Careers | The Aerospace Corporation

Make a Career Out of Making a Difference: Explore Jobs

Whether youre ensuring the resiliency of satellite systems or finding a better way to remove dangerous debris from orbit, your work at Aerospace will make a difference. From delivering world-class mission assurance to pioneering technological breakthroughs, youll help build a safer, stronger future.

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Careers | The Aerospace Corporation

Aerospace – Schafer Corporation

For four decades, Schafer has been a dominant leader in advanced concept development, system design, analysis and prototyping of aerospace capabilities for the military and civilian communities. We bring innovative and agile expertise with global presence, unique capabilities, and hands-on experience to support the most complex aerospace applications. Our capabilities include laser system design and development for both space-based communications and advanced weapons, Space Situational Awareness systems to detect, track and identify space objects, integrated network architectures for integrated Missile Defense command andcontrol, design and development of kinetic kill systems, and launch and range support for NASAs space exploration mission. We are proud to be part of Government, Industry, and Commercial teams that are delivering essential capabilities satisfying critical national security and civilian needs.

We provide a wide variety of engineering and technical services to our Government, prime contractor customers and teammates, and maintain a highly skilled subject matter staff. We pride ourselves in our ability to couple academic principles with engineering applications to support the design, analyses, and development of complex aerospace systems. Our experience includes support to NASA and to Commercial Space Companies.

Schafers Military Aerospace Team integrates a strong technical foundation with new innovations for todays need for flexible, interoperable defense capabilities. The Military Aerospace sector is comprised of the Advanced Concepts and Technology Team in Albuquerque, New Mexico, the Systems Engineering and Integration Team in Huntsville, Alabama and distributed Subject Matter Experts (SMEs).

Schafers Civil and Commercial Aerospace Team is a new and developing area for the company. The team has integrated a strong technical foundation with key areas required by our customers including systems engineering, scheduling, earned value management, and project planning and control. The Civil and Commercial Space sector currently has work at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida as well as support to Commercial aerospace companies in Huntsville, Alabama. This includes subject matter experts in:

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Aerospace – Schafer Corporation

Aerospace Industry | Gore

Gores commitment to innovation is based on a thorough understanding of materials and how they interact with their environment with the result of reliable products for the aerospace industry. Gores products meet the industrys unique challenges that include reducing downtime for maintenance, decreasing operating costs, improving pilot communication, and providing protection and comfort for flight and ground personnel.

Gore products have been instrumental in the success of the Phoenix Mars Lander, the International Space Station, and hundreds of satellite and aerospace applications. Gore fibers have been woven into the outer layer of astronauts’ space suits since the first space shuttle mission. With this foundation, Gore continues to develop reliable, time-tested, and proven solutions for the most challenging aerospace applications.

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Aerospace Industry | Gore

AEROSPACE – PPG – Paints, Coatings and Materials

Businesses

PPG’s aerospace business is a leading manufacturer of TRANSPARENCIES, SEALANTS, and COATINGS, and provider of electrochromic window systems, surface solutions, PACKAGING, and CHEMICAL MANAGEMENT SERVICES, delivering new technologies and solutions to airframe manufacturers, airlines and maintenance providers for the commercial, military and general aviation industries globally.

VisitPPG’s Aerospace Web Site

Sylmar, CAPPG Aerospace Transparencies Research and Technology Center12780 San Fernando RoadSylmar, CA 91342USATel: 818-362-6711

Allison Park, PAPPG Coatings Innovation Center4325 Rosanna DriveAllison Park, PA 15101USATel: 412-492-5200Fax: 412-492-5221

Harmar, PAPPG Coatings Innovation Center400 Guys Run RdCheswick, PA 15024USATel: 412-820-8500

United KingdomPPG Sealants and CoatingsDarlington RoadShildon Co Durham DL4 2QPUnited KingdomTel: 44 (0) 1388 772541Fax: 44 (0) 1388 774373

FrancePPG Aerospace Coatings7 Alle de la PlaineGonfreville lOrcher76700 HarfleurFranceTel: 33 (0) 235 53 54 00Fax: 33 (0) 235 53 54 02

PPG Aerospace CoatingsPPG Industries France S.A.S.3, Z.A.E. Les Dix Muids B.P. 8959583 MarlyCedex, FranceTel: 33 (0) 327 19 35 00

PPG operates aerospace facilities worldwide with manufacturing sites and regional sales offices located in every region.

Packaging and Application Systems deliver custom solutions for single and multi-compoenent adhesives, sealants, coatings, and lubricants.

PPG’sgoal is to bring more effective management of chemicals through the entire product life cycle, thus reducing the Total Cost of Ownership (TCO) for our customers.

Alteos is registered trademark of PPG Industries Ohio, Inc.

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AEROSPACE – PPG – Paints, Coatings and Materials

Honeywell Aerospace

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Honeywell Aerospace

Rockwell Collins Interior Systems Jobs

Please contact Applicant Support with additional questions.(Note: You cannot submit a resume using this link. Resumes will only be accepted by applying on the Rockwell Collins Career Opportunities Page.)

Qualified individuals with a disability have the right to request a reasonable accommodation. If you are unable or limited in your ability to use or access our careers website as a result of your disability, request a reasonable accommodation by: (1) sending an email toApplicant Support(2) informing us regarding the nature of your request and (3) providing your contact information.

EOE/Minorities/Females/Vet/DisabledAll qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, or protected veteran status.EEO is the LawEEO Policy Statement

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Rockwell Collins Interior Systems Jobs

Aerospace Bristol | The new home of Concorde

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Enter your name and email address below and we’ll be pleased to keep you up-to-date with all of Aerospace Bristol’s progress. Aerospace Bristol supporters receive regular emails containing our latest event information, special offers, appeals, projects, and news about Concorde and other exhibits.

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Aerospace Bristol | The new home of Concorde

Airbus Home

Recruited more than a year ago as an intern, Marie is now in charge of setting up infrastructures, defining strategies of supervision and implementing them into different security products like SIEM, IDS or Hypervisor.

I was given the opportunity to work in many different contexts and with a range of clients. We see a lot of things, share all sorts of ideas but were not stuck in the same routine. This is what I think makes you stay.

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MAG Aerospace

WE ARE

MAG Aerospace is an industry leader in providing and enabling real-time situational awareness to help our customers make the world smaller and safer. MAGs team of 900+ professionals operate 200+ manned and unmanned special mission aircraft more than 98,000 flight hours annually on 5 continents in support of our customers missions. MAGs world class tactical-technical-intelligence experts flawlessly execute manned and unmanned Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) operations, training, and technical services, as well as chartered fixed and rotary wing operations, for federal, international, civilian, and commercial customers worldwide.

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MAG Aerospace

UTC Aerospace Systems – UTC Aerospace Systems

We dont just dream up ideas that can change the world, we develop, manufacture and deliver them with exceptional service to one of the fastest growing industries on the planet. We are shaping a future of flight that is more intelligent, integrated and electric than ever before. Its nothing short of incredible and its in the air every day.

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UTC Aerospace Systems – UTC Aerospace Systems

Aerospace Trade Shows, Aerospace Trade Fairs, Expos …

Tue, 06 – Thu, 08 Nov 2018starting tomorrow Singapore Industrial Engineering Business ServicesWed, 07 – Sat, 10 Nov 20182 days to go Jakarta, IndonesiaInternational Aero Exhibition Auto & Automotive Science & Research AerospaceTue, 06 – Sun, 11 Nov 2018starting tomorrow Zhuhai, ChinaInternational Aviation & Aerospace Exhibition Auto & Automotive Aerospace Wed, 07 – Sun, 11 Nov 20182 days to go Taichung, Taiwan Auto & Automotive Industrial Engineering Automation & Robotics AerospaceSat, 10 – Sun, 11 Nov 20185 days to go Monroe, USA Science & Research AerospaceWed, 14 – Fri, 16 Nov 2018 BahrainThe fastest growing airshow in the Middle East Business Services Security & Defense Aerospace Thu, 15 – Sun, 18 Nov 2018 Cairo, Egyptinternational exhibition for compressed air technology & accessories Industrial Engineering Science & Research AerospaceTue, 20 – Thu, 22 Nov 2018 Munich, GermanyInternational Aerospace Supply Fair Science & Research AerospaceWed, 28 – Fri, 30 Nov 2018 Koto, Japan Science & Research Aerospace Tue, 11 Dec 2018 Hampton, USALangley Air Force Base Tech Expo connects government and industry to collaborate on mission requirements and technology solutions. This event, which is open and free to all Langley AFB personnel, provides… Aerospace IT & TechnologyWed, 19 – Thu, 20 Dec 2018 Mumbai, India Auto & Automotive Business Services Fabrications AerospaceTue, 05 – Thu, 07 Feb 2019 Farnborough, UKThe aviation industry trade fair Auto & Automotive Electric & Electronics Automation & Robotics Aerospace Wed, 06 – Thu, 07 Feb 2019 Labge, FranceDeciElec Embedded Systems Reference event for electronics, connected & embedded systems, participants will beneficiate from the Business Convention unique concept:Business meetings dedicated to electronics,… Electric & Electronics AerospaceSat, 09 – Sun, 10 Feb 2019 Buckeye, USABuckeye Air Fair is a vital event that will focus on not only one event but also some other secondary programs which will make this field a must attend for all. The time of this event is for one day and… Security & Defense Aerospace Air, Aviation & AirportsFri, 22 – Sun, 24 Feb 2019 Secaucus, USA Science & Research Aerospace Wed, 27 – Thu, 28 Feb 2019 SingaporeThe Air Retail Show Asia provides the attendees with the opportunity to meet and interact with senior executives in the Asian Aviation industry. It focuses on ancillary strategies, price management & distribution… Logistics & Transportation Aerospace IT & TechnologyWed, 27 Feb – Fri, 01 Mar 2019 Orlando, USAThe Air Force Associations Annual Air Warfare Symposium and Technology Exposition provides the attendees with insights on Air Force Update, Precision in AFCENT, Technology: Today and on the Horizon, Close… Science & Research AerospaceTue, 26 Feb – Sun, 03 Mar 2019 Lara, AustraliaOne of the most exciting events ever staged at Avalon Science & Research Aerospace Tue, 26 Feb – Sun, 03 Mar 2019 Avalon, AustraliaAustralian International Airshow and Aerospace & Defence Exposition features a display of military fighter jets to the snarl of warbirds, a unique mix of military, commercial, antique, airsport, rotor… Auto & Automotive Logistics & Transportation AerospaceTue, 26 Feb – Sun, 03 Mar 2019 Avalon, Australia Logistics & Transportation Security & DefenseTue, 12 – Wed, 13 Mar 2019 Munich, GermanyBringing together the best aspects for aerospace technology, Connected Aircraft Europe delivers a great complementary addition to Avionics Expo and Aero Testing Expo, offering greater connectivity between… Logistics & Transportation Security & Defense Wed, 13 – Thu, 14 Mar 201912th edition Mexico City, MexicoThe leading logistics event in Mexico. Auto & Automotive Logistics & Transportation Aerospace Shipping & PortsFri, 15 – Sun, 17 Mar 2019 Titusville, USAThe airshow will have a little something for everyone. Auto & Automotive AerospaceFri, 15 – Sun, 17 Mar 2019 Brussels, Belgium Business Services Aerospace Tue, 19 – Wed, 20 Mar 2019 Tacoma, USAThe Manufacturing, Fabrication, Repair & Maintenance Services Industry trade fair. Electric & Electronics Industrial Engineering Plastic & Polymers AerospaceFri, 22 – Sat, 23 Mar 20192nd edition Katy, USA Science & Research AerospaceSat, 06 – Sun, 07 Apr 2019 Waco, USAAirshow excitement for the entire family! Proud to honor our military and inspire our youth. Travel & Tourism Business Services Aerospace Air, Aviation & Airports Tue, 09 – Thu, 11 Apr 2019 SingaporeBest of Rotorcraft in One Great Lift Off Security & Defense AerospaceWed, 10 – Fri, 12 Apr 2019 Split, CroatiaExhibition is all about sea defense and aerospace. Security & Defense AerospaceWed, 10 – Sat, 13 Apr 2019 Friedrichshafen, GermanyThe global show for general aviation Science & Research Logistics & Transportation Aerospace Sat, 13 Apr 2019 Louisville, USAThunder Over Louisville Air Show features illustrations of homebuilt aircraft supplies, avionics plug-n-play instrument panels, ultralight powered paraglider sales, service and instruction, engine monitoring… Logistics & Transportation AerospaceTue, 16 – Thu, 18 Apr 2019 Montreal, CanadaThe Railway, Shipping & Aviation Products, Spares & Equipment trade fair. Science & Research AerospaceFri, 19 – Sun, 21 Apr 2019 Beijing, ChinaThe leading trade fair for model industry in Asia. Education & Training Aerospace Air, Aviation & Airports Mon, 29 Apr – Thu, 02 May 2019 Long Beach, USAAerospace & Defense Manufacturing Conference & Expo Industrial Engineering Security & Defense AerospaceSat, 04 – Sun, 05 May 2019 Fort Lauderdale, USAFocus on the aviation industry Science & Research AerospaceSat, 04 – Sun, 05 May 2019 Chino, USAVoted One of the Top 10 Air Shows in the Country! Auto & Automotive Logistics & Transportation Aerospace Air, Aviation & Airports Sat, 04 – Sun, 05 May 2019 Albion Park Rail, Australia Telecommunication Science & Research AerospaceSun, 05 May 2019 Abingdon, UK Science & Research AerospaceMon, 06 – Wed, 08 May 2019 Washington DC, USAFocus on the navy industry. Railway & Roadways Science & Research Security & Defense Aerospace Wed, 08 – Thu, 09 May 2019 Madrid, SpainGlobal Robot Expo event is just based on robotics related technologies and innovation. This conference will cover topics like latest advancements in Artificial Intelligence, Industry 4.0, Service Robotics,… Industrial Engineering Automation & Robotics Aerospace

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Aerospace Trade Shows, Aerospace Trade Fairs, Expos …

Aerospace – Georgia Department of Economic Development

Article first appeared in Hypepotamus By: R. Steven, Justice, P.E.; Executive Director, Georgia Centers of Innovation Most entrepreneurs are jacks-of-all-trades who are equipped with the knowledge and abilities to solve business problems as they arise, but there are some obstacles that require a more specialized industry-centric approach. These are the challenges that keep business owners

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Aerospace – Georgia Department of Economic Development

Aerospace – SC Council on Competitiveness

In 2012, South Carolinas Secretary of Commerce Robert M. Hitt, III appointed the Aerospace Task Force to develop a strategic plan to grow the states aerospace cluster. With input from Regional Advisory Councils and led by Charlie Farrell, the group of public and private leaders recommended priorities for action.

In late 2013, the SC Council on Competitiveness received an Investing in Manufacturing Community Partnerships (IMCP) planning grant from the United States Department of Commerce/Economic Development Administration. The Council worked closely with the SC Department of Commerce and other partners around the state to compete for these funds that enabled additional activities to occur to support the aerospace cluster. The first ever aerospace economic impact study was conducted to provide a baseline to understand the growth patterns of this important industry to the states economy. The economic impact studys findings clearly show that South Carolina does indeed have an aerospace industry cluster and that there are opportunities to strengthen and grow the cluster. With continued, targeted efforts by the SC Council on Competitiveness and the SC Department of Commerce, South Carolina will be positioned to compete nationally and globally as a destination for the aerospace industry.

Using the IMCP grant, Deborah Cameron was hired as the Director of Aerospace Initiatives and Wayne Fritz was hired as Senior Project Manager. Charlie Farrell remained as an adviser to the effort for the first year. Staff traveled the state meeting companies and organizations related to the aerospace cluster. Regional and local economic development alliances were also engaged in outreach to companies in their respective locations. Information gathered from these consultations was utilized to develop programming helpful to the industry.

SC Council on Competitiveness partners withUSCs McNair Center for Aerospace Innovation and Research, theSouth Carolina Department of Commerce, the South Carolina Aeronautics Commission, and the South Carolina Aviation Associationto host the Aerospace Industry Day event which attracts over 500 attendees.

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SC Aerospace is a collaborative effort to advance and market South Carolinas aerospace industry cluster on the global stage. We are a partnership of the public, private, academic, and nonprofit sectors connecting the industrys assets and securing future growth.

We work to:

We host quarterly events to connect aerospace industry leaders and expose them to state assets relevant to the industry, convene aerospace organizations to promote collaboration and alignment, publish monthly newsletters to communicate industry news, partner to host an annual aerospace conference, conduct relevant industry research, host a web site and GIS asset map, represent South Carolina on a broader stage, and much more.

South Carolinas aerospace cluster consists of over 400 civilian companies, as well as four major military aviation facilities:

While The Boeing Company is the dominant face of aerospace in the state, there are numerous other recognizable firms located in South Carolina. These include Lockheed Martin Corporation, TIGHITCO, Stevens Aviation, GKN Aerospace, Labinal, Champion Aerospace, and Ranger Aerospace. Yet, most companies in the aerospace cluster report having five or fewer employees. These small businesses comprise 95% of aerospace firm growth over the five-year period from 2007 2012.There are over 53,000 workers directly employed by civilian aerospace companies and military aviation facilities in South Carolina. The average total compensation of a civilian aerospace employee is about $71,000 far greater than the state average compensation of about $41,000.

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Aerospace – SC Council on Competitiveness

The Aviation and Aerospace Industry in Florida

Industry Overview

Florida has long been the worlds premier gateway to space, the undisputed air traffic hub of the Americas, a major hub for flight training and MRO, and home to leading manufacturers of all types of aircraft and aircraft components. As a result, Florida has a rich supply chain and talent pool benefiting industry businesses. It’s no wonder industry leaders including Boeing, Embraer, General Dynamics, Lockheed Martin, Northrop Grumman, Pratt & Whitney, Sikorsky, and so many more have significant operations here.

Florida is a premier aerospace and space location, and is a top state for aerospace manufacturing attractiveness. Our 470+industry companies excel in areas from aircraft parts and assembly, to intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance, to missiles. Florida also offers tremendous space launch assets.

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The Aviation and Aerospace Industry in Florida

Aerospace engineering | Britannica.com

Aerospace engineering, also called aeronautical engineering, or astronautical engineering, field of engineering concerned with the design, development, construction, testing, and operation of vehicles operating in the Earths atmosphere or in outer space. In 1958 the first definition of aerospace engineering appeared, considering the Earths atmosphere and the space above it as a single realm for development of flight vehicles. Today the more encompassing aerospace definition has commonly replaced the terms aeronautical engineering and astronautical engineering.

The design of a flight vehicle demands a knowledge of many engineering disciplines. It is rare that one person takes on the entire task; instead, most companies have design teams specialized in the sciences of aerodynamics, propulsion systems, structural design, materials, avionics, and stability and control systems. No single design can optimize all of these sciences, but rather there exist compromised designs that incorporate the vehicle specifications, available technology, and economic feasibility.

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materials science: Materials for aerospace

The primary goal in the selection of materials for aerospace structures is the enhancement of fuel efficiency to increase the distance traveled and the payload delivered. This goal can be attained by developments on two fronts: increased engine efficiency through higher operating temperatures and

The roots of aeronautical engineering can be traced to the early days of mechanical engineering, to inventors concepts, and to the initial studies of aerodynamics, a branch of theoretical physics. The earliest sketches of flight vehicles were drawn by Leonardo da Vinci, who suggested two ideas for sustentation. The first was an ornithopter, a flying machine using flapping wings to imitate the flight of birds. The second idea was an aerial screw, the predecessor of the helicopter. Manned flight was first achieved in 1783, in a hot-air balloon designed by the French brothers Joseph-Michel and Jacques-tienne Montgolfier. Aerodynamics became a factor in balloon flight when a propulsion system was considered for forward movement. Benjamin Franklin was one of the first to propose such an idea, which led to the development of the dirigible. The power-driven balloon was invented by Henri Gifford, a Frenchman, in 1852. The invention of lighter-than-air vehicles occurred independently of the development of aircraft. The breakthrough in aircraft development came in 1799 when Sir George Cayley, an English baron, drew an airplane incorporating a fixed wing for lift, an empennage (consisting of horizontal and vertical tail surfaces for stability and control), and a separate propulsion system. Because engine development was virtually nonexistent, Cayley turned to gliders, building the first successful one in 1849. Gliding flights established a data base for aerodynamics and aircraft design. Otto Lilienthal, a German scientist, recorded more than 2,000 glides in a five-year period, beginning in 1891. Lilienthals work was followed by the American aeronaut Octave Chanute, a friend of the American brothers Orville and Wilbur Wright, the fathers of modern manned flight.

Following the first sustained flight of a heavier-than-air vehicle in 1903, the Wright brothers refined their design, eventually selling airplanes to the U.S. Army. The first major impetus to aircraft development occurred during World War I, when aircraft were designed and constructed for specific military missions, including fighter attack, bombing, and reconnaissance. The end of the war marked the decline of military high-technology aircraft and the rise of civil air transportation. Many advances in the civil sector were due to technologies gained in developing military and racing aircraft. A successful military design that found many civil applications was the U.S. Navy Curtiss NC-4 flying boat, powered by four 400-horsepower V-12 Liberty engines. It was the British, however, who paved the way in civil aviation in 1920 with a 12-passenger Handley-Page transport. Aviation boomed after Charles A. Lindberghs solo flight across the Atlantic Ocean in 1927. Advances in metallurgy led to improved strength-to-weight ratios and, coupled with a monocoque design, enabled aircraft to fly farther and faster. Hugo Junkers, a German, built the first all-metal monoplane in 1910, but the design was not accepted until 1933, when the Boeing 247-D entered service. The twin-engine design of the latter established the foundation of modern air transport.

The advent of the turbine-powered airplane dramatically changed the air transportation industry. Germany and Britain were concurrently developing the jet engine, but it was a German Heinkel He 178 that made the first jet flight on Aug. 27, 1939. Even though World War II accelerated the growth of the airplane, the jet aircraft was not introduced into service until 1944, when the British Gloster Meteor became operational, shortly followed by the German Me 262. The first practical American jet was the Lockheed F-80, which entered service in 1945.

Commercial aircraft after World War II continued to use the more economical propeller method of propulsion. The efficiency of the jet engine was increased, and in 1949 the British de Havilland Comet inaugurated commercial jet transport flight. The Comet, however, experienced structural failures that curtailed the service, and it was not until 1958 that the highly successful Boeing 707 jet transport began nonstop transatlantic flights. While civil aircraft designs utilize most new technological advancements, the transport and general aviation configurations have changed only slightly since 1960. Because of escalating fuel and hardware prices, the development of civil aircraft has been dominated by the need for economical operation.

Technological improvements in propulsion, materials, avionics, and stability and controls have enabled aircraft to grow in size, carrying more cargo faster and over longer distances. While aircraft are becoming safer and more efficient, they are also now very complex. Todays commercial aircraft are among the most sophisticated engineering achievements of the day.

Smaller, more fuel-efficient airliners are being developed. The use of turbine engines in light general aviation and commuter aircraft is being explored, along with more efficient propulsion systems, such as the propfan concept. Using satellite communication signals, onboard microcomputers can provide more accurate vehicle navigation and collision-avoidance systems. Digital electronics coupled with servo mechanisms can increase efficiency by providing active stability augmentation of control systems. New composite materials providing greater weight reduction; inexpensive one-man, lightweight, noncertified aircraft, referred to as ultralights; and alternate fuels such as ethanol, methanol, synthetic fuel from shale deposits and coal, and liquid hydrogen are all being explored. Aircraft designed for vertical and short takeoff and landing, which can land on runways one-tenth the normal length, are being developed. Hybrid vehicles such as the Bell XV-15 tilt-rotor already combine the vertical and hover capabilities of the helicopter with the speed and efficiency of the airplane. Although environmental restrictions and high operating costs have limited the success of the supersonic civil transport, the appeal of reduced traveling time justifies the examination of a second generation of supersonic aircraft.

The use of rocket engines for aircraft propulsion opened a new realm of flight to the aeronautical engineer. Robert H. Goddard, an American, developed, built, and flew the first successful liquid-propellant rocket on March 16, 1926. Goddard proved that flight was possible at speeds greater than the speed of sound and that rockets can work in a vacuum. The major impetus in rocket development came in 1938 when the American James Hart Wyld designed, built, and tested the first U.S. regeneratively cooled liquid rocket engine. In 1947 Wylds rocket engine powered the first supersonic research aircraft, the Bell X-1, flown by the U.S. Air Force captain Charles E. Yeager. Supersonic flight offered the aeronautical engineer new challenges in propulsion, structures and materials, high-speed aeroelasticity, and transonic, supersonic, and hypersonic aerodynamics. The experience gained in the X-1 tests led to the development of the X-15 research rocket plane, which flew nearly 200 flights over a nine-year period. The X-15 established an extensive database in transonic and supersonic flight (up to five times the speed of sound) and revealed vital information concerning the upper atmosphere.

The late 1950s and 60s marked a period of intense growth for astronautical engineering. In 1957 the U.S.S.R. orbited Sputnik I, the worlds first artificial satellite, which triggered a space exploration race with the United States. In 1961 U.S. president John F. Kennedy recommended to Congress to undertake the challenge of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth by the end of the 1960s. This commitment was fulfilled on July 20, 1969, when astronauts Neil A. Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr., landed on the Moon.

The 1970s began the decline of the U.S. manned spaceflights. The exploration of the Moon was replaced by unmanned voyages to Jupiter, Saturn, and other planets. The exploitation of space was redirected from conquering distant planets to providing a better understanding of the human environment. Artificial satellites provide data pertaining to geographic formations, oceanic and atmospheric movements, and worldwide communications. The frequency of U.S. spaceflights in the 1960s and 70s led to the development of a reusable, low-orbital-altitude space shuttle. Known officially as the Space Transportation System, the shuttle has made numerous flights since its initial launch on April 12, 1981. It has been used for both military and commercial purposes (e.g., deployment of communications satellites).

In most countries, governments are the aerospace industrys largest customers, and most engineers work on the design of military vehicles. The largest demand for aerospace engineers comes from the transport and fighter aircraft, missile, spacecraft, and general aviation industries. The typical aerospace engineer holds a bachelors degree, but there are many engineers holding masters or doctorate degrees (or their equivalents) in various disciplines associated with aerospace-vehicle design, development, and testing.

The U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is a governmental organization that employs many engineers for research, development, testing, and procurement of military vehicles. Government agencies award and monitor industrial contracts ranging from engineering problem studies to design and fabrication of hardware. Universities receive limited funding, primarily for analytical research. Some of the larger institutions, however, are developing or expanding flight-research facilities and increasing faculty members in an effort to increase productivity in both research and testing.

The design of a flight vehicle is a complex and time-consuming procedure requiring the integration of many engineering technologies. Supporting teams are formed to provide expertise in these technologies, resulting in a completed design that is the best compromise of all the engineering disciplines. Usually the support teams are supervised by a project engineer or chief designer for technical guidance and by a program manager responsible for program budgets and schedules. Because of the ever-increasing requirement for advanced technology and the high cost and high risk associated with complex flight vehicles, many research and development programs are canceled before completion.

The design process can be dissected into five phases and is the same for most aerospace products. Phase one is a marketing analysis to determine customer specifications or requirements. Aerospace engineers are employed to examine technical, operational, or financial problems. The customers requirements are established and then passed on to the conceptual design team for the second phase.

The conceptual design team generally consists of aerospace engineers, who make the first sketch attempt to determine the vehicles size and configuration. Preliminary estimates of the vehicles performance, weight, and propulsion systems are made. Performance parameters include range, speed, drag, power required, payload, and takeoff and landing distances. Parametric trade studies are conducted to optimize the design, but configuration details usually change. This phase may take from a few months to years for major projects.

Phase three is the preliminary design phase. The optimized vehicle design from phase two is used as the starting point. Aerospace engineers perform computer analyses on the configuration; then wind-tunnel models are built and tested. Flight control engineers study dynamic stability and control problems. Propulsion groups supply data necessary for engine selection. Interactions between the engine inlet and vehicle frame are studied. Civil, mechanical, and aerospace engineers analyze the bending loads, stresses, and deflections on the wing, airframe, and other components. Material science engineers aid in selecting low-weight, high-strength materials and may conduct aeroelastic and fatigue tests. Weight engineers make detailed estimates of individual component weights. As certain parameters drive the vehicle design, the preliminary designers are often in close contact with both the conceptual designers and the marketing analysts. The time involved in the preliminary design phase depends on the complexity of the problem but usually takes from six to 24 months.

Phase four, the detailed design phase, involves construction of a prototype. Mechanical engineers, technicians, and draftsmen help lay out the drawings necessary to construct each component. Full-scale mock-ups are built of cardboard, wood, or other inexpensive materials to aid in the subsystem layout. Subsystem components are built and bench-tested, and additional wind-tunnel testing is performed. This phase takes from one to three years.

The final phase concerns flight-testing the prototype. Engineers and test pilots work together to assure that the vehicle is safe and performs as expected. If the prototype is a commercial transport aircraft, the vehicle must meet the requirements specified by government organizations such as the Federal Aviation Administration in the United States and the Civil Aviation Authority in the United Kingdom. Prototype testing is usually completed in one year but can take much longer because of unforeseen contingencies. The time required from the perception of a customers needs to delivery of the product can be as long as 10 to 15 years depending on the complexity of the design, the political climate, and the availability of funding.

High-speed computers have now enabled complex aerospace engineering problems to be analyzed rapidly. More extensive computer programs, many written by aerospace engineers, are being formulated to aid the engineer in designing new configurations.

The aerospace engineer is armed with an extensive background suitable for employment in most positions traditionally occupied by mechanical engineers as well as limited positions in the other various engineering disciplines. The transportation, construction, communication, and energy industries provide the most opportunities for non-aerospace applications.

Because land and sea vehicles are designed for optimum speed and efficiency, the aerospace engineer has become a prominent member of the design teams. Because up to half of the power required to propel a vehicle is due to the resistance of the air, the configuration design of low-drag automobiles, trains, and boats offers better speed and fuel economy. The presence of the aerospace engineer in the automobile industry is evident from the streamlined shapes of cars and trucks that evolved during the late 20th century, at a time when gasoline prices were escalating and the aerospace industry was in a lull. Airline companies employ engineers as performance analysts, crash investigators, and consultants. The Federal Aviation Administration makes use of the technical expertise of the aerospace engineer in various capacities.

The construction of large towers, buildings, and bridges requires predictions of aerodynamic forces and the creation of an optimum design to minimize these forces. The consideration of aerodynamic forces of flat surfaces such as the side of a building or superstructure is not new. In 1910 Alexandre-Gustave Eiffel achieved remarkable experimental results measuring the wind resistance of a flat plate, using the Eiffel Tower as a test platform.

Many companies benefit not from the advanced hardware developments of aerospace technology but by the understanding and application of aerospace methodology. Companies engaged in satellite communications require an understanding of orbital mechanics, trajectories, acceleration forces, and aerodynamic heating and an overall knowledge of the spacecraft industry. Advanced aerodynamic design of airfoils and rotor systems is applied in an effort to improve the efficiency of propellers, windmills, and turbine engines. The impact of aerospace technology has trickled down to many companies engaged in the research and development of flight simulation, automatic controls, materials, dynamics, robotics, medicine, and other high-technology fields.

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Aerospace engineering | Britannica.com

Aerospace | DSV

Our expertise, exceptional hands-on service, and extensive network of service providers means safe, efficient, and trustworthy transport of aircraft engines all around the globe.

DSV ensures proper handling from door to door, start to finish.

Customer FocusWe listen, we understand and we keep you informed. We work with you to achieve continuous improvement, meeting your KPIs and your specific requirements.

EntrepreneurshipOur business is global, but our local offices have a great deal of autonomy to make fast, unbureacratic decisions to help you run your business.

ReliabilityWe are among the world’s leading transport and logistics organizations. We’ll keep you flying.

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The AERO Space

The AERO Space is the only pole dance studio collective in Oregon with two separate pole studios–one for classes and one dedicated to provide our members unlimited access to a fully-equipped practice space available 24/7. Our mission statement is “to foster empowerment through movement education” and to that end, we offer a wide variety of classes & trainings that are intelligent, informed and fun.

Our professionally trained instructors are the most experienced teachers you’ll find at any studio in Portland and together they boast an aggregate of over 30 years of pole dance and fitness instruction experience. We pride ourselves on offering the highest level of safe and professional training in Oregon and we work hard to create an atmosphere of positivity, open-mindedness, and respectfulness in our classes and in our studio. We aim to give you the freedom to express yourself however you want, whenever you want.

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The AERO Space

Front Page – Bye Aerospace

Bye Aerospace is a world leader and innovator of solar-electric aircraft. The company, which was founded in 2007 and is headquartered near Denver, is developing medium and high altitude long endurance UAVs, focusing on advances in energy and design efficiencies. We are growing and revolutionizing the general aviation, aerospace and defense industries. In fact, Bye Aerospace was named one of the “Top 50 Colorado Companies to Watch“ for 2017.

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Front Page – Bye Aerospace

Aerospace – Air Products & Chemicals

For over 75 years

Air Products has offered industrial gases, modified gas atmospheres, equipment and technical support to help aerospace manufacturers and their suppliers improve product quality, reduce operating costs and increase production efficiency. Our broad capabilities help our customers succeed in a competitive, global industry that demands both high quality and value, while facing new challenges in terms of fuel efficiency and higher reliability. We offer a full range of high performance and industry standard gases (nitrogen, hydrogen, argon, helium, oxygen, and gas mixtures), in addition to on-site gas generation, microbulk CryoEase microbulk supply options, gas handling equipment and technology, and global supply capability.Also learn more about our expertise in the growing commercialized space industry. For more in-depth information, please select your segment from the list below.

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Aerospace – Air Products & Chemicals