Nanomedicinelab

FlatChem, 2018, in press

ACS Nano, 2018, in press

bioRxiv, 2018, published online 14 November

Advanced Materials, 2018, in press

Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 2018, in press

Molecular Therapy, 2018, in press

Biomaterials, 2018, published online 13 October

Archives of Toxicology, 2018, published online 26 September

ACS Nano, 2018, in press

Carbon, 2018, published online 5 October

See the original post:

Nanomedicinelab

Dublin Aerospace

Dublin Aerospace is based at Dublin International Airport, Ireland. Our facility is 20,000m2 in size and covers Hangar 1, 4 and 5. We operate a 4 bay base maintenance facility that can presently handle approx 70 aircraft per annum, an APU overhaul centre that can handle 400 APUs a year and a Landing Gear services centre that has capacity for 250 legs annually.

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Dublin Aerospace

Home – Aerospace Industries Association

Now more than ever, membership in AIA is the right decision.

As we all know, this is a turbulent time for the nation and the aerospace and defense industrywe face numerous economic and political challenges, both domestically and internationally.

In times like these, AIAs strong representation and advocacy is essential to protecting the business interests of the nations aerospace and defense industry and helping to establish new opportunities.

We help youand all levels of your organizationget closer to your customers and competitors by providing numerous networking opportunities through meetings, international air shows, and an extensive network of councils, committees, and working groups.

Learn More

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Home – Aerospace Industries Association

North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD)

U.S. Air Force Gen. Terrence J. OShaughnessy receives the North American Aerospace Defense Commands flag from the Canadian Armed Forces Chief of the Defence Staff, Gen. J.H. Vance, signifying his acceptance of command, May 24, 2018 on Peterson U.S. Air Force Base, Colorado OShaughnessy is the 25th NORAD commander. (DoD Photo by N&NC Public Affairs)

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North American Aerospace Defense Command (NORAD)

AsMA | Aerospace Medical Association

AsMA | Aerospace Medical Association

This website uses cookies to ensure the best possible web experience. By continuing and using the site, you consent to the use of cookies. If you wish to disable them or to learn more about how we use cookies, please view our Cookies Policy. Got it!

Learn about the history and mission of Aerospace Medicine by watching the professionals making it happen!

Military aviation operations present numerous unique Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance issues. Sustained acceleration, fatigue, orientation problems, and attention management issues are just a few.

Commercial aviation presents Aerospace Medicine problems for the aircrew, ground support crews, and the passengers they serve.

General aviation aircraft present unique Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance problems. Human Performance factors continue to be leading causes of General Aviation mishaps.

The ability for humans to perform under extreme environmental conditions poses challenging problems for Aerospace Medicine professionals. Altitude, thermal issues, fatigue, acceleration, and numerous other environmental stressors must be appropriately managed to ensure optimized human performance. Managing the mission environment through technology requires a process of human-centered design and acquisition known as Human Systems Integration.

Human participation in space operations presents some of the most interesting and challenging Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance problems. Microgravity, bone density and muscle atrophy issues, radiation exposure, and thermal stressors are just some of the space medicine problems.

AsMA is a scientific forum providing a setting for many different disciplines to come together and share their expertise for the benefit of all persons involved in air and space travel. The Association has provided its expertise to a multitude of Federal and international agencies on a broad range of issues, including aviation and space medical standards, the aging pilot, and physiological stresses of flight. AsMA’s membership includes aerospace medicine specialists, flight nurses, physiologists, psychologists, human factors specialists, physician assistants, and researchers in this field. Most are with industry, civil aviation regulatory agencies, departments of defense and military services, the airlines, space programs, and universities.

Approximately 30% of the membershiporiginate from outside the United States.

Through the efforts of the AsMA members, safety in flight and man’s overall adaptation to adverse environments have been more nearly achieved.

Lifestyle Diseases conference, Lifestyle Diseases workshop, Global Lifestyle Diseases Conference, Lifestyle Diseases symposium, Lifestyle Diseases congress, Lifestyle Diseases meeting, Lifestyle Di…Read More

The peer-reviewed monthly journal provides contact with physicians, life scientists, bioengineers, and medical specialists working in both basic medical research and in its clinical applications…

The AsMA Global Connection Story with IACRoland Vermeiren, M.D., FAsMA

So youre looking online for a particular article from Aerospace Medicine and Human Performance (AMHP). How do you find it?

AsMAs staff were deeply saddened to hear of the death of L. Edward Antosek, M.D.

The Aerospace Human Factors Association (AsHFA) President, Dr. Annette Sobel, has published a visioning statement related to the application of Aerospace Human Factors to Space Missions. Read more

The Translational Research Institute for Space Health (TRISH) is offering several funding opportunities:

Call for 2019 TRISH Postdoctoral Fellowships Now open!Read more

More Announcements

The Aerospace Medical Association offers free information publications for passengers preparing for commercial airline travel. We also offer more detailed medical guidelines for physicians that can be used to advise patients with preexisting illness planning to travel by air.

Which of the following is NOT included in an examination of the sensorium?

a.Orientation to time, place, and personb.Retention of three unrelated memory items for five minutesc.General knowledged.Depressed or elated moode.Proverb interpretation: concrete or abstract.

Read the Answer More Questions

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AsMA | Aerospace Medical Association

Nanomedicinelab

FlatChem, 2018, in press

ACS Nano, 2018, in press

bioRxiv, 2018, published online 14 November

Advanced Materials, 2018, in press

Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 2018, in press

Molecular Therapy, 2018, in press

Biomaterials, 2018, published online 13 October

Archives of Toxicology, 2018, published online 26 September

ACS Nano, 2018, in press

Carbon, 2018, published online 5 October

Excerpt from:

Nanomedicinelab

jo lab – Cardiovascular Mechanobiology and Nanomedicine

Our lab studies the mechanisms by which blood flow regulates endothelial biology and dysfunction, which leads to atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification. In addition to in vitro (a cone-and-plate bioreactor) systems, the lab also developed an in vivomodel (a mouse partial carotid ligation model) in conjunction with OMICs approaches to understand how disturbed flow vs. stable flow differently regulate vascular and valve endothelial biology and pathobiology at the genome-, epigenome-, and metabolome-wide level.With these methods, we have been able to carry out several OMICs studies that have allowed us to identify mechanosensitive mRNAs, microRNAs, epigenetic DNA methylome, metabolites, and long non-coding RNAs (on-going work). These genome-, epigenome- and metabolome-wide OMICs studies have guided us not only to identify mechanosensitive genes, metabolites and epigenetic changes, but to demonstrate the critical role that some of these flow-sensitive molecular transducers play a role in controlling endothelial biology, atherosclerosis and aortic valve disease

Postdoctoral Fellow in Mechanobiology and Disease at Emory

A postdoctoral position is available immediately to study the mechanisms by which mechano-sensitive genes and epigenetics regulate vascular biology, atherosclerosis and aortic valve disease, and to develop gene-based therapies and targeted delivery methods in Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. We are looking for a motivated and talented biomedical scientist or engineer with PhD or MD in related fields and with strong publication record. Please apply here: https://faculty-emory.icims.com/jobs/18016/job, and also send your CV by e-mail to Professor Jo. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until filled but by June 10, 2018.

See the article here:

jo lab – Cardiovascular Mechanobiology and Nanomedicine

Nanomedicinelab

ACS Nano, 2018, in press

bioRxiv, 2018, published online 14 November

Advanced Materials, 2018, in press

Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 2018, in press

Molecular Therapy, 2018, in press

Biomaterials, 2018, published online 13 October

Archives of Toxicology, 2018, published online 26 September

ACS Nano, 2018, in press

Carbon, 2018, published online 5 October

2D Materials, 2018, 5: 035020

Read more:

Nanomedicinelab

jo lab – Cardiovascular Mechanobiology and Nanomedicine

Our lab studies the mechanisms by which blood flow regulates endothelial biology and dysfunction, which leads to atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification. In addition to in vitro (a cone-and-plate bioreactor) systems, the lab also developed an in vivomodel (a mouse partial carotid ligation model) in conjunction with OMICs approaches to understand how disturbed flow vs. stable flow differently regulate vascular and valve endothelial biology and pathobiology at the genome-, epigenome-, and metabolome-wide level.With these methods, we have been able to carry out several OMICs studies that have allowed us to identify mechanosensitive mRNAs, microRNAs, epigenetic DNA methylome, metabolites, and long non-coding RNAs (on-going work). These genome-, epigenome- and metabolome-wide OMICs studies have guided us not only to identify mechanosensitive genes, metabolites and epigenetic changes, but to demonstrate the critical role that some of these flow-sensitive molecular transducers play a role in controlling endothelial biology, atherosclerosis and aortic valve disease

Postdoctoral Fellow in Mechanobiology and Disease at Emory

A postdoctoral position is available immediately to study the mechanisms by which mechano-sensitive genes and epigenetics regulate vascular biology, atherosclerosis and aortic valve disease, and to develop gene-based therapies and targeted delivery methods in Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. We are looking for a motivated and talented biomedical scientist or engineer with PhD or MD in related fields and with strong publication record. Please apply here: https://faculty-emory.icims.com/jobs/18016/job, and also send your CV by e-mail to Professor Jo. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until filled but by June 10, 2018.

See more here:

jo lab – Cardiovascular Mechanobiology and Nanomedicine

Nanomedicinelab

ACS Nano, 2018, in press

bioRxiv, 2018, published online 14 November

Advanced Materials, 2018, in press

Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 2018, in press

Molecular Therapy, 2018, in press

Biomaterials, 2018, published online 13 October

Archives of Toxicology, 2018, published online 26 September

ACS Nano, 2018, in press

Carbon, 2018, published online 5 October

2D Materials, 2018, 5: 035020

View post:

Nanomedicinelab

jo lab – Cardiovascular Mechanobiology and Nanomedicine

Our lab studies the mechanisms by which blood flow regulates endothelial biology and dysfunction, which leads to atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification. In addition to in vitro (a cone-and-plate bioreactor) systems, the lab also developed an in vivomodel (a mouse partial carotid ligation model) in conjunction with OMICs approaches to understand how disturbed flow vs. stable flow differently regulate vascular and valve endothelial biology and pathobiology at the genome-, epigenome-, and metabolome-wide level.With these methods, we have been able to carry out several OMICs studies that have allowed us to identify mechanosensitive mRNAs, microRNAs, epigenetic DNA methylome, metabolites, and long non-coding RNAs (on-going work). These genome-, epigenome- and metabolome-wide OMICs studies have guided us not only to identify mechanosensitive genes, metabolites and epigenetic changes, but to demonstrate the critical role that some of these flow-sensitive molecular transducers play a role in controlling endothelial biology, atherosclerosis and aortic valve disease

Postdoctoral Fellow in Mechanobiology and Disease at Emory

A postdoctoral position is available immediately to study the mechanisms by which mechano-sensitive genes and epigenetics regulate vascular biology, atherosclerosis and aortic valve disease, and to develop gene-based therapies and targeted delivery methods in Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. We are looking for a motivated and talented biomedical scientist or engineer with PhD or MD in related fields and with strong publication record. Please apply here: https://faculty-emory.icims.com/jobs/18016/job, and also send your CV by e-mail to Professor Jo. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until filled but by June 10, 2018.

Continued here:

jo lab – Cardiovascular Mechanobiology and Nanomedicine

Nanomedicinelab

Advanced Materials, 2018, in press

Molecular Therapy, 2018, in press

Biomaterials, 2018, published online 13 October

Archives of Toxicology, 2018, published online 26 September

ACS Nano, 2018, in press

Carbon, 2018, published online 5 October

2D Materials, 2018, 5: 035020

Journal of Controlled Release, 2018, 276: 157-167

ACS Nano, 2018, 12(2): 1373-1389

2D Materials, 2018, 5: 035014

Originally posted here:

Nanomedicinelab

jo lab – Cardiovascular Mechanobiology and Nanomedicine

Our lab studies the mechanisms by which blood flow regulates endothelial biology and dysfunction, which leads to atherosclerosis and aortic valve calcification. In addition to in vitro (a cone-and-plate bioreactor) systems, the lab also developed an in vivomodel (a mouse partial carotid ligation model) in conjunction with OMICs approaches to understand how disturbed flow vs. stable flow differently regulate vascular and valve endothelial biology and pathobiology at the genome-, epigenome-, and metabolome-wide level.With these methods, we have been able to carry out several OMICs studies that have allowed us to identify mechanosensitive mRNAs, microRNAs, epigenetic DNA methylome, metabolites, and long non-coding RNAs (on-going work). These genome-, epigenome- and metabolome-wide OMICs studies have guided us not only to identify mechanosensitive genes, metabolites and epigenetic changes, but to demonstrate the critical role that some of these flow-sensitive molecular transducers play a role in controlling endothelial biology, atherosclerosis and aortic valve disease

Postdoctoral Fellow in Mechanobiology and Disease at Emory

A postdoctoral position is available immediately to study the mechanisms by which mechano-sensitive genes and epigenetics regulate vascular biology, atherosclerosis and aortic valve disease, and to develop gene-based therapies and targeted delivery methods in Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering at Emory University in Atlanta, Georgia, USA. We are looking for a motivated and talented biomedical scientist or engineer with PhD or MD in related fields and with strong publication record. Please apply here: https://faculty-emory.icims.com/jobs/18016/job, and also send your CV by e-mail to Professor Jo. Applications will be reviewed on a rolling basis until filled but by June 10, 2018.

More here:

jo lab – Cardiovascular Mechanobiology and Nanomedicine

UC San Diego NanoEngineering Department

The NanoEngineering program has received accreditation by the Accreditation Commission of ABET, the global accreditor of college and university programs in applied and natural science, computing, engineering and engineering technology. UC San Diego’s NanoEngineering program is the first of its kind in the nation to receive this accreditation. Our NanoEngineering students can feel confident that their education meets global standards and that they will be prepared to enter the workforce worldwide.

ABET accreditation assures that programs meet standards to produce graduates ready to enter critical technical fields that are leading the way in innovation and emerging technologies, and anticipating the welfare and safety needs of the public. Please visit the ABET website for more information on why accreditation matters.

Congratulations to the NanoEngineering department and students!

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UC San Diego NanoEngineering Department

Nanoengineering – Wikipedia

Nanoengineering is the practice of engineering on the nanoscale. It derives its name from the nanometre, a unit of measurement equalling one billionth of a meter.

Nanoengineering is largely a synonym for nanotechnology, but emphasizes the engineering rather than the pure science aspects of the field.

The first nanoengineering program was started at the University of Toronto within the Engineering Science program as one of the options of study in the final years. In 2003, the Lund Institute of Technology started a program in Nanoengineering. In 2004, the College of Nanoscale Science and Engineering at SUNY Polytechnic Institute was established on the campus of the University at Albany. In 2005, the University of Waterloo established a unique program which offers a full degree in Nanotechnology Engineering. [1] Louisiana Tech University started the first program in the U.S. in 2005. In 2006 the University of Duisburg-Essen started a Bachelor and a Master program NanoEngineering. [2] Unlike early NanoEngineering programs, the first Nanoengineering Department in the world, offering both undergraduate and graduate degrees, was established by the University of California, San Diego in 2007.In 2009, the University of Toronto began offering all Options of study in Engineering Science as degrees, bringing the second nanoengineering degree to Canada. Rice University established in 2016 a Department of Materials Science and NanoEngineering (MSNE).DTU Nanotech – the Department of Micro- and Nanotechnology – is a department at the Technical University of Denmark established in 1990.

In 2013, Wayne State University began offering a Nanoengineering Undergraduate Certificate Program, which is funded by a Nanoengineering Undergraduate Education (NUE) grant from the National Science Foundation. The primary goal is to offer specialized undergraduate training in nanotechnology. Other goals are: 1) to teach emerging technologies at the undergraduate level, 2) to train a new adaptive workforce, and 3) to retrain working engineers and professionals.[3]

Continued here:

Nanoengineering – Wikipedia

The NANO-ENGINEERING FLAGSHIP initiative

Nano-Engineering introduces a novel key-enabling non-invasive broadband technology, the Nano-engineered Interface (NaI), realising omni -connectivity and putting humans and their interactions at the center of the future digital society.Omni-connectivity encompasses real-time communication, sensing, monitoring, and data processing among humans, objects, and their environment. The vision of Omni-connectivity englobes people in a new sphere of extremely simplified, intuitive and natural communication.The Nano-engineered Interface (NaI) a non-invasive wireless ultraflat functional system will make this possible. NaI will be applicable to any surface on any physical item and thereby exponentially diversify and increase connections among humans, wearables, vehicles, and everyday objects. NaI will communicate with other NaI-networks from local up to satellites by using the whole frequency spectrum from microwave frequency to optics

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The NANO-ENGINEERING FLAGSHIP initiative

NETS – What are Nanoengineering and Nanotechnology?

is one billionth of a meter, or three to five atoms in width. It would take approximately 40,000 nanometers lined up in a row to equal the width of a human hair. NanoEngineering concerns itself with manipulating processes that occur on the scale of 1-100 nanometers.

The general term, nanotechnology, is sometimes used to refer to common products that have improved properties due to being fortified with nanoscale materials. One example is nano-improved tooth-colored enamel, as used by dentists for fillings. The general use of the term nanotechnology then differs from the more specific sciences that fall under its heading.

NanoEngineering is an interdisciplinary science that builds biochemical structures smaller than bacterium, which function like microscopic factories. This is possible by utilizing basic biochemical processes at the atomic or molecular level. In simple terms, molecules interact through natural processes, and NanoEngineering takes advantage of those processes by direct manipulation.

SOURCE:http://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-nanoengineering.htm

Link:

NETS – What are Nanoengineering and Nanotechnology?

Undergraduate Degree Programs | NanoEngineering

The Department of NanoEngineering offers undergraduate programs leading to theB.S. degreesinNanoengineeringandChemical Engineering. The Chemical Engineering and NanoEngineering undergraduate programs areaccredited by the Engineering Accreditation Commission of ABET. The undergraduate degree programs focus on integrating the various sciences and engineering disciplines necessary for successful careers in the evolving nanotechnology industry.These two degree programshave very different requirements and are described in separate sections.

B.S. NanoEngineering

TheNanoEngineering Undergraduate Program became effective Fall 2010.Thismajor focuses on nanoscale science, engineering, and technology that have the potential to make valuable advances in different areas that include, to name a few, new materials, biology and medicine, energy conversion, sensors, and environmental remediation. The program includes affiliated faculty from the Department of NanoEngineering, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, and the Department of Bioengineering. The NanoEngineering undergraduate program is tailored to provide breadth and flexibility by taking advantage of the strength of basic sciences and other engineering disciplines at UC San Diego. The intention is to graduate nanoengineers who are multidisciplinary and can work in a broad spectrum of industries.

B.S. Chemical Engineering

The Chemical Engineering undergraduate program is housed within the NanoEngineering Department. The program is made up of faculty from the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, the Department of Bioengineering and the Department of NanoEngineering. The curricula at both the undergraduate and graduate levels are designed to support and foster chemical engineering as a profession that interfaces engineering and all aspects of basic sciences (physics, chemistry, and biology). As of Fall 2008, the Department of NanoEngineering has taken over the administration of the B.S. degree in Chemical Engineering.

Academic Advising

Upon admission to the major, students should consult the catalog or NanoEngineering website for their program of study, and their undergraduate/graduate advisor if they have questions. Because some course and/or curricular changes may be made every year, it is imperative that students consult with the departments student affairs advisors on an annual basis.

Students can meet with the academic advisors during walk-in hours, schedule an appointment, or send messages through the Virtual Advising Center (VAC).

Program Alterations/Exceptions to Requirements

Variations from or exceptions to any program or course requirements are possible only if the Undergraduate Affairs Committee approves a petition before the courses in question are taken.

Independent Study

Students may take NANO 199 or CENG 199, Independent Study for Undergraduates, under the guidance of a NANO or CENG faculty member. This course is taken as an elective on a P/NP basis. Under very restrictive conditions, however, it may be used to satisfy upper-division Technical Elective or Nanoengineering Elective course requirements for the major. Students interested in this alternative must have completed at least 90 units and earned a UCSD cumulative GPA of 3.0 or better. Eligible students must identify a faculty member with whom they wish to work and propose a two-quarter research or study topic. Please visit the Student Affairs office for more information.

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Undergraduate Degree Programs | NanoEngineering

About the NANO-ENGINEERING FLAGSHIP

Turning the NaI concept into reality necessitates an extraordinary and long-term effort. This requires the integration of nanoelectronics, nanophotonics, nanophononics, nanospintronics, topological effects, as well as the physics and chemistry of materials. This also requires operations in an extremely broad range of science and technology, including Microwaves, Millimeter waves, TeraHertz, Infrared and Optics, and will exploit various excitations, such as surface waves, spin waves, phonons, electrons, photons, plasmons, and their hybrids, for sensing, information processing and storage. Integrating

This high level of integration, which goes beyond individual functionalities, components and devices and requires cooperation across a range of disciplines, makes the Nano Engineering Flagship unique in its approach. It will be crucial in tackling the 6 strategic challenges identified as:

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About the NANO-ENGINEERING FLAGSHIP

Scientists Say New Material Could Hold up an Actual Space Elevator

Space Elevator

It takes a lot of energy to put stuff in space. That’s why one longtime futurist dream is a “space elevator” — a long cable strung between a geostationary satellite and the Earth that astronauts could use like a dumbwaiter to haul stuff up into orbit.

The problem is that such a system would require an extraordinarily light, strong cable. Now, researchers from Beijing’s Tsinghua University say they’ve developed a carbon nanotube fiber so sturdy and lightweight that it could be used to build an actual space elevator.

Going Up

The researchers published their paper in May, but it’s now garnering the attention of their peers. Some believe the Tsinghua team’s material really could lead to the creation of an elevator that would make it cheaper to move astronauts and materials into space.

“This is a breakthrough,” colleague Wang Changqing, who studies space elevators at Northwestern Polytechnical University, told the South China Morning Post.

Huge If True

There are still countless galling technical problems that need to be overcome before a space elevator would start to look plausible. Wang pointed out that it’d require tens of thousands of kilometers of the new material, for instance, as well as a shield to protect it from space debris.

But the research brings us one step closer to what could be a true game changer: a vastly less expensive way to move people and spacecraft out of Earth’s gravity.

READ MORE: China Has Strongest Fibre That Can Haul 160 Elephants – and a Space Elevator? [South China Morning Post]

More on space elevators: Why Space Elevators Could Be the Future of Space Travel

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Scientists Say New Material Could Hold up an Actual Space Elevator