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My Medicine – WebMD

WebMD My Medicine Help

Q: What is an interaction?

A: Mixing certain medicines together may cause a bad reaction. This is called an interaction. For example, one medicine may cause side effects that create problems with other medicines. Or one medicine may make another medicine stronger or weaker.

Q: How do you classify the seriousness of an interaction?

A: The following classification is used:

Contraindicated: Never use this combination of drugs because of high risk for dangerous interaction

Serious: Potential for serious interaction; regular monitoring by your doctor required or alternate medication may be needed

Significant: Potential for significant interaction (monitoring by your doctor is likely required)

Mild: Interaction is unlikely, minor, or nonsignificant

Q: What should I do if my medications show interactions?

A: Call your doctor or pharmacist if you are concerned about an interaction. Do not stop taking any prescribed medication without your doctor's approval. Sometimes the risk of not taking the medication outweighs the risk or the interaction.

Q: Why can't I enter my medication?

A: There may be medications, especially otc or supplements, that have not been adequately studied for interactions. If we do not have interaction information for a certain medication it can't be saved in My Medicine.

Q: Do you cover all FDA warnings?

A: WebMD will alert users to the most important FDA warnings and alerts affecting consumers such as recalls, label changes and investigations. Not all FDA actions are included. Go to the FDA for a comprehensive list of warnings.

Q: Can I be alerted by email if there is an FDA warning or alert?

A: Yes. If you are signed in to WebMD.com and using My Medicine you can sign up to receive email alerts when you add a medicine. To unsubscribe click here.

Q: Can I add medicines for family members?

A: Yes. Click the arrow next to your picture to add drug profiles for family or loved ones.

Q: Can I access My Medicine from my mobile phone?

A: Yes. Sign in to the WebMD Mobile App. Your saved medicine can be found under "Saved."

Q: Why are there already medicines saved when this my first time using this tool?

A: If you have previously saved a medication on WebMD, for example, in the WebMD Mobile App, these may display in My Medicine.

See more here:

My Medicine - WebMD

Medicine | Definition of Medicine at Dictionary.com

c.1200, "medical treatment, cure, remedy," also used figuratively, of spiritual remedies, from Old French medecine (Modern French mdicine) "medicine, art of healing, cure, treatment, potion," from Latin medicina "the healing art, medicine; a remedy," also used figuratively, perhaps originally ars medicina "the medical art," from fem. of medicinus (adj.) "of a doctor," from medicus "a physician" (see medical); though OED finds evidence for this is wanting. Meaning "a medicinal potion or plaster" in English is mid-14c.

To take (one's) medicine "submit to something disagreeable" is first recorded 1865. North American Indian medicine-man "shaman" is first attested 1801, from American Indian adoption of the word medicine in sense of "magical influence." The U.S.-Canadian boundary they called Medicine Line (first attested 1910), because it conferred a kind of magic protection: punishment for crimes committed on one side of it could be avoided by crossing over to the other. Medicine show "traveling show meant to attract a crowd so patent medicine can be sold to them" is American English, 1938. Medicine ball "stuffed leather ball used for exercise" is from 1889.

View post:

Medicine | Definition of Medicine at Dictionary.com

Medicine – definition of medicine by The Free Dictionary

Quotations"Formerly, when religion was strong and science weak, men mistook magic for medicine; now, when science is strong and religion weak, men mistake medicine for magic" [Thomas Szasz The Second Skin]

Branches of medicine aetiology or etiology, anaesthetics, anaplasty, anatomy, andrology, angiology, audiology, aviation medicine, bacteriology, balneology, bioastronautics, biomedicine, cardiology, chiropody, dental hygiene or oral hygiene, dental surgery, dentistry, dermatology, diagnostics, eccrinology, electrophysiology, electrotherapeutics, embryology, encephalography, endocrinology, endodontics, epidemiology, exodontics, forensic or legal medicine, gastroenterology, genitourinary medicine, geratology, geriatrics, gerontology, gynaecology or (U.S.) gynecology, haematology or (U.S.) hematology, hydrotherapeutics, immunochemistry, immunology, industrial medicine, internal medicine, laryngology, materia medica, midwifery, morbid anatomy, myology, neonatology, nephrology, neuroanatomy, neuroendocrinology, neurology, neuropathology, neurophysiology, neuropsychiatry, neurosurgery, nosology, nostology, nuclear medicine, nutrition, obstetrics, odontology, oncology, ophthalmology, optometry, orthodontics or orthodontia, orthopaedics or (U.S.) orthopedics, orthoptics, orthotics, osteology, osteoplasty, otolaryngology, otology, paediatrics or (U.S.) pediatrics, pathology, periodontics, pharyngology, physical medicine, physiotherapy or (U.S.) physiatrics, plastic surgery, posology, preventive medicine, proctology, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, psychology, radiology, rheumatology, rhinology, serology, space medicine, spare-part surgery, speech therapy, sports medicine, stomatology, surgery, symptomatology, syphilology, therapeutics, tocology or tokology, toxicology, trichology, urology, venereology, veterinary science or medicine, virology

Medical practitioners and specialists aetiologist or etiologist, anaesthetist, anatomist, andrologist, audiologist, bacteriologist, balneologist, barefoot doctor, cardiologist, chiropodist, consultant, dental hygienist or oral hygienist, dentist or dental surgeon, dermatologist, diagnostician, dietitian, district nurse, doctor, electrophysiologist, embryologist, endocrinologist, endodontist, epidemiologist, exodontist, extern or externe (U.S. & Canad.), forensic scientist, gastroenterologist, general practitioner or GP, geriatrician or geriatrist, gerontologist, gynaecologist or (U.S.) gynecologist, haematologist or (U.S.) hematologist, health visitor, house physician, houseman, hydrotherapist, immunologist, intern or interne (U.S. & Canad.), internist, junior doctor, laboratory technician, laryngologist, matron, midwife, myologist, neonatologist, nephrologist, neuroanatomist, neurologist, neuropathologist, neurophysiologist, neuropsychiatrist, neurosurgeon, nosologist, nurse, nursing officer, nutritionist, obstetrician, occupational therapist, odontologist, oncologist, ophthalmologist, optician, optometrist, orderly, orthodontist, orthopaedist or (U.S.) orthopedist, orthoptist, orthotist, osteologist, otolaryngologist, otologist, paediatrician or (U.S.) pediatrician, paramedic, pathologist, pharyngologist, physiotherapist or physio, plastic surgeon, proctologist, psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, psychologist, radiographer, radiologist, registrar, resident (U.S. & Canad.), rheumatologist, rhinologist, serologist, speech therapist, surgeon, syphilologist, therapist, toxicologist, trichologist, urologist, venereologist, veterinary surgeon, vet or (U.S.) veterinarian, virologist

Medical and surgical instruments and equipment arthroscope, artificial heart, artificial kidney, aspirator, bandage, bedpan, bistoury, bronchoscope, cannula or canula, cardiograph, catheter, catling, clamp, clinical thermometer, colonoscope, colposcope, compressor, CT scanner or CAT scanner, curet or curette, cystoscope, defibrillator, depressor, dialysis machine, drain, electrocardiograph, electroencephalograph, electromyograph, encephalogram, endoscope, fetoscope, fibrescope or (U.S.) fiberscope, fluoroscope, forceps, gamma camera, gastroscope, gonioscope, haemostat or (U.S.) hemostat, heart-lung machine, heat lamp, hypodermic or hypodermic needle, hypodermic or hypodermic syringe, inhalator, inspirator, iron lung, kidney machine, kymograph or cymograph, lancet or lance, laparoscope, laryngoscope, life-support machine, microscope, nebulizer, needle, nephroscope, oesophagoscope or (U.S.) esophagoscope, ophthalmoscope, orthoscope, otoscope, oxygen mask, oxygen tent, pacemaker, packing, perimeter, pharyngoscope, plaster cast, pneumatometer, pneumograph, probe, proctoscope, Pulmotor (trademark), raspatory, respirator, resuscitator, retinoscope, retractor, rheometer, rhinoscope, roentgenoscope or rntgenoscope, scalpel, scanner, skiascope, sling, sound, specimen bottle, speculum, sphygmograph, sphygmomanometer, spirograph, spirometer, splint, stethoscope, stomach pump, stretcher, stupe, stylet, styptic pencil, suture, swab, syringe, thoracoscope, tourniquet, trepan, trephine, trocar, ultrasound scanner, urethroscope, urinometer, ventilator, wet pack, X-ray machine

Branches of alternative medicine acupressure, acupuncture, Alexander technique, aromatherapy, autogenic training, Bach flower remedy, biofeedback, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy or homoeopathy, hydrotherapy, hypnosis, hypnotherapy, iridology, kinesiology, massage, moxibustion, naturopathy, osteopathy, radionics, reflexology, shiatsu

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Medicine - definition of medicine by The Free Dictionary

Medicine

One of the nation's most recognized centers for medical education, Tulane University School of Medicine is a vibrant center for education, research and public service. Tulane University School of Medicine is the second-oldest medical school in the Deep South and the 15th oldest medical school in the United States. Tulane School of Medicine is fully accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education.

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Tulane School of Medicine students thank you for your generous gift.

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Medicine

Medicine | Define Medicine at Dictionary.com

c.1200, "medical treatment, cure, remedy," also used figuratively, of spiritual remedies, from Old French medecine (Modern French mdicine) "medicine, art of healing, cure, treatment, potion," from Latin medicina "the healing art, medicine; a remedy," also used figuratively, perhaps originally ars medicina "the medical art," from fem. of medicinus (adj.) "of a doctor," from medicus "a physician" (see medical); though OED finds evidence for this is wanting. Meaning "a medicinal potion or plaster" in English is mid-14c.

To take (one's) medicine "submit to something disagreeable" is first recorded 1865. North American Indian medicine-man "shaman" is first attested 1801, from American Indian adoption of the word medicine in sense of "magical influence." The U.S.-Canadian boundary they called Medicine Line (first attested 1910), because it conferred a kind of magic protection: punishment for crimes committed on one side of it could be avoided by crossing over to the other. Medicine show "traveling show meant to attract a crowd so patent medicine can be sold to them" is American English, 1938. Medicine ball "stuffed leather ball used for exercise" is from 1889.

See the original post:

Medicine | Define Medicine at Dictionary.com

Drugs.com | Prescription Drug Information, Interactions …

Posted today in Medical

A fainting-related fall that caused nerve damage in his right hand could explain why Leonardo da Vinci's painting skills declined later in life, a new paper suggests.The report, published as the world marks the 500th anniversary of the artist's death, contradicts the common belief that da Vinci's difficulties stemmed from a stroke.To arrive at that...

Posted today in Medical

Buyer beware: When it comes to testosterone supplements, men should know a new study finds there is precious little evidence to support claims they will boost testosterone levels, sex drive, strength and overall energy.To come to this conclusion, the researchers first broke down 50 testosterone supplements into their component parts.The investigators...

Posted yesterday in New Drug Approvals

The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Qternmet XR (dapagliflozin, saxagliptin and metformin hydrochloride) extended release tablets as an oral adjunct treatment to diet and exercise to improve glycaemic control in adults with type-2 diabetes (T2D).The approval is based on two Phase III trials, which evaluated combinations of dapagliflozin...

Posted 3 days ago in New Drug Approvals

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today the approval of Dengvaxia, the first vaccine approved for the prevention of dengue disease caused by all dengue virus serotypes (1, 2, 3 and 4) in people ages 9 through 16 who have laboratory-confirmed previous dengue infection and who live in endemic areas. Dengue is endemic in the U.S. territories...

Posted 2 days ago in FDA Alerts

Vivimed Life Sciences Pvt Ltd (Vivimed) is recalling 19 lots of Losartan Potassium Tablets USP 25 mg, 50 mg, and 100 mg to consumer level. Due to the detection of an impurity N-Nitroso-N-methyl-4-aminobutyric acid (NMBA) that is above the US Food & Drug Administrations interim acceptable exposure limit of 9.82 ppm. Based on the available...

Posted 2 days ago in Medical

In the ABCs of vitamins, B12 is often overlooked. But it's essential for the making of nerve and red blood cells, as well as DNA along with many other body processes. Adults and teens need just 2.4 micrograms a day, but you can fall short even on this small amount.You're at particular risk of a B12 deficiency if you're a vegetarian because animal...

Posted 2 days ago in Medical

Imagine a ringing in your ears so intense and unrelenting that you become desperate enough to try to kill yourself.That is a reality for some -- women in particular -- who suffer from severe tinnitus, new research shows.The survey of 72,000 Swedish adults found that 9% of women who suffered from severe tinnitus had attempted suicide, as had 5.5%...

Posted 2 days ago in Medical

An overhaul of the U.S. food system is needed so Americans can easily choose healthy foods, claims an advisory from the American Heart Association (AHA)."Innovation in the food system is needed at multiple levels -- the food industry, agricultural industry, public health and medicine, policy, and among communities, worksites, schools, and families....

Posted 2 days ago in Medical

Ira Goodman woke up in the middle of the night drenched with sweat. His head pounded like nothing he'd experienced in all his 31 years. The room spun and he felt extremely nauseous.He'd eaten an enchilada the night before, so he figured these were symptoms of food poisoning.He stumbled to the bathroom, vomited and returned to bed. He slept fitfully....

Posted 2 days ago in Medical

Getting a good night's sleep can be difficult for many, but restful slumber can be especially hard for stroke survivors. And although various studies have examined the association, doctors continue to overlook the interplay between sleep disorders and stroke, finds a new report on the issue.More than 50 percent of stroke survivors are estimated to...

Read more news...

Posted in Blog

The signing of the 2018 Farm Bill by Trump in December last year paved the way for a more widespread (yet still restricted) cultivation of hemp and a more regulated cannabidiol (CBD) market. And that market is currently booming, with a forecasted revenue of over 22 million by 2022. But there is still a lot []

Posted in Blog

For many Americans, alcohol is a big part of their life. No matter the occasion, from weddings to birthday parties, family gatherings to date nights, most assume alcohol will be available. In fact, more than 50% of people say they would enjoy a major event less if alcohol was prohibited. But at what point does []

Posted in Blog

The history of syphilis makes interesting reading. For a start, theres controversy about its origins. Some believe it to have been prevalent from at least 3000BC, whereas the more popular theory links its general introduction to the world to the return of the Columbus navigators from the New World in 1493. Regardless of its actual []

Go here to read the rest:

Drugs.com | Prescription Drug Information, Interactions ...

My Medicine – WebMD

WebMD My Medicine Help

Q: What is an interaction?

A: Mixing certain medicines together may cause a bad reaction. This is called an interaction. For example, one medicine may cause side effects that create problems with other medicines. Or one medicine may make another medicine stronger or weaker.

Q: How do you classify the seriousness of an interaction?

A: The following classification is used:

Contraindicated: Never use this combination of drugs because of high risk for dangerous interaction

Serious: Potential for serious interaction; regular monitoring by your doctor required or alternate medication may be needed

Significant: Potential for significant interaction (monitoring by your doctor is likely required)

Mild: Interaction is unlikely, minor, or nonsignificant

Q: What should I do if my medications show interactions?

A: Call your doctor or pharmacist if you are concerned about an interaction. Do not stop taking any prescribed medication without your doctor's approval. Sometimes the risk of not taking the medication outweighs the risk or the interaction.

Q: Why can't I enter my medication?

A: There may be medications, especially otc or supplements, that have not been adequately studied for interactions. If we do not have interaction information for a certain medication it can't be saved in My Medicine.

Q: Do you cover all FDA warnings?

A: WebMD will alert users to the most important FDA warnings and alerts affecting consumers such as recalls, label changes and investigations. Not all FDA actions are included. Go to the FDA for a comprehensive list of warnings.

Q: Can I be alerted by email if there is an FDA warning or alert?

A: Yes. If you are signed in to WebMD.com and using My Medicine you can sign up to receive email alerts when you add a medicine. To unsubscribe click here.

Q: Can I add medicines for family members?

A: Yes. Click the arrow next to your picture to add drug profiles for family or loved ones.

Q: Can I access My Medicine from my mobile phone?

A: Yes. Sign in to the WebMD Mobile App. Your saved medicine can be found under "Saved."

Q: Why are there already medicines saved when this my first time using this tool?

A: If you have previously saved a medication on WebMD, for example, in the WebMD Mobile App, these may display in My Medicine.

Read the rest here:

My Medicine - WebMD

Drugs.com | Prescription Drug Information, Interactions …

Posted today in News for Health Professionals

A type of breast implant linked to cancer can still be sold in the United States, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration said Thursday.The agency said it is too soon to ban a type of textured implant recently linked to anaplastic large cell lymphoma and noted that these kinds of implants account for less than 10 percent of the U.S. market.The decision...

Posted today in Medical

Even if they never use a condom during sex, gay men whose HIV is undetectable due to ongoing antiretroviral treatment cannot infect their male partner, new research reveals."Whether men who are in monogamous relationships in these circumstances chose to use or not to use condoms is up to them, but there is no need to do so to prevent HIV transmission...

Posted 2 days ago in New Drug Approvals

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today approved Mavyret (glecaprevir and pibrentasvir) tablets to treat all six genotypes of hepatitis C virus (HCV) in children ages 12 to 17. Mavyret was previously approved to treat HCV in adults in 2017.Direct-acting antiviral drugs reduce the amount of HCV in the body by preventing the virus from...

Posted yesterday in New Drug Approvals

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration announced today the approval of Dengvaxia, the first vaccine approved for the prevention of dengue disease caused by all dengue virus serotypes (1, 2, 3 and 4) in people ages 9 through 16 who have laboratory-confirmed previous dengue infection and who live in endemic areas. Dengue is endemic in the U.S. territories...

Posted 2 days ago in News for Health Professionals

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration today announced the agency is requiring a new boxed warning the agencys most prominent warning on certain prescription insomnia drugs to better ensure patients and their health care professionals have the information they need when considering use of these medicines. The boxed warning follows several...

Posted today in Medical

-- Hemorrhoids are swollen veins in the rectum. Also known as piles, hemorrhoids affect an estimated three of four adults, says Mayo Clinic.Signs of hemorrhoids include:Bleeding during bowel movements.Itching or irritation in the anal region.Pain or discomfort.Anal swelling.A lump near the anus.Many people make lifestyle changes or try home...

Posted today in News for Health Professionals

Prior authorization obstacles are delaying patient access to radiation oncology treatments, according to a survey released by the American Society for Radiation Oncology.A total of 620 radiation oncologists completed the survey online, and 53 responses were collected at the ASTRO Annual Meeting in October 2018. The findings, which examined the extent...

Posted today in News for Health Professionals

Drug overdose deaths involving cocaine and psychostimulants accounted for 19.8 and 14.7 percent, respectively, of all 2017 drug overdose deaths, and the death rates are continuing to increase, according to research published in the May 3 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report.Mbabazi Kariisa,...

Posted today in Medical

Up all night, stressing out, feeling pressured. Cramming for college finals can bring all that, plus have students reaching for fatty, sugary foods, a new study suggests."Stress has long been implicated in poor diet. People tend to report overeating and comfort eating foods high in fat, sugar and calories in times of stress," said study leader Nathalie...

Posted today in Medical

Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay:Pharmaceutical Exec Convicted of Bribing Doctors to Prescribe Opioid SprayJohn Kapoor, the founder and former chairman of Insys Therapeutics, was convicted Thursday of paying doctors millions in bribes to prescribe the highly addictive fentanyl spray...

Read more news...

Posted in Blog

The signing of the 2018 Farm Bill by Trump in December last year paved the way for a more widespread (yet still restricted) cultivation of hemp and a more regulated cannabidiol (CBD) market. And that market is currently booming, with a forecasted revenue of over 22 million by 2022. But there is still a lot []

Posted in Blog

For many Americans, alcohol is a big part of their life. No matter the occasion, from weddings to birthday parties, family gatherings to date nights, most assume alcohol will be available. In fact, more than 50% of people say they would enjoy a major event less if alcohol was prohibited. But at what point does []

Posted in Blog

The history of syphilis makes interesting reading. For a start, theres controversy about its origins. Some believe it to have been prevalent from at least 3000BC, whereas the more popular theory links its general introduction to the world to the return of the Columbus navigators from the New World in 1493. Regardless of its actual []

Visit link:

Drugs.com | Prescription Drug Information, Interactions ...

Medicine | Define Medicine at Dictionary.com

c.1200, "medical treatment, cure, remedy," also used figuratively, of spiritual remedies, from Old French medecine (Modern French mdicine) "medicine, art of healing, cure, treatment, potion," from Latin medicina "the healing art, medicine; a remedy," also used figuratively, perhaps originally ars medicina "the medical art," from fem. of medicinus (adj.) "of a doctor," from medicus "a physician" (see medical); though OED finds evidence for this is wanting. Meaning "a medicinal potion or plaster" in English is mid-14c.

To take (one's) medicine "submit to something disagreeable" is first recorded 1865. North American Indian medicine-man "shaman" is first attested 1801, from American Indian adoption of the word medicine in sense of "magical influence." The U.S.-Canadian boundary they called Medicine Line (first attested 1910), because it conferred a kind of magic protection: punishment for crimes committed on one side of it could be avoided by crossing over to the other. Medicine show "traveling show meant to attract a crowd so patent medicine can be sold to them" is American English, 1938. Medicine ball "stuffed leather ball used for exercise" is from 1889.

See original here:

Medicine | Define Medicine at Dictionary.com

My Medicine – WebMD

WebMD My Medicine Help

Q: What is an interaction?

A: Mixing certain medicines together may cause a bad reaction. This is called an interaction. For example, one medicine may cause side effects that create problems with other medicines. Or one medicine may make another medicine stronger or weaker.

Q: How do you classify the seriousness of an interaction?

A: The following classification is used:

Contraindicated: Never use this combination of drugs because of high risk for dangerous interaction

Serious: Potential for serious interaction; regular monitoring by your doctor required or alternate medication may be needed

Significant: Potential for significant interaction (monitoring by your doctor is likely required)

Mild: Interaction is unlikely, minor, or nonsignificant

Q: What should I do if my medications show interactions?

A: Call your doctor or pharmacist if you are concerned about an interaction. Do not stop taking any prescribed medication without your doctor's approval. Sometimes the risk of not taking the medication outweighs the risk or the interaction.

Q: Why can't I enter my medication?

A: There may be medications, especially otc or supplements, that have not been adequately studied for interactions. If we do not have interaction information for a certain medication it can't be saved in My Medicine.

Q: Do you cover all FDA warnings?

A: WebMD will alert users to the most important FDA warnings and alerts affecting consumers such as recalls, label changes and investigations. Not all FDA actions are included. Go to the FDA for a comprehensive list of warnings.

Q: Can I be alerted by email if there is an FDA warning or alert?

A: Yes. If you are signed in to WebMD.com and using My Medicine you can sign up to receive email alerts when you add a medicine. To unsubscribe click here.

Q: Can I add medicines for family members?

A: Yes. Click the arrow next to your picture to add drug profiles for family or loved ones.

Q: Can I access My Medicine from my mobile phone?

A: Yes. Sign in to the WebMD Mobile App. Your saved medicine can be found under "Saved."

Q: Why are there already medicines saved when this my first time using this tool?

A: If you have previously saved a medication on WebMD, for example, in the WebMD Mobile App, these may display in My Medicine.

Excerpt from:

My Medicine - WebMD

Medicine – definition of medicine by The Free Dictionary

Quotations"Formerly, when religion was strong and science weak, men mistook magic for medicine; now, when science is strong and religion weak, men mistake medicine for magic" [Thomas Szasz The Second Skin]

Branches of medicine aetiology or etiology, anaesthetics, anaplasty, anatomy, andrology, angiology, audiology, aviation medicine, bacteriology, balneology, bioastronautics, biomedicine, cardiology, chiropody, dental hygiene or oral hygiene, dental surgery, dentistry, dermatology, diagnostics, eccrinology, electrophysiology, electrotherapeutics, embryology, encephalography, endocrinology, endodontics, epidemiology, exodontics, forensic or legal medicine, gastroenterology, genitourinary medicine, geratology, geriatrics, gerontology, gynaecology or (U.S.) gynecology, haematology or (U.S.) hematology, hydrotherapeutics, immunochemistry, immunology, industrial medicine, internal medicine, laryngology, materia medica, midwifery, morbid anatomy, myology, neonatology, nephrology, neuroanatomy, neuroendocrinology, neurology, neuropathology, neurophysiology, neuropsychiatry, neurosurgery, nosology, nostology, nuclear medicine, nutrition, obstetrics, odontology, oncology, ophthalmology, optometry, orthodontics or orthodontia, orthopaedics or (U.S.) orthopedics, orthoptics, orthotics, osteology, osteoplasty, otolaryngology, otology, paediatrics or (U.S.) pediatrics, pathology, periodontics, pharyngology, physical medicine, physiotherapy or (U.S.) physiatrics, plastic surgery, posology, preventive medicine, proctology, psychiatry, psychoanalysis, psychology, radiology, rheumatology, rhinology, serology, space medicine, spare-part surgery, speech therapy, sports medicine, stomatology, surgery, symptomatology, syphilology, therapeutics, tocology or tokology, toxicology, trichology, urology, venereology, veterinary science or medicine, virology

Medical practitioners and specialists aetiologist or etiologist, anaesthetist, anatomist, andrologist, audiologist, bacteriologist, balneologist, barefoot doctor, cardiologist, chiropodist, consultant, dental hygienist or oral hygienist, dentist or dental surgeon, dermatologist, diagnostician, dietitian, district nurse, doctor, electrophysiologist, embryologist, endocrinologist, endodontist, epidemiologist, exodontist, extern or externe (U.S. & Canad.), forensic scientist, gastroenterologist, general practitioner or GP, geriatrician or geriatrist, gerontologist, gynaecologist or (U.S.) gynecologist, haematologist or (U.S.) hematologist, health visitor, house physician, houseman, hydrotherapist, immunologist, intern or interne (U.S. & Canad.), internist, junior doctor, laboratory technician, laryngologist, matron, midwife, myologist, neonatologist, nephrologist, neuroanatomist, neurologist, neuropathologist, neurophysiologist, neuropsychiatrist, neurosurgeon, nosologist, nurse, nursing officer, nutritionist, obstetrician, occupational therapist, odontologist, oncologist, ophthalmologist, optician, optometrist, orderly, orthodontist, orthopaedist or (U.S.) orthopedist, orthoptist, orthotist, osteologist, otolaryngologist, otologist, paediatrician or (U.S.) pediatrician, paramedic, pathologist, pharyngologist, physiotherapist or physio, plastic surgeon, proctologist, psychiatrist, psychoanalyst, psychologist, radiographer, radiologist, registrar, resident (U.S. & Canad.), rheumatologist, rhinologist, serologist, speech therapist, surgeon, syphilologist, therapist, toxicologist, trichologist, urologist, venereologist, veterinary surgeon, vet or (U.S.) veterinarian, virologist

Medical and surgical instruments and equipment arthroscope, artificial heart, artificial kidney, aspirator, bandage, bedpan, bistoury, bronchoscope, cannula or canula, cardiograph, catheter, catling, clamp, clinical thermometer, colonoscope, colposcope, compressor, CT scanner or CAT scanner, curet or curette, cystoscope, defibrillator, depressor, dialysis machine, drain, electrocardiograph, electroencephalograph, electromyograph, encephalogram, endoscope, fetoscope, fibrescope or (U.S.) fiberscope, fluoroscope, forceps, gamma camera, gastroscope, gonioscope, haemostat or (U.S.) hemostat, heart-lung machine, heat lamp, hypodermic or hypodermic needle, hypodermic or hypodermic syringe, inhalator, inspirator, iron lung, kidney machine, kymograph or cymograph, lancet or lance, laparoscope, laryngoscope, life-support machine, microscope, nebulizer, needle, nephroscope, oesophagoscope or (U.S.) esophagoscope, ophthalmoscope, orthoscope, otoscope, oxygen mask, oxygen tent, pacemaker, packing, perimeter, pharyngoscope, plaster cast, pneumatometer, pneumograph, probe, proctoscope, Pulmotor (trademark), raspatory, respirator, resuscitator, retinoscope, retractor, rheometer, rhinoscope, roentgenoscope or rntgenoscope, scalpel, scanner, skiascope, sling, sound, specimen bottle, speculum, sphygmograph, sphygmomanometer, spirograph, spirometer, splint, stethoscope, stomach pump, stretcher, stupe, stylet, styptic pencil, suture, swab, syringe, thoracoscope, tourniquet, trepan, trephine, trocar, ultrasound scanner, urethroscope, urinometer, ventilator, wet pack, X-ray machine

Branches of alternative medicine acupressure, acupuncture, Alexander technique, aromatherapy, autogenic training, Bach flower remedy, biofeedback, chiropractic, herbalism, homeopathy or homoeopathy, hydrotherapy, hypnosis, hypnotherapy, iridology, kinesiology, massage, moxibustion, naturopathy, osteopathy, radionics, reflexology, shiatsu

More here:

Medicine - definition of medicine by The Free Dictionary

Cryptocurrency News: This Week on Bitfinex, Tether, Coinbase, & More

Cryptocurrency News
On the whole, cryptocurrency prices are down from our previous report on cryptos, with the market slipping on news of an exchange being hacked and a report about Bitcoin manipulation.

However, there have been two bright spots: 1) an official from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) said that Ethereum is not a security, and 2) Coinbase is expanding its selection of tokens.

Let's start with the good news.
SEC Says ETH Is Not a Security
Investors have some reason to cheer this week. A high-ranking SEC official told attendees of the Yahoo! All Markets Summit: Crypto that Ethereum and Bitcoin are not.

The post Cryptocurrency News: This Week on Bitfinex, Tether, Coinbase, & More appeared first on Profit Confidential.

Follow this link:

Cryptocurrency News: This Week on Bitfinex, Tether, Coinbase, & More

Ripple Price Forecast: XRP vs SWIFT, SEC Updates, and More

Ripple vs SWIFT: The War Begins
While most criticisms of XRP do nothing to curb my bullish Ripple price forecast, there is one obstacle that nags at my conscience. Its name is SWIFT.

The Society for Worldwide Interbank Financial Telecommunication (SWIFT) is the king of international payments.

It coordinates wire transfers across 11,000 banks in more than 200 countries and territories, meaning that in order for XRP prices to ascend to $10.00, Ripple needs to launch a successful coup. That is, and always has been, an unwritten part of Ripple’s story.

We’ve seen a lot of progress on that score. In the last three years, Ripple wooed more than 100 financial firms onto its.

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Cryptocurrency News: Bitcoin ETFs, Andreessen Horowitz, and Contradictions in Crypto

Cryptocurrency News
This was a bloody week for cryptocurrencies. Everything was covered in red, from Ethereum (ETH) on down to the Basic Attention Token (BAT).

Some investors claim it was inevitable. Others say that price manipulation is to blame.

We think the answers are more complicated than either side has to offer, because our research reveals deep contradictions between the price of cryptos and the underlying development of blockchain projects.

For instance, a leading venture capital (VC) firm launched a $300.0-million crypto investment fund, yet liquidity continues to dry up in crypto markets.

Another example is the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's.

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Cryptocurrency News: Looking Past the Bithumb Crypto Hack

Another Crypto Hack Derails Recovery
Since our last report, hackers broke into yet another cryptocurrency exchange. This time the target was Bithumb, a Korean exchange known for high-flying prices and ultra-active traders.

While the hackers made off with approximately $31.5 million in funds, the exchange is working with relevant authorities to return the stolen tokens to their respective owners. In the event that some is still missing, the exchange will cover the losses. (Source: “Bithumb Working With Other Crypto Exchanges to Recover Hacked Funds,”.

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Cryptocurrency News: Looking Past the Bithumb Crypto Hack

Cryptocurrency News: Bitcoin ETF Rejection, AMD Microchip Sales, and Hedge Funds

Cryptocurrency News
Although cryptocurrency prices were heating up last week (Bitcoin, especially), regulators poured cold water on the rally by rejecting calls for a Bitcoin exchange-traded fund (ETF). This is the second time that the proposal fell on deaf ears. (More on that below.)

Crypto mining ran into similar trouble, as you can see from Advanced Micro Devices, Inc.'s (NASDAQ:AMD) most recent quarterly earnings. However, it wasn't all bad news. Investors should, for instance, be cheering the fact that hedge funds are ramping up their involvement in cryptocurrency markets.

Without further ado, here are those stories in greater detail.
ETF Rejection.

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Cryptocurrency News: What You Need to Know This Week

Cryptocurrency News
Cryptocurrencies traded sideways since our last report on cryptos. However, I noticed something interesting when playing around with Yahoo! Finance’s cryptocurrency screener: There are profitable pockets in this market.

Incidentally, Yahoo’s screener is far superior to the one on CoinMarketCap, so if you’re looking to compare digital assets, I highly recommend it.

But let's get back to my epiphany.

In the last month, at one point or another, most crypto assets on our favorites list saw double-digit increases. It’s true that each upswing was followed by a hard crash, but investors who rode the trend would have made a.

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Cryptocurrency News: XRP Validators, Malta, and Practical Tokens

Cryptocurrency News & Market Summary
Investors finally saw some light at the end of the tunnel last week, with cryptos soaring across the board. No one quite knows what kicked off the rally—as it could have been any of the stories we discuss below—but the net result was positive.

Of course, prices won’t stay on this rocket ride forever. I expect to see a resurgence of volatility in short order, because the market is moving as a single unit. Everything is rising in tandem.

This tells me that investors are simply “buying the dip” rather than identifying which cryptos have enough real-world value to outlive the crash.

So if you want to know when.

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Cryptocurrency News: Vitalik Buterin Doesn’t Care About Bitcoin ETFs

Cryptocurrency News
While headline numbers look devastating this week, investors might take some solace in knowing that cryptocurrencies found their bottom at roughly $189.8 billion in market cap—that was the low point. Since then, investors put more than $20.0 billion back into the market.

During the rout, Ethereum broke below $300.00 and XRP fell below $0.30, marking yearly lows for both tokens. The same was true down the list of the top 100 biggest cryptos.

Altcoins took the brunt of the hit. BTC Dominance, which reveals how tightly investment is concentrated in Bitcoin, rose from 42.62% to 53.27% in just one month, showing that investors either fled altcoins at higher.

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Cryptocurrency News: Vitalik Buterin Doesn’t Care About Bitcoin ETFs

Cryptocurrency News: New Exchanges Could Boost Crypto Liquidity

Cryptocurrency News
Even though the cryptocurrency news was upbeat in recent days, the market tumbled after the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) rejected calls for a Bitcoin (BTC) exchange-traded fund (ETF).

That news came as a blow to investors, many of whom believe the ETF would open the cryptocurrency industry up to pension funds and other institutional investors. This would create a massive tailwind for cryptos, they say.

So it only follows that a rejection of the Bitcoin ETF should send cryptos tumbling, correct? Well, maybe you can follow that logic. To me, it seems like a dramatic overreaction.

I understand that legitimizing cryptos is important. But.

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