.S. Sentencing Commission recommendation to eliminate the disparity between crack and powder cocaine sentences.

He also rejected, with the encouragement of drug czar General Barry McCaffrey, Health Secretary Donna Shalalas advice to end the federal ban on funding for syringe access programs. Yet, a month before leaving office, Clinton asserted in a Rolling Stone interview that “we really need a re-examination of our entire policy on imprisonment” of people who use drugs, and said that marijuana use “should be decriminalized.”

At the height of the drug war hysteria in the late 1980s and early 1990s, a movement emerged seeking a new approach to drug policy. In 1987, Arnold Trebach and Kevin Zeese founded the Drug Policy Foundation describing it as the loyal opposition to the war on drugs. Prominent conservatives such as William Buckley and Milton Friedman had long advocated for ending drug prohibition, as had civil libertarians such as longtime ACLU Executive Director Ira Glasser. In the late 1980s they were joined by Baltimore Mayor Kurt Schmoke, Federal Judge Robert Sweet, Princeton professor Ethan Nadelmann, and other activists, scholars and policymakers.

In 1994, Nadelmann founded The Lindesmith Center as the first U.S. project of George Soros Open Society Institute. In 2000, the growing Center merged with the Drug Policy Foundation to create the Drug Policy Alliance.

George W. Bush arrived in the White House as the drug war was running out of steam yet he allocated more money than ever to it. His drug czar, John Walters, zealously focused on marijuana and launched a major campaign to promote student drug testing. While rates of illicit drug use remained constant, overdose fatalities rose rapidly.

The era of George W. Bush also witnessed the rapid escalation of the militarization of domestic drug law enforcement. By the end of Bush’s term, there were about 40,000 paramilitary-style SWAT raids on Americans every year mostly for nonviolent drug law offenses, often misdemeanors. While federal reform mostly stalled under Bush, state-level reforms finally began to slow the growth of the drug war.

Politicians now routinely admit to having used marijuana, and even cocaine, when they were younger. When Michael Bloomberg was questioned during his 2001 mayoral campaign about whether he had ever used marijuana, he said, “You bet I did and I enjoyed it.” Barack Obama also candidly discussed his prior cocaine and marijuana use: “When I was a kid, I inhaled frequently that was the point.”

Public opinion has shifted dramatically in favor of sensible reforms that expand health-based approaches while reducing the role of criminalization in drug policy.

Marijuana reform has gained unprecedented momentum throughout the Americas. Alaska, California, Colorado, Nevada, Oregon, Maine, Massachusetts, Washington State, and Washington D.C. have legalized marijuana for adults. In December 2013, Uruguay became the first country in the world to legally regulate marijuana. In Canada, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau plans legalize marijuana for adults by 2018.

In response to a worsening overdose epidemic, dozens of U.S. states passed laws to increase access to the overdose antidote, naloxone, as well as 911 Good Samaritan laws to encourage people to seek medical help in the event of an overdose.

Yet the assault on American citizens and others continues, with 700,000 people still arrested for marijuana offenses each year and almost 500,000 people still behind bars for nothing more than a drug law violation.

President Obama, despite supporting several successful policy changes such as reducing the crack/powder sentencing disparity, ending the ban on federal funding for syringe access programs, and ending federal interference with state medical marijuana laws did not shift the majority of drug policy funding to a health-based approach.

Now, the new administration is threatening to take us backward toward a 1980s style drug war. President Trump is calling for a wall to keep drugs out of the country, and Attorney General Jeff Sessions has made it clear that he does not support the sovereignty of states to legalize marijuana, and believes good people dont smoke marijuana.

Progress is inevitably slow, and even with an administration hostile to reform there is still unprecedented momentum behind drug policy reform in states and localities across the country. The Drug Policy Alliance and its allies will continue to advocate for health-based reforms such as marijuana legalization, drug decriminalization, safe consumption sites, naloxone access, bail reform, and more.

We look forward to a future where drug policies are shaped by science and compassion rather than political hysteria.

More here:

A Brief History of the Drug War | Drug Policy Alliance

War on Drugs | United States history | Britannica.com

War on Drugs, the effort in the United States since the 1970s to combat illegal drug use by greatly increasing penalties, enforcement, and incarceration for drug offenders.

The War on Drugs began in June 1971 when U.S. Pres. Richard Nixon declared drug abuse to be public enemy number one and increased federal funding for drug-control agencies and drug-treatment efforts. In 1973 the Drug Enforcement Agency was created out of the merger of the Office for Drug Abuse Law Enforcement, the Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs, and the Office of Narcotics Intelligence to consolidate federal efforts to control drug abuse.

The War on Drugs was a relatively small component of federal law-enforcement efforts until the presidency of Ronald Reagan, which began in 1981. Reagan greatly expanded the reach of the drug war and his focus on criminal punishment over treatment led to a massive increase in incarcerations for nonviolent drug offenses, from 50,000 in 1980 to 400,000 in 1997. In 1984 his wife, Nancy, spearheaded another facet of the War on Drugs with her Just Say No campaign, which was a privately funded effort to educate schoolchildren on the dangers of drug use. The expansion of the War on Drugs was in many ways driven by increased media coverage ofand resulting public nervousness overthe crack epidemic that arose in the early 1980s. This heightened concern over illicit drug use helped drive political support for Reagans hard-line stance on drugs. The U.S. Congress passed the Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1986, which allocated $1.7 billion to the War on Drugs and established a series of mandatory minimum prison sentences for various drug offenses. A notable feature of mandatory minimums was the massive gap between the amounts of crack and of powder cocaine that resulted in the same minimum sentence: possession of five grams of crack led to an automatic five-year sentence while it took the possession of 500 grams of powder cocaine to trigger that sentence. Since approximately 80% of crack users were African American, mandatory minimums led to an unequal increase of incarceration rates for nonviolent black drug offenders, as well as claims that the War on Drugs was a racist institution.

Concerns over the effectiveness of the War on Drugs and increased awareness of the racial disparity of the punishments meted out by it led to decreased public support of the most draconian aspects of the drug war during the early 21st century. Consequently, reforms were enacted during that time, such as the legalization of recreational marijuana in a number of states and the passage of the Fair Sentencing Act of 2010 that reduced the discrepancy of crack-to-powder possession thresholds for minimum sentences from 100-to-1 to 18-to-1. While the War on Drugs is still technically being waged, it is done at much less intense level than it was during its peak in the 1980s.

See the article here:

War on Drugs | United States history | Britannica.com

The Aerospace Corporation – Official Site

The Aerospace Corporation functions as the nations independent testing, assessment, and research center for national security space systems, specializing in advanced military space systems. Along with supporting the effective and timely development and operation of national security systems through rigorous scientific research and application of advanced technology, our technical teams also focus on developing and integrating new technologies to enhance existing space systems.

Research is focused on fields pertaining to space and space-related systems, including electrical power systems for rockets and spacecraft, microelectronics, optoelectronics and microelectromechanical systems, laser technologies, active optical remote-sensing systems, optical communications, fiber-optic sensor applications, and applications of atomic physics.Learn More

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The Aerospace Corporation – Official Site

Home – Aerospace Industries Association

Now more than ever, membership in AIA is the right decision.

As we all know, this is a turbulent time for the nation and the aerospace and defense industrywe face numerous economic and political challenges, both domestically and internationally.

In times like these, AIAs strong representation and advocacy is essential to protecting the business interests of the nations aerospace and defense industry and helping to establish new opportunities.

We help youand all levels of your organizationget closer to your customers and competitors by providing numerous networking opportunities through meetings, international air shows, and an extensive network of councils, committees, and working groups.

Learn More

Read more:

Home – Aerospace Industries Association

Tiangong-1 Reentry | The Aerospace Corporation

Tiangong-1 Reentry

The world watched and waited as the Chinese space station Tiangong-1 hurtled towards a fiery reentry. Please visit our media kit page for background information.

This prediction was performed by The Aerospace Corporation on 2018 April 1.

(Click on image to view full-size image.)

Dotted lines indicate dates of probable orbital maneuvers.

On 2016 March 21, an official Chinese statement declared that telemetry services with Tiangong-1 had ceased. Based on The Aerospace Corporations analysis of Two-Line Element set data from the JSpOC, the last orbitaladjustment for Tiangong-1 was made in December 2015. Likewise, amateur satellite trackershave been tracking Tiangong-1 and claimit has been orbiting uncontrolled since at least June 2016. On 2016September 14, China madean official statement that they predict Tiangong-1 will reenter the atmosphere in the latter half of 2017. China later updated its prediction via an announcement to the UNs Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Spaceon December 8, 2017. It was not mentioned whether the reentry was to betargeted or remain uncontrolled.

It is a well known scientific principle thatany measurement or prediction will always have an associated uncertainty. In the case of most reentering objects, the uncertainty associated with predicting reentry location is extremely large and precludes an accurate location prediction until shortly before the reentry has occured.In general, it is much easier to predict an accurate reentry time rather than an accurate reentry location. Based on Tiangong-1s inclination, however, we can confidently say that this object will reenter somewhere between 43 North and43 South latitudes.

Due to the uncertainties involved it is very difficult to predict the exact timing of a space objects reentry. There are several sources of uncertainty which include: 1) significant variation in the density of the upper layers of the atmosphere, 2) significant uncertainties in the orientation of the space craft over time, uncertainties in some physical properties of the spacecraft such as the exact mass and material composition, and 3) uncertainties in the exact location and speed of the space station. When aggregated, these factors translate into a reentry timing uncertainty that is roughly 20% of the time to go (the time between the date of the prediction and the predicted date of reentry).

It is highly unlikely that debris from this reentry will strike any person or significantly damage any property.The only known case of space debris striking a person is Ms.Lottie Williams of Tulsa, Oklahoma who was struck by a small piece of space debris in 1996 but was not harmed in any significant way.

As reentry gets closer, we are able to narrow possible reentry locations to a collection of specific ground tracks instead of broad regions of the globe. As the reentry time gets closer, the number of ground tracks will diminish until we are left with only one, and after that with only a portion of a single ground track. Areas not within the ground tracks are clear. The exact statistical likelihood of you or your property being struck by reentering debris is constantly changing. Potential reentry points and whether the final ground track is over inhabited or uninhabited areas will determine the risk to a specific location. Even so, the likelihood of any one person (i.e. YOU) being struck by debris is still far less than winning the Powerball Jackpot.

It is unlikelythat this is a controlled reentry. Although not declared officially, it is suspected that control of Tiangong-1 was lost and will not be regained before reentry.

No, no astronauts are currently on board Tiangong-1. The last manned mission departed from Tiangong-1 in June 2013.

It may be possible to see Tiangong-1 reentering depending on your location, the time of day, and visibility during reentry which will not be known until a few days prior to the event. A more detailed predicted reentry region will be provided a few days prior to the reentry time frame. Visiblyincandescent objectsfrom this reentry will likely last tens of seconds (up to a minute or more) in contrast with the vast majority of natural meteors which last mere seconds.

Depending on the time of day and cloud visibility, the reentry may appear as multiple bright streaks moving across the sky in the same direction. Due to the relatively large size of the object, it is expected that there will be many pieces reentering together, some of which may survive reentry and land on the Earths surface. Some examplesof reentries can be found here: video 1, video 2.

Potentially,there may be a highly toxic and corrosive substance calledhydrazine on board the spacecraft that could survive reentry. For your safety, do not touch any debris you may find on the ground nor inhale vapors it may emit.

Yes. Contact CORDS at http://www.aerospace.org/cords/contacting-cords/ Please report your location and time of the sighting, a description of what you saw, and provide any images or videos you may have captured of the reentry.

No. The largest object to reenter is the Mir space station at 120,000 kg which reentered on 2001 March 23. In comparison, Tiangong-1 is only 8,500 kg. For further space debris reentry information, consult the table onthis page.

In the history of spaceflight, no known person has ever been harmed by reentering space debris. Only one person has ever been recorded as being hit by a piece of space debris and, fortunately, she was not injured.

Tiangong-1 FAQ

Tiangong-1 Reentry Update

Tiangong-1 Captured via Telescope

Reentry Test Campaign Announcement

Basic Tiangong-1 background info

Official statement regarding Tiangong-1 telemetry ceasing

Official statement regarding Tiangong-1 reentry

Amateur satellite trackers claim Tiangong-1 likely uncontrolled

Controlled vs. uncontrolled reentries

General reentry info

Newsweek

Wired

New York Times

Reuters: Tiangong-1 is not out of control

Chinas Manned Space Program

Read the rest here:

Tiangong-1 Reentry | The Aerospace Corporation

Home | Aerospace Engineering | Georgia Institute of …

Welcome to Georgia TechThe Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering

Each year, more than 1,200 students from around the world come to Atlanta to study aerospace engineering at the Daniel Guggenheim School at Georgia Tech, one of the oldest and largest educational programs of its kind. Though selective in our enrollment, the School is not narrow in its approach to the study of this ever-expanding discipline. With more than 40 tenure-track faculty, and countless cross-disciplinary research collaborations, the School provides the sort of breadth and depth that consistently rank it in the top five aerospace educators in the nation. The School’s undergraduate program is ranked #2 and its graduate programs #4 in the nation, according to the latest US News & World Report.

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Home | Aerospace Engineering | Georgia Institute of …

AsMA | Aerospace Medical Association

May 23, 2018

The 2018-2019 President of the Aerospace Physiology Society (AsPS) is Thomas V. Massa.

Annette L. Sobel, M.D., M.S., is the new president of the Aerospace Human Factors Association (AsHFA).

Martin F. Hudson, MBBS, MRCP(UK), FRCP Edin., is the incoming president of the Airline Medical Directors Association (AMDA) for 2018-2019.

Joseph P. Dervay, M.D., M.P.H., M.M.S., FACEP, is the incoming president of the Space Medicine Association (SMA). He has previously served as a Member-at-Large and Vice President.

Dwight A. Holland, M.D., Ph.D., is beginning a 1-year term as the President of the Life Sciences and Engineering Branch (LSBEB).

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AsMA | Aerospace Medical Association

Weatherford Aerospace

Facing the challenges of tomorrow today

Deep technical skills coupled with in-depth, aerospace knowledge and some of the largest tanks in the industry.

Exemplary reputation and credibility

A preferred provider of a long and growing list of aerospace original equipment and Tier 1 manufacturers.

Industry Leader for more than 40 years.

Forming, chemical milling, fabrication, non-destructive inspection, corrosion protection & painted aircraft parts.

Go here to see the original:

Weatherford Aerospace

Dublin Aerospace Careers

ga(‘create’, ‘UA-85816480-1’, ‘auto’); ga(‘send’, ‘pageview’);

For more information on the job and to apply for the position, please click on the job that interests you.

We currently have requirements for the following contractors:

If you are interested in the above please contact Irish Aviation Solutions for more information.

Read more:

Dublin Aerospace Careers

Tiangong-1 Reentry | The Aerospace Corporation

Tiangong-1 Reentry

The world watched and waited as the Chinese space station Tiangong-1 hurtled towards a fiery reentry. Please visit our media kit page for background information.

This prediction was performed by The Aerospace Corporation on 2018 April 1.

(Click on image to view full-size image.)

Dotted lines indicate dates of probable orbital maneuvers.

On 2016 March 21, an official Chinese statement declared that telemetry services with Tiangong-1 had ceased. Based on The Aerospace Corporations analysis of Two-Line Element set data from the JSpOC, the last orbitaladjustment for Tiangong-1 was made in December 2015. Likewise, amateur satellite trackershave been tracking Tiangong-1 and claimit has been orbiting uncontrolled since at least June 2016. On 2016September 14, China madean official statement that they predict Tiangong-1 will reenter the atmosphere in the latter half of 2017. China later updated its prediction via an announcement to the UNs Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Spaceon December 8, 2017. It was not mentioned whether the reentry was to betargeted or remain uncontrolled.

It is a well known scientific principle thatany measurement or prediction will always have an associated uncertainty. In the case of most reentering objects, the uncertainty associated with predicting reentry location is extremely large and precludes an accurate location prediction until shortly before the reentry has occured.In general, it is much easier to predict an accurate reentry time rather than an accurate reentry location. Based on Tiangong-1s inclination, however, we can confidently say that this object will reenter somewhere between 43 North and43 South latitudes.

Due to the uncertainties involved it is very difficult to predict the exact timing of a space objects reentry. There are several sources of uncertainty which include: 1) significant variation in the density of the upper layers of the atmosphere, 2) significant uncertainties in the orientation of the space craft over time, uncertainties in some physical properties of the spacecraft such as the exact mass and material composition, and 3) uncertainties in the exact location and speed of the space station. When aggregated, these factors translate into a reentry timing uncertainty that is roughly 20% of the time to go (the time between the date of the prediction and the predicted date of reentry).

It is highly unlikely that debris from this reentry will strike any person or significantly damage any property.The only known case of space debris striking a person is Ms.Lottie Williams of Tulsa, Oklahoma who was struck by a small piece of space debris in 1996 but was not harmed in any significant way.

As reentry gets closer, we are able to narrow possible reentry locations to a collection of specific ground tracks instead of broad regions of the globe. As the reentry time gets closer, the number of ground tracks will diminish until we are left with only one, and after that with only a portion of a single ground track. Areas not within the ground tracks are clear. The exact statistical likelihood of you or your property being struck by reentering debris is constantly changing. Potential reentry points and whether the final ground track is over inhabited or uninhabited areas will determine the risk to a specific location. Even so, the likelihood of any one person (i.e. YOU) being struck by debris is still far less than winning the Powerball Jackpot.

It is unlikelythat this is a controlled reentry. Although not declared officially, it is suspected that control of Tiangong-1 was lost and will not be regained before reentry.

No, no astronauts are currently on board Tiangong-1. The last manned mission departed from Tiangong-1 in June 2013.

It may be possible to see Tiangong-1 reentering depending on your location, the time of day, and visibility during reentry which will not be known until a few days prior to the event. A more detailed predicted reentry region will be provided a few days prior to the reentry time frame. Visiblyincandescent objectsfrom this reentry will likely last tens of seconds (up to a minute or more) in contrast with the vast majority of natural meteors which last mere seconds.

Depending on the time of day and cloud visibility, the reentry may appear as multiple bright streaks moving across the sky in the same direction. Due to the relatively large size of the object, it is expected that there will be many pieces reentering together, some of which may survive reentry and land on the Earths surface. Some examplesof reentries can be found here: video 1, video 2.

Potentially,there may be a highly toxic and corrosive substance calledhydrazine on board the spacecraft that could survive reentry. For your safety, do not touch any debris you may find on the ground nor inhale vapors it may emit.

Yes. Contact CORDS at http://www.aerospace.org/cords/contacting-cords/ Please report your location and time of the sighting, a description of what you saw, and provide any images or videos you may have captured of the reentry.

No. The largest object to reenter is the Mir space station at 120,000 kg which reentered on 2001 March 23. In comparison, Tiangong-1 is only 8,500 kg. For further space debris reentry information, consult the table onthis page.

In the history of spaceflight, no known person has ever been harmed by reentering space debris. Only one person has ever been recorded as being hit by a piece of space debris and, fortunately, she was not injured.

Tiangong-1 FAQ

Tiangong-1 Reentry Update

Tiangong-1 Captured via Telescope

Reentry Test Campaign Announcement

Basic Tiangong-1 background info

Official statement regarding Tiangong-1 telemetry ceasing

Official statement regarding Tiangong-1 reentry

Amateur satellite trackers claim Tiangong-1 likely uncontrolled

Controlled vs. uncontrolled reentries

General reentry info

Newsweek

Wired

New York Times

Reuters: Tiangong-1 is not out of control

Chinas Manned Space Program

Continued here:

Tiangong-1 Reentry | The Aerospace Corporation

Home – Aerospace Industries Association

Now more than ever, membership in AIA is the right decision.

As we all know, this is a turbulent time for the nation and the aerospace and defense industrywe face numerous economic and political challenges, both domestically and internationally.

In times like these, AIAs strong representation and advocacy is essential to protecting the business interests of the nations aerospace and defense industry and helping to establish new opportunities.

We help youand all levels of your organizationget closer to your customers and competitors by providing numerous networking opportunities through meetings, international air shows, and an extensive network of councils, committees, and working groups.

Learn More

Go here to read the rest:

Home – Aerospace Industries Association

Weatherford Aerospace

Facing the challenges of tomorrow today

Deep technical skills coupled with in-depth, aerospace knowledge and some of the largest tanks in the industry.

Exemplary reputation and credibility

A preferred provider of a long and growing list of aerospace original equipment and Tier 1 manufacturers.

Industry Leader for more than 40 years.

Forming, chemical milling, fabrication, non-destructive inspection, corrosion protection & painted aircraft parts.

Read the original post:

Weatherford Aerospace

Home | Aerospace Engineering | Georgia Institute of …

Welcome to Georgia TechThe Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering

Each year, more than 1,200 students from around the world come to Atlanta to study aerospace engineering at the Daniel Guggenheim School at Georgia Tech, one of the oldest and largest educational programs of its kind. Though selective in our enrollment, the School is not narrow in its approach to the study of this ever-expanding discipline. With more than 40 tenure-track faculty, and countless cross-disciplinary research collaborations, the School provides the sort of breadth and depth that consistently rank it in the top five aerospace educators in the nation. The School’s undergraduate program is ranked #2 and its graduate programs #4 in the nation, according to the latest US News & World Report.

View original post here:

Home | Aerospace Engineering | Georgia Institute of …

AsMA | Aerospace Medical Association

May 18, 2018

AirRx, an app that assists physicians volunteering in-flight assistance to sick passengers, has been shown to improve physician performance in a study at The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine…

What Does the Future Hold, and What Will Be Our Role in It?Valerie E. Martindale , Ph.D., CAsP, FAsMA

An article in Januarys issue of Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance (AMHP) is being featured on the Texas Advanced Computing Centers (TACCs) web site.

AsMA is pleased to annouce the scholarship winners for 2018.

Read the rest here:

AsMA | Aerospace Medical Association

Dublin Aerospace Careers

ga(‘create’, ‘UA-85816480-1’, ‘auto’); ga(‘send’, ‘pageview’);

For more information on the job and to apply for the position, please click on the job that interests you.

We currently have requirements for the following contractors:

If you are interested in the above please contact Irish Aviation Solutions for more information.

Read the rest here:

Dublin Aerospace Careers

Tiangong-1 Reentry | The Aerospace Corporation

Tiangong-1 Reentry

The world watched and waited as the Chinese space station Tiangong-1 hurtled towards a fiery reentry. Please visit our media kit page for background information.

This prediction was performed by The Aerospace Corporation on 2018 April 1.

(Click on image to view full-size image.)

Dotted lines indicate dates of probable orbital maneuvers.

On 2016 March 21, an official Chinese statement declared that telemetry services with Tiangong-1 had ceased. Based on The Aerospace Corporations analysis of Two-Line Element set data from the JSpOC, the last orbitaladjustment for Tiangong-1 was made in December 2015. Likewise, amateur satellite trackershave been tracking Tiangong-1 and claimit has been orbiting uncontrolled since at least June 2016. On 2016September 14, China madean official statement that they predict Tiangong-1 will reenter the atmosphere in the latter half of 2017. China later updated its prediction via an announcement to the UNs Committee on Peaceful Uses of Outer Spaceon December 8, 2017. It was not mentioned whether the reentry was to betargeted or remain uncontrolled.

It is a well known scientific principle thatany measurement or prediction will always have an associated uncertainty. In the case of most reentering objects, the uncertainty associated with predicting reentry location is extremely large and precludes an accurate location prediction until shortly before the reentry has occured.In general, it is much easier to predict an accurate reentry time rather than an accurate reentry location. Based on Tiangong-1s inclination, however, we can confidently say that this object will reenter somewhere between 43 North and43 South latitudes.

Due to the uncertainties involved it is very difficult to predict the exact timing of a space objects reentry. There are several sources of uncertainty which include: 1) significant variation in the density of the upper layers of the atmosphere, 2) significant uncertainties in the orientation of the space craft over time, uncertainties in some physical properties of the spacecraft such as the exact mass and material composition, and 3) uncertainties in the exact location and speed of the space station. When aggregated, these factors translate into a reentry timing uncertainty that is roughly 20% of the time to go (the time between the date of the prediction and the predicted date of reentry).

It is highly unlikely that debris from this reentry will strike any person or significantly damage any property.The only known case of space debris striking a person is Ms.Lottie Williams of Tulsa, Oklahoma who was struck by a small piece of space debris in 1996 but was not harmed in any significant way.

As reentry gets closer, we are able to narrow possible reentry locations to a collection of specific ground tracks instead of broad regions of the globe. As the reentry time gets closer, the number of ground tracks will diminish until we are left with only one, and after that with only a portion of a single ground track. Areas not within the ground tracks are clear. The exact statistical likelihood of you or your property being struck by reentering debris is constantly changing. Potential reentry points and whether the final ground track is over inhabited or uninhabited areas will determine the risk to a specific location. Even so, the likelihood of any one person (i.e. YOU) being struck by debris is still far less than winning the Powerball Jackpot.

It is unlikelythat this is a controlled reentry. Although not declared officially, it is suspected that control of Tiangong-1 was lost and will not be regained before reentry.

No, no astronauts are currently on board Tiangong-1. The last manned mission departed from Tiangong-1 in June 2013.

It may be possible to see Tiangong-1 reentering depending on your location, the time of day, and visibility during reentry which will not be known until a few days prior to the event. A more detailed predicted reentry region will be provided a few days prior to the reentry time frame. Visiblyincandescent objectsfrom this reentry will likely last tens of seconds (up to a minute or more) in contrast with the vast majority of natural meteors which last mere seconds.

Depending on the time of day and cloud visibility, the reentry may appear as multiple bright streaks moving across the sky in the same direction. Due to the relatively large size of the object, it is expected that there will be many pieces reentering together, some of which may survive reentry and land on the Earths surface. Some examplesof reentries can be found here: video 1, video 2.

Potentially,there may be a highly toxic and corrosive substance calledhydrazine on board the spacecraft that could survive reentry. For your safety, do not touch any debris you may find on the ground nor inhale vapors it may emit.

Yes. Contact CORDS at http://www.aerospace.org/cords/contacting-cords/ Please report your location and time of the sighting, a description of what you saw, and provide any images or videos you may have captured of the reentry.

No. The largest object to reenter is the Mir space station at 120,000 kg which reentered on 2001 March 23. In comparison, Tiangong-1 is only 8,500 kg. For further space debris reentry information, consult the table onthis page.

In the history of spaceflight, no known person has ever been harmed by reentering space debris. Only one person has ever been recorded as being hit by a piece of space debris and, fortunately, she was not injured.

Tiangong-1 FAQ

Tiangong-1 Reentry Update

Tiangong-1 Captured via Telescope

Reentry Test Campaign Announcement

Basic Tiangong-1 background info

Official statement regarding Tiangong-1 telemetry ceasing

Official statement regarding Tiangong-1 reentry

Amateur satellite trackers claim Tiangong-1 likely uncontrolled

Controlled vs. uncontrolled reentries

General reentry info

Newsweek

Wired

New York Times

Reuters: Tiangong-1 is not out of control

Chinas Manned Space Program

Link:

Tiangong-1 Reentry | The Aerospace Corporation

The Aerospace Corporation | Assuring Mission Success

The Aerospace Corporation functions as the nations independent testing, assessment, and research center for national security space systems, specializing in advanced military space systems. Along with supporting the effective and timely development and operation of national security systems through rigorous scientific research and application of advanced technology, our technical teams also focus on developing and integrating new technologies to enhance existing space systems.

Research is focused on fields pertaining to space and space-related systems, including electrical power systems for rockets and spacecraft, microelectronics, optoelectronics and microelectromechanical systems, laser technologies, active optical remote-sensing systems, optical communications, fiber-optic sensor applications, and applications of atomic physics.Learn More

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Home – Aerospace Industries Association

Now more than ever, membership in AIA is the right decision.

As we all know, this is a turbulent time for the nation and the aerospace and defense industrywe face numerous economic and political challenges, both domestically and internationally.

In times like these, AIAs strong representation and advocacy is essential to protecting the business interests of the nations aerospace and defense industry and helping to establish new opportunities.

We help youand all levels of your organizationget closer to your customers and competitors by providing numerous networking opportunities through meetings, international air shows, and an extensive network of councils, committees, and working groups.

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Home | Aerospace Engineering | Georgia Institute of …

Welcome to Georgia TechThe Daniel Guggenheim School of Aerospace Engineering

Each year, more than 1,200 students from around the world come to Atlanta to study aerospace engineering at the Daniel Guggenheim School at Georgia Tech, one of the oldest and largest educational programs of its kind. Though selective in our enrollment, the School is not narrow in its approach to the study of this ever-expanding discipline. With more than 40 tenure-track faculty, and countless cross-disciplinary research collaborations, the School provides the sort of breadth and depth that consistently rank it in the top five aerospace educators in the nation. The School’s undergraduate program is ranked #2 and its graduate programs #4 in the nation, according to the latest US News & World Report.

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