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Nanomedicine scientist to join USC faculty – Daily Trojan Online

Mark Davis, a chemical engineering professor and nanomedicine researcher at the California Institute of Technology, will be joining the USC faculty in the fall, according to USC News.

Davis will serve as provost professor in the Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering in the Viterbi School of Engineering, and will also have joint appointments in the Department of Preventive Medicine and the Department of Chemistry.

Davis will also be a strategic advisor to the deans of both Viterbi and Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, and will continue his research on nanomedicine, specifically on nanoparticles that would be able to deliver medicine to the brain.

Mark Davis is a stellar addition to our faculty, Provost Michael Quick said to USC News. His multidisciplinary scholarship and research is an asset to the USC Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience, where we are building bridges across our campus to transform medicine and science.

Davis previously conducted his research at CalTech and at Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University. He has been recognized by the National Academy of Engineering, the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Medicine. He is also the author of more than 425 scientific publications, and two textbooks and holds 75 U.S. patents.

Davis specializes in materials synthesis, such as zeolites that can be used for molecular recognition, and polymers that can be used for therapeutic delivery.

At USC, he will continue his nanomedicine research on treatment for cancer.

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Nanomedicine scientist to join USC faculty – Daily Trojan Online

Renowned chemical engineer and nanomedicine pioneer joining USC – USC News

Mark E. Davis, a renowned chemical engineering professor and nanomedicine pioneer at Caltech, will join the USC faculty in October. His work on biomaterials for cancer treatment holds great promise to make medicines more targeted and effective.

Davis, one of the few academics selected to the National Academy of Engineering (1997), the National Academy of Sciences (2006) and the National Academy of Medicine (2011), will hold a Provost Professor appointment at USC, with a primary academic home in the Mork Family Department of Chemical Engineering at the USC Viterbi School of Engineering. He will be based at the University Park Campus, the soon to open Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience and the Health Sciences Campus.

In addition to his USC Viterbi appointment, Davis also will hold joint appointments in the Department of Preventive Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, as well as the Department of Chemistry at the USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences.

Davis research efforts involve materials synthesis in two general areas: zeolites and other solids that can be used for molecular recognition and catalysis, and polymers for the delivery of a broad range of therapeutics. He also conducts pioneering work on engineering nanoparticles for cancer therapeutics.

During his time at Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University (Virginia Tech) from 1981 to 1991, Davis and his research team invented a number of new zeolites and molecular sieves. They were the first to report the synthesis of a molecular sieve with uniform pore sizes larger than 1 nanometer. In recognition of his work, Davis became the first engineer to receive the National Science Foundations Alan T. Waterman Award in 1990.

While at Caltech in 1995, Davis expanded the focus of his research to biomaterials for cancer research. He did so in response to his wifes long and painful but ultimately successful fight against breast cancer.

Davis and his team became the first researchers to successfully engineer nanoparticles made from polymeric materials specifically designed and created for human cancer therapeutics. To date, three different nanoparticles invented by his lab have gone to numerous human, cancer clinical trials that have been and are being conducted both in the United States and throughout the world.

At USC, Davis will continue his groundbreaking work on engineering nanoparticles that can deliver drugs to the brain, research that began in recent years and could improve the treatment of brain cancer, Parkinsons and Alzheimers diseases, among other conditions. At Caltech, he and his team discovered how to successfully design nanoparticles that safely cross the blood-brain barrier in rodent models. Their work continues on the pathway to clinical translation of these nanoparticles that, if successful, would be a major medical breakthrough.

Davis will also serve as a strategic adviser to the deans of USC Viterbi and USC Dornsife, and will mentor faculty and students on convergent bioscience and engineering. As part of his duties at the Keck School of Medicine, Davis will serve as co-director of the MD/PhD program.

The connection between engineering and medicine is really a focal point for me, Davis said. At USC, I will work on trying to be a conduit to help people do translational medicine, especially in the area of therapeutics.

Mark Davis is a stellar addition to our faculty, said Provost Michael Quick. His multidisciplinary scholarship and research is an asset to the USC Michelson Center for Convergent Bioscience, where we are building bridges across our campus to transform medicine and science. I know he will help move us forward in these efforts. We are looking forward to his expertise and guidance.

USC Viterbi Dean Yannis C. Yortsos said: We are truly excited to have such a superb engineer and scientist as Mark Davis join USC. We are eagerly looking forward to his leadership in advancing the rapidly accelerating convergence between engineering and medicine.

Rohit Varma, dean of the Keck School and director of the USC Gayle and Edward Roski Eye Institute, added, We are delighted to welcome Mark to the Keck School family.

He will be a tremendous resource for our MD-PhD program. His visionary work that converges the disciplines of technology and health/medicine will inspire our students to innovate and create at the forefront of translational science.

USC Dornsife Dean Amber D. Miller said: USC Dornsife extends a warm welcome toProvost Professor Davis. We greatly benefit from his strong record of leadership, innovation and expertise in creating synergies across scientific fields.

Davis has written more than 425 scientific publications, two textbooks and holds 75 U.S. patents. He is a founding editor of CaTTech and a former associate editor of Chemistry of Materials and the AIChE Journal, published by the American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

Over the decades, Davis has won a raft of awards, including the Colburn and Professional Progress awards from the AIChE and the Somorjai, Ipatieff, Langmuir, Murphree and Gaden prizes from the American Chemical Society. In 2014, he received the Prince of Asturias Award for Technical and Scientific Research from the King of Spain, and in 2015, he was elected to the National Academy of Inventors.

A scientist with an entrepreneurial bent, Davis founded Calando Pharmaceuticals Inc., a company that created the first RNAi therapeutic to reach the clinic for treating cancer, and Avidity Bioscience.

Apart from his scientific achievements, Davis attained All American Status for Masters Track and Field in the 400-, 200- and 100-meter dashes. In 2011, he won the 400-meter dash for men of age 55-59 at the Masters World Championship.

He holds three degrees from the University of Kentucky, all in chemical engineering.

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Renowned chemical engineer and nanomedicine pioneer joining USC – USC News

Nanomedicine: A Vast Horizon on a Molecular Landscape – Part VIII, Magnetic Nanoparticles theranostics – Lexology (registration)

This is the eighth article in a review series on Nanomedicine. We started from reviewing the major research and entrepreneurial development of nanomedicine and the relevant patent landscape (Part I and Part II). The first topic we discussed was Organs-on-a-chip (Part III). Following that, we focused on nanotechnology in medical therapeutics. Nanoparticles have nanoscale dimensions and demonstrate unique chemical and physical properties from their bulk. This also gives them great advantages in drug delivery (Part IV), cancer therapeutics (Part V), and bio-imaging (Part VI). In the last installment, we reviewed one special type of nanoparticles: quantum dots, which are incredibly small semiconductor particles (Part VII). Here, we will review the theranostic applications and IP landscape of another special type of nanoparticles known as magnetic nanoparticles (MNP). As in the past, those patent documents cited in the article are summarized in the table at the end.

Magnetic Nanoparticles Magnetic nanoparticles, also known as superparamagnetic nanoparticles are small inorganic crystals about 5-20 nm in diameter. Two main classes of MNPs currently used for clinical imaging are ferromagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and ultrasmall superparameganetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPION). MNPs are usually multilayer materials, which give them their various properties and functionalities for diagnosis and disease treatment. The structure of iron oxide nanoparticles has three main components: an iron oxide core as a Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) contrast agent, a biocompatible coating outside the core, and an outer therapeutic coating with specific ligands for biomarker targeting. See (US 8,945,628 by Dr. Ralph Weissleder at Massachusetts General Hospital and US 7,462,446 by Dr. Miqin Zhang at the University of Washington). This unique structure enables MNP accumulation in the sites of interest via biomarker targeting. It further allows the diagnosis of diseases, the evaluation of treatment efficacy, and the localized delivery of drugs and disease therapies. The integration of both diagnostic and therapeutic modalities into one single agent is called a theranostic agent. We will discuss the diagnostic and therapeutic properties of MNPs in cancer.

Magnetic Nanoparticles for Diagnosis In 2008, the International Agency for Research on Cancer reported that the total number of cancer case around the world doubled between 1975 and 2000, and that the number of cases are expected to triple by 2030. This means there will be 13-17 million cancer deaths annually by that time. The only chance for successful treatment of cancer is early cancer diagnosis, by identifying the cancer before the patient shows symptoms. Currently the standard cancer detection technology in the clinic is imaging, such as positron emission tomography (PET) and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI). Dr. Ralph Weissleder at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) is a pioneer in the field of clinical imaging using advanced nanomaterials (US 6,615,063, US 8,569,078 and US 9,097,644). He predicted that high resolution molecular imaging technologies (including those utilizing nanoparticles) can screen tumor growth at very early stages.

Currently, there are two main nanoimaging technologies, fluorescence imaging and MRI. In fluorescence imaging, quantum dots can target malignant tissues and show strong localized signals (Part VI). Magnetic nanoparticles demonstrate advanced applications in MRI. MRI is a non-invasive medical imaging technology based on nuclear magnetic resonance. When the magnetic field around the nuclei varies, the nuclei relax their magnetic moment through spin-lattice relaxation and spin-spin relaxation. With the assistance of MRI contrast agents, the MRI captures the change of relaxation times of protons around tissues and forms the medical images. Iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles are one of the currently used contrast agents for MRI. These particles can shorten the spin-lattice relaxation time T1 (brighter signal) and the spin-spin relaxation time T2 (darker signal), forming a sharper and brighter image. These particles can also be actively targeted or passively targeted to malignant sites to differentiate between normal and diseased tissues.

MNPs are the most advanced contrast labels currently being used in research and development for medical imaging. Dr. Shan Wangs group at Stanford University has developed superparameganetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and fluorescent tag conjugated SPIONs for biological molecular imaging (US 7,682,838 and US 8,722,017 ). Dr. Miqin Zhangs group at the University of Washington has developed MNPs with a Fe3O4 core and a mesoporous silica shell embedded with carbon dots and paclitaxel (a common anti-cancer drug), and covered by another layer of silica. These MNPs enable confocal and twophoton fluorescence imaging via carbon dots and MRI via magnetic Fe3O4. They also deliver the paclitaxel to cancer cells to kill them through combined photothermal and chemotherapy. Dr. Zhang also developed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) conjugated MNPs for imaging T cells and also chitosan-polyethylene oxide oligomer copolymer coated MNPs for brain tumor imaging and drug delivery (US 20160193369, US 20150320890, and US 20140286872). Dr. Koichiro Hayashi demonstrated the advantages of using SPIONs for cancer theranostics by combining MRI and magnetic hyperthermia treatment (WO/2012/026194). His team modified the SPION clusters with folic acid and polyethylene glycol (PEG) to promote the accumulation of clusters in tumors. Dr. Qun Zhao at the University of Georgia developed hyperthermia treatment of head and neck cancers in a mouse model via intratumor injection of SPIONs. Ultrasmall superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (USPIONs) having smaller size in diameter, resulting in longer circulation time. These particles can accumulate in the microvascularture before being endocytosed (i.e. removed) by macrophages. Therefore, these particles can be used for tumor-associated microvessel imaging. Dr. Edward Neuwelt reported clinical data with enhanced brain tumor imaging by USPIONs. Other groups from France and Switzerland also reported similar results.

Summary Magnetic nanoparticles are not only used as MRI contrast labels for medical imaging, but also used as therapeutic drug delivery carriers, as hyperthermia tools, and even as combined drug delivery and imaging agents for cancer therapy. In the next installment, we will discuss further details on the application of these particles in cancer therapeutics.

The General Hospital Corporation

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Nanomedicine: A Vast Horizon on a Molecular Landscape – Part VIII, Magnetic Nanoparticles theranostics – Lexology (registration)

PhD Research Fellow in Biophysics and Nanomedicine – Times Higher Education (THE)

A PhD research fellowship within the field of biophysics is available at the Department of Physics. The appointments have duration of 3 years with the possibility of until 1 year extension with 25% teaching duties in agreement with the department. Student should start mid-August 2017.

Information about the department The position is organized in the Department of Physics. Currently, there are 22 professors, 12 associate professors, 4 adjunct professors, 72 PhD research fellows and 15 postdoctoral positions appointed at the Department of Physics. Our research spans a broad spectrum of natural sciences and technology, which in turn allows us to offer an education providing a solid basis for future careers. Physics research is carried out in experimental as well as theoretical fields, often across conventional boundaries between disciplines. Research staff at the department makes a special effort to increase the awareness and understanding of the importance and impact of physics in our society. Further information about the department can be found at https://www.ntnu.edu/physics

Job description The PhD student will work on the project Acoustic Cluster Therapy (ACT) for improved treatment of cancer and brain diseases funded by the Research Council of Norway. This project is in collaboration with international universities and two companies Phoenix Solutions who developed a platform for ultrasound activated targeted drug delivery and Cristal therapeutics who developed a pioneering approach to transform drugs into tailor-made nanoparticles. A major challenge in cancer therapy is to obtain adequate delivery of the therapeutic agents to cancer cells, and limit the systemic exposure. The explored concepts utilize an acoustic activated cluster (microbubble/ microdroplet) system and nanoparticles to deliver a drug payload at the targeted pathology. The biodistribution of (novel) biologicals will be assessed using (fluorescence) microscopy other imaging modalities in healthy animals and disease models. In vivo MRI, ultrasound, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging, ex vivo analyses, and histological examinations will be used to investigate the in vivo distribution and behavior of the nanoparticles.

The project involves studies in cell cultures and preclinical testing in mice, which require designing and building various experimental setups for ultrasound exposure and imaging. The student should have broad experimental experience especially with imaging techniques like confocal laser scan microscopy (CLSM) or multi photon microscopy (MPM). Knowledge of image analysis methods would be considered an asset. It is essential that the student is willing to work with laboratory animals and thus willing to obtain the FELASA license. Furthermore, it is crucial to be able to travel to workshops and for research collaboration in other EU countries as well as the USA with notice.

Qualifications The student should hold very good grades and a Master of Science in biophysics, bio (nano)technology, biomedical sciences, or related sciences.

The regulations for PhD programs at NTNU state that the applicant must have a master’s degree or equivalent with at least 5 years of studies and an average grade of A or B within a scale of A-E for passing grades (A best). Candidates from universities outside Norway are kindly requested to send a Diploma Supplement or a similar document, which describes in detail the study and grade system and the rights for further studies associated with the obtained degree: http://ec.europa.eu/education/tools/diploma-supplement_en.htm

The position requires spoken and written fluency in the English language. Such evidence might be represented by the results of standard tests such as TOEFL, IELTS, Cambridge Certificate in Advanced English (CAE) or Cambridge Certificate of Proficiency in English (CPE). The candidate’s language skills might also be assessed in a personal interview.

For more information about the research activities see http://www.ntnu.edu/physics/biophysmedtech/ultrasound

Terms of employment The appointment of the PhD fellows will be made according to Norwegian guidelines for universities and university colleges and to the general regulations regarding university employees. Applicants must agree to participate in organized doctoral study programs within the period of the appointment and have to be qualified for the PhD-study.

NTNUs personnel policy objective is that the staff must reflect the composition of the population to the greatest possible extent.

The position as PhD is remunerated according to the Norwegian State salary scale. There is a 2% deduction for superannuation contribution.

It is expected that the candidate can start in the position within August 2017 (but preferably not later). Further information can be obtained from Professor Catharina Davies, Department of Physics, NTNU, Phone: +47 73593688, e-mail: catharina.davies@ntnu.no or Dr. Annemieke van Wamel, Phone: +47 73593432, e-mail: annemieke.wamel@ntnu.no.

The application The application should contain: -CV -Reference letters -Certificates from Bachelor and Master degrees -List of publications or other scientific work, if any -Statement on research interest (maximum one page) -Documentation of English language proficiency (e.g. TOEFL, IELTS, etc.) if English or a Scandinavian language is not the applicant’s mother tongue

Applications must be submitted electronically through this site. Applications submitted elsewhere will not be considered.

The reference number of the position is: NV-40/17

Application deadline: April 6th 2017.

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PhD Research Fellow in Biophysics and Nanomedicine – Times Higher Education (THE)

Nanomedicine provides HIV treatment alternative – Healio

Nanomedicine provides HIV treatment alternative
Healio
The results of two trials, which examined the use of nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients, found that a new nanomedicine method has the potential to cut the dose of leading HIV treatment in half, according to new evidence presented

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Nanomedicine provides HIV treatment alternative – Healio

Nanobiotix reports jump in fourth-quarter and full-year revenues boosted by upfront payments from PharmaEngine – Proactive Investors UK

The Euronext-listed late clinical-stage company reported revenue of 517,738 for the three months to December 31, up from 58,556 in the third quarter.

Nanomedicine firm Nanobiotix SA () has reported a jump in fourth-quarter and full-year 2016 revenues boosted by upfront payments from Taiwan-based PharmaEngine.

The Euronext-listed late clinical-stage company, which is pioneering novel approaches for the local treatment of cancer, reported revenue of 517,738 for the three months to December 31, up from 58,556 in the third quarter.

The firm said the pro-rata share upfront payment from PharmaEngine is within the framework of the licensing contract signed in August 2012 for the development and commercialisation of the lead NanoXray product, NBTXR3 in the Asia-Pacific region.

The upfront payment totalled 810,640, generating revenue of 46,854 over the period.

The group said the invoicing of services and other sales respectively totalled 371,074 and 99,450 for the fourth quarter.

In total, Nanobiotixs 2016 revenues were 1.5581mln, which the firm said was fully in line with its expectations. In 2015, the groups revenues were 265,543.

Last years revenues included a milestone payment of US$1.0mln (890,472) from PharmaEngine in June 2016.

That payment was triggered by the first patient injection of NBTXR3 in Asia within Nanobiotixs Soft Tissue Sarcoma pivotal phase in the AsiaPacific region.

In December, Nanobiotix released positive results from Phase I/II trial evaluating NBTXR3 in liver cancers, with preliminary data showing feasibility and good safety of treatment with NBTXR3 at a 10% dose level.

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Nanobiotix reports jump in fourth-quarter and full-year revenues boosted by upfront payments from PharmaEngine – Proactive Investors UK

New Nano Approach Could Cut Dose of Leading HIV Treatment in Half – Infection Control Today

Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilized nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.

The healthy volunteer trial, conducted by the collaborative nanomedicine research program led by pharmacologist Andrew Owen and materials chemist Steve Rannard, and in collaboration with the St Stephen’s AIDS Trust at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital in London, examined the use of nanotechnology to improve the delivery of drugs to HIV patients. The results were from two trials which are the first to use orally dosed nanomedicine to enable HIV therapy optimization.

Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to the prevention and treatment of disease in the human body. By developing smaller pills that are better for patients and less expensive to manufacture, this evolving discipline has the potential to dramatically change medical science and is already having an impact in a number of clinically used therapies and diagnostics worldwide.

Currently, the treatment of HIV requires daily oral dosing of HIV drugs, and chronic oral dosing has significant complications that arise from the high pill burden experienced by many patients across populations with varying conditions leading to non-adherence to therapies.

Recent evaluation of HIV patient groups have shown a willingness to switch to nanomedicine alternatives if benefits can be shown. Research efforts by the Liverpool team have focused on the development of new oral therapies, using Solid Drug Nanoparticle (SDN) technology which can improve drug absorption into the body, reducing both the dose and the cost per dose and enabling existing healthcare budgets to treat more patients.

The trial results confirmed the potential for a 50 percent dose reduction while maintaining therapeutic exposure, using a novel approach to formulation of two drugs: efavirenz (EFV) and, lopinavir (LPV). EFV is the current WHO-recommended preferred regimen, with 70% of adult patients on first-line taking an EFV-based HIV treatment regimen in low- and middle-income countries.

The trial is connected to the University’s ongoing work as part of the multinational consortium OPTIMIZE, a global partnership working to accelerate access to simpler, safer and more affordable HIV treatment. Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, OPTIMIZE is led by the Wits Reproductive Health & HIV Institute in Johannesburg, South Africa, and includes the interdisciplinary Liverpool team, Columbia University, Mylan Laboratories and the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP). OPTIMIZE is supported by key partners including UNITAID and the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC)

Benny Kottiri, USAID’s Office of HIV/AIDS Research Division Chief, said: “The potential applications for HIV treatment are incredibly promising. By aligning efforts, these integrated investments offer the potential to reduce the doses required to control the HIV virus even further, resulting in real benefits globally. This would enable the costs of therapy to be reduced which is particularly beneficial for resource-limited countries where the burden of disease is highest.”

Source: University of Liverpool

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New Nano Approach Could Cut Dose of Leading HIV Treatment in Half – Infection Control Today

New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half – Science Daily

New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half
Science Daily
The healthy volunteer trial, conducted by the collaborative nanomedicine research programme led by Pharmacologist Professor Andrew Owen and Materials Chemist Professor Steve Rannard, and in collaboration with the St Stephen's AIDS Trust at the …

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New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half – Science Daily

Nano-size revolution is getting bigger – InDaily

Adelaide’s independent news Get InDaily in your inbox. Daily. Subscribe

An explosion of nanotechnology research and development is occurring as newly identified forms of carbon, including graphene, carbon nanotubes and nano-diamonds, pave the way for new products and industries.

Innovations are snowballing in fields as diverse as medicine to clean energy.

Using ever more technology to manipulate and control structures at the nanoscale, scientists and engineers around the world are also looking to develop more effective medicines, longer lasting batteries for our mobile devices (including cars) and greener energy generation as well as many other applications that will benefit from big advances in small things.

We are on the cusp of nanotechnology being useful and used right across the economy and its very exciting.

Once considered science fiction, nanotech now plays a big part in our everyday life, from the materials used in computer chips and increasingly compact electronics to your phone display and the comfortable soles of running shoes.

Well before scientists understood what an atom was let alone a nanoparticle, Venetian artisans were working at nano-particle scale about 1500 years ago by treating gold in glass to generate unique visual effects.

The discipline of nanotechnology took off in the mid-1990s when the ability to see or more correctly image surfaces and particles in the range of 1-100nm (about 1/10,000 the width of a human hair) became possible.

From a practical point of view, nanotechnology is all about the way molecules arrange with each other to form a higher order structure in much the same way as bricks and glass can be organised to make a house.

We can do this by design, where we use advanced lithography to make computer chips, or we can start to design the molecules or sub-structures so that they can organise themselves.

We can also leverage the observation that the properties of materials can also change when particles become very small.

A very visible example is the transparent sunscreens that we use on a regular basis. Gone are the days when the most effective sunscreen, zinc cream, was white (or vividly coloured as it became).

Zinc oxide has the inherent ability to absorb dangerous ultraviolet light but if the particles are large, they also scatter visible light, making it appear white.By making the particles smaller, they no longer scatter light and become transparent to the human eye in a relatively simple optical trick.

In another example, gold is normally considered to be a very stable, inert material but very small gold particles have interesting catalytic properties and may lead to an economic route to split water into hydrogen and oxygen.

In addition, like many small metal and semiconducting materials, gold also changes colour to red and blue when they are very small, rather than their more familiar gold colour, which can make provide interesting optical effects from security printing to the detection of fingerprints on difficult surfaces.

Professor David Lewis leads the Centre for NanoScale Science and Technology (CNST) at Flinders where researchers work with industry under the State Government assisted NanoConnect program.

NanoConnect aims to help companies understand how the best materials and nanotechnology can help them in their processes.

The CNST, and other nanotech experts such as Professor Amanda Ellis, are leading research efforts in a number of nano fields, including making DNA nanostructures for a range of applications from bio-sensing to genotyping as well as integrating piezoelectric (energy harvesting) polymers into carbon-based energy storage devices.

Synthetic and biomaterial based polymer membranes incorporating nanotech advances are also being developed for uses such as water and gas purification.

Read more about nanotechnology and other research at Flinders in the Universitys 50th anniversary publication, The Investigator Transformed.

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Nano-size revolution is getting bigger – InDaily

New Technique Cuts HIV Treatment in Half – Controlled Environments Magazine

Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilized nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice, and progress.

The healthy volunteer trial, conducted by the collaborative nanomedicine research program led by Pharmacologist Professor Andrew Owen and Materials Chemist Professor Steve Rannard, and in collaboration with the St Stephens AIDS Trust at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital in London, examined the use of nanotechnology to improve the delivery of drugs to HIV patients. The results were from two trials which are the first to use orally dosed nanomedicine to enable HIV therapy optimization.

Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to the prevention and treatment of disease in the human body. By developing smaller pills that are better for patients and less expensive to manufacture, this evolving discipline has the potential to dramatically change medical science and is already having an impact in a number of clinically used therapies and diagnostics worldwide.

Currently, the treatment of HIV requires daily oral dosing of HIV drugs, and chronic oral dosing has significant complications that arise from the high pill burden experienced by many patients across populations with varying conditions leading to non-adherence to therapies.

Recent evaluation of HIV patient groups has shown a willingness to switch to nanomedicine alternatives if benefits can be shown. Research efforts by the Liverpool team have focused on the development of new oral therapies, using Solid Drug Nanoparticle (SDN) technology which can improve drug absorption into the body, reducing both the dose and the cost per dose and enabling existing healthcare budgets to treat more patients.

The trial results confirmed the potential for a 50 percent dose reduction while maintaining therapeutic exposure, using a novel approach to formulation of two drugs: efavirenz (EFV) and, lopinavir (LPV). EFV is the current WHO-recommended preferred regimen, with 70 percent of adult patients on first-line taking an EFV-based HIV treatment regimen in low- and middle-income countries.

The trial is connected to the Universitys ongoing work as part of the multinational consortium OPTIMIZE, a global partnership working to accelerate access to simpler, safer and more affordable HIV treatment. Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, OPTIMIZE is led by the Wits Reproductive Health & HIV Institute in Johannesburg, South Africa, and includes the interdisciplinary Liverpool team, Columbia University, Mylan Laboratories, and the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP). OPTIMIZE is supported by key partners including UNITAID and the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC).

Benny Kottiri, USAIDs Office of HIV/AIDS Research Division Chief, says, The potential applications for HIV treatment are incredibly promising. By aligning efforts, these integrated investments offer the potential to reduce the doses required to control the HIV virus even further, resulting in real benefits globally. This would enable the costs of therapy to be reduced which is particularly beneficial for resource-limited countries where the burden of disease is highest.

Source: University of Liverpool

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New Technique Cuts HIV Treatment in Half – Controlled Environments Magazine

Nominations invited for $250,000 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and … – Northwestern University NewsCenter

EVANSTON – Northwestern Universitys International Institute for Nanotechnology (IIN) is now accepting nominations for two prestigious international prizes: the $250,000 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and Nanomedicine and the $10,000 Kabiller Young Investigator Award in Nanoscience and Nanomedicine.

The deadline for nominations is May 15, 2017. Details are available on the IIN website.

Our goal is to recognize the outstanding accomplishments in nanoscience and nanomedicine that have the potential to benefit all humankind, said David G. Kabiller, a Northwestern trustee and alumnus. He is a co-founder of AQR Capital Management, a global investment management firm in Greenwich, Connecticut.

The two prizes, awarded every other year, were established in 2015 through a generous gift from Kabiller. Current Northwestern-affiliated researchers are not eligible for nomination until 2018 for the 2019 prizes.

The Kabiller Prize the largest monetary award in the world for outstanding achievement in the field of nanomedicine celebrates researchers who have made the most significant contributions to the field of nanotechnology and its application to medicine and biology.

The Kabiller Young Investigator Award recognizes young emerging researchers who have made recent groundbreaking discoveries with the potential to make a lasting impact in nanoscience and nanomedicine.

The IIN at Northwestern University is a hub of excellence in the field of nanotechnology, said Kabiller, chair of the IIN executive council and a graduate of Northwesterns Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences and Kellogg School of Management. As such, it is the ideal organization from which to launch these awards recognizing outstanding achievements that have the potential to substantially benefit society.

Nanoparticles for medical use are typically no larger than 100 nanometers comparable in size to the molecules in the body. At this scale, the essential properties (e.g., color, melting point, conductivity, etc.) of structures behave uniquely. Researchers are capitalizing on these unique properties in their quest to realize life-changing advances in the diagnosis, treatment and prevention of disease.

Nanotechnology is one of the key areas of distinction at Northwestern, said Chad A. Mirkin, IIN director and George B. Rathmann Professor of Chemistry in Weinberg. We are very grateful for Davids ongoing support and are honored to be stewards of these prestigious awards.

An international committee of experts in the field will select the winners of the 2017 Kabiller Prize and the 2017 Kabiller Young Investigator Award and announce them in September.

The recipients will be honored at an awards banquet Sept. 27 in Chicago. They also will be recognized at the 2017 IIN Symposium, which will include talks from prestigious speakers, including 2016 Nobel Laureate in Chemistry Ben Feringa, from the University of Groningen, the Netherlands.

The winner of the inaugural Kabiller Prize, in 2015, was Joseph DeSimone the Chancellors Eminent Professor of Chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and the William R. Kenan Jr. Distinguished Professor of Chemical Engineering at North Carolina State University and of Chemistry at UNC-Chapel Hill.

DeSimone was honored for his invention of particle replication in non-wetting templates (PRINT) technology that enables the fabrication of precisely defined, shape-specific nanoparticles for advances in disease treatment and prevention. Nanoparticles made with PRINT technology are being used to develop new cancer treatments, inhalable therapeutics for treating pulmonary diseases, such as cystic fibrosis and asthma, and next-generation vaccines for malaria, pneumonia and dengue.

Warren Chan, professor at the Institute of Biomaterials and Biomedical Engineering at the University of Toronto, was the recipient of the inaugural Kabiller Young Investigator Award, also in 2015. Chan and his research group have developed an infectious disease diagnostic device for a point-of-care use that can differentiate symptoms.

In total, the IIN represents and unites more than $1 billion in nanotechnology infrastructure, research and education. These efforts, plus those of many other groups, have helped transition nanomedicine from a laboratory curiosity to life-changing technologies that are positively impacting the world.

The IIN houses numerous centers and institutes, including the Ronald and JoAnne Willens Center for Nano Oncology, an NIH Center of Cancer Nanotechnology Excellence, an Air Force Center of Excellence for Advanced Bioprogrammable Nanomaterials, and the Convergence Science & Medicine Institute.

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Nominations invited for $250,000 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and … – Northwestern University NewsCenter

New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half – Phys.Org

February 21, 2017 Credit: University of Liverpool

Successful results of a University of Liverpool-led trial that utilised nanotechnology to improve drug therapies for HIV patients has been presented at the Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) in Seattle, a leading annual conference of HIV research, clinical practice and progress.

The healthy volunteer trial, conducted by the collaborative nanomedicine research programme led by Pharmacologist Professor Andrew Owen and Materials Chemist Professor Steve Rannard, and in collaboration with the St Stephen’s AIDS Trust at the Chelsea & Westminster Hospital in London, examined the use of nanotechnology to improve the delivery of drugs to HIV patients. The results were from two trials which are the first to use orally dosed nanomedicine to enable HIV therapy optimisation.

Manipulation of matter

Nanotechnology is the manipulation of matter on an atomic, molecular, and supramolecular scale. Nanomedicine is the application of nanotechnology to the prevention and treatment of disease in the human body. By developing smaller pills that are better for patients and less expensive to manufacture, this evolving discipline has the potential to dramatically change medical science and is already having an impact in a number of clinically used therapies and diagnostics worldwide.

Currently, the treatment of HIV requires daily oral dosing of HIV drugs, and chronic oral dosing has significant complications that arise from the high pill burden experienced by many patients across populations with varying conditions leading to non-adherence to therapies.

Developing new therapies

Recent evaluation of HIV patient groups have shown a willingness to switch to nanomedicine alternatives if benefits can be shown. Research efforts by the Liverpool team have focused on the development of new oral therapies, using Solid Drug Nanoparticle (SDN) technology which can improve drug absorption into the body, reducing both the dose and the cost per dose and enabling existing healthcare budgets to treat more patients.

The trial results confirmed the potential for a 50 percent dose reduction while maintaining therapeutic exposure, using a novel approach to formulation of two drugs: efavirenz (EFV) and, lopinavir (LPV). EFV is the current WHO-recommended preferred regimen, with 70% of adult patients on first-line taking an EFV-based HIV treatment regimen in low- and middle-income countries.

The trial is connected to the University’s ongoing work as part of the multinational consortium OPTIMIZE, a global partnership working to accelerate access to simpler, safer and more affordable HIV treatment. Funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development, OPTIMIZE is led by the Wits Reproductive Health & HIV Institute in Johannesburg, South Africa, and includes the interdisciplinary Liverpool team, Columbia University, Mylan Laboratories and the Medicines Patent Pool (MPP). OPTIMIZE is supported by key partners including UNITAID and the South African Medical Research Council (SAMRC).

Potential applications

Benny Kottiri, USAID’s Office of HIV/AIDS Research Division Chief, said: “The potential applications for HIV treatment are incredibly promising. By aligning efforts, these integrated investments offer the potential to reduce the doses required to control the HIV virus even further, resulting in real benefits globally. This would enable the costs of therapy to be reduced which is particularly beneficial for resource-limited countries where the burden of disease is highest.”

Explore further: New nanomedicine approach aims to improve HIV drug therapies

More information: The presentation is available online: http://www.croiwebcasts.org/console/player/33376?mediaType=slideVideo&

Cells within our bodies divide and change over time, with thousands of chemical reactions occurring within each cell daily. This makes it difficult for scientists to understand what’s happening inside. Now, tiny nanostraws …

Drugs disguised as viruses are providing new weapons in the battle against cancer, promising greater accuracy and fewer side effects than chemotherapy.

DNA, the stuff of life, may very well also pack quite the jolt for engineers trying to advance the development of tiny, low-cost electronic devices.

The precise control of electron transport in microelectronics makes complex logic circuits possible that are in daily use in smartphones and laptops. Heat transport is of similar fundamental importance and its control is …

A new technique using liquid metals to create integrated circuits that are just atoms thick could lead to the next big advance for electronics.

The ability of small intestine cells to absorb nutrients and act as a barrier to pathogens is “significantly decreased” after chronic exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide, a common food additive found in everything …

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New nano approach could cut dose of leading HIV treatment in half – Phys.Org

Israel launches two nano-satellites – Arutz Sheva

The satellites are launched

Science Ministry spokesman

Two Israeli nano-satellites were successfully launched into space from India at 6am Wednesday, using a launcher from the Indian Space Research Organization.

The new nano-satellites are the size of milk cartons, allowing Israeli researchers better navigation and easy information access.

One of the satellites belongs to Ben Gurion University and will provide Israel with high-resolution photos. The BGUSAT is equipped with cameras able to detect climate trends and changes, and has a small chip allowing it to function like a larger satellite. The BGUSAT weighs 11 pounds (5 kg).

The second satellite belongs to SpacePharma, the Israeli company which first developed nano-satellites. This satellite has a mini-lab on board which conducts four experiments, some of which investigate the effect of zero gravity on different substances. The experiments are controlled by the researchers via a direct application on their smartphones. The automatic system allows the researchers to change the experiments as necessary, as well as receive data on radiation, temperature, and more. The SpacePharma satellite weights 9.92 lbs (4.5 kg) and is equipped with a camera which can take microscopic pictures.

A record 101 other satellites from around the globe left the same launcher together with the Israeli satellites. All of the satellites entered an orbit 310.75 miles (500 kilometers) high within minutes after launch.

88 of the other satellites launched on the PSLV launcher belong to a US company, three of them belong to India, and the others belong to Kazakhstan, Holland, Switzerland, and the United Arab Emirates.

Launched together, the 102 satellites weighed 1,378 kilograms. India’s three satellites were released at a lower orbit, but the other 97 will orbit together with the Israeli satellites at a height of 310.75 miles (500 kilometers) from Earth.

The launcher traveled at a speed of 16780.6 mph (27,000 km per hour), which is forty times faster than the average airplane.

The Israeli satellites will serve researchers from Israel and around the world, providing information for climate research and medicine. Science, Technology and Space Minister Ofir Akunis (Likud) said, “We are proud to see how Israeli research has launched. We are proud of the Israeli researchers who developed these two small satellites, which will help us advance medical and environmental research for the sake of all humanity.”

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Israel launches two nano-satellites – Arutz Sheva

Research briefs: diagnostic imaging – Medical Physics Web (subscription)

Automated system classifies skin cancers

Skin cancer, the most common human malignancy, is usually diagnosed visually and then confirmed with follow-up biopsies and histological tests. Automated classification of skin lesions is desirable but challenging because such lesions vary greatly in appearance. Now, researchers from Stanford University have devised a deep-learning algorithm that can classify skin cancers from images. They trained the algorithm using a dataset of 129,450 clinical images representing more than 2000 different skin diseases. In tests on clinical images, the algorithm could diagnose the most common and the most deadly types of skin cancer malignant carcinomas and melanomas, respectively with equivalent performance to a group of 21 board-certified dermatologists (Nature 542 115).

“We made a very powerful machine learning algorithm that learns from data,” said Andre Esteva, co-lead author of the paper and a graduate student in the Thrun lab. “Instead of writing into computer code exactly what to look for, you let the algorithm figure it out.” The authors note that the system has yet to be validated in a real-world clinical setting, but has extensive potential to affect primary care. They also hope to make the algorithm smartphone compatible in the near future. “My main eureka moment was when I realized just how ubiquitous smartphones will be,” added Esteva. “Everyone will have a supercomputer in their pockets with a number of sensors in it, including a camera. What if we could use it to visually screen for skin cancer? Or other ailments?”

Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School have designed a portable cancer diagnostic system that enables faster and more accurate diagnosis of brain tumours in the operating room. Typically, after removing the tumour, the surgeon must wait 30 to 40 minutes while the tissue is sent to a pathology lab for processing, sectioning, staining, mounting and interpretation. This can delay decision-making in the operating room, while tissue processing can introduce artefacts. Instead, the Michigan researchers have developed a stimulated Raman histology (SRH) system that can provide fast analysis of fresh brain tumour samples in the operating room, with no sample processing or staining required (Nature Biomedical Engineering 1 0027).

SRH is based on stimulated Raman scattering microscopy, using a fibre-laser-based microscope. The technology produces images that are virtually coloured to highlight cellular and architectural features and are almost indistinguishable from traditionally stained samples. The researchers imaged tissue from 101 neurosurgical patients using the new approach and conventional methods. Both produced accurate results but SRH was much faster. Neuropathologists given 30 samples, processed via SRH or traditional methods, were equally likely to make a correct diagnosis with either sample. The team has also built a machine learning process that could predict brain tumour subtype with 90% accuracy. “By achieving excellent image quality in fresh tissues, we’re able to make a diagnosis during surgery,” said first author Daniel Orringer. “Our technique may disrupt the intraoperative diagnosis process in a great way, reducing it from a 30-minute process to about three minutes. Initially, we developed this technology as a means of helping surgeons detect microscopic tumour, but we found the technology was capable of much more than guiding surgery.”

A research team headed up at the Center for Nanomedicine in the Republic of Korea has developed the Nano MRI Lamp a platform based on an MRI contrast that only “switches on” in the presence of the targeted disease. The Nano MRI Lamp technology combines two magnetic materials: a superparamagnetic quencher (magnetic nanoparticle) and a paramagnetic enhancer (MRI contrast agent). When the two materials are separated by more than 7nm, the MRI signal is on, whereas when they are placed closer than 7nm, the signal is switched off. The researchers named this approach magnetic resonance tuning (Nature Materials doi: 10.1038/nmat4846).

The team tested the Nano MRI Lamp’s performance by detecting the presence of MMP-2, an enzyme that can induce tumour metastasis, in mice with cancer. They connected the two magnetic materials with a linker, bringing them close together and switching the MRI signal off. In the presence of cancer, the MMP-2 cleaves this linker, separating the materials and switching the MRI signal on. The resulting MR image thus indicated the location of the tumour, with the signal brightness correlated with MMP-2 concentration in the cancerous tissue. “The current contrast agent is like using a flashlight during a sunny day: its effect is limited. Instead, this new technology is like using a flash light at night and therefore more useful,” explained team leader Jinwoo Cheon.

The first-in-human application of a PET radiotracer designed to identify both early and metastatic prostate cancer has been reported by a USChina research team. The new tracer is a Ga-68-labelled peptide BBN-RGD agent that targets both gastrin-releasing peptide receptor and integrin v3, both of which are overexpressed in prostate cancer cells. The study included 13 patients with prostate cancer (four newly diagnosed and nine post-therapy) and five healthy volunteers. PET/CT using Ga-68-BBN-RGD detected 20 bone lesions in seven patients, either with primary prostate cancer or after radical prostatectomy. No adverse side effects were found during the procedure and two-week follow-up, demonstrating the safety of the radiotracer (J. Nucl. Med. 58 228).

“Compounds capable of targeting more than one biomarker have the ability of binding to both early and metastatic stages of prostate cancer, creating the possibility for a more prompt and accurate diagnostic profile for both primary and the metastatic tumours,” explained senior investigator Xiaoyuan Chen, from the Laboratory of Molecular Imaging and Nanomedicine at NIBIB. Looking ahead, Chen says that Ga-68-BBN-RGD could play a role in staging and detecting prostate cancer and provide guidance for internal radiation therapy, using the same peptide labelled with therapeutic radionuclides. He points out that larger-scale clinical investigations are warranted.

MSOM offers 3D in vivo skin mapping Raman imaging steps closer to the clinic Multifunctional bubbles image and treat PET helps quantify bone metastases response

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Research briefs: diagnostic imaging – Medical Physics Web (subscription)

Global Nanomedicine Market Is Primarily Driven by an Increase in the Rate of Investments Made Into It – Digital Journal

Transparency Market Research Report Added “Nanomedicine Market – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share,Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2013 – 2019”

This press release was orginally distributed by SBWire

Albany, NY — (SBWIRE) — 02/14/2017 — The global nanomedicine market will exhibit a CAGR of 12.3% within a forecast period of 2013 to 2019. The market was valued at US$78.54 bn in 2012 and is expected to reach US$177.60 bn before the end of 2019, according to a research report released by market intelligence firm, Transparency Market Research. The report, titled “Nanomedicine Market – Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends and Forecast, 2013 – 2019,” holds vital data on this market for to help the market stakeholders in strategic planning in the near future.

Download PDF Brochure: http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com/sample/sample.php?flag=S&rep_id=1753

According to the data given in the report, the global nanomedicine market is primarily driven by an increase in the rate of investments made into it. These investments are coming in the form of government support and collaborations within the healthcare industry. Most of the investments are made to improve the research and development efforts in the global nanomedicine market.The high rate of investments is being made to complement the rising prevalence of chronic diseases, which is increasing the number of patients with unresolved medical requirements.

Major restraints on the global nanomedicine market, as stated in the report, are the high costs associated with the development of effective nanomedicine, along with the overall insufficiency of framework in terms of regulatory guidance.The future of the global nanomedicine market could rely on a growing trend of identifying new applications in nanomedicine, along with its increasing scope of use in emerging economies.

The report provides a segmented analysis of the global nanomedicine market in terms of applications and geography.In terms of applications, the global nanomedicine market was led by the oncology segment in 2012, when it held nearly 38.0% of the market. Oncology holds a high percentage of nanomedicine use in the commercialized sense, allowing it to hold the largest share in the global nanomedicine market. The report, however, states that the oncology segment will lose market share to the cardiovascular segment, which is growing at the fastest rate due to an increasing population of geriatric citizens around the world.

The regional analysis of the global nanomedicine market provided in the report reveals Asia Pacific to exhibit the fastest CAGR of 14.6% between 2013 and 2019. This region owes its rapid growth rate to the increase in awareness of the benefits of nanomedicine usage in the treatment of chronic diseases. This is more relevant to China and India, where the growing rate of diagnosis of chronic illnesses, coupled with the increase in healthcare expenditure and collaborative efforts, is promoting the use of nanomedicine.

Till 2012, the global nanomedicine market was led by North America owing to the highly advanced infrastructure and services present in the healthcare industry. The report suggests that North America will maintain its dominance over the global nanomedicine market for the given forecast period.

The key players in the global nanomedicine market are Teva Pharmaceutical Industries Ltd., Sigma-Tau Pharmaceuticals Inc., UCB SA, Nanosphere Inc., Pfizer Inc., GE Healthcare, Merck & Co. Inc., Johnson & Johnson, Mallinckrodt plc, Celgene Corporation, Abbott Laboratories, and CombiMatrix Corp.

About Transparency Market Research Transparency Market Research (TMR) is a global market intelligence company providing business information reports and services. The company’s exclusive blend of quantitative forecasting and trend analysis provides forward-looking insight for thousands of decision makers. TMR’s experienced team of analysts, researchers, and consultants use proprietary data sources and various tools and techniques to gather and analyze information.

Contact Us Transparency Market Research State Tower, 90 State Street, Suite 700 Albany, NY 12207 United States Tel: +1-518-618-1030 USA – Canada Toll Free: 866-552-3453 Email: sales@transparencymarketresearch.com Website: http://www.transparencymarketresearch.com

For more information on this press release visit: http://www.sbwire.com/press-releases/global-nanomedicine-market/release-766924.htm

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Global Nanomedicine Market Is Primarily Driven by an Increase in the Rate of Investments Made Into It – Digital Journal

Nanomedical Devices Industry Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2027 – Satellite PR News (press release)

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Nanomedical Devices Industry Size, Application Analysis, Regional Outlook, Competitive Strategies and Forecast to 2027

Market Research Future

PUNE, MAHARASHTRA, INDIA, February 14, 2017 /EINPresswire.com/ Market Highlights Till now, around 250 nanomedicine products are being tested or used in humans. According to experts, the long-term impact of nanomedicinal products on human health and the environment is still not certain. During the last 10 years, there has been steep growth in development of devices that integrate nanomaterials or other nanotechnology. Enhancement of in vivo imaging and testing has been a highly popular area of research, followed by bone substitutes and coatings for implanted devices. The market for Nano-Medical Devices is booming.

Ask for your specific company profile and country level customization on report. Request a Sample Report @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/sample_request/1236

Segmentation Global Nano-Medical Devices Market has been segmented on the basis of types which comprises of Implantable Biosensors, Implantable cardioverter-Defibrillators (ICD), Implantable drug delivery system and others. On the basis of applications, the market is segmented into Disease indication, Drug release regulation, controlling fast or irregular heartbeat, consistent drug delivery and others. On the basis of end users, market is segmented into Hospitals, clinics, research institutes and others.

Key Players Stryker Corporation (U.S.) Medtronic (Ire) 3M Company (U.S.) St. Jude Medical, Inc. (U.S.) PerkinElmer, Inc. (U.S.) Starkey Hearing Technologies Smith & Nephew plc.

Regional Analysis of Nano-Medical devices Market: Globally North America is the largest market for Nano medical devices. The North American market for nanomedical devices is expected to grow at a CAGR of XX% and is expected to reach at US$ XXX Million by the end of the forecasted period. Europe is the second-largest market for Nano-Medical Devices which is expected to grow at a CAGR of XX%. Asia is the fastest growing market in the segment.

Taste the market data and market information presented through more than 85 market data tables and figures spread in 130 numbers of pages of the project report. Avail the in-depth table of content TOC & market synopsis on Global Nanomedical Devices Market Research Report- Forecast To 2027

Brief TOC of Global Nano-Medical Devices Market 1 Executive Summary 2 Scope of the Report 2.1 Market Definition 2.2 Scope of the Study 2.3 Markets Structure

3 Market Research Methodology 3.1 Research Process 3.2 Secondary Research 3.3 Primary Research 3.4 Forecast Model

4 Market Landscape 5 Industry Overview of Global Nano-Medical Devices Market 5.1 Introduction 5.2 Growth Drivers 5.3 Impact analysis 5.4 Market Challenges Continued.

Browse full Nano-Medical Devices Market @ https://www.marketresearchfuture.com/reports/nanomedical-devices-market

Study Objectives of Nanomedical devices Market: To provide detailed analysis of the market structure along with forecast for the next 10 years of the various segments and sub-segments of the nanomedical devices Market To provide insights about factors affecting the market growth To analyze the nanomedical devices Market based on various factors- price analysis, supply chain analysis, porters five force analysis etc. To provide historical and forecast revenue of the market segments and sub-segments with respect to four main geographies and their countries- Americas, Europe, Asia, and Rest of World. To provide country level analysis of the market with respect to the current market size and future prospective To provide country level analysis of the market for segments by types, by applications, by end users and sub-segments. To provide overview of key players and their strategic profiling in the market, comprehensively analyzing their core competencies, and drawing a competitive landscape for the market

About Market Research Future: At Market Research Future (MRFR), we enable our customers to unravel the complexity of various industries through our Cooked Research Report (CRR), Half-Cooked Research Reports (HCRR), Raw Research Reports (3R), Continuous-Feed Research (CFR), and Market Research & Consulting Services.

Contact: Akash Anand Market Research Future Magarpatta Road, Hadapsar, Pune 411028 Maharashtra, India +1 646 845 9312 Email: akash.anand@marketresearchfuture.com

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Nanomedical Devices Industry Global Industry Analysis, Size, Share, Growth, Trends, and Forecast 2027 – Satellite PR News (press release)

Scientists Devise New Platform to Overcome the Limits of MRI Contrast Agents – Scicasts (press release) (blog)

Daejeon, Korea (Scicasts) A research team led by CHEON Jinwoo at the Center for Nanomedicine, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), developed the Nano MRI Lamp: A new technology platform that tunes the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals “ON” only in the presence of the targeted disease.

Published in Nature Materials, this study can overcome the limitations of existing MRI contrast agents.

MRI is an increasingly popular non-invasive technique for diagnosis and, importantly, does not use harmful radiation. Some tissues show a natural contrast on MRI, but for some specific types of imaging, patients are administered a MRI contrast agent to enhance the difference between the target area and the rest of the body. “Typical MRI contrast agents, like gadolinium, are injected in an “ON” state and distributed across the whole biological system with relatively large background signal,” explains Director Cheon. “We found a new principle to switch the MRI contrast agent “ON” only in the location of the target.” IBS scientists discovered how to switch the signal ON/OFF by using the Nano MRI Lamp.

The Nano MRI Lamp technology consists of two magnetic materials: A quencher (magnetic nanoparticle) and an enhancer (MRI contrast agent). The switch is due to the distance between the two. When the two materials are at a critical distance, farther than 7 nanometers (nm), the MRI signal is “ON”, whereas when they are placed closer than 7 nm, the MRI signal is “OFF”. The researchers named this phenomenon Magnetic REsonance Tuning (MRET), which is analogous to the powerful optical sensing technique called Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET).

The researchers tested the Nano MRI Lamp for cancer diagnosis. They detected the presence of an enzyme that can induce tumour metastasis, MMP-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-2) in mice with cancer. They connected the two magnetic materials with a linker that is naturally cleaved by MMP-2. Since the linker keeps the two materials close to each other, the MRI signal was “OFF”. However, in the presence of the cancer, the linker is cleaved by MMP-2, which cause the two materials to be separated and the MRI signal switched “ON”. Therefore, the MRI signal indicated the location of MMP-2, and the tumour. The scientists also found that the brightness of the MRI signal correlates with the concentration of MMP-2 in the cancerous tissue.

Most importantly, the Nano MRI Lamp remains switched off until it meets a biomarker associated with a specific disease, allowing higher sensitivity. “The current contrast agent is like using a flashlight during a sunny day: Its effect is limited. Instead, this new technology is like using a flash light at night and therefore more useful,” explains Cheon.

Beyond cancer diagnosis, the Nano MRI Lamp can, in principle, be applied to investigate a variety of biological events, such as enzymolysis, pH variation, protein-protein interactions, etc. IBS scientists expect that it would be useful for both in vitro and in vivo diagnostics.

“Although we still have a long way to go, we established the principle and believe that the MRET and Nano MRI Lamp can serve as a novel sensing principle to augment the exploration of a wide range of biological systems,” concludes Cheon. The research group is now working on developing safer and smarter multitasking contrast agents, which can simultaneously record and interpret multiple biological targets, and eventually allow a better understanding of biological processes and accurate diagnosis of diseases.

Article adapted from a Institute for Basic Science news release.

Publication: Distance-dependent magnetic resonance tuning as a versatile MRI sensing platform for biological targets. Jin-sil Choi et al. Nature Materials (February 06, 2017): Click here to view.

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Scientists Devise New Platform to Overcome the Limits of MRI Contrast Agents – Scicasts (press release) (blog)

The First European Nanomedicine Mentoring Program Launches a New Edition – Apply to boost your project … – Cordis News

The Nanomedicine Translation Advisory Board (NanomedTAB) offers a free-of-charge mentoring program to promising nanomedicine teams and projects at any stage of development to assess, advise and accelerate their translation and get to commercial application faster and more reliably. To reach this objective, the TAB counts on 11 experts from the industry, specifically recruited for their diverse, extensive and complementary experience in the translation of innovative technologies for healthcare.

The fourth TABs round is now open to companies, public and private research entities, and other organisations leading nanomedicine innovative projects in Europe. Deadline for applications is 27th February 2017.

Selected projects in this round will be invited to attend the TAB-In Session, designed as 2-hour face-to-face meetings with the experts. These meetings will be organised on 4th April 2017 in London in the framework of the European Nanomedicine Meeting 2017 (http://www.britishsocietynanomedicine.org/enm-2017-conference1.html).

Applications to the TAB should be submitted through the following link: http://www.nanomedtab.eu/?apply.

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The First European Nanomedicine Mentoring Program Launches a New Edition – Apply to boost your project … – Cordis News

4th TAB-in Sessions during the European Nanomedicine Meeting 2017 in London – Cordis News

The fourth TABs round is now open to companies, public and private research entities, and other organisations leading nanomedicine innovative projects in Europe. Selected projects in this round will be invited to attend the TAB-In Session, designed as 2-hour face-to-face meetings with the experts and organised on 4th April 2017 in London in the framework of the European Nanomedicine Meeting 2017.

The current statistics of the cases supported by the TAB experts are very promising with 52 teams from 16 countries already having applied, and about half of them being currently benefiting from the experts continuous coaching.

Applications to the TAB should be submitted before 27th February 2017 through the following link: http://www.nanomedtab.eu/?apply.

Information about the European Nanomedicine Meeting 2017 can be found on the event’s website at http://www.britishsocietynanomedicine.org/enm-2017-conference1.html

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4th TAB-in Sessions during the European Nanomedicine Meeting 2017 in London – Cordis News

Smarter MRI Diagnosis with Nano MRI Lamp – R & D Magazine

A research team led by CHEON Jinwoo at the Center for Nanomedicine, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), developed the Nano MRI Lamp: A new technology platform that tunes the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) signals “ON” only in the presence of the targeted disease. Published inNature Materials, this study can overcome the limitations of existing MRI contrast agents.

MRI is an increasingly popular non-invasive technique for diagnosis and, importantly, does not use harmful radiation. Some tissues show a natural contrast on MRI, but for some specific types of imaging, patients are administered a MRI contrast agent to enhance the difference between the target area and the rest of the body. “Typical MRI contrast agents, like gadolinium, are injected in an “ON” state and distributed across the whole biological system with relatively large background signal,” explains Director Cheon. “We found a new principle to switch the MRI contrast agent “ON” only in the location of the target.” IBS scientists discovered how to switch the signal ON/OFF by using the Nano MRI Lamp.

The Nano MRI Lamp technology consists of two magnetic materials: A quencher (magnetic nanoparticle) and an enhancer (MRI contrast agent). The switch is due to the distance between the two. When the two materials are at a critical distance, farther than 7 nanometers (nm), the MRI signal is “ON”, whereas when they are placed closer than 7 nm, the MRI signal is “OFF”. The researchers named this phenomenon Magnetic REsonance Tuning (MRET), which is analogous to the powerful optical sensing technique called Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer (FRET).

The researchers tested the Nano MRI Lamp for cancer diagnosis. They detected the presence of an enzyme that can induce tumor metastasis, MMP-2 (matrix metalloproteinase-2) in mice with cancer. They connected the two magnetic materials with a linker that is naturally cleaved by MMP-2. Since the linker keeps the two materials close to each other, the MRI signal was “OFF”. However, in the presence of the cancer, the linker is cleaved by MMP-2, which cause the two materials to be separated and the MRI signal switched “ON”. Therefore, the MRI signal indicated the location of MMP-2, and the tumor. The scientists also found that the brightness of the MRI signal correlates with the concentration of MMP-2 in the cancerous tissue.

Most importantly, the Nano MRI Lamp remains switched off until it meets a biomarker associated with a specific disease, allowing higher sensitivity. “The current contrast agent is like using a flashlight during a sunny day: Its effect is limited. Instead, this new technology is like using a flash light at night and therefore more useful,” explains Cheon.

Beyond cancer diagnosis, the Nano MRI Lamp can, in principle, be applied to investigate a variety of biological events, such as enzymolysis, pH variation, protein-protein interactions, etc. IBS scientists expect that it would be useful for both in vitro and in vivo diagnostics.

“Although we still have a long way to go, we established the principle and believe that the MRET and Nano MRI Lamp can serve as a novel sensing principle to augment the exploration of a wide range of biological systems,” concludes Cheon. The research group is now working on developing safer and smarter multitasking contrast agents, which can simultaneously record and interpret multiple biological targets, and eventually allow a better understanding of biological processes and accurate diagnosis of diseases.

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Smarter MRI Diagnosis with Nano MRI Lamp – R & D Magazine


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