Hilary Swank on New Space Exploration Series Away: I Wanted to Be an Astronaut Before I Wanted to Be an Actor – Anglophenia

Hilary Swank (Trust) is set to star in the forthcoming Netflix series Away, premiering on September 4. As a child, Swank dreamt of becoming an astronaut and now its coming true on-screen.

In an interview with USA Today, she said, I wanted to be an astronaut before I wanted to be an actor, which was about the age of nine. It still has the same feeling for me now as it did then, the whole idea of something bigger than us and the unknown. I still would love to go to space someday, but being an actor and playing an astronaut is second best.

Her character is named Emma Green and is scheduled to go on a mission to explore Mars for three years. She struggles with the idea of being away from her family for that long. But, we suppose it comes with the territory.

The first look trailer provides some background on the story and what we can expect:

Greens fellow astronaut makes a good point, reminding her, Do you think you are the only one haunted by the sacrifices weve made?

No one really likes working with a complainer, possibly she is the odd-astronaut-out. But, as the trailer progresses, it seems she gets it together. As well, these are life and death situations theres no time for moping.

The 10-part series is loosely based on Chris Jones 2014 Esquire article of the same name, which you can read here.

In addition to Swank, you can look for Josh Charles (The Good Wife), Talitha Bateman (Annabelle: Creation), Ato Essandoh (Jason Bourne), Mark Ivanir (The Terminal), Ray Panthaki (Marcella) and Vivian Wu (The Best Partner).

Is this something you can get into?

Link:

Hilary Swank on New Space Exploration Series Away: I Wanted to Be an Astronaut Before I Wanted to Be an Actor - Anglophenia

In space exploration, Switzerland punches above its weight – MENAFN.COM

(MENAFN - Swissinfo) All of a sudden, everyone is talking about it: the 2019 Nobel Prize won by Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz has reminded the Swiss that the country's astrophysicists are at the forefront of the hunt for exoplanets, as they are in many areas of space exploration and research.

This content was published on June 5, 2020 - 14:45 June 5, 2020 - 14:45 Marc-Andr Miserez

After some years in the regional print and broadcast media in French Switzerland, in 2000 I joined Radio Swiss International, which then became swissinfo.ch. Since then I have been writing (and producing short videos) on a variety of subjects, from politics to business, and including culture and science.

More

(de) Im Weltraum gehrt die kleine Schweiz zu den Grossen

(es) En el espacio, la pequea Suiza juega en la liga de los grandes

(pt) Sua no espao sideral

(zh) ''

(fr) Dans l'espace, la petite Suisse joue dans la cour des grands

(ar)

(ru)

(ja)

(it) Nello spazio, la piccola Svizzera concorre con i grandi

The 1995 discovery made little noise outside scientific circles. But as the years passed, the public began to realise that what was once the realm of science fiction had become a proven reality: the galaxy is teaming not only with stars, but also with planets. The first to have identified one of these planets orbiting a star other than our sun were none other than Switzerland's own Michel Mayor and Didier Queloz.

24 years later, the discovery earned Mayor and Queloz the Nobel Prize for physics.

More

MENAFN1008202002100000ID1100610850

Read the rest here:

In space exploration, Switzerland punches above its weight - MENAFN.COM

OWC Sending Customer Content to Outer Space on the Envoy Pro – PRNewswire

WOODSTOCK, Ill., Aug. 10, 2020 /PRNewswire/ -- OWC; a leading technology and new frontiers innovator, bringing new capabilities to Earth for Mac & PC users since 1988, and one of the world's most respected providers of Memory, External Drives, SSDs, Mac & PC docking solutions and performance upgrade kits, today announced that the Envoy Pro Thunderbolt 3 external SSD will be going into space and returning with a leading space exploration developer's upcoming launch. OWC is holding a contest for creatives to submit their videos, songs and images for consideration, for the chance to have that creative content included on the drive when it is sent into space.

Entrants are challenged to show the team at OWC what they've created. Participants can submit a video, a song, image(s), or any other type of content they have produced using an OWC product. Entries should be uploaded to Facebook, Twitter and/or Instagram calling out @PoweredbyOWC and using #OWCInSpace in order for all content to be properly evaluated by the OWC team. Posts should mention which OWC product was used in the creative process. Winners will be contacted by DM, so be sure to follow @PoweredbyOWC on those platforms.

The contest will begin accepting submissions on August 10th and will do so through August 21st.All submissions will be evaluated by executive and creative team members at OWC. Selected winning entrants will be uploaded onto the OWC Envoy Pro and launched into orbit with the September 2020 launch.

Prizes:One grand-prize winning entry will receive a 16" MacBook Pro, an LG 32" IPS 4K Thunderbolt monitor, and a specially-engraved OWC Envoy Pro. The top ten first-prize winning selected content providers will receive a specially engraved version of the OWC Envoy Pro drive. All winning submissions will receive a certificate of participation and a commemorative patch following the rocket launch and return. All prizes will be distributed following the launch and return of the rocket.

Contest Guidelines:Contestants are asked to upload an original video or song between one to two minutes in length, or an image or multiple images. Show OWC your out-of-this-world work, and show the world why OWC solutions are the key to unlocking true creative potential.

Guidelines for submission: all entries should be English-language content only, or if in another language, please use English subtitles. All voting results will be final, and the winners will be notified by DM, so be sure to follow @PoweredbyOWC on Facebook, Twitter and/or Instagram. Entering the contest is easy, just post content beginning August 10th.

For contest details visit: OWC in Space. Key points are:

"We have known for many years that our customers include some of the most talented and creative people around, and we want to give them the chance to have a part in this adventure with us," said Larry O'Connor, Founder and CEO, Other World Computing. "OWC is proud to provide storage and upgrades that keep our customers' content and creations safe for years, and we can't wait to see the entries, get them on the space-bound Envoy Pro, and back here to Earth!"

Send your family into space In addition to the contest, OWC will also be sending photos into space! Open to everyone 18 and older, the photos can be of anything that is significant to the photographer a family photo, a pet, a travel image, a selfie something important that you'd like to share with the galaxy! The collected images will be uploaded to the Envoy Pro, and contributors will receive a certificate of participation following space travel. Images should be within community standards; OWC will not utilize nor acknowledge any images outside the parameters. Anyone submitting an image will need a verifiable email in order to receive certificate of participation. Images can be uploaded through the OWC website.

Open to legal US residents 18 and over. Limit one entry per person. Entrants must comply with the submission policy. OWC reserves the right to disqualify any submission that does not follow the guidelines and content restrictions listed in the terms and conditions. OWC reserves the right to utilize every entry for promotional purposes. Winners will be notified via DM; be sure to follow @PoweredbyOWC on Facebook, Twitter and/or Instagram. Prizes are nontransferable and no substitution will be made. Entrants agree to receive OWC special offers via email. Void where prohibited. For submission policy information please visit: https://eshop.macsales.com/service/ideasolicitation.cfm.

OWC respects our community's First Amendment right to freedom of speech. However, in accordance with our community standards, we reserve the right to reject all material that is obscene, offensive, insulting, derogatory, defamatory, and intimidating to any and all classes of individuals.

About OWC Other World Computing (OWC), founded in 1988, is dedicated to helping Mac and PC enthusiasts do more and reach higher. We believe in sustainability and OWC solutions are truly built to last, go the distance, and enable users to maximize the technology investment they have already made. OWC's operation provides leadership in business sustainability, with our headquarters among the first in the world awarded LEED Platinum OWC features an award-winning technical support team as well as an unparalleled library of step-by-step DIY and informational videos. From the home desktop to the enterprise rack, to the audio recording studio to the motion picture set and beyond, there should be no compromise, and that is why OWC is here.

Get social: follow OWC on Facebook, Instagram, YouTube and Twitter.

2020 Other World Computing, Inc. All rights reserved. Apple and Mac are the trademarks of Apple Inc., registered in the U.S. and other countries. Intel and Thunderbolt are trademarks of Intel Corporation registered in the U.S. and/or other countries. Other marks may be the trademark or registered trademark property of their respective owners.

#Thunderbolt3 @getthunderbolt

SOURCE OWC

Continue reading here:

OWC Sending Customer Content to Outer Space on the Envoy Pro - PRNewswire

San Antonio ‘in the hunt’ to land U.S. Space Command – San Antonio Express-News

San Antonio is in the hunt to be the new home of U.S. Space Command.

Mayor Ron Nirenberg said Wednesday the city has survived the initial cut as the Air Force seeks a permanent headquarters for the command, now based in Colorado Springs, Colo.

He said San Antonio was a natural fit because of its quality of life, a skilled work force that includes military personnel transitioning to civilian life, a large veterans community, and specialists who work in space-related fields.

We have the largest presence of cyber and intelligence capabilities outside of the national capital region, Nirenberg said. And we have a public-private military and civilian infrastructure thats required, including medical and military support networks, housing, transportation and veteran services, as well as electric, water, gas and telecommunications that are all critically important.

Related Stories

Space Command was established as the 11th combat command in August 2019. It operates just like the Central Command, a unified command that has overseen wars in Iraq and Afghanistan with forces from the various military branches.

Space Command acts as a warfighting command in space, with its leader reporting directly to the defense secretary.

It is separate from U.S. Space Force, established as a new branch of the military last year, and the first since the Air Force was created in 1947. Space Force will organize, train and equip troops the Pentagon calls space professionals.

It is headquartered at the Pentagon with the other major military branches.

Gen. John William Jay Raymond commands both organizations at the moment.

The Air Force didnt say how many cities were eliminated in the original competition, but Richard Perez, president and CEO of the San Antonio Chamber of Commerce, said 100 originally joined the contest. The quest for the command has gone on largely below the radar, with the mayor saying nothing publicly about it and Bexar County Judge Nelson Wolff not even being aware there was a push for it.

I just dont know the particulars of this deal, of who makes the decision and I dont know what the chambers been doing on it. But anything that enhances our military presence Im very much for, Wolff said.

Governors from 26 states nominated cities to host the command. Nirenberg said he learned of the development last weekend. Houston and Fort Worth also had been nominated by Gov. Greg Abbott earlier this summer.

On ExpressNews.com: DNC hack part of a cyber war thats just begun

Air Force spokeswoman Ann Stefanek said Wednesday that a release announcing criteria for cities seeking to host Space Command was sent out May 15. She said the Air Force had entered the evaluation phase of the selection process and it would select candidates in mid-to late-November. A decision is expected in January, and the new headquarters will take about six years to put in place.

Nirenberg and others see Space Command as a good fit for the citys growing cyber footprint that includes National Security Agency Texas, where thousands work in a sprawling complex off Potranco Road and West Military Drive.

WHAT: U.S. Space Command was established as the eleventh unified combat command in August 2019. It will draw forces from all military branches to oversee operations in space. Its leader reports directly to the defense secretary.

WHERE: Space Command is temporarily headquartered in Colorado Springs, Colo., with personnel and functions at Peterson AFB and Schriever AFB, Colo., Offutt AFB, Neb, and Vandenberg AFB, Calif. San Antonio is in the running for the permanent headquarters.

WHATS DIFFERENT: Space Command is distinct from and complementary to U.S. Space Force. U.S. Space Force will organize, train, and equip space forces.

SOURCE: U.S. Space Command

How Space Command might interact with those organizations and others isnt yet clear.

San Antonio has 75,000 uniformed and civilian personnel, 235,000 military dependents and 270,000 military retirees and veterans.

The Air Force last year created the 16th Air Force at Lackland, bringing together what one general called the exquisite capabilities America already has harnessed in air, space, cyberspace, electronic warfare and information operations.

The 16th replaced the San Antonio-based 24th and 25th Air Forces and aimed to integrate intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance along with cyber and electronic warfare and information operations in ways that have marked joint operations for decades but do it faster.

San Antonio already is home to several large commands. They include the Air Education and Training Command at Joint Base San Antonio-Randolph, and Army North, Army South, and the Armys Installation Management Command, all at JBSA-Fort Sam Houston.

The city is home to three major installations and the largest joint base in the United States. Instructor pilots and some fledgling fliers learn their craft at Randolph, while JBSA-Lackland is the longtime home of basic military training, graduating around 39,000 recruits a year.

Fort Sam Houston is the citys oldest installation, dating to 1845 when it was called the Post at San Antonio. Its present-day museum is housed in a National Historic Landmark structure built in the Quadrangle that year.

The U.S. Army Medical Center of Excellence at Fort Sam instructs 2,000 to 2,500 combat medics a day and 37,000 trainees a year in varying specialties.

The post also is home to Brooke Army Medical Center, which has a Level 1 trauma center, and the U.S. Institute of Surgical Research Burn Center. Its Center for the Intrepid helps troops and civilians recover from debilitating burn and trauma injuries.

On ExpressNews.com: Air Force merges pair of San Antonio commands with one goal: Make them even deadlier

Perez, a former city councilman, cited Joint Base San Antonio and its big Army, Navy and Air Force contingents as pluses in the citys quest to win either Space Command outright or some component of it.

Nirenberg said hes always viewed the Port San Antonio area as a possible home for the new command, but conceded he didnt know where it might land if the Pentagon picks the Alamo City as the winner.

Still, he said that while conventional wisdom puts Colorado Springs in the pole position, San Antonio not only has assets that give it a good shot but also a rich history one tied deeply to manned space exploration.

The history goes back at least to Airman 1st Class Donald Farrell entering a 3-by-5-foot metal cabin, then at Randolph, on Feb. 9, 1958, and acting as a pilot on a seven-day mock mission to the moon. When it ended, the New York Times described Farrell, 23, of the Bronx as a genuine pioneer.

Years before, Brooks researchers experimented with various types of atmospheres that might be used in a capsule environment. They also conducted psychological studies, putting volunteer airmen from Lackland AFB into low-pressure altitude chambers.

The studies continued into the mid-1960s and once saw a two-man crew spend 17 days in isolation. Early research into sealed chambers used for long-duration mock missions were used for both the Gemini program and futuristic space stations and missions to Mars.

I can go into what the specific assets we have to bring forth, but I think theres some poetry in the way history works. San Antonio was a quiet birthplace for space exploration for the United States generally. Farrell being the threshold we needed to make sure that humans could be safely launched into space, the fact that President Kennedy threw his Cap Over the Wall, figuratively, at Brooks, unfortunately, on the day before he died, Nirenberg said.

But it signified that the modern era of our country conquering space and this is the next step, he added. Weve been there from the start, at every phase, and I think we should be there at the start of this new modern era.

Sig Christenson covers the military and its impact in the San Antonio and Bexar County area. To read more from Sig, become a subscriber. sigc@express-news.net | Twitter: @saddamscribe

More here:

San Antonio 'in the hunt' to land U.S. Space Command - San Antonio Express-News

How the first Navy SEAL ended up in space – Business Insider – Business Insider

It is no secret that Navy SEALs, the special operations force of the US Navy, are constantly striving to out-perform themselves and each other, but how far can they go? In 1984, one of them went above and beyond his teammates and made history.

"At the time, NASA was taking astronaut candidates who were not just pilots," said Capt. William Shepherd, retired SEAL, and the first commander of the International Space Station. "There were candidates made up of doctors, engineers and scientists, and I looked at that and said, 'You know, I've spent a lot of time in the water in my SCUBA gear, and that's an awful lot like being in a space suit, so I think I'll just apply and see what happens.'"

Not long after, Shepherd learned he would become a member of the NASA Astronaut Corps, making him not only the first military non-aviator, but also the first Navy SEAL to go through astronaut training in US history.

After four years of training, Shepherd embarked on the space shuttle mission STS-27 (Space Transformation System 27), and launched into space for his first time December 2, 1988 from the John F. Kennedy Space Center, Cape Canaveral, Florida.

"We are now at a crossroads, deciding whether we are bound to inhabit only the Earth, or if humans are to live and work far from the home planet," said Shepherd in an interview regarding the fifth anniversary of continuous life aboard the International Space Station. "Let us continue now with new explorations which are more expansive and more bold; voyages which will define us as a space-faring civilization."

Navy Lt. Cmdr. Chris Cassidy in his space suit during zero gravity training at the NASA Neutral Buoyancy Lab in Houston, March 24, 2009. US Navy

Shepherd's path to becoming an astronaut in service to the country started with Underwater Demolition Team Eleven, then SEAL Teams One and Two, and Special Boat Unit Twenty, all operating in the Pacific, Atlantic, and European theaters.

Although Shepherd was standing in the ranks among the most highly trained warriors in the world, he looked toward the stars to achieve more, he wasn't the only one. Capt. (SEAL) Chris Cassidy, a current astronaut, spent more than 10 years in the SEAL teams and was directly influenced by the previous achievements of Shepherd.

"In my experience with the SEAL teams and with going through BUD/S, it's given me the confidence to know I can accomplish anything that I want," said Cassidy in an interview with US Navy SEAL & SWCC Page. "If you look at SEALs after their life in the teams, you'll find people in all different sectors of industry doing all types of things. I personally always had an interest in astronauts, and I followed Capt. Shepherd's career and was inspired by him to be an astronaut."

In 2004, Cassidy was selected for NASA's Astronaut Candidate Class and joined a group of fellow explorers including pilots and engineers. Shortly after selection, he began intensive training that included land survival, T-38 jet ground and flight training, Shuttle orbiter systems training, space station systems training, science and engineering briefings and orientation tours at all NASA centers, including the Kennedy Space Center and Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama.

Currently, Cassidy is in command of the International Space Station on "Expedition 63." The current mission he leads is conducting research investigations focused on biology, earth science, human research, physical sciences and technology development, as well as providing the foundation for continuing human spaceflight beyond low-earth orbit to the Moon and Mars which is central to future space exploration as part of NASA's Artemis program.

Navy Lt. Cmdr. Chris Cassidy is lowered into the Neutral Buoyancy Lab for a mission training session in Houston, March 24, 2009. US Navy

The Artemis program is an ongoing US government-funded crewed spaceflight program with the goal of landing "the first woman and the next man" on the Moon by 2024, and it is likely that a US astronaut currently serving in the program will be the next American to step on the surface of the Moon.

It is possible that astronaut could be Lt. (SEAL) Jonny Kim.

In 2002, Kim decided to leave his hometown of Santa Monica, California to enlist in the Navy and join the ranks of Naval Special Warfare operators.

"I didn't like the person I was growing up to become. I needed to find myself and my identity," said Kim in an interview with former SEAL, Jocko Willink. "And for me, getting out of my comfort zone, getting away from the people I grew up with, and finding adventure, that was my odyssey, and it was the best decision I ever made."

After completing Basic Underwater Demolition/SEAL (BUD/S), Kim was assigned as a Special Warfare Operator to SEAL Team Three Charlie Platoon and served as a Special Operations Combat Medic, sniper, navigator and point man on more than 100 combat operations spanning two deployments to the Middle East including Ramadi and Sadr City, Iraq.

His experiences as a medic taught him about teamwork, humility and service. Upon returning home, he decided to challenge himself yet again and applied for a commissioning program that put him on the path to become a medical doctor. Kim's application was accepted and he began his residency to Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts.

Jonny Kim, NASA astronaut candidate, readies for helicopter water survival training at NASA Johnson Space Center's Neutral Buoyancy Laboratory in Houston. Josh Valcarcel/NASA

In 2017, Kim was a resident physician in emergency medicine with Partners Healthcare at Massachusetts General Hospital, and Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. He finally met his goal of becoming a doctor, but he didn't stop there. That same year, he applied to become an astronaut and was accepted, joining NASA's team on the Artemis program.

"I was told that with the right attitude, and with enough hard work, if you get up after every time you fail, you can amount to something and you can do positive work. You can leave a positive mark for our world, and that's what I aim to do," said Kim.

Kim's unwavering perseverance led him to be the outstanding American that many call a hero, and he encourages many others to follow in his path of greatness as well.

"Don't let that hunger for the unknown go away," said Kim. "That curiosity is so important, so you should maintain that passion for what you do. Never in a million years would I have thought I could have been an astronaut candidate. I didn't have the confidence from my childhood, but dreams are possible and all good things in life are hard to get, so persevere and don't give up!"

The rest is here:

How the first Navy SEAL ended up in space - Business Insider - Business Insider

NASA releases weird-looking shape of our solar system – The Indian Express

By: Tech Desk | Updated: August 9, 2020 12:20:18 pm An updated model of our solar systems heliosphere (Source: Opher, et al/NASA)

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) scientists have developed a new prediction about the shape of the bubble that surrounds our solar system. This has been made possible after the data collected from a model that was developed using various NASA missions.

Earlier, scientists thought that the shape of our heliosphere that travels through space as it orbits around the centre of the galaxy is similar to that of a comet with a round leading edge with a long tail trailing behind.

The scientists have not been able to figure out the shape of our solar systems heliosphere because its closest edge is more than ten billion miles from Earth. With the help of two Voyager spacecraft, they have been able to measure this region.

To study our boundary to the interstellar space, astronomers have been capturing and observing particles flying toward our planet. Galactic cosmic rays, the charged particles that come from different parts of the galaxy along with existing ones help scientists study the boundary of our galaxy as they travel out towards the heliosphere and are bounced back by a series of electromagnetic processes. Under NASAs Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX), scientists use these particles as radar to know our boundary to the interstellar space.

There are two fluids mixed together. You have one component that is very cold and one component that is much hotter, the pick-up ions, said Opher, a professor of astronomy at Boston University. If you have some cold fluid and hot fluid, and you put them in space, they wont mix they will evolve mostly separately. What we did was separate these two components of the solar wind and model the resulting 3D shape of the heliosphere.

ALSO READ | Hubble used Moon as Earths mirror during lunar eclipse, may help finding Earth-like planets

Because the pick-up ions dominate the thermodynamics, everything is very spherical. But because they leave the system very quickly beyond the termination shock, the whole heliosphere deflates, said Opher.

Heliosphere acts like a shield to our solar system that guards us against the rest of the galaxy from particles shot after a supernova (a powerful and luminous stellar explosion). However, it cant absorb all of the radiations and lets a quarter of these galactic rays into our solar system.

The particles that break through our heliosphere are still dangerous but our planet is protected by its magnetic field and atmosphere. Thats why there is a need to understand our heliosphere which will be a major breakthrough in future space exploration.

The Indian Express is now on Telegram. Click here to join our channel (@indianexpress) and stay updated with the latest headlines

For all the latest Technology News, download Indian Express App.

IE Online Media Services Pvt Ltd

Go here to read the rest:

NASA releases weird-looking shape of our solar system - The Indian Express

The fault in our stars: Constellation mapping through events in time shows devastation caused by man in space – MEAWW

Humans have always been fascinated with what lies beyond the earth. They have looked up at the heavens, enthralled at the stars and the nature of the objects often seen in the night sky. Space exploration had captured the minds of people, well before technological achievements made them physically possible. While pilots and scientists have always had vested interests in the cosmos, it has also been a constant creative inspiration for writers and artists. The interstellar has tickled people's fancy for centuries and perhaps also explains why it has become a common and persisting theme in literature and art. Scientific and technological advancements enabled the development of rockets and electronics in the 20th century, making it possible to send machines, animals and even people past the earth's atmosphere to explore outer space.

Humans have been sending objects into space since the 1950s, searching for answers to the timeless theories of outer space. Technological developments have gradually increased the number of space missions and as a result, roughly 500,000 man-made objects, including 2,000 satellites and over 22,000 larger pieces of space junk, have been orbiting the earth. It doesn't end there. Over the next few years, there are plans to launch thousands of objects more. Junk and debris consisting of objects both big and small have been taking up space in our skies and the accumulating number only poses a huge risk to space travel. It increases the chances of dangerous collisions, and by not clearing up the existing junk or restricting the number of launches, mankind may ruin the view of the night sky forever.

Under Lucky Stars has shared new designs, revealing the devastating impact of space exploration by humans over time. A company that makes custom-made star maps of constellations, it has created star maps using key dates in history to visualize the amount of junk and debris in space at that time, according to their data. This campaign comes following the #SaveOurStars campaign launched by Under Lucky Stars earlier this year. It also reveals what the view of our night sky could look like in the future if we don't make efforts to clear up our space junk. "Since the 1960s and more notably the first moon landing, public interest in space exploration has continued to grow by excess. Humans are inquisitive, and as a race, we're keen to learn more about how and when we came to be, including the atmosphere around us. But this intrigue has come at a cost," said Zoltan Toth-Czifra, founder of Under Lucky Stars.

"Although necessary to explore time and space, the damage we are leaving behind is continuing to grow, which will eventually lead to damage beyond control. A few satellites may seem like nothing in the vast area of space, but the junk and debris left behind from space activities causes a number of problems, mainly the increased risk of collision," he added. "These designs highlight the impact mankind is having outside of our own planet earth and is a signal that we must clean up our act and monitor launches if we want to continue to explore our perimeters safely."

Space debris count: 1,000 to 2,000 pieces

One of the most iconic historical events and aeronautical achievements, the moon landing marked the beginning for the decades worth of space exploration that would follow. The official moon landing did not happen until 20 July 1969, but the US launched Apollo 11, four days prior. The mission occurred eight years after President John F Kennedy announced the national goal of landing a man on the moon by the end of the 1960s. As featured in the star chart above, the low amount of activity in space highlights just a few satellites launched at the time, with roughly 1,000 to 2,000 pieces of space debris.

Space debris count: 8,000 pieces

The infamous social media website, Facebook began in 2004, while founder Mark Zuckerburg was still a student at Harvard University. Initially launched as an interactive platform to connect Harvard students, Facebook is by far the biggest social media website in the world with over 2.6 billion monthly active users. During this time the activity in space had multiplied twofold. Almost three-and-a-half decades of space exploration later, an approximate of 303 satellites were found to be in space in 2004, and more than 8,000 pieces of space debris.

Space debris count: 17,000 pieces

On June 23, 2016, the EU referendum culminated with the UK voting to leave the European Union, an event termed as "Brexit". The decision would come as a drastic change in the future for many. And while this development took place on the earth, things were also changing in the skies. By 2016, the number of satellites launched since the 1960s had spiked to 1,351, and more than 17,000 pieces of space junk littered the atmosphere.

Space debris count: 18,000 pieces

Businessman and television personality, Donald J Trump, succeeded Barack Obama to become the 45th President of the US in 2017. The public ceremony held on January 20 garnered an estimated crowd of 600,000 people. Meanwhile, there were 388 scheduled satellite launches noted during the year, increasing by 187% from the 135 pieces in 2016. This brought the total to 1,739.

Space debris count: 22,000 pieces

Aerospace manufacturer and space transportation services company, SpaceX, announced this year that it would be sending thousands of satellites into low-orbit earth as part of their plan to achieve access-all-areas broadband internet supply. On June 13, the company launched Falcon 9, sending 50 more internet satellites into the orbit. So far more than 500 satellites have been launched by the company, but this was just to get the ball rolling. SpaceX aims to launch some 1,600 orbiting routers at the end of 2020. In total, SpaceX has plans to launch nearly 12,000 satellites. At the moment, there are roughly 22,000 pieces of space debris orbiting the earth.

Predicted space debris count: 50,000 pieces

Ten years on from the last launch by SpaceX, the fate of the cosmos looks bleak. At the rate that the number of satellites and items of space junk is increasing every decade, there could be an estimated 50,000 satellites and pieces of debris in space by 2030. This could potentially jeopardize our view of the night sky forever, as the number of satellites may go on to possibly outweigh the number of stars that a human eye can grasp.

Excerpt from:

The fault in our stars: Constellation mapping through events in time shows devastation caused by man in space - MEAWW

The Weather Station At The Top Of The World – Hackaday

The crown jewels of the Earths mountain ranges, the Himalayas, are unsurpassed in their beauty, their height, and their deadly attraction to adventurers, both professional and amateur. The gem of the Himalayas is, of course, Mount Everest, known as Sagarmatha to the Nepalis and Chomolungma to the Tibetans. At 8,848 meters (29,029 ft) or more; its a geologically young mountain thats still being thrust upward by tectonic activity its a place so forbidding that as far as we know the summit was never visited until 1953, despite at least 30 years of previous attempts, many of which resulted in death.

The conquest of Everest remains a bucket list challenge for many adventurers, and despite advances in technology that have made the peak accessible to more people or perhaps because of that more than 300 corpses litter the mountain, testament to what can happen when you take the power of Mother Nature for granted.

To get better data on the goings-on at the Roof of the World, an expedition recently sought to install five weather stations across various points on the route up Mount Everest, including one at its very peak. The plan was challenging, both from a mountaineering perspective and in terms of the engineering required to build something that would be able to withstand some of the worst conditions on the planet, and to send valuable data back reliably. It didnt all go exactly to plan, but its still a great story about the intersection of science and engineering.

Despite seven decades of exploration that have seen over 5,200 pairs of boots across its summit, Mount Everest remains very much a climatological mystery. There has never been a permanent weather station at the summit, in part because of the technical challenges that building and installing such a device entails. What little we know of conditions at the summit come by way of portable instruments lugged up by expeditions, with the deadly conditions up there making it impossible to stay around long enough to gather much more than a few readings of wind speed, pressure, and temperature. In addition, almost all Everest summit attempts occur during a very brief window lasting only a few weeks to as little as a few days out of every year.

The need for a permanent weather station on Everest is not just driven by the demands of adventure seekers. The Himalayas stand in a unique position to act as sentinels for a changing climate. By some estimates, nearly a quarter of the worlds population gets their drinking water from the glaciers nestled in and around the Himalayas, and knowing how those ice packs are responding to rising temperatures is critically important. But with so few weather stations above 5,000 meters, climatologists have to rely on remote sensing to build a picture of whats going on up there, and a skewed one at that.

Theres another bit of serendipity with the peak of Mount Everest: it actually reaches high enough to penetrate into the jet stream, those high-velocity air currents that meander around the globe. This partly explains the characteristically bad weather and high winds on the summit of Everest, the bane of most explorers. But jet stream winds also reveal a lot about the air masses that they typically form the boundary of, and hence are valuable tools for studying the climate. Jet stream winds are generally studied through the use of weather balloons, which can obviously only send back limited data. Having a permanent weather station sitting where it can directly monitor the jet stream will prove to be invaluable to climate researchers.

Having established the need for a network of Everest weather stations, The National Geographic and Rolex Perpetual Planet Everest Expedition took up the non-trivial task ofdesigning equipment that was up to the extreme conditions on the mountain. This would be an installation like no other, more akin to designing instruments for a space mission than for monitoring terrestrial weather. Even the most durable of commercially available, scientific-grade weather stations would pale by comparison to what the Everest summit stations would require.

The comparison to space exploration is apt on a number of levels. First, weight is a primary concern, since every gram of material used to build the station, plus all the tools and hardware needed to install it, would have to be lugged up the 8,800-meter peak using nothing but muscle power. That meant that the station would have to be broken into pieces to spread the load over multiple climbers. Also, just as a planetary spacecraft is repeatedly tested to ensure it will survive the forces of launch and landing, so too would the station have to be tested to ensure its survival in some of the harshest weather conditions this planet can dish out.

Another way the engineering of the weather station is similar to space exploration is in terms of power and communication. The Everest weather stations would need to be completely self-contained, which as a practical matter means solar power. That presents special challenges: a solar panel is large, flat, and offers a lot of sail area to the wind. Whats more, solar panels are notoriously fragile, and the winds on Everest are known to pick up chunks of gravel as they whip around. A solar power system would need to be built to survive this constant peppering with rocks. Also, the weather can be cloudy for weeks at a time on the summit, so a battery to store energy would also be required.

For communication, the Everest weather station took another page from the spacecraft engineers playbook: redundancy. Data from the station would have to be sent wirelessly, and so it was provided with redundant transmitters. In addition to the prominent high-gain Yagi antenna for the 400-MHz instrumentation and scientific measurement (ISM) band, which talks back to the weather station at the base camp, the summit station also supports data transfer via a Thuraya FT2225 M2M L-band satellite terminal.

Finally, in an environment where wind speeds can exceed 290 km/h (180 MPH), the station has to be able to be literally bolted down. The exact mounting location couldnt be easily surveyed in advance, so the legs and feet of the station were made adjustable for angles up to 50. In addition to having its feet bolted to the rock, the mast was provided with adjustable guy wires, again to be bolted to the rock, to keep the instrument mast secure and to keep the directional antennas pointing in the right direction.

After extensive testing by the manufacturer, Cambell Scientific Instruments, on New Hampshires Mount Washington, where the highest-ever wind speed was recorded (317 km/h, or 231 MPH), the five weather stations were shipped to Nepal in time for the spring 2019 climbing season. The team honed their installation procedure on the four lower-altitude stations before attempting the final assault on the summit station.

The expedition team was far from alone. The Nepali government had issued a record number of climbing permits in 2019, which resulted in over 700 climbers converging on the mountain for the 2019 season. By the time the team had made it to the South Col camp, the traditional last stop before attempting the summit, they were at the back of an enormous traffic jam of climbers desperate for their chance to stand on the summit, however briefly.

This paradoxical crush of humanity on the way to one of the least accessible spots on the planet presented a huge risk to the team. While getting a few seconds on the summit for a selfie was the goal of the hundreds of climbers in line ahead of them, the team would need something like three hours to install the weather station. They faced a tough choice: attempt the summit and face the possibility of having not enough oxygen bottles and not enough room to work, or settle for a spot lower down the mountain. They opted for the latter and selected a spot on the Southeast Ridge known as The Balcony, at 8,430 meters above sea level, that gave them the time and the room to work, while only being 450 meters shy of the summit.

Once the team selected the site for the station, they quickly ran into trouble. First, the batteries they brought along to power the cordless hammer drills needed to bolt the station to the rock were too cold to work. Warm armpits under thick mountaineering jackets thawed the batteries enough to get on with the work, but it soon became apparent that the very thing that made lugging everything up the mountain possible the ability to break the station into separate parts also caused them to leave a critical part behind. The masts to hold the wind sensors arguably the most critical instruments in the station had gone missing.

Even on the Roof of the World, hackers rule, and a solution to the expedition-ending problem was soon found. By an incredible stroke of good fortune, the team discovered that the handles of the lightweight aluminum snow shovels that they had brought along were about the same size as the missing parts. A Sherpa set to the task of disassembling the shovel and hammering the handle into submission, while the universal problem solver duct tape was applied to improve the fit. The fixes worked well enough to bolt everything down and power up the station to confirm it was operating before heading back down the mountain.

The Balcony station sent data back to the NGS for about nine months before something happened to knock it offline. Its not clear what caused the failure; the rest of the lower altitude stations are all still sending back data, so its something specific to the Balcony station. The station went offline in January, so it could be that the hacked instrument masts werent up to the fierce winter winds and were ripped off. Or perhaps the solar panels were destroyed by wind-borne gravel, or even fouled by some bit of cast-off climbing gear. The route up to the summit, after all, is not exactly pristine.

Unfortunately, the only way to be sure what happened to the Balcony station is to visit it, and while that should have been possible during the 2020 climbing season, the COVID-19 pandemic had other ideas. Nepal canceled all permits to climb the mountain in 2020, and access from the Chinese side has always been limited. A Chinese survey team did summit in May of 2020, but they approached along the Northeast Ridge, a route that didnt pass anywhere near the balcony.

With the climbing season now closed, the fate of the highest weather station in the world will remain a mystery until at least the spring of 2021. Hopefully its still up there, and can be brought back online with a simple fix. But the fact that it got up there in the first place and that it worked for nine months is a testament to the engineering that went into the whole effort.

Continued here:

The Weather Station At The Top Of The World - Hackaday

Ice Sheets Covered Southern Highlands of Early Mars | Planetary Science, Space Exploration – Sci-News.com

The southern highlands of Mars are dissected by hundreds of ancient valley networks (3.9-3.5 billion years old), which are evidence that water once sculpted the Martian surface. According to new research, these valley networks were carved by water melting beneath glacial ice, not by free-flowing rivers as previously thought.

A view of Mars showing the planets northern polar ice cap. Image credit: ISRO / ISSDC / Emily Lakdawalla.

For the last four decades, since Martian valleys were first discovered, the assumption was that rivers once flowed on Mars, eroding and originating all of these valleys, said lead author Dr. Anna Grau Galofre, a researcher in the Department of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences at the University of British Columbia and the School of Earth and Space Exploration at Arizona State University.

But there are hundreds of valleys on Mars, and they look very different from each other.

If you look at Earth from a satellite you see a lot of valleys: some of them made by rivers, some made by glaciers, some made by other processes, and each type has a distinctive shape. Mars is similar, in that valleys look very different from each other, suggesting that many processes were at play to carve them.

The similarity between many Martian valleys and the subglacial channels on Devon Island in the Canadian Arctic motivated Dr. Grau Galofre and colleagues to conduct this new study.

Devon Island is one of the best analogs we have for Mars here on Earth it is a cold, dry, polar desert, and the glaciation is largely cold-based, said co-author Professor Gordon Osinski, a researcher in the Department of Earth Sciences and the Institute for Earth and Space Exploration at the University of Western Ontario.

A glacial valley network on Mars. Image credit: Grau Galofre et al, doi: 10.1038/s41561-020-0618-x.

In the study, the scientists analyzed 10,276 Martian valley segments, using a novel algorithm to infer their underlying erosion processes.

They used data from the Mars Orbiter Laser Altimeter (MOLA) instrument on NASAs Mars Global Surveyor spacecraft and the High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) on ESAs Mars Express orbiter.

These results are the first evidence for extensive subglacial erosion driven by channelized meltwater drainage beneath an ancient ice sheet on Mars, said co-author Professor Mark Jellinek, a researcher in the Department of Earth Sciences at the University of Western Ontario.

The findings demonstrate that only a fraction of valley networks match patterns typical of surface water erosion, which is in marked contrast to the conventional view.

Using the geomorphology of the Martian surface to rigorously reconstruct the character and evolution of the planet in a statistically meaningful way is, frankly, revolutionary.

Distribution of Martian valley networks (purple) and those analyzed (white) by Grau Galofre et al. Image credit: Grau Galofre et al, doi: 10.1038/s41561-020-0618-x.

The teams theory also helps explain how the Martian valleys would have formed 3.8 billion years ago on a planet that is further away from the Sun than Earth, during a time when the Sun was less intense.

Climate modeling predicts that Mars ancient climate was much cooler during the time of valley network formation, Dr. Grau Galofre said.

We tried to put everything together and bring up a hypothesis that hadnt really been considered: that channels and valleys networks can form under ice sheets, as part of the drainage system that forms naturally under an ice sheet when theres water accumulated at the base.

These environments would also support better survival conditions for possible ancient life on Mars.

A sheet of ice would lend more protection and stability of underlying water, as well as providing shelter from solar radiation in the absence of a magnetic field something Mars once had, but which disappeared billions of years ago.

The research was published online today in the journal Nature Geoscience.

_____

A. Grau Galofre et al. Valley formation on early Mars by subglacial and fluvial erosion. Nat. Geosci, published online August 3, 2020; doi: 10.1038/s41561-020-0618-x

See the article here:

Ice Sheets Covered Southern Highlands of Early Mars | Planetary Science, Space Exploration - Sci-News.com

Stunning Illustrated Guide To The Universe And Space Exploration Reaches New Zealand – Scoop.co.nz

Wednesday, 5 August 2020, 5:30 pmPress Release: Oratia Books

Thereis no better way to fathom the immensity and mysteries ofthe universe than by following a map and few space mapscan compete in simplicity, colour and lucidity with thoseput together in Space Maps: Your Tour of theUniverse, a beautifully illustrated large-size book foryoung readers released in New Zealand this week by OratiaBooks.

Originated in Italy with a true world outlook(the maps display views from the Southern Hemisphere as wellas North), Space Maps is an irresistible invitationto outer space. This gorgeous English-language edition drawson the latest discoveries of astronomy to take children tothe farthest reaches of the universe. It balances a mixtureof circular maps and flat maps of the Solar System and thegalaxies beyond.

The book is organised into fiveparts, answering key questions:

What do we seewith our naked eye?

Where are we in theuniverse?

What are the other planetslike?

What do modern telescopes see?

Where is the sky studied from?

From ancient views ofthe sky to the International Space Station, Earth to Plutoand Crab Nebulae to space suits, Space Maps has theuniverse covered. The book is part of a very popularinternational series originated by Italian publisher DalcEdizioni that includes Food Atlas, also published inNew Zealand by Oratia Books.

Lara Albanese is an award-winning author ofover 20 books about science for children. She is professorof physics at the Universit degli Studi di Parma, Italy.Tommaso Vidus Rosin is the illustrator of numerous books forchildren and adults. He also lives inParma.

Space Maps: Your Tour of theUniverse by Lara Albanese, illustrated byTommaso Vidus Rosin.

Published in New Zealand byOratia Books

ISBN: 978-0-947506-68-1 | RRP $39.99HB

Scoop Media

Become a member Find out more

Go here to read the rest:

Stunning Illustrated Guide To The Universe And Space Exploration Reaches New Zealand - Scoop.co.nz

Mark Zuckerberg Got $5.3 Billion Richer This Week Following Instagrams Launch Of TikTok Competitor – Forbes

THE CHANGING FORTUNES OF THE WORLDS RICHEST

F

acebook cofounder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg, 36, briefly became the youngest centibillionaire in the world on Friday. His net worth crossed the $100 billion threshold two days after Instagram launched Reels, a feature almost identical to TikToks scrolling video platform, sending Facebooks stock soaring 12% on Thursday and Friday.

Facebook shares came back to earth a bit Friday afternoon, but still ended the week 8% higher than the prior Friday, far outpacing the S&P 500 (2.5%) and the Dow Jones Industrial Average (3.8%). Zuckerberg, who owns about 15% of the company, added $5.3 billion to his net worth between July 31 and August 7making him the weeks biggest gainer Forbes estimates his net worth to be $98.6 billion.

Reels could not have come at a better time for Facebook. TikTok, the Gen Z-beloved app that is owned by Chinese tech company ByteDance, has become a target of President Donald Trumps ire. Trump said on July 31 he would ban the app, deeming it a threat to national security (though some speculate his efforts are, above all else, retribution for the TikTok-enabled prank pulled on his Tulsa, Oklahoma rally in June). Late Thursday night, he made good on that threat, issuing an executive order that will prohibit Americans from doing business with ByteDance starting September 20. ByteDance has reportedly threatened to sue the U.S. government in response.

Zuckerberg may not be the only billionaire to profit from the TikTok drama. Microsoft, in which cofounder and former CEO Bill Gates still owns an estimated 1.4% stake, is in negotiations to buy the embattled app from ByteDance. On Sunday, the company said in a statement that it would seek to acquire TikTok service in Canada, Australia and New Zealand, in addition to the U.S., but the Financial Times reported Thursday that Microsoft is planning to take over the entire global business of TikTok. Gates, 64, has not yet seen a windfall in the market from the potential deal Microsoft only rose 3.6% this week, leaving Gates worth $113.6 billion.

WASHINGTON, DC - SEPTEMBER 19: Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos announces the co-founding of The Climate Pledge at the National Press Club on September 19, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for Amazon)

The worlds two remaining centibillionaires saw gains this week as well. Jeff Bezos (net worth: $189.8 billion), whose fortune rose $2.6 billion in the past week, sold off $3.1 billion worth of Amazon stock on Monday and Tuesday. It remains unclear why he sold the stock, but he has promised to sell shares annually to fund his space exploration company, Blue Origin, and Recode has reported that Bezos recently established a new corporation, Fellowship Ventures LLC, to be the vehicle for his $10 billion pledge to fight climate change. Meanwhile, LVMH chairman and CEO Bernard Arnault (net worth: $107.1 billion) regained some ground after a rough earnings report for the luxury conglomerate last week led to a $6 billion drop in his fortune. This week, his net worth rose by $2.2 billion as the stock partly recovered.

See the rest here:

Mark Zuckerberg Got $5.3 Billion Richer This Week Following Instagrams Launch Of TikTok Competitor - Forbes

GomSpace + ESA Working Together To Implement Juventas Smallsat For Hera Mission – SatNews Publishers

Recently, GomSpace Luxembourg SARL and the European Space Agency (ESA), signed a contract to continue development and implementation of the Juventas CubeSat in support of the Hera mission.

The contract value is approximately 11,000,000 euros and is focused on the delivery of the Juventas spacecraft and its associated payloads for launch with Hera in 2024. The amount will be divided between several partners, whereof GomSpace share is about 6,100,000 euros.

Together, NASAs DART and Hera missions, and the international research collaboration known as the Asteroid Impact and Deflection Assessment (AIDA), will demonstrate deflection technology that could be used to protect Earth from hazardous asteroids by shunting them off a collision course. Juventas is a 6U smallsat containing a low frequency radar, named JuRa, as its primary payload (see Heras CubeSat to perform first radar probe of an asteroid).

The smallsat will operate in close proximity to the Didymos asteroid system, focusing radar and radio-science experiments targeting the moon of the binary asteroid, named Dimorphos. Juventas will complete its mission by attempting to land on the surface of Dimorphos, making measurements on the landing dynamics from likely bouncing events to capture details of the asteroids surface properties and end with measurements taken by a gravimeter payload to give insight to the dynamical properties of the asteroid.

GomSpace Luxembourg is the project prime and is also working with GomSpace Denmark and GomSpace Sweden on some spacecraft platform components. The project continues the successful collaboration built from the initial design phase and includes the partners:

With both GomSpace Luxembourg and EmTroniX centrally positioned in the project it fully supports Luxembourgs long-term vision for space exploration and exploitation.

Executive Comments

The Juventas mission will be complementing the larger Hera mothercraft significantly increasing our science return. JuRa will provide the first ever direct measurement of the interior structure of an asteroid. Juventas will also attempt the first ever small body landing by a cubesat to reveal important surface properties. We are very excited to start the implementation phase together with the strong consortium led by GomSpace, said Ian Carnelli of ESA, Project Manager of the Hera project.

We are happy to continue our collaboration with ESA and the Hera project on this exciting mission. Juventas will be the first GomSpace designed nanosatellite in deep space demonstrating its capabilities in the harshest environment thus far. As part of the project we will continue to build our deep space capabilities and organisation based in GomSpace Luxembourg, added Niels Buus, CEO of GomSpace.

The Luxembourg led Juventas satellite is a very important pathfinder mission cementing our national position as a pioneer in developing the required capabilities for peaceful exploration and sustainable use of space resources, noted Marc Serres, the CEO of the Luxembourg Space Agency.

The rest is here:

GomSpace + ESA Working Together To Implement Juventas Smallsat For Hera Mission - SatNews Publishers

‘Twinkle’ mission will search for planets outside our solar system that could support life – The Ohio State University News

Astronomers are preparing to further study the atmospheres of planets discovered through NASAs Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS) mission to identify the most promising exoplanets planets in solar systems beyond our own for habitability and signs of life.

Set to launch in late 2021, Twinkle is a space mission that will deliver unprecedented data via satellite telescope to astronomers about the elemental composition of exoplanet atmospheres. Astronomers at The Ohio State University, along with astronomers at Vanderbilt University, are founding members of the mission and will play a leading role in shaping the missions directives, targets and survey operations.

With a core group of faculty, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students and undergraduates all engaged in cutting-edge research, Ohio States and Vanderbilts astronomy departments have worked together to establish themselves as leaders in the study of exoplanets planets orbiting other stars and the search for life on these worlds, said Scott Gaudi, Thomas Jefferson Professor for Discovery and Space Exploration at Ohio State.

Finding Earth-like planets orbiting sun-like stars with oxygen-rich atmospheres and an ozone layer in the upper atmosphere to protect life from being mutated by UV rays, like what we have on this planet, is no small feat.

Gaudi, Ji Wang, assistant professor of astronomy at Ohio State, and Keivan Stassun, professor of physics and astronomy at Vanderbilt, are assembling a list of target planets to study until the satellites launch. Once the satellite is in its sun-synchronous, low-Earth polar orbit, the team will collect and calibrate data, sitting at the computer screen with bated breath for the first signs of breathable atmospheres. The full data analysis will take a few years to process and potentially create opportunities for the mission to be extended.

Twinkle is nimble, so we will be able to observe many candidates with multiple visits to the same target, Wang said. We also have a very competitive team here at Ohio State that can leverage NASAs James Webb Space Telescope mission to focus on a handful of the most promising targets identified for biosignature detection. Finding biosignatures on exoplanets represents one of our best chances of finding signs of life elsewhere.

Stassun, a co-investigator on the TESS mission, has spent the last eight years developing, designing, launching and running the program.

We already have a decent estimate of the number of Earth-like planets with similar size, mass and bulk composition in our galaxy, but what we dont yet know is how common atmospheres like ours are on these planets, Stassun said. The Twinkle mission can bring answers to this burning question. The measurements that we will take will help us identify planets with atmospheres, and of those, which are breathable and livable.

In addition to atmospheric research of exoplanets, Twinkles broad-wavelength spectroscopic capabilities will also enable astronomers to study the surfaces of asteroids and nuclei of comets in our solar system. Beyond these core science cases, scientists can use Twinkle to monitor stellar activity and variability, observe protoplanetary disks around stars in various stages of planet formation, study brown dwarfs and shed new light on the planets and moons in our solar system.

Twinkle is the inaugural mission of Blue Skies Space Ltd., a company incorporated in England and Wales. Blue Skies Space was co-founded by Marcell Tessenyi, Giovanna Tinetti and Jonathan Tennyson, all academics working at University College London, to deliver independent satellites that address the global scientific communitys need for high-quality data from space.

The Ohio State Universitys participation in the Twinkle Mission is funded through the Thomas Jefferson Chair for Discovery and Space Exploration endowment. Vanderbilts participation is funded through the Vanderbilt Initiative in Data-intensive Astrophysics (VIDA). Blue Skies Space is funded by a combination of private and public sources including the UK Space Agency (UKSA) and European Space Agency (ESA), which support the development of this innovative new model for delivering space science missions.

See more here:

'Twinkle' mission will search for planets outside our solar system that could support life - The Ohio State University News

Quantitative & Qualitative Analysis on AI in Space Exploration Market 2020 |Trends, Growth, Opportunities, Scope & Detail Survey by 2026 | …

Comprehensive quantitative and qualitative research on AI in Space Exploration market. According to the current market state, this report continuously observing the promising growth of the global market. The study includes growth trends, micro- economic and macro-economic indicators in detail with the help of PESTEL analysis. Reports Intellect projects AI in Space Exploration Market based on elite players, present, past, and futuristic data which will offer as a profitable guide for all the market competitors. Well illustrated SWOT analysis, revenue share, and contact information are shared in this report analysis. Report Intellect Report aims to provide an evaluation and deliver essential information on the competitive landscape to meet the unique requirements of the enterprises and individuals operating in the AI in Space Exploration Market for the forecast period, 20202026.

Top Companies are covering This Report:-

Orbital ATKDARPANeuralaDescartes LabsKittyHawkIris AutomationFlyby NavPrecisionHawkPilot.aiMRX Global Holding Corp.Oceaneering InternationalMaxar TechnologiesNorthrop GrummanAstrobotic TechnologiesMotiv Space Systems

Get Sample PDF Brochure @https://www.reportsintellect.com/sample-request/944055

Our analysts are working ceaselessly to congregate, identify, analyze, and portray the actual impact of Covid-19 on each of our published research reports. Our team analysts have used advanced primary and secondary research techniques and tools to compile this report using top-down and bottom-up approaches and further analyzed using analytical tools. The report offers effective measures and benchmarks for players to secure a position of strength in the market. New players can also use this research study to create business strategies and get informed about future exchange challenges. We provide comprehensive competitive scrutiny that includes detailed company profiling of leading players, a study on the nature and characteristics of the vendor landscape, and other important facts.

By Product Type:Robotic armsRoversSpace probesOthersBy Applications:GovernmentCommercial

Market Segment by Regions, regional analysis covers

North America (United States, Canada, Mexico)

Asia-Pacific (China, Japan, Korea, India, Southeast Asia)

South America (Brazil, Argentina, Colombia, etc.)

Europe, Middle East and Africa (Germany, France, UK, Russia and Italy, Saudi Arabia, UAE, Egypt, Nigeria, South Africa)

Table of Content:

1 Report Overview1.1 Study Scope1.2 Key Market Segments1.3 Players Covered1.4 Market Analysis by Type1.5 Market by Application1.6 Study Objectives1.7 Years Considered

2 Global Growth Trends2.1 AI in Space Exploration Market Size2.2 AI in Space Exploration Growth Trends by Regions2.3 Industry Trends

3 Market Share by Key Players3.1 AI in Space Exploration Market Size by Manufacturers3.2 AI in Space Exploration Key Players Head office and Area Served3.3 Key Players AI in Space Exploration Product/Solution/Service3.4 Date of Enter into AI in Space Exploration Market3.5 Mergers & Acquisitions, Expansion Plans

4 Breakdown Data by Type and Application4.1 Global AI in Space Exploration Sales by Type

4.2 Global AI in Space Exploration Revenue by Type4.3 AI in Space Exploration Price by Type

4.4 Global AI in Space Exploration- Size by Type

4.5 Global AI in Space Exploration-Size by Application

5 Breakdown Data by End User5.1 Overview5.2 Global AI in Space Exploration Breakdown Data by End User

6 Analysts Viewpoints/Conclusions

7 Appendix

Continued.

Discount PDF Brochure @https://www.reportsintellect.com/discount-request/944055

Reasons to Buy

To gain detailed insight analyses of the AI in Space Exploration market and have a comprehensive perception of the global market and its commercial landscape.

To understand trends that are impacting the demand prospect for the AI in Space Exploration in various regions.

Learn about the market policies that are being adopted by prominent organizations.

To understand the future outlook and prospects for the AI in Space Exploration market.

Our report enlightens the current as well as the future challenges of the market and helps in crafting unique solutions to maximize your growth potential.

About Us:-

Reports Intellect provides Research Reports for everything related to market research and market intelligence. We are aware of trade importance and market need in todays competitive world.

Our team works efficiently to fetch the most authentic research reports backed with perfect data figures that guarantee outstanding results every time for you and your business.

Whether it is the latest report from the researchers or a custom demand feel free to contact us. We are available 24 hours for our beloved clients.

Contact Us:

[emailprotected]

PH + 1-706-996-2486

US Address:

225 Peachtree Street NE,

Suite 400,

Atlanta, GA 30303

View original post here:

Quantitative & Qualitative Analysis on AI in Space Exploration Market 2020 |Trends, Growth, Opportunities, Scope & Detail Survey by 2026 | ...

Florida’s Space Coast: The Great Space Coast Road Trip – PRNewswire

Day 1, Titusville: Explore the past and future of space exploration at Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex. They're committed to creating a Trusted Space for guests and while a few exhibits are still closed, you'll get a free ticket to return in 2021 to experience them. On your way to dinner, make time to stroll through the Astronaut Walk of Fame. Grab a meal at the iconic Dixie Crossroads or head to Shiloh's Steak and Seafood for a beautiful view of the Indian River Lagoon and NASA's Vehicle Assembly Building. If you have an RV, make reservations at Jetty Park or Canaveral National Seashore.

Day 2, Beaches: With 72 miles of beaches, you're sure to find somewhere to relax. We're known as the East Coast Surfing Capital for a reason! Start off in Cocoa Beach by visiting Ron Jon Surf Shop and the Cocoa Beach Surf Company. Buy a swimsuit, take surfing lessons, and rent a board. Don't forget to pose with Kelly Slater's statue! Stroll down the Cocoa Beach Pier for more shopping and food while watching the waves. Please be aware that Cocoa Beach and Satellite have issued mask mandates. If you're interested in deep sea fishing, Port Canaveral has plenty of charters available. RV camping can be found at Palm Shores RV Park and Wickham Park.

Day 3, Melbourne/Palm Bay: Start off your day at the Brevard Zoo, where you can kayak through Expedition Africa and past giraffes. Plan ahead as they are using timed entry and require face coverings. Take your lunch out to one of the Brevard County Parks along the Indian River Lagoon, the most biologically diverse estuary in North America. Visit Bass Pro Shop in Palm Bay and charter a fishing trip from one of our many fantastic captains. Stroll through Downtown Melbourne for more great dining and nightlife. Head to Sebastian Inlet State Park to park your RV and call it a night. Enjoy the park in the morning before leaving on your next adventure.

"Whether you add an extra day to an existing trip, or decide to explore all the Space Coast has to offer as a trip on its own, there's opportunities for memories across the area," says Peter Cranis, Executive Director of Florida's Space Coast Office of Tourism. To plan your trip and find more information about safety precautions, visit our website. There's Space for You Here.

About Florida's Space CoastFlorida's Space Coast is a family-friendly destination located 45 minutes east of Orlando and encompasses Cocoa Beach, Melbourne and the Beaches, Port Canaveral, Titusville, Palm Bay and Viera. It's home to the world's second-busiest cruise port and 72 miles of beaches (the longest stretch in the state), as well as 190,000 acres of wetlands and waterways full of habitat found nowhere else. Florida's Space Coast is home to NASA's Kennedy Space Center, where rockets still soar into orbit. For more information, contact Florida's Space Coast Office of Tourism at (877) 572-3224 or visit http https://www.visitspacecoast.com.

SOURCE Florida's Space Coast Office of Tourism

Read the rest here:

Florida's Space Coast: The Great Space Coast Road Trip - PRNewswire

The Eagle Has Landed | Georgia Southern Magazine – Georgia Southern University Newsroom

Georgia Southern Alumni Reflect on Work with NASA Space ProgramThe Vertical Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center

In the summer of 1967, Georgia Southern graduates Bob Pound (67) and Charlie Abner (67) hopped in a car and headed for Cape Canaveral with one missionto fix NASA.

In January of that year, NASA was conducting a pre-flight check for the crew of Apollo 1the programs first crewed missionwhen a fire broke out in the cockpit and killed its three astronauts.

After that, we said Lets go down there and put the space program back on its feet, said Pound, a native of Statesboro.

They didnt call. They didnt have an appointment. They just pulled into the badging station on U.S. 1 and figured theyd found their destination. Wasnt a very big building, but it had some rockets out front, said Pound.

What can we do for you? the attendant asked.

Well, we came down here to get a job, said Pound.

Okay, who with?

Well, NASA, of course! Isnt this NASAs place here? Pound said they didnt realize it at the time, but there were several hundred contractors coming in and out of Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

Uh, let me make a few phone calls, said the attendant, and motioned them to wait in the lobby.

Pound listened as the attendant talked on the phone.

No, they dont have an appointment.theyre here! Theyre sitting right here! No, they just came in and said theyre looking for a job. No, theyre here already!

They said that over and over, recalled Pound, laughing.

The attendant hung up the phone and said, Theyre going to call me back.

Pound and Abner waited and waited, wondering with each passing minute if theyd made the trip for nothing. Then the phone rang.

It was a call that not only changed their lives, but also carved a path for several Georgia Southern graduates who would follow in their footsteps.

Pound and Abner were the first graduates of Georgia Southerns physics and mathematics degrees to join the ranks at NASA, and the tale of their success quickly spread through the small department.

Sonny Belson (68) traveled down to Cape Canaveral the next summer and showed up unannounced the way his classmates had. He interviewed and was offered a job the next day. Chris Fairey (69) skipped class to drive down to KSC and get his name on the list, and he was hired the summer after graduation.

It was absolutely amazing that you literally walked in, a cold call off the street, and here I am, said Belson. And Im still at it after all theseyears.

Though they all graduated with the same degrees, they were each assigned to wildly different roles within the Apollo program. Pound says this was a testament to the college and its faculty, especially Carroll W. Bryant, Ph.D., professor emeritus and head of the physics department at Georgia Southern from 1963-1975. He passed away in Statesboroin 1988.

Bryant was an accomplished physicist who served as a scientific advisor to the U.S. Armed Forces and most notably worked on the development of the atomic bomb. He was not only a knowledgeable physicist, but also had the wealth of experience to convey physics practical use for his students.

He was really an amazing man in terms of what he could convey to us in terms of theory and physics and his own application. said Fairey. You ask yourself, How am I going to use all of this? And what you realize at the end is that what theyre teaching you are the tools. You may not necessarily use a particular theorem or a math equation, but you understand how it evolved and why its there and how it can be used.

When Pound, Abner, Belson, Fairey and other alumni joined NASA, they were thrust into a workforce of more than 400,000 employees, contractors and consultants working all over the United States to achieve one goal, set by President John F. Kennedy: before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely toearth.

Pound was assigned to the Ground Instrumentation Systems technical staff in the Central Information Facility (CIF). His team collected real-time telemetry data surrounding the Saturn V rocket, and displayed it on the huge Eidophor Projectors in the Control Room. Abner started as a ground station engineer, working up to ground station manager before leaving to join the Air Forcein 1968.

Fairey joined Pound in the CIF, the entire second floor of which housed two giant GE 635 computers that were responsible for managing data for Apollo. Today, you have more computing power on your phone! saidFairey.

Belson went to work with the design engineering directorate in the communications electronics area, where he installed and designed the operational television system at the launchpad and towers around the complex, and the mobile television vans for use during launch andevents.

As each took on their small piece of the larger puzzle, they couldnt immediately see the true impact and scale of what they were doing. It wasnt long, however, before the picture became crystal clear.

Well, at the time, of course, it was just a job, said Pound. Then we saw how big it was and what all it encompassed, and we thought, Wow! This is going to be something big! And we felt like we were doing a pretty important job.

Its easy to get lost in the massive scale of NASA. There, everythingis big.

Anytime you put together a large program like the Apollo program that involved human spaceflight as well as the manufacturing of the launch vehicle and the facilities that manage it, you realize the scale of the vehicle itself, saidFairey.

The biggest part of the Apollo program was the Saturn V rocket, which is still the most powerful rocket ever built.

The Saturn V was a three-stage, expendable, super-heavy lift launch vehicle that was used to send Apollo missions into space between 1967 and 1973. It was 363 feet tall, weighed more than 6.5 million pounds and reached speeds of more than 17,000 mph to break free from earths gravity. To house the construction of these rockets, NASA constructed the Vertical Assembly Buildingthe VABwhich is still the largest and most visible complex at KSC. The building is 526 feet tall and covers 8 acres of square footage. Its a vast cavern with 40 floors of scaffolds and railings that allow thousands of technicians to reach every part of the spacecraft.

Once the Saturn V was built, it had to be moved to one of two launch pads, the closest of which was 3.5 miles away. To accomplish this impossible task, NASA used one of two machines called crawlers, weighing 6 million pounds each, to carry the launch vehiclefully uprightacross the complex, traveling at less than 1 mph. The journey took roughly 8 hours to complete.

Even more impressive was the level of detail involved in creating these rockets and executing their missions. Each stage of each rocket was built by a different American company, and each wire, duct, nozzle, rivet and screw was carefully designed by engineers who were armed with nothing but slide rules and an expert grasp of their field.

For each Georgia Southern alumnus, their role supported one step in an impossibly large number of procedures and processes that all came to fruition on July 16, 1969. The launch of Apollo 11, which carried the first men to step foot on the moon, was a history-altering event each of them witnessed firsthand.

Its kind of hard to describe until you see it, saidFairey.

From a mankind standpoint, this was a significant achievement, said Belson. You know, if you look at where we are today in all of that, its based on how we got there. So its very, very important for mankind overall that we were able to go do this. And somehow we played a part in that.

Accomplishing the goal of manned space flight came with difficulty and sometimes tragedy,however.

In 1970, while more than 210,000 miles from earth, the crew of Apollo 13 was doing a routine stir of the oxygen tanks on the service module when a faulty wire ignited and caused an explosion. With the service module inoperative, the crew of three astronauts had to use the lunar excursion module (LEM) as their lifeboat home, but it was only designed to support two men for two days.

Back on earth, engineers at Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston worked around the clock to create procedures to reprogram and modify the LEM to support all three crew members for four days, and communicated the plans to astronauts who had limited power in their craft, a cold and wet cabin, and a shortage of potable water.

For Pound and others that worked in the Launch Control Center at KSC, these types of events meant quick decisions and immediate actionboth of which would mean the difference between life and death for the flight crew and ground personnel.

We used to say it was hours and hours of boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror, said Pound. And we had to be able to make decisions pretty quickly without talking to the other people. And then we had to know who to talk to in case we needed answers to get things done.

While the story of Apollo 13 ended happily, there were other space program missions thatdid not.

In 1986, Fairey was the shuttle project engineer for the Space Shuttle Challenger, and one of the key figures involved in its launch. On Jan. 28, 1986, he was in the control room of KSC when, only 73 second into liftoff, a leak in one of Challengers rocket boosters caused the external fuel tank to explode, disintegrating the shuttle and killing its crew.

It was a horrible dayespecially due to the fact that I had trained with the crew. I knew the crew, saidFairey.

I was midfield of the shuttle landing facility, and actually was there with some of the astronaut family, said Belson. Its very close and personal and, you know, I still wont watch the video. I wont watch it today. Yeah, it was very emotional.

Fairey and his engineers spent the next two years going over the accident, learning what happened. As a result, they completely reworked all of their procedures, software and training and then completely retrained with their colleagues in Houston and Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville,Alabama.

You do all you can to minimize the risk, but its risky business, said Fairey. I mean, youre sitting on top of a bombliquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. It took a lot of people checking a lot of things, double checking, lots of tests and test firings. This is a risky business, and when you commit to human spaceflight, you have to be willing to take the risk.

Through both tragedy and triumph, mankinds pursuit of space changed the worldforever.

Since its establishment in 1958, and its charge to reach the moon within a decade in 1962, NASA has been a place where scientists and mathematicians can dream big. The space program enlarged those dreams, broadened them far beyond the bounds of earth, and made people believe that they could achieve anything to which they set their minds.

In addition to space exploration, however, the NASA space program also pioneered new technologies that people around the world now take for granted in their daily lives. Whether they use solar panel technology, cordless and battery-powered tools, reflective vests or even memory foam, they can thank NASA and the space program for these inventions.

The technology that came out of this program was awesome, said Fairey. It advanced the United States exponentially in terms of computing capability, material science and all thosethings.

The technology that came out of this program was awesome, said Fairey. It advanced the United States exponentially in terms of computing capability, material science and all thosethings.

During his tenure in the Apollo program, Fairey worked with researchers from the University of Arizona to pioneer a lightning detection system at KSC as lightning was an especially dangerous hazard during launch. Fairey worked on all the mathematical algorithms used in thesystem.

It was so accurate that you could actually see the electrical potential build up if a storm was coming from Orlando or out in the ocean, he said. And you could calculate when it would get here and make a determination of whether or not it was safe to launch. And so they use that today for all the launches.

Fairey passed away on April 8, 2020, but left a great legacy at NASA. He finished his career as the flow director for four missions of the Space Shuttle Discovery, an orbiter that launched several satellites and other hardware into space, including the Hubble Space Telescope. Most notably, Fairey arranged for Discovery astronauts to fly several Georgia Southern University flags on one of their missions, and then presented one of the flags to the University.

After more than 30 years of service, Fairey retired in 2002 and became a docent at NASA, sharing his knowledge and his love of teaching with camp participants and museum visitors, and inspiring the next generation of students interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)fields.

In his interview, he reflected on the program and the impact it had on the world.

Youre proud to have been a part of a team that worked so hard for so many years that achieved this unbelievable goal that many people thought was not even possible, he said. So youre very humbled in the aspect of you being such a small portion, and just one individual of a very large team that achieved this magnificent goal.

Abner returned to NASA in 1974 and finished his career as the chief engineer for the Space Shuttle program. He is currently semi-retired as a staff engineer at the United Space Alliance.

Belson worked with the design engineering directorate throughout his career at NASA, and helped design the video systems that film the countdowns and launches, as well as the video simulators that astronauts used to train for their missions in space. He left NASA after the Challenger accident and went to work for the Department Of Defence supporting Expendable Launch Vehicle satellite programs being flown from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and Vandenberg Air Force Station in California.

It gives you a certain sense of fulfillment that we had the opportunity to even participate in this, said Belson. When I go back and look at the history, I remember watching Dr. Wernher von Braun on TV talking about rockets and going to the moon and landing on the moon. So its not a job, its more of a vocation, you know?

Pound finished his career as chief of the NASA Test Directors office, the culmination of his many roles in coordinating and planning for all the missions at KSC. He worked at NASA for 28 years and retiredin 1995.

I hope it makes Georgia Southern feel proud of us, said Pound. Thats what Im hoping. I think we did a pretty good job while we were down here and glad we could do what we could. And then the Georgia Southern people looking at it and looking at us saying, Well, we were part of that. So Georgia Southern was a part ofit, too.

It was a really fun career, he added. I enjoyed every minute of it, except for the moments of sheer terror.Doy Cave

Continue reading here:

The Eagle Has Landed | Georgia Southern Magazine - Georgia Southern University Newsroom

Mars is the place (in space) to be – Cosmos

Mars is about to become crowded. When the spacecraft carrying NASAs Perseverance rover safely launched from Cape Canaveral on 30 July, it became the third in a small fleet of spacecraft now heading for the Red Planet: one from the US, one from China, and one from the United Arab Emirates.

Any Mars launch is exciting, but with three space agencies all planning to arrive at Mars next February, the drama is more intense than usual. Not to mention that NASAs launch was accompanied by a small earthquake, magnitude 3.9, which rattled its Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California one of the sites overseeing the launch about 20 minutes before liftoff.

Happily, the earthquake did not affect the mission, which lifted off exactly on schedule at 7:50 Eastern Daylight Time. They never lost the signal, says launch manager Omar Baez. They said they were ready to proceed, and we able to launch on time.

It was just the Earth being excited about going to Mars, jokes JPLs director, Michael Watkins.

The first of the three missions, called Hope (Al Amal in Arabic), was launched by the UAE Space Agency a newcomer to planetary exploration atop a Japanese rocket on 20 July.

The mission is the first Mars launch ever attempted by an Arab nation. The name was chosen because it sends a message of optimism to millions of young Arabs, says Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, ruler of the Emirate of Dubai. If a small, young Arab nation is able to reach Mars, truly anything is possible, adds project manager Omran Sharaf.

Its a message of hope also to women scientists who, according to a tabulation by the New York Times, make up a whopping four-fifths of the entire science team.

The government has invested heavily in education, especially womens education, says Robert Lillis, associate director for planetary science at the University of California Berkeleys Space Sciences Laboratory, which provided science collaboration, training, and instrument components for the mission.

The project, he says, is part of the Emirates effort to prepare for a post-oil world, to lay the groundwork for a future in which entrepreneurs, inventors and ideas not oil are funding their economy.

The mission is an orbiter designed to study the Martian atmosphere and weather in unprecedented detail.

Our science mission is to produce the first-ever truly global picture of the Martian atmosphere, says Sharaf. This is the first holistic study of the Martian climate and how the layers of the atmosphere fit together.

The Chinese launch, a mission called Tianwen-1, came three days later. (Its name means heavenly questions, chosen in honor of a 2300-year-old classical Chinese poem.)

It is Chinas second attempt to go to Mars. The first failed in 2011 when the Russian mission on which it piggybacked couldnt get out of Earth orbit.

Since then, China has had two successful landings on the Moon, and with Tianwen-1 is attempting a twofer: a package that includes both an orbiter and a rover.

If the rover lands safely, China will become only the third country to successfully land on Mars. (The other two are the US and the former Soviet Union, whose Mars 3 lander survived a mere 110 seconds after it soft-landed in 1971). It will be only the second to deploy a rover.

Although it will reach Mars in February, it wont land immediately. Instead, it will go into a mapping orbit, trying to pick the best landing site before the rover attempts the descent a couple of months later.

NASAs Perseverance mission is a prelude to a hoped-for Mars sample return mission scheduled for 2026-2031. Its job is to explore a crater that was known to host a lake, collecting rock samples that might contain signatures of ancient life. It will then cache these samples for later retrieval and return to Earth for examination with much more advanced laboratory equipment than can be put on a rover.

In the process, Perseverance will also study the craters geology, attempt to make oxygen from the carbon dioxide in the thin Martian air, and even deploy a helicopter that, if all goes well, will make the first powered, controlled flight on an alien world.

A fourth probe, also a rover, also was scheduled for launch this month, this one a joint project of the European Space Agency and Russia. It has been postponed to 2022, however, due to an engineering problem.

A two-year delay was required because Mars launch windows only occur every 26 months the reason why four different programs had all scheduled launches for this month.)

Meanwhile, Hope, Tianwen-1, and Perseverance are securely on their way.

Im looking forward to ideally a very quiet and boring trip to Mars, as we prepare for the never-boring and always-stressful entry, descent and landing, says Perseverances chief engineer, Adam Steltzner, in a sentiment that is undoubtedly shared by the Chinese and the Emiratis.

The Royal Institution of Australia has an Education Resource based on this article. You can access it here.

The rest is here:

Mars is the place (in space) to be - Cosmos

Western Slope Skies – The Limits of Space – KVNF Public Radio

We consider our universe to be limitless. Over the decades, people have explored that infinity to discover what is out there, even who is out there. But what about the space closest to us? The low Earth orbit is overcrowded by satellites, space junk, and the leftover remnants of space exploration. These leftover pieces affect how scientists and people experience space.

Episode aired Friday, Aug. 7th & Wednesday, Aug. 12th, 2020

Orbital debris, also known as space junk, are objects left in space that no longer function as intended. Objects in orbit will eventually return to the ground but are currently launching faster than they are re-entering. Many objects stay in orbit for decades. NASA estimates the amount of orbital debris in the low Earth orbit exceeds over 100 million pieces, ranging from one millimeter to over ten centimeters. This is enough for around one third of Americans to have their own piece of space junk.

The low Earth orbit also holds many objects currently in use, like satellites for weather and communications, the Hubble Telescope, and the International Space Station. However, even these essential devices contribute to overcrowding. When stargazing or photographing the night sky, it is hard not to see the bright streak of a satellite in view.

The oldest man-made object still in orbit is Vanguard 1. Launched in 1958, it was the fourth satellite launched into space. On Earth, after 50 years even trash becomes a part of an areas historical landscape. Do we leave these random remnants of past space projects in orbit to commemorate the history of human space exploration?

In order to preserve the beauty of our night sky, we must balance objects that provide value to humanity with decluttering our orbit.

This balance may not be hard to strike. We can sustain the overcrowding of the low Earth orbit by removing five of the highest risk objects each year, both small pieces that risk collision and large pieces that affect long-term accumulation. Scientists are currently working on the best way to remove items, however, there is no overarching regulatory body to create concrete removal plans.

We consider space to be limitless, but just like any other resource, it does have limits. We need to learn how to balance this resource. Not just for the humans of right now, but also those of the future. Will we look back in 30 years and wonder why no one tried to preserve it earlier?

Western Slope Skies is produced by members and friends of the Black Canyon Astronomical Society. This episode was written and recorded by Megan Spencer from Devils Tower National Monument.

Read the rest here:

Western Slope Skies - The Limits of Space - KVNF Public Radio

The Eagle Has Landed – Georgia Southern University Newsroom

Georgia Southern Alumni Reflect on Work with NASA Space ProgramThe Vertical Assembly Building at Kennedy Space Center

In the summer of 1967, Georgia Southern graduates Bob Pound (67) and Charlie Abner (67) hopped in a car and headed for Cape Canaveral with one missionto fix NASA.

In January of that year, NASA was conducting a pre-flight check for the crew of Apollo 1the programs first crewed missionwhen a fire broke out in the cockpit and killed its three astronauts.

After that, we said Lets go down there and put the space program back on its feet, said Pound, a native of Statesboro.

They didnt call. They didnt have an appointment. They just pulled into the badging station on U.S. 1 and figured theyd found their destination. Wasnt a very big building, but it had some rockets out front, said Pound.

What can we do for you? the attendant asked.

Well, we came down here to get a job, said Pound.

Okay, who with?

Well, NASA, of course! Isnt this NASAs place here? Pound said they didnt realize it at the time, but there were several hundred contractors coming in and out of Kennedy Space Center (KSC).

Uh, let me make a few phone calls, said the attendant, and motioned them to wait in the lobby.

Pound listened as the attendant talked on the phone.

No, they dont have an appointment.theyre here! Theyre sitting right here! No, they just came in and said theyre looking for a job. No, theyre here already!

They said that over and over, recalled Pound, laughing.

The attendant hung up the phone and said, Theyre going to call me back.

Pound and Abner waited and waited, wondering with each passing minute if theyd made the trip for nothing. Then the phone rang.

It was a call that not only changed their lives, but also carved a path for several Georgia Southern graduates who would follow in their footsteps.

Pound and Abner were the first graduates of Georgia Southerns physics and mathematics degrees to join the ranks at NASA, and the tale of their success quickly spread through the small department.

Sonny Belson (68) traveled down to Cape Canaveral the next summer and showed up unannounced the way his classmates had. He interviewed and was offered a job the next day. Chris Fairey (69) skipped class to drive down to KSC and get his name on the list, and he was hired the summer after graduation.

It was absolutely amazing that you literally walked in, a cold call off the street, and here I am, said Belson. And Im still at it after all theseyears.

Though they all graduated with the same degrees, they were each assigned to wildly different roles within the Apollo program. Pound says this was a testament to the college and its faculty, especially Carroll W. Bryant, Ph.D., professor emeritus and head of the physics department at Georgia Southern from 1963-1975. He passed away in Statesboroin 1988.

Bryant was an accomplished physicist who served as a scientific advisor to the U.S. Armed Forces and most notably worked on the development of the atomic bomb. He was not only a knowledgeable physicist, but also had the wealth of experience to convey physics practical use for his students.

He was really an amazing man in terms of what he could convey to us in terms of theory and physics and his own application. said Fairey. You ask yourself, How am I going to use all of this? And what you realize at the end is that what theyre teaching you are the tools. You may not necessarily use a particular theorem or a math equation, but you understand how it evolved and why its there and how it can be used.

When Pound, Abner, Belson, Fairey and other alumni joined NASA, they were thrust into a workforce of more than 400,000 employees, contractors and consultants working all over the United States to achieve one goal, set by President John F. Kennedy: before this decade is out, of landing a man on the moon and returning him safely toearth.

Pound was assigned to the Ground Instrumentation Systems technical staff in the Central Information Facility (CIF). His team collected real-time telemetry data surrounding the Saturn V rocket, and displayed it on the huge Eidophor Projectors in the Control Room. Abner started as a ground station engineer, working up to ground station manager before leaving to join the Air Forcein 1968.

Fairey joined Pound in the CIF, the entire second floor of which housed two giant GE 635 computers that were responsible for managing data for Apollo. Today, you have more computing power on your phone! saidFairey.

Belson went to work with the design engineering directorate in the communications electronics area, where he installed and designed the operational television system at the launchpad and towers around the complex, and the mobile television vans for use during launch andevents.

As each took on their small piece of the larger puzzle, they couldnt immediately see the true impact and scale of what they were doing. It wasnt long, however, before the picture became crystal clear.

Well, at the time, of course, it was just a job, said Pound. Then we saw how big it was and what all it encompassed, and we thought, Wow! This is going to be something big! And we felt like we were doing a pretty important job.

Its easy to get lost in the massive scale of NASA. There, everythingis big.

Anytime you put together a large program like the Apollo program that involved human spaceflight as well as the manufacturing of the launch vehicle and the facilities that manage it, you realize the scale of the vehicle itself, saidFairey.

The biggest part of the Apollo program was the Saturn V rocket, which is still the most powerful rocket ever built.

The Saturn V was a three-stage, expendable, super-heavy lift launch vehicle that was used to send Apollo missions into space between 1967 and 1973. It was 363 feet tall, weighed more than 6.5 million pounds and reached speeds of more than 17,000 mph to break free from earths gravity. To house the construction of these rockets, NASA constructed the Vertical Assembly Buildingthe VABwhich is still the largest and most visible complex at KSC. The building is 526 feet tall and covers 8 acres of square footage. Its a vast cavern with 40 floors of scaffolds and railings that allow thousands of technicians to reach every part of the spacecraft.

Once the Saturn V was built, it had to be moved to one of two launch pads, the closest of which was 3.5 miles away. To accomplish this impossible task, NASA used one of two machines called crawlers, weighing 6 million pounds each, to carry the launch vehiclefully uprightacross the complex, traveling at less than 1 mph. The journey took roughly 8 hours to complete.

Even more impressive was the level of detail involved in creating these rockets and executing their missions. Each stage of each rocket was built by a different American company, and each wire, duct, nozzle, rivet and screw was carefully designed by engineers who were armed with nothing but slide rules and an expert grasp of their field.

For each Georgia Southern alumnus, their role supported one step in an impossibly large number of procedures and processes that all came to fruition on July 16, 1969. The launch of Apollo 11, which carried the first men to step foot on the moon, was a history-altering event each of them witnessed firsthand.

Its kind of hard to describe until you see it, saidFairey.

From a mankind standpoint, this was a significant achievement, said Belson. You know, if you look at where we are today in all of that, its based on how we got there. So its very, very important for mankind overall that we were able to go do this. And somehow we played a part in that.

Accomplishing the goal of manned space flight came with difficulty and sometimes tragedy,however.

In 1970, while more than 210,000 miles from earth, the crew of Apollo 13 was doing a routine stir of the oxygen tanks on the service module when a faulty wire ignited and caused an explosion. With the service module inoperative, the crew of three astronauts had to use the lunar excursion module (LEM) as their lifeboat home, but it was only designed to support two men for two days.

Back on earth, engineers at Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center in Houston worked around the clock to create procedures to reprogram and modify the LEM to support all three crew members for four days, and communicated the plans to astronauts who had limited power in their craft, a cold and wet cabin, and a shortage of potable water.

For Pound and others that worked in the Launch Control Center at KSC, these types of events meant quick decisions and immediate actionboth of which would mean the difference between life and death for the flight crew and ground personnel.

We used to say it was hours and hours of boredom punctuated by moments of sheer terror, said Pound. And we had to be able to make decisions pretty quickly without talking to the other people. And then we had to know who to talk to in case we needed answers to get things done.

While the story of Apollo 13 ended happily, there were other space program missions thatdid not.

In 1986, Fairey was the shuttle project engineer for the Space Shuttle Challenger, and one of the key figures involved in its launch. On Jan. 28, 1986, he was in the control room of KSC when, only 73 second into liftoff, a leak in one of Challengers rocket boosters caused the external fuel tank to explode, disintegrating the shuttle and killing its crew.

It was a horrible dayespecially due to the fact that I had trained with the crew. I knew the crew, saidFairey.

I was midfield of the shuttle landing facility, and actually was there with some of the astronaut family, said Belson. Its very close and personal and, you know, I still wont watch the video. I wont watch it today. Yeah, it was very emotional.

Fairey and his engineers spent the next two years going over the accident, learning what happened. As a result, they completely reworked all of their procedures, software and training and then completely retrained with their colleagues in Houston and Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville,Alabama.

You do all you can to minimize the risk, but its risky business, said Fairey. I mean, youre sitting on top of a bombliquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen. It took a lot of people checking a lot of things, double checking, lots of tests and test firings. This is a risky business, and when you commit to human spaceflight, you have to be willing to take the risk.

Through both tragedy and triumph, mankinds pursuit of space changed the worldforever.

Since its establishment in 1958, and its charge to reach the moon within a decade in 1962, NASA has been a place where scientists and mathematicians can dream big. The space program enlarged those dreams, broadened them far beyond the bounds of earth, and made people believe that they could achieve anything to which they set their minds.

In addition to space exploration, however, the NASA space program also pioneered new technologies that people around the world now take for granted in their daily lives. Whether they use solar panel technology, cordless and battery-powered tools, reflective vests or even memory foam, they can thank NASA and the space program for these inventions.

The technology that came out of this program was awesome, said Fairey. It advanced the United States exponentially in terms of computing capability, material science and all thosethings.

The technology that came out of this program was awesome, said Fairey. It advanced the United States exponentially in terms of computing capability, material science and all thosethings.

During his tenure in the Apollo program, Fairey worked with researchers from the University of Arizona to pioneer a lightning detection system at KSC as lightning was an especially dangerous hazard during launch. Fairey worked on all the mathematical algorithms used in thesystem.

It was so accurate that you could actually see the electrical potential build up if a storm was coming from Orlando or out in the ocean, he said. And you could calculate when it would get here and make a determination of whether or not it was safe to launch. And so they use that today for all the launches.

Fairey passed away on April 8, 2020, but left a great legacy at NASA. He finished his career as the flow director for four missions of the Space Shuttle Discovery, an orbiter that launched several satellites and other hardware into space, including the Hubble Space Telescope. Most notably, Fairey arranged for Discovery astronauts to fly several Georgia Southern University flags on one of their missions, and then presented one of the flags to the University.

After more than 30 years of service, Fairey retired in 2002 and became a docent at NASA, sharing his knowledge and his love of teaching with camp participants and museum visitors, and inspiring the next generation of students interested in STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics)fields.

In his interview, he reflected on the program and the impact it had on the world.

Youre proud to have been a part of a team that worked so hard for so many years that achieved this unbelievable goal that many people thought was not even possible, he said. So youre very humbled in the aspect of you being such a small portion, and just one individual of a very large team that achieved this magnificent goal.

Abner returned to NASA in 1974 and finished his career as the chief engineer for the Space Shuttle program. He is currently semi-retired as a staff engineer at the United Space Alliance.

Belson worked with the design engineering directorate throughout his career at NASA, and helped design the video systems that film the countdowns and launches, as well as the video simulators that astronauts used to train for their missions in space. He left NASA after the Challenger accident and went to work for the Department Of Defence supporting Expendable Launch Vehicle satellite programs being flown from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida and Vandenberg Air Force Station in California.

It gives you a certain sense of fulfillment that we had the opportunity to even participate in this, said Belson. When I go back and look at the history, I remember watching Dr. Wernher von Braun on TV talking about rockets and going to the moon and landing on the moon. So its not a job, its more of a vocation, you know?

Pound finished his career as chief of the NASA Test Directors office, the culmination of his many roles in coordinating and planning for all the missions at KSC. He worked at NASA for 28 years and retiredin 1995.

I hope it makes Georgia Southern feel proud of us, said Pound. Thats what Im hoping. I think we did a pretty good job while we were down here and glad we could do what we could. And then the Georgia Southern people looking at it and looking at us saying, Well, we were part of that. So Georgia Southern was a part ofit, too.

It was a really fun career, he added. I enjoyed every minute of it, except for the moments of sheer terror.Doy Cave

See more here:

The Eagle Has Landed - Georgia Southern University Newsroom

Casetify launches NASA-branded tech accessories on day of Perseverance rover launch – Space.com

A new set of phone cases, Apple Watch bands and other trinkets allows you to carry your love for NASA with you everywhere you go.

Lifestyle brand Casetify launched a special collection including dozens of accessories that feature NASA's famous "meatball" and "worm" logos, among other space-themed designs. You can check out the entire group here. (NASA likely gave its endorsement to Casetify, as the agency has strict rules around using the logo for commercial purposes.)

The official launch date for the accessories was Thursday (July 30), the same date that NASA's Perseverance rover successfully lifted off from Florida on its way to search for ancient life on Mars. The old-school NASA "worm" logo re-debuted on the Demo-2 astronaut launch aboard a SpaceX rocket in May, which marked the first crewed commercial orbital launch from the U.S.

Related: NASA re-embraces the 'worm,' its retro cool retired logo, for new merchandise

The Casetify collection has 16 NASA-inspired designs for iPhone and iPad cases, Macbook shells and Apple Watch bands, along with insignia rings. The designs include an astronaut's access badge, blueprints of the space shuttle, and mission assignments. The cases for phones and other devices are designed to be protective for falls of up to 6.2 feet (1.9 meters).

"When it comes to advanced technology and exploration, there's no better source for inspiration than NASA," Wes Ng, Casetify CEO and co-founder, said in a company statement. "We know our community will be over the moon to see NASA's emblems reimagined in true Casetify style."

Follow Elizabeth Howell on Twitter @howellspace. Follow us on Twitter @Spacedotcom and on Facebook.

Visit link:

Casetify launches NASA-branded tech accessories on day of Perseverance rover launch - Space.com