Copenhagen suspect known to police

Prime minister describes first shooting at freedom of speech event as a terrorist attack

Bullet holes seen in the window and door of Krudttonden cafe after shots were fired during a discussion meeting about art, blasphemy and free speech in Copenhagen. One person was killed. Photograph: EPA

Forensic police officers work at the area around a cultural centre in Copenhagen, Denmark, where unidentified gunmen killed at least one person and wounded several police officers after opening fire. Photograph: Claus Bjorn Larsen/AFP/Getty Images

Police forensic specialists investigate at the scene of the first shooting in Copenhagen. Police said on Sunday the suspected gunman in two shooting attacks in the city had been shot dead. Photograph: EPA

Danish police shot and killed a man in Copenhagen on Sunday they believe was responsible for two deadly attacks at an event promoting freedom of speech and on a synagogue.

Denmarks spy chief Jens Madsen said the gunman was known to the intelligence services prior to the shooting and probably acted alone. He did not elaborate.

We cannot yet say anything concrete about the motive … but are considering that he might have been inspired by the events in Paris some weeks ago, Mr Madsen told a news conference.

The prime minister described the first shooting, which bore similarities to an assault in Paris in January on the office of weekly newspaper Charlie Hebdo, as a terrorist attack.

Two civilians died in Saturdays attacks and five police were wounded. One man died in the first shooting, in a cafe hosting Swedish artist Lars Vilks, who has been threatened with death for depicting the Prophet Mohammad in cartoons. Another died in an attack on a synagogue close by.

Islamist gunmen attacked a Jewish supermarket in Paris two days after the Charlie Hebdo attack. Danish police had launched a massive manhunt with helicopters roaring overhead and an array of armoured vehicles on the usually peaceful streets of

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Copenhagen suspect known to police

Copenhagen attacks an 'affront to freedom of speech': Tony Abbott

Copenhagen attack an affront to one of our fundamental values: Prime Minister Tony Abbott. Photo: Andrew Meares

Prime Minister Tony Abbott has condemned a “brutal” shooting in Denmark as an affront to free speech, also flagging further efforts aimed at securing Australia’s borders amid growing concerns about the threat of terrorism attacks on home soil.

Mr Abbott, in a statement issued on Sunday, said the thoughts of all Australians were with the Danish people.

“As with the Charlie Hebdo atrocity in Paris, the Copenhagen attack is an affront to one of our most fundamental values – freedom of speech,” Mr Abbott said.

“We stand with the people and government of Denmark in confronting this cynical attempt to undermine that fundamental right.”

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Earlier, the prime minister signalled security at Australia’s borders would be ramped up.

Mr Abbott, who will deliver a national security statement on Monday week, said the rise of Daesh, or Islamic State, had seen new threats emerge, “where any extremist can grab a knife, a flag, a camera phone and a victim and carry out a terror attack”.

Authorities on Friday confirmed police and a prayer hall were among targets uncovered by investigations into two alleged terrorists arrested in western Sydney last week.

A number of items were seized from the home of Omar Al-Kutobi, 24, and Mohammad Kiad, 25, allegedly including a machete, hunting knife and homemade Islamic State flag, as well as a video that allegedly shows one of the men vowing to launch an attack in the name of IS.

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Copenhagen attacks an 'affront to freedom of speech': Tony Abbott

Free Speech Debate Still Alive After Attack in Denmark

TIME World Terrorism Updated: Feb. 14, 2015 8:14 PM Lars RonbogGetty Images A victim is carried into an ambulance after a shooting at a public meeting and discussion arranged by the Lars Vilks Committee about Charlie Hebdo and freedom of speech on Feb. 14, 2015 in Copenhagen.

Still alive in the room.

As gunfire erupted outside a Copenhagen cultural center on Saturday afternoon, French ambassador Franois Zimeray tweeted that message to the world.

The message conveys some of the terror that Zimeray and other participants in a panel discussion on freedom of speech must have felt. But the presence of mind that it took to send contains an even more chilling suggestion: no longer are such violent crimes unexpected.

Although Danish authorities have not detained the perpetrator or established his motives, all evidence suggests that the Feb. 14 attack, like that at the Parisian satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo, and like several attempted attacks in Denmark before that, was motivated by cartoons of the prophet Mohammed.

Soon after 3:30 p.m., a gunman (authorities originally said there were two, but later revised the figure) wearing a maroon baklava and armed with an automatic weapon tried to shoot his way into the caf at Krudttoenden, a cultural center in eastern Copenhagen, where a discussion entitled Art, Blasphemy, and Freedom of Expression, was underway.

He was prevented from entering by police, but not before he fired dozens of shots, killing a 40-year-old man, and injuring three officers. For Swedish cartoonist Lars Vilks, who was attending the panel discussion, there was no doubt about who the intended target was: himself. After publishing a cartoon in 2007 that depicted the prophet Mohammed as a dog, Vilks had a $100,000 bounty placed on his head by the then-leader of Al Qaeda in Iraq, and has been the object of several assassination attacks.

What other motive could there be? he told the Associated Press.

The Danish prime minister identified the attack as terrorism and put the nation on high alert. Police have set up controls around major transit hubs to prevent the perpetrator, who escaped the crime scene by hijacking a VW Polo, from leaving the country. Just after 1 a.m. on Feb 15, a second shooting took place, this one at Copenhagens main synagogue. According to police, one person was shot in the head and two police officers were wounded, but they have not yet determined whether this attack is related to the earlier one. The suspect in the synagogue shooting fled on foot.

We must end this as soon as possible, because we must not get into a situation like the one we saw in Paris, where they took hostages, Hans Jorgen Bonnichsen, chief of operations for the Danish intelligence service PET, told the Danish newspaper Berlingske.

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Free Speech Debate Still Alive After Attack in Denmark

One dead in gun attack on Danish freedom of speech meeting

Swedish cartoonist and historian Lars Vilks, who depicted the key Islamic holy figure with the body of a dog in 2007, was at the Krudttonden cafe in Copenhagen, Denmark, when shots were fired around 4pm yesterday.

The cafe in northern Copenhagen was hosting an event titled ‘Art, Blasphemy And The Freedom Of Expression’.

Danish prime minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt said: “We feel certain now that it’s a politically motivated attack, and thereby it is a terrorist attack.

“We take this situation extremely seriously. We are in a high alarm all over the country, and our main priority at this stage is to catch the perpetrators and make sure that we find them as soon as possible.”

Danish police, who initially said they were searching for two suspects, issued a picture of the main suspect last night, taken on street cameras near to where the getaway car, a VW Polo, was later found dumped.

The shooting comes little more than a month after the attack on the offices of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris which left 12 people dead.

French president Francois Hollande expressed his solidarity with Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt.

In a statement issued from his official Twitter account Hollande also said Interior Minister Bernard Cazeneuve would go to Copenhagen as soon as possible.

French Foreign Minister Laurent Fabius condemned what he called a “terrorist attack” in a separate statement.

Prime Minister David Cameron said his thoughts were with the Danish people, tweeting: “I condemn the shootings in Copenhagen. Freedom of speech must always be protected.”

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One dead in gun attack on Danish freedom of speech meeting

Copenhagen caf: two gunmen in terror attack at freedom of speech event

The meeting was organised by Swedish artist Lars Vilks, who has faced several death threats for his controversial caricatures of the Prophet Mohammad.

The attack came just over a month after the Charlie Hebdo attacks in Paris, in which Islamist terrorists killed 17 people.

The French ambassador to Denmark, Francois Zimeray, was one of the speakers at the event, which was described by Helle Thorning-Schmidt, the Danish prime minister as a terrorist act.

As many as 200 bullet holes ripped through the window of the Krudttoenden caf and at least two people were taken away on stretchers, including a uniformed police officer.

The gunmen then fled the area in a dark coloured VW Polo car, according to witnesses. The car was later found in a nearby street but the two gunmen were still at large on Saturday night.

Helle Merete Brix, one of the organisers of the event called Art, Blasphemy And The Freedom Of Expression confirmed that Vilks was at the event but had not been injured.

She said: I saw a masked man running past. A couple of police officers were injured. I clearly consider this as an attack on Lars Vilks.

Niels Ivar Larsen, one of the speakers at the event, said: I heard someone firing with an automatic weapons and someone shouting. Police returned the fire and I hid behind the bar. I felt surreal, like in a movie.

In a statement, Danish police said the victim was a 40-year-old who had been attending the event. He had not been identified last night.

Blix was ushered away shortly after the attack by one of the Danish police guards that accompanies him whenever he is in the country.

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Copenhagen caf: two gunmen in terror attack at freedom of speech event

One man dead and three policemen wounded at freedom of speech seminar in Denmark

A MAJOR manhunt is under way for a gunman who opened fire on a freedom-of-speech event in Copenhagen, leaving a civilian dead and three police officers injured.

The shooter opened fire at the Krudttonden cafe, killing a man, during an event featuring Swedish cartoonist and historian Lars Vilks, who depicted the Prophet Mohammed with the body of a dog in 2007.

Danish police, who initially said they were searching for two suspects, issued a picture of the main suspect this evening, taken on street cameras near to where the getaway car, a VW Polo, was later found dumped.

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The cafe in northern Copenhagen was hosting an event titled Art, Blasphemy And The Freedom Of Expression when the shots were fired, according to reports.

It comes little more than month after the attack on the offices of the French satirical magazine Charlie Hebdo in Paris which left 12 people dead.

Danish prime minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt told reporters in Copenhagen: “We feel certain now that it’s a politically motivated attack, and thereby it is a terrorist attack.

“We take this situation extremely seriously. We are in a high alarm all over the country, and our main priority at this stage is to catch the perpetrators and make sure that we find them as soon as possible.”

Copenhagen Police said both Mr Vilks and French ambassador to Denmark Francois Zimeray, who was also at the event, were both unharmed. The three police officers are also “out of danger”, they said.

Mr Zimeray tweeted from his FranceDK account shortly after the shooting, writing: “Still alive in the room.”

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One man dead and three policemen wounded at freedom of speech seminar in Denmark

Shots Fired at Copenhagen Free Speech Event: Reports

Shots rang out Saturday afternoon at a cafe in Copenhagen, Denmark, killing one person and wounding three police officers during a freedom of speech event hosted by controversial Swedish cartoonist Lars Vilks, police said. As a manhunt continued for the lone shooter, Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt put the entire nation on high alert and condemned the violence as a “terrorist attack.”

“We feel certain now that it was a politically motivated attack, and thereby it was a terrorist attack,” she told reporters close to the site of the shooting. An event organizer said that Vilks was present at the conference, but was not injured. Vilks told The Associated Press by phone that he believes he was the intended target of the attack, asking, “what other motive could there be?”

Early Sunday morning three people were also shot outside a Copenhagen synagogue. One civilian victim later died and two police officers were wounded, police said. The gunman escaped. Police have not said that the two shootings are linked. They are treating both shootings as terror attacks.

The suspect in the cafe shooting fled after gunfire erupted around 4 p.m. local time (10 a.m. ET) at Krudttoenden cafe in the Osterbro district, Copenhagen police said in a statement. A surveillance photo shows the suspect wearing dark clothes and a scarf. Police said initial interviews indicate only one person fired the shots, and had left the scene in a dark-colored Volkswagen Polo that had been carjacked. The car was later found.

U.S. National Security Council spokesperson Bernadette Meehan said the U.S. stands ready to help in the investigation. “The United States condemns today’s deplorable shooting in Copenhagen. We offer our condolences to the loved ones of the deceased victim, and our thoughts are with those wounded in this attack,” she said in a statement.

Forensic investigators are seen at the site of a shooting in Copenhagen Feb. 14. A civilian was killed and three police were wounded on Saturday in a shooting at a meeting in Copenhagen attended by Lars Vilks, an artist who has received death threats since publishing images of the Prophet Mohammad.

The TV2 channel said there were some 30 bullet holes in the window of the cafe and at least two people were taken away on stretchers. Two of the three police officers injured are members of Denmark’s national security intelligence agency, PET. Police told NBC News that one person was killed but it was unclear whether the victim, described as a civilian, died at the scene.

Inna Shevchenko, the leader of Ukrainian feminist group FEMEN, tweeted that she was participating in a panel discussion at the cafe when the shooting occurred. “I didn’t see anything. I heard about 20 shots while speaking and then people started to run,” she wrote.

Vilks has faced numerous death threats for caricaturing the Prophet Muhammad in 2007. A Pennsylvania woman last year got a 10-year prison term for a plot to kill Vilks. In 2010, two brothers tried to burn down his house in southern Sweden and were imprisoned for attempted arson.

The event that the 68-year-old artist was hosting Saturday was called “Arts, Blasphemy and Freedom of Expression,” according to his website. When the artist is in Denmark, he receives police protection.

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Shots Fired at Copenhagen Free Speech Event: Reports

One dead after shots fired at Copenhagen freedom of speech meeting

A man has died after at least one gunman opened fire on a cafe in the Danish capital of Copenhagen, which was hosting a freedom of speech debate.

Three policemen were also injured in the shooting at the debate organised by Swedish artist Lars Vilks, who has faced numerous threats for caricaturing the Prophet Mohammed.

Denmarks security service PET said the circumstances surrounding the shooting indicate that we are talking about a terror attack.

Danish police said the gunman used an automatic weapon to shoot through the windows of the Krudttoenden cafe, which TV footage showed were riddled with bullet holes. The gunman then fled in a hijacked Volkswagen Polo that was found later a few miles away.

Police initially said there were two gunmen but later said they believed there was only one shooter, and described him as 25 to 30 years old with an athletic build, and carrying a black automatic weapon. They released a blurred photograph of the suspect wearing dark clothes and a scarf covering part of his face.

The shooting came a month after Islamic militants attacked another media outlet that had printed cartoons of the Prophet Mohammed, the Charlie Hebdo satirical magazine in Paris, killing 12 people.

A police spokesman said it was possible the gunman had planned the same scenario as in the Charlie Hebdo massacre.

There was no immediate claim of responsibility for the shooting, which took place shortly before 4pm local time.

Helle Merete Brix, one of the organisers of the event, said Mr Vilks was present at the event but not injured.

She said: I saw a masked man running past. I clearly consider this as an attack on Lars Vilks.

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One dead after shots fired at Copenhagen freedom of speech meeting

Italian senators pass bill criminalizing denial of genocides

February 13, 2015 – 11:29 AMT

PanARMENIAN.Net – Italian senators voted this week in favor of a bill criminalizing the denial of the Holocaust and other genocides, following changes to the proposed law to protect freedom of speech, Asbarez reported, citing Italian news agency The Local.

A total of 234 senators voted for the bill, while eight abstained and three voted against the legislation, which supposes a three-year sentence for promoting, inciting or committing acts of racial discrimination based in part or entirely on the denial of genocide. Crimes against humanity and war crimes are also covered in the bill, which now needs to pass through Italys lower house before it can become law.

The Senate vote follows revisions which lawmakers say ensure freedom of speech and the freedom to study are upheld.

Senator Giuseppe Lumia, part of the justice committee, said the vote marked a turning point in Italy. Denying the Holocaust and genocides will be punished as in so many other countries, he was quoted as saying.

France and Germany are among the European states which have criminalized Holocaust denial. A British bishop was in 2013 convicted of the crime, after giving an interview to Swedish television in which he questioned the number of Jews killed in Nazi concentration camps.

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Italian senators pass bill criminalizing denial of genocides

Policy update restricts demonstrations

As citizens of the United States, it can be easy to take freedom of speech for granted. At Loyola University Chicago, the concept of complete student freedom within Loyola walls is diminished through school policies, as well as the administrations reactions (or lack thereof) to any speech that students attempt to voice. Under the university roof, speech does not seem free it seems regulated, silenced and disregarded.

Loyolas Community Standards were updated as of Jan. 26 specifically, Section 506 (titled Free Expression and Demonstration Policy and Approval Process), which holds guidelines for on-campus demonstrations and outlines the requirements for protests.

Loyola justified these updates as clarification of terms and greater ease of registration process for demonstrations.

While the university appears and claims to be making it easier to protest on campus, the new policy is actually doing the exact opposite.

One obvious change to the community standards was the actual definition of what is considered a demonstration. The new version expands the term to a gathering of two or more people who publicly express a position or feeling toward a person or cause. Previously, a demonstration was defined as any organized or impromptu gathering of two or more people that could be perceived as displaying feelings toward a person or a cause.

Other changes dealt with the process for Loyola students planning a protest or demonstration. Students who want to hold a demonstration must now submit a form to the university at least three days in advance. Previously, the form needed to be submitted 10 days in advance.

Amongst other smaller updates, it was also specified that demonstrations must take place within the Damen Student Center or the Terry Student Center, not in any other building on campus.

Changes are being made on paper, and The Phoenix Editorial Board appreciates the universitys efforts to promote and enable students to speak their minds more easily on campus. But there are two key issues here: One, why is it that students can only protest indoors at two university buildings? And two, even if students did protest, would their words really have any effect on the future?

We welcome the reduction of notification time, but the updates to the speech policy are still problematic and dont promise real change.

First, by carefully defining what constitutes a demonstration, Loyola is saying that every time a group of people even just two people are vocal about an issue, that group of people would have to notify the university three days in advance in order to express their opinions. This means that meetings of people, perhaps a meeting as simple as handing out flyers on campus in a group of two or more people, would have to go through a process to demonstrate on campus.

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Policy update restricts demonstrations

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France Arrests French Comedian Dieudonne 3 Days After Charlie Hebdo Freedom of Speech – Video


France Arrests French Comedian Dieudonne 3 Days After Charlie Hebdo Freedom of Speech
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