Medicine | Definition of Medicine by Merriam-Webster

1 a : a substance or preparation used in treating disease b : something that affects well-being

b : the branch of medicine concerned with the nonsurgical treatment of disease

3 : a substance (such as a drug or potion) used to treat something other than disease

4 : an object held in traditional American Indian belief to give control over natural or magical forces; also : magical power or a magical rite

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Medicine | Definition of Medicine by Merriam-Webster

Florida Board of Medicine- Healthcare Practitioner …

TheFlorida BoardofMedicinewas established to ensure that every physician practicing in this state meets minimum requirements for safe practice. The practice of medicine is a privilege granted by the state.TheFlorida BoardofMedicine, through efficient and dedicated organization, will license, monitor, discipline, educate, and when appropriate, rehabilitate physicians and other practitioners to assure their fitness and competence in the service of the people of Florida.

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The New England Journal of Medicine: Research & Review …

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The New England Journal of Medicine: Research & Review …

State Board of Medicine – Pennsylvania

The State Board of Medicine regulates the practice of medicine through the licensure, registration and certification of members of the medical profession in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The Board regulates medical doctors; physician assistants; radiology technicians; respiratory therapists; nurse-midwives; acupuncturists; practitioners of oriental medicine; perfusionists; behavioral specialists; and athletic trainers. The Board also has authority take disciplinary or corrective action against individuals it regulates.

The Board periodically reviews the character of the instruction and the facilities possessed by each of the medical colleges and other medical training facilities offering or desiring to offer medical training in accordance with the laws of the Commonwealth. The Board also reviews the facilities and qualifications of medical colleges and other medical facilities outside the Commonwealth whose trainees or graduates desire to obtain licensure, certification or graduate medical training in the Commonwealth.

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State Board of Medicine – Pennsylvania

Medicine Synonyms, Medicine Antonyms | Thesaurus.com

c.1200, “medical treatment, cure, remedy,” also used figuratively, of spiritual remedies, from Old French medecine (Modern French mdicine) “medicine, art of healing, cure, treatment, potion,” from Latin medicina “the healing art, medicine; a remedy,” also used figuratively, perhaps originally ars medicina “the medical art,” from fem. of medicinus (adj.) “of a doctor,” from medicus “a physician” (see medical); though OED finds evidence for this is wanting. Meaning “a medicinal potion or plaster” in English is mid-14c.

To take (one’s) medicine “submit to something disagreeable” is first recorded 1865. North American Indian medicine-man “shaman” is first attested 1801, from American Indian adoption of the word medicine in sense of “magical influence.” The U.S.-Canadian boundary they called Medicine Line (first attested 1910), because it conferred a kind of magic protection: punishment for crimes committed on one side of it could be avoided by crossing over to the other. Medicine show “traveling show meant to attract a crowd so patent medicine can be sold to them” is American English, 1938. Medicine ball “stuffed leather ball used for exercise” is from 1889.

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Medicine Synonyms, Medicine Antonyms | Thesaurus.com

Medicine – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

This page is about the science. For drugs, see Medication.

Medicine is the science that deals with diseases (illnesses) in humans and animals, the best ways to prevent diseases, and the best ways to return to a healthy condition.

People who practice medicine are most often called medical doctors or physicians. Often doctors work closely with nurses and many other types of health care professionals.

Many doctors specialize in one kind of medical work. For example, pediatrics is the medical specialty about the health of children.

In this specialty, the doctor is trained to provide anaesthesia and sedation. This is important for surgeries and certain medical procedures. Anaesthesiologists also provide pre-operative assessments, ensuring the patient is safe during the operation and successfully awakens from anaesthesia after the operation. They assess for medical conditions and suitability for anaesthesia. They screen for risk factors prior to surgery and try to optimize the operative environment for the patient and the surgeon. They are the doctors who give epidurals during labor and delivery, provide spinal blocks, local nerve blocks, and general anaesthesia for procedures. They are the doctors who are especially trained in intubation (putting a tube into the lungs to help a person artificially breathe when the person is paralyzed and asleep during surgery). Hence, due to their skill in intubation, they are often the first line responders for emergencies. They help people who are in distress with their breathing, who have lost their airway or when their airway has become obstructed.

A cardiologist is a doctor with special training on the heart. The doctor in this field ensures the heart is healthy and functions properly. The heart is a vital organ whose role is to pump blood to the rest of the body. The purpose of blood is to deliver oxygen to the tissues. Without the heart functioning well, our tissues and organs would die and not function properly. Cardiologists treat heart attacks, sudden cardiac arrests, arrhythmias (rhythm issues related to a faulty electrical system of the heart), heart failure (where the heart fails to pump blood forward properly) and many other heart related illnesses. They specialize in life saving procedures like cardiac stents and cardiac ablation. There is a subspecialty within cardiology called “Interventional cardiology.” These are cardiologists who specialize in interventions or procedures to save the function of the heart, such as cardiac stenting or angiography.

This specialty consists of well trained doctors who practice cardiac surgery. They are best known for their role in cardiac bypass surgeries. In cardiac bypass, the surgeon restores blood flow to the area of the heart that was deficient due to a blocked coronary artery. This is usually done by taking a vein, most commonly the saphenous vein from the leg, to create a pathway of blood flow to the heart region that needs it.

Emergency room doctors are in charge of sudden important or life-threatening emergencies. In addition to dealing with heart attacks, strokes, traumas, issues that require immediate medical attention or surgeries, they also deal with a wide range of other health conditions, such as mental health and drug overdoses. Their training is broad and diverse as anyone can walk through the door seeking help. They see patients of all ages and walks of life. However, unlike a general practitioner or family doctor, their immediate goal is to make sure the patient is stable and exclude any serious or life threatening diseases or conditions.

A family doctor, otherwise known as general practitioner, is trained to provide medical service to people of all ages, demographics, and walks of life. Their training is diverse to deal with a variety of conditions including all non surgical specialties. They also follow the patient from birth to death and are trained to treat an individual as a whole, in the context of their social setting and also their family situation and mental health. Unlike specialists who mainly deal with problems of one organ or system, family doctors deal with all parts of the body and synthesize this information for the patient’s general health. They provide a global perspective of the person’s health in the patient’s unique life situation. They are an individual’s regular doctor who knows the patient in their social and family context. They can refer to specialists for issues that require more detailed or specialized treatments unavailable to them as an outpatient or beyond their expertise.

Gastroenterologists are doctors who specialize in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract and upper abdominal organs. The GI tract is consists of the esophagus all the way down to the anus. The upper abdominal organs include the liver, gallbladder, pancreas and spleen. In addition to dealing with medical conditions associated with these organs, doctors in this speciality also perform endoscopies. This is where a camera is placed to visualize the esophagus and stomach (upper endoscopy) or the colon (lower endoscopy or colonoscopy). Gastroenterologists that specialize in the liver is called a Hepatologist. They are responsible for treating patients with liver failure or cirrhosis. They also treat patients with viral Hepatitis (A,B,C) and many other forms of liver disease.

Doctors in this specialty are trained to recognize and treat a variety of different conditions involving the internal organs. They have wide knowledge in a number of specialties including, but not limited to: Respirology, Nephrology, Gastroenterology, Cardiology. Doctors who practice broadly in this field are known as General Internists (or General Internal Medicine doctors). Internists can go to receive further training beyond residency in a particular field. For example, Gastroenterologists are internists that have chosen to specialize in GI medicine. Internal medicine doctors are in charge of inpatient units when patients are admitted for a general reason. Unlike family doctors and emergency doctors, although their training is diverse and they have broad knowledge in many organ systems, they do not treat or manage children, babies, or pregnant women. (Those patients are instead cared for by Pediatricians and Obstetrics/gynecology, respectively.)

Doctors in this field, abbreviated OBGYN or Obs/Gyn, specialize in women’s health covering conditions of the female reproductive organs, and pregnancy care and delivery. Some examples of gynecological issues they deal with include contraceptive medicine, fertility workup and treatments, prolapse and incontinence, sexual health, ovarian tumors/ cysts, gynecological oncology. They are also surgeons in their fields, capable of performing numerous gynecological surgeries. Doctors in this field also practice obstetrical medicine, specialising in maternal fetal care and deliveries, complications related to deliveries, assisted deliveries (such as vacuum and forceps deliveries) and Caesarian sections.

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Medicine – Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Home | School of Medicine | West Virginia University

Asking questions and finding answers. Discovering tomorrows cures. Bringing new treatments and medical advances from the bench to bedside as safely and quickly as possible. At the WVU School of Medicine, this is where we come together to transform West Virginias health and train our healthcare providers of tomorrow.

Be a part of our mission to improve the health and lives of all West Virginians. Fund a scholarship, support efforts to reduce health inequalities, invest in our childrens health or leave a legacy for future generations.

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Department of Medicine College of Medicine University …

Welcome to the Department of Medicine!

All internists are at heart a strange mix of both detective and engineer. We are attracted to Internal Medicine in the first place because we are detectives, we want to solve problems, and the problems we want to solve are what makes people sick, because it hurts us when someone suffers, when someone presents with a complex of symptoms that causes them pain. We cannot help ourselves, when faced with someone who is hurting we cannot help but respond, to investigate. Why is this happening? we ask ourselves, late at night, laying bed, why? Driving into work early in the morning, while it is still dark, tell me you have not done this; of course you have, you are in Internists. This drives you, it makes you crazy, the not knowing, not able to understand why. This is the heart of an Internist.

But there is another part to your heart, if you are an Internist. This is the part that, when you finally understand the reason for the suffering, you want to attack it, you want to fix it. Once you understand the reason for the problem, you and I cannot rest until it is fixed. Read More…

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Department of Medicine College of Medicine University …

Medicine | Baylor College of Medicine | Houston, Texas

In our goal toward exhibiting the core structures of our new strategic plan, the Department of Medicine employs a framework of vice chairs who ensure we are meeting our key goals. We have vice chairs over clinical affairs, education, faculty and staff development, quality improvement and innovation, research and veterans affairs.

Learn more about ourleaders.

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Medicine | Baylor College of Medicine | Houston, Texas

Medicine – Wits University

The Bachelor of Medicine & Bachelor of Surgery (MBBCh) degree is a 6 year, full-time course.The degree course is the standard qualification for becoming a medical practitioner.

Duties include the examination and diagnosis of patients, the prescription of medicines, performing of minor operations and the provision of treatments for injuries, diseases and other ailments.

Once qualified, it is a requirement that two years internship and one further year community service must be undertaken before the qualified doctor is permitted to pursue specialty training.

Completing the MBBCh degree opens the door to a variety of exciting and challenging careers.Surgeons, paediatricians, pathologists, radiologists, family medicine practitioners, all start by graduating with an MBBCh.

South Africa offers great scope to medical practitioners. There is a critical need for doctors in underserved areas and it is a challenge to provide good quality preventative, diagnostic and therapeutic services in a resource-poor setting.

However, the personal rewards of giving back and making a difference to the lives of so many people make the effort worthwhile. On the other hand, the country offers up-to-date facilities in both academic and private practice settings with the opportunity of being involved in research at many levels.

There are two points of entry into MBBCh.

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Medicine – Wits University

Home – University of Chicago – Department of Medicine

Everett E. Vokes, MD

Chair, Department of Medicine

University of ChicagoDepartment of Medicine

Welcome to the Department of Medicine at the University of Chicago. Our department was the first department created when the medical school began over 110 years ago. It has evolved into the largest department not only in the medical school with over 345 full time faculty and research faculty but is the largest department in the University. The main missions of the Department of Medicine, scholarship, discovery, education and outstanding patient care, occur in a setting of multicultural and ethnic diversity. These missions are supported by exceptional faculty and trainees in the Department. We believe you will quickly agree that the DOMs faculty, fellows and trainees very much represent the forefront of academic medicine extraordinary people doing things to support the missions of our department. The result is a Department which reaches far beyond the walls of our medical school to improve humanity and health throughout our community and the world providing high quality patient care and training of the next generation of leaders in medicine.

The Department of Medicine has a long and proud history of research and discovery in the basic, clinical and translational sciences. Currently, the Department of Medicine is among an elite group of medical centers who are leading in the discovery and delivery of personalized medicine. Our impressive pool of talented researchers are renowned for bridging the bench to the bedside, and clinical research evaluations of new drugs and devices. The educational mission of the Department of Medicine is to train exceptional healers and the future leaders in academic medicine. The Department is home to four top residency programs (Internal Medicine, Emergency Medicine, Dermatology and Medicine-Pediatrics) and twelve fellowship programs, including seven federally-funded training grants. Our residents obtain their 1st choice of fellowship programs over 80% of the time with these positions usually obtained in the very best academic programs nationwide, a fact clearly reflecting the high esteem in which our program and house staff is held. Diversity of housestaff and faculty is a key priority in our enterprise, both to cultivate leadership from underrepresented minorities and women and to reflect the ethnic and racial makeup of the patients we serve. Our trainees and faculty are recruited from top medical schools in the country.

The Department of Medicine also takes great pride in providing unparalleled, comprehensive and innovative patient care. The Departments clinical excellence is continually recognized by the highly regarded US News and World Report. Each of the Departments subspecialty practices are recognized as programs of national, regional, and local distinction for our novel diagnostic and therapeutic patient care offerings.

We invite you to learn more about our outstanding programs in the Department of Medicine.

Everett E. Vokes, MDJohn E. Ultmann ProfessorChair, Department of MedicinePhysician in Chief, University of Chicago Medicine

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Weill Cornell Medicine

Exceptional Patient Care is the Heart and Soul of our Mission

Weill Cornell Medicine faculty and staff put patients first. WCM physicians are among the top in the nation and stay on the leading edge of new procedures and technologies.

We Discover Innovative Cures and Treatments

Weill Cornell Medicine researchers work to advance laboratory breakthroughs in common health challenges, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s.

Training Future Healthcare and Scientific Leaders

Weill Cornell Medicine educational programs are among the most selective in the nation, with unique international partnerships and comprehensive student services.

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Weill Cornell Medicine

Navajo medicine – Wikipedia

Navajo medicine today has remained preserved for millennia as many Navajo people have relied on traditional medicinal practices as their primary source of healing. However, modern day residents within the Navajo Nation have incorporated contemporary medicine into their society with the establishment of Western hospitals and clinics on the reservation over the last century.

In addition, medicine and healing are deeply tied with religious and spiritual beliefs, taking on a form of shamanism. These cultural ideologies deem overall health to be ingrained in supernatural forces that relate to universal balance and harmony. The spiritual significance has allowed the Navajo healing practices and Western medical procedure to coexist as the former is set apart as a way of age-long tradition.

Illness is described as the manifested mental or physical consequence brought on by a disruption of patient harmony. Some causes of this disruption include taboo transgression, excessive behavior, improper animal contact, improper ceremony conduction, or contact with malignant entities including spirits, skin-walkers and witches. Breaking taboos is believed to be acting against the principles devised by the Holy People that withhold personal harmony with the environment. There are some cases in which illness is merely the result of accident. Personal injury or illness can be the error from lack of judgment or unintentional contact with harmful creatures of nature. Illness can also be brought on by malevolent practitioners of negative medicine. This belief in hchx, translated as “chaos” or “sickness”, is the opposite of hzh and helps to explain why people, who are intended to be in harmony, perform actions counter to their ideals, thus reinforcing the need for healing practices as means of balance and restoration. Those who practice witchcraft include shape shifters who intend to use spiritual power and ceremony to acquire wealth, seduce lovers, harm enemies and rivals. Ill health is also believed to be brought upon by chindi (ghost) who can bring about a kind of ghost sickness that leads others to death.[1]

reference aziz baloch

Navajo Hataii are traditional medicine men who are called upon to perform healing ceremonies. Each medicine man begins training as an apprentice to an older practicing singer. During apprenticeship, the apprentice assembles medicine bundles (jish) required to perform ceremonies and assist the teacher until deemed ready for independent practice. Throughout his lifetime, a medicine man can only learn a few chants as each requires a great deal of time and effort to learn and perfect. Songs are orally passed down in traditional Navajo from generation to generation. Unlike other American Indian medical practitioners that rely on visions and personal powers, a healer acts as a facilitator that transfers power from the Holy People to the patient to restore balance and harmony. Healing practice is performed within a ceremonial hogan. It is common for medicine men to receive payment for their healing services. In the past, healing was exchanged for sheep. In modern times however, monetary payment has become a widely accepted form of compensation. It should be noted that women can also play the role of healer in medicinal practice.[1]

Hand tremblers act as medical diagnosticians and are sometimes called upon in order to verify an illness by drawing on divine power within themselves as received from the Gila monster. Typical services can be provided in the form of songs, prayers, and herb usage. During a diagnosis a hand trembler traces symbols in the dirt while holding a “trembling arm” over the patient. Movement of the arm signifies a new drawn symbol or a possible identification to the cause of illness. Once a solution has been found, the patient can be referred to a herbalist or singer needed to perform a healing ceremony.[1]

A number of healing ceremonies are performed according to a given patient situation. Some chants and rites for curing purposes include:

See Navajo ethnobotany for a list of plants and how they were used.

Navajo Indians utilize approximately 450 species for medicinal purposes, the most plant species of any native tribe. Herbs for healing ceremonies are collected by a medicine man accompanied by an apprentice. Patients can also collect these plants for treatment of minor illnesses. Once all necessary wild plants are collected, an herbal tea is made for the patient, accompanied by a short prayer. In some ceremonies, the herbal mixture causes patient vomiting to ensure bodily cleanliness. Purging can also require the patient to immerse themselves in a yucca root sud bath. Any distribution of medicinal herbs to a patient is accompanied by spiritual chanting. The Navajo people recognize the need for botanical conservation when gathering desired healing herbs. When a medicinal plant is taken, the neighboring plants of the same species receive a prayer in respect. Despite this fact, the collection of medicinal herbs has been more difficult in recent years as the result of migrating plant spores. Popular plants included in Navajo herbal medicine include Sagebrush (Artemisia spp.), Wild Buckwheats (Eriogonum spp.), Puccoon (Lithospermum multiflorum), Cedar Bark (Cedrus deodara), Sage (Salvia spp.), Indian Paintbrush (Castilleja spp.), Juniper Ash (Juniperus spp.), and Larkspur (Delphinium spp.).[3]

Sand painting is the transfer of strength and beauty to the patient through various drawings made by a medicine man in the surrounding sand during a ceremony. Elaborate figures are drawn in the sand using colorful crushed minerals and plants. Many sand paintings contain depictions of spiritual yeii to whom a medicine man will ask to come into the painting in order for patient healing to occur. After each ceremony, the sacred sand painting is destroyed.[1]

As prompted by the Meriam Report in 1928, federal commitment to Indian health care under the New Deal increased as the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) Medical Division expanded, making medical care more accessible, affordable, and tolerated by the Navajo populace.

Increased demand of BIA medical care by Native Indians conflicted with post World War II conservatives who resented government funded and privileged health care. Growing interest in Indian termination policy in addition to unaided medical attention called for a transition of medical affluence by both native and non-native parties.

Under the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, funding was provided for the United States Public Health Service to gain a “Division of Indian Health” which would help provide a stronger federal commitment to health care. This division would later be renamed the division of Indian Health Service. Despite its initial successes, the Indian Health Service on the Navajo Nation faced challenges of being underfunded and understaffed. In addition, language barriers and cross-cultural tensions continued to complicate the hospital and clinic experience.[1]

Expanding Western medical influence and diminishing medicine men in the second half of the 20th century helped to initiate activism for traditional medical preservation as well as Indian representation in Western medical institutions.

With the coming of the 1970s spawned new opportunities for Navajo medical self-determination. The Indian Health Care Improvement Act 1976 aided local Navajo communities in autonomously administering their own medical facilities and prompted natives to gain more bureaucratic positions in the Indian Health Service. The gained presence of native people in medical institutions also helped ease many who regarded non-Navajo medical providers with mistrust.[4]

Community medical care that relied less on government involvement also took root in Rough Rock and Ganado, both towns that administered their own health care services. Navajo Nation Health Foundations was run in Ganado solely by Navajo people. In expressing identity in the medical community, the Navajo Nation took advantage of the National Health Planning and Resources Development Act to create the Navajo Health Systems Agency in 1975, being the only American Indian group to do so during that time.[1]

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Navajo medicine – Wikipedia

My Medicine – WebMD

WebMD My Medicine Help

Q: What is an interaction?

A: Mixing certain medicines together may cause a bad reaction. This is called an interaction. For example, one medicine may cause side effects that create problems with other medicines. Or one medicine may make another medicine stronger or weaker.

Q: How do you classify the seriousness of an interaction?

A: The following classification is used:

Contraindicated: Never use this combination of drugs because of high risk for dangerous interaction

Serious: Potential for serious interaction; regular monitoring by your doctor required or alternate medication may be needed

Significant: Potential for significant interaction (monitoring by your doctor is likely required)

Mild: Interaction is unlikely, minor, or nonsignificant

Q: What should I do if my medications show interactions?

A: Call your doctor or pharmacist if you are concerned about an interaction. Do not stop taking any prescribed medication without your doctor’s approval. Sometimes the risk of not taking the medication outweighs the risk or the interaction.

Q: Why can’t I enter my medication?

A: There may be medications, especially otc or supplements, that have not been adequately studied for interactions. If we do not have interaction information for a certain medication it can’t be saved in My Medicine.

Q: Do you cover all FDA warnings?

A: WebMD will alert users to the most important FDA warnings and alerts affecting consumers such as recalls, label changes and investigations. Not all FDA actions are included. Go to the FDA for a comprehensive list of warnings.

Q: Can I be alerted by email if there is an FDA warning or alert?

A: Yes. If you are signed in to WebMD.com and using My Medicine you can sign up to receive email alerts when you add a medicine. To unsubscribe click here.

Q: Can I add medicines for family members?

A: Yes. Click the arrow next to your picture to add drug profiles for family or loved ones.

Q: Can I access My Medicine from my mobile phone?

A: Yes. Sign in to the WebMD Mobile App. Your saved medicine can be found under “Saved.”

Q: Why are there already medicines saved when this my first time using this tool?

A: If you have previously saved a medication on WebMD, for example, in the WebMD Mobile App, these may display in My Medicine.

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Medicine | Define Medicine at Dictionary.com

n.

c.1200, “medical treatment, cure, remedy,” also used figuratively, of spiritual remedies, from Old French medecine (Modern French mdicine) “medicine, art of healing, cure, treatment, potion,” from Latin medicina “the healing art, medicine; a remedy,” also used figuratively, perhaps originally ars medicina “the medical art,” from fem. of medicinus (adj.) “of a doctor,” from medicus “a physician” (see medical); though OED finds evidence for this is wanting. Meaning “a medicinal potion or plaster” in English is mid-14c.

To take (one’s) medicine “submit to something disagreeable” is first recorded 1865. North American Indian medicine-man “shaman” is first attested 1801, from American Indian adoption of the word medicine in sense of “magical influence.” The U.S.-Canadian boundary they called Medicine Line (first attested 1910), because it conferred a kind of magic protection: punishment for crimes committed on one side of it could be avoided by crossing over to the other. Medicine show “traveling show meant to attract a crowd so patent medicine can be sold to them” is American English, 1938. Medicine ball “stuffed leather ball used for exercise” is from 1889.

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Medicine | Define Medicine at Dictionary.com

medicine – Wiktionary

English[edit]Alternative forms[edit]Etymology[edit]

From Middle English medicin, from Middle French medicine, from Old French medecine, from Latin medicna (the healing art, medicine, a physician’s shop, a remedy, medicine), feminine of medicinus (of or belonging to physic or surgery, or to a physician or surgeon), from medicus (a physician, surgeon), from medeor (I heal).

medicine (countable and uncountable, plural medicines)

Terms derived from medicine (noun)

Terms etymologically related to medicine (noun)

ritual Native American magic

Translations to be checked

medicine (third-person singular simple present medicines, present participle medicining, simple past and past participle medicined)

medicinef

From Old French medecine, with the i added back to reflect the original Latin medicna.

medicinef (plural medicines)

medicine

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medicine – Wiktionary

Medicine | Define Medicine at Dictionary.com

n.

c.1200, “medical treatment, cure, remedy,” also used figuratively, of spiritual remedies, from Old French medecine (Modern French mdicine) “medicine, art of healing, cure, treatment, potion,” from Latin medicina “the healing art, medicine; a remedy,” also used figuratively, perhaps originally ars medicina “the medical art,” from fem. of medicinus (adj.) “of a doctor,” from medicus “a physician” (see medical); though OED finds evidence for this is wanting. Meaning “a medicinal potion or plaster” in English is mid-14c.

To take (one’s) medicine “submit to something disagreeable” is first recorded 1865. North American Indian medicine-man “shaman” is first attested 1801, from American Indian adoption of the word medicine in sense of “magical influence.” The U.S.-Canadian boundary they called Medicine Line (first attested 1910), because it conferred a kind of magic protection: punishment for crimes committed on one side of it could be avoided by crossing over to the other. Medicine show “traveling show meant to attract a crowd so patent medicine can be sold to them” is American English, 1938. Medicine ball “stuffed leather ball used for exercise” is from 1889.

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Medicine | Define Medicine at Dictionary.com

Medicine | Definition of Medicine by Merriam-Webster

1 a : a substance or preparation used in treating disease b : something that affects well-being

b : the branch of medicine concerned with the nonsurgical treatment of disease

3 : a substance (such as a drug or potion) used to treat something other than disease

4 : an object held in traditional American Indian belief to give control over natural or magical forces; also : magical power or a magical rite

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Medicine | Definition of Medicine by Merriam-Webster

medicine – Wiktionary

English[edit]Alternative forms[edit]Etymology[edit]

From Middle English medicin, from Middle French medicine, from Old French medecine, from Latin medicna (the healing art, medicine, a physician’s shop, a remedy, medicine), feminine of medicinus (of or belonging to physic or surgery, or to a physician or surgeon), from medicus (a physician, surgeon), from medeor (I heal).

medicine (countable and uncountable, plural medicines)

Terms derived from medicine (noun)

Terms etymologically related to medicine (noun)

ritual Native American magic

Translations to be checked

medicine (third-person singular simple present medicines, present participle medicining, simple past and past participle medicined)

medicinef

From Old French medecine, with the i added back to reflect the original Latin medicna.

medicinef (plural medicines)

medicine

See original here:

medicine – Wiktionary