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Could this nano battery lead to mobiles that fully charge in just 12 minutes?

Researchers say their battery could be a breakthrough in energy storage It uses structures called nanopores to hold electrolyte to carry charge University of Maryland team say next batch will be ten times more powerful

By Damien Gayle for MailOnline

Published: 02:48 EST, 11 November 2014 | Updated: 06:25 EST, 11 November 2014

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A breakthrough in the design of batteries could mean the days when your mobile phone spends half the time plugged into the wall are numbered.

A remarkable new prototype battery needs just 12 minutes to fully recharge, rather than the hours conventional cells need to replenish.

What's more, researchers at the University of Maryland say their new invention could bring about the long sought-for miniaturisation of energy storage components.

Cross section: A new kind of battery made from millions of tiny nano-sized cells could revolutionise electrical energy storage and slash the time it takes to charge our electronic devices

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Could this nano battery lead to mobiles that fully charge in just 12 minutes?

Authorities: Investigation finds faked research at U. chemical engineering lab

Authorities say an investigation has found faked research at a University of Utah chemical engineering lab.

Jordan Allred, Deseret News

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SALT LAKE CITY An investigation has found faked research at a University of Utah chemical engineering lab.

A graduate student doctored photos for a paper about microscopic structures called nanorods, making it appear as if a theory on how to change their position worked, said Jeffrey Botkin, the associate vice president for research integrity at the university.

"There was no legitimate data in that paper," Botkin said.

The magnified images of the pill-shaped structures attracted attention on social media after the paper was published last year because the rounded ends appeared to be surrounded by square outlines, as if they had been highlighted and moved with an image manipulation program like Photoshop.

The paper purported to show a method for bringing the ends of the nanorods together at an angle that could have had implications for creating synthetic antibodies.

The paper published by the journal Nano Letters has already been retracted.

A university investigation found doctoral candidate Rajasekhar Anumolu changed the images, which were the basis for all the findings in the paper published in June 2013, Botkin said. Anumolu did not return phone and email messages seeking comment.

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Authorities: Investigation finds faked research at U. chemical engineering lab

Better Bomb-Sniffing Technology

November 7, 2014

Image Caption: Ling Zang, a University of Utah professor of materials science and engineering, holds a prototype detector that uses a new type of carbon nanotube material for use in handheld scanners to detect explosives, toxic chemicals and illegal drugs. Zang and colleagues developed the new material, which will make such scanners quicker and more sensitive than today's standard detection devices. Ling's spinoff company, Vaporsens, plans to produce commercial versions of the new kind of scanner early next year. Credit: Dan Hixon, University of Utah College of Engineering

Provided by Vince Horiuchi, University of Utah

University of Utah engineers have developed a new type of carbon nanotube material for handheld sensors that will be quicker and better at sniffing out explosives, deadly gases and illegal drugs.

A carbon nanotube is a cylindrical material that is a hexagonal or six-sided array of carbon atoms rolled up into a tube. Carbon nanotubes are known for their strength and high electrical conductivity and are used in products from baseball bats and other sports equipment to lithium-ion batteries and touchscreen computer displays.

Vaporsens, a university spin-off company, plans to build a prototype handheld sensor by years end and produce the first commercial scanners early next year, says co-founder Ling Zang, a professor of materials science and engineering and senior author of a study of the technology published online Nov. 4 in the journal Advanced Materials.

The new kind of nanotubes also could lead to flexible solar panels that can be rolled up and stored or even painted on clothing such as a jacket, he adds.

Zang and his team found a way to break up bundles of the carbon nanotubes with a polymer and then deposit a microscopic amount on electrodes in a prototype handheld scanner that can detect toxic gases such as sarin or chlorine, or explosives such as TNT.

When the sensor detects molecules from an explosive, deadly gas or drugs such as methamphetamine, they alter the electrical current through the nanotube materials, signaling the presence of any of those substances, Zang says.

You can apply voltage between the electrodes and monitor the current through the nanotube, says Zang, a professor with USTAR, the Utah Science Technology and Research economic development initiative. If you have explosives or toxic chemicals caught by the nanotube, you will see an increase or decrease in the current.

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Better Bomb-Sniffing Technology

Rutgers University Neuro Engineering Group (RUNEG) Awards First Faculty Seed Grants

Piscataway, NJ (PRWEB) November 06, 2014

Dr. Kibum Lee (Rutgers University), Dr. Hilton Kaplan (Rutgers University) and their industrial sponsor received the very first seed fund grant from the Rutgers University Neuro-Engineering Group in late July. The grant will provide financial support allowing the researchers to develop a nano-particle based synthetic transcription factor, to stimulate the expression of neuronal switch genes in stem cells, which can ultimately generate neurons. The technology described will potentially be used to regenerate nerves, a huge unmet clinical need.

Dr. Melitta Schachner (Rutgers University) and her industrial sponsor received the second Seed Grant Fund from RUNEG in early October. The goal of her research is to launch pilot animal model studies, using transgenic mice, to ultimately find a treatment for genetic neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimers, Huntingtons and ALS.

The seed funds help foster collaborative and interdisciplinary research, to facilitate translational science in the development of devices that enhance central and peripheral nerve regeneration, restoration of motor and sensory function, and transmission of neural signals by brain-computer interfaces. With the help of industrial partners, RUNEG seeks to accelerate the transfer and commercialization of inventions and technologies into clinically useful products and therapies.

Media Contact: Kristen Ryan kohnoffice(at)dls(dot)rutgers(dot)edu New Jersey Center for Biomaterials 145 Bevier Rd, Piscataway NJ 08854

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Rutgers University Neuro Engineering Group (RUNEG) Awards First Faculty Seed Grants

Measuring nano-vibrations

1 hour ago Mechanical resonator based on a carbon nanotube. The nanotube is suspended and clamped at the two anchor points, shown by the arrows. The nanotube vibrates as a guitar string. Credit: ICFO

In a recent paper published in Nature Nanotechnology, Joel Moser and ICFO colleagues of the NanoOptoMechanics research group led by Prof. Adrian Bachtold, together with Marc Dykman (Michigan University), report on an experiment in which a carbon nanotube mechanical resonator exhibits quality factors of up to 5 million, 30 times better than the best quality factors measured in nanotubes to date.

Imagine that the host of a dinner party tries to get his guests' attention by giving a single tap of his oyster spoon on his crystal glass. Now, imagine, to the amazement of all, that the crystal glass vibrates for several long minutes, producing a clear ringing sound. Surely the guests would marvel at this almost never ending crystal tone. Some might even want to investigate the origin of this phenomenon rather than listen to the host's speech.

The secret of such an imaginary non-stop vibrating system relies on the fact that it dissipates very little energy. The energy dissipation of a vibrating system is quantified by the quality factor. In laboratories, by knowing the quality factor, scientists can quantify how long the system can vibrate and how much energy is lost in the process. This allows them to determine how precise the resonator can be at measuring or sensing objects.

Scientists use mechanical resonators to study all sorts of physical phenomena. Nowadays, carbon nanotube mechanical resonators are in demand because of their extremely small size and their outstanding capability of sensing objects at the nanoscale. Though they are very good mass and force sensors, their quality factors have been somewhat modest. However, the discovery made by the ICFO researchers is a major advancement in the field of nano mechanics and an exciting starting point for future innovative technologies.

What is a Mechanical Resonator?

A mechanical resonator is a system that vibrates at very precise frequencies. Like a guitar string or a tightrope, a carbon nanotube resonator consists of a tiny, vibrating bridge-like (string) structure with typical dimensions of 1m in length and 1nm in diameter. If the quality factor of the resonator is high, the string will vibrate at a very precise frequency, thus enabling these systems to become appealing mass and force sensors, and exciting quantum systems.

Why is This Discovery so Important?

For many years, researchers observed that quality factors decreased with the volume of the resonator, that is the smaller the resonator the lower the quality factor, and because of this trend it was unthinkable that nanotubes could exhibit giant quality factors.

The giant quality factors that ICFO researchers have measured have not been observed before in nanotube resonators mainly because their vibrational states are extremely fragile and easily perturbed when measured. The values detected by the team of scientists was achieved through the use of an ultra-clean nanotube at cryostat temperatures of 30mK (-273.12 Celsius- colder than the temperature of outerspace!) and by employing an ultra-low noise method to detect minuscule vibrations quickly while reducing as much as possible the electrostatic noise.

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Measuring nano-vibrations

1,300 degrees? No sweat for solar paint

A 459 foot tall power boiler tower, one of three, glows bright from an array of mirrors, below, that focus reflected sunlight on to it.

In a potential breakthrough for the solar energy industry, a San Diego-based research team has developed a light-trapping paint that can endure intense heat for years.

The nano-particle material can withstand outdoor temperatures of 750 degrees Celsius (1,380 Fahrenheit) for extended periods without cracking or peeling. The discovery could improve the economic performance of thermal solar towers, which gather heat energy by concentrating sunlight reflected off thousands of optical mirrors.

The paint was developed by a research team at the UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering and described in two articles in the journal Nano Energy.

Inside solar towers, steam or molten salt is heated to extreme temperatures to help propel steam turbines and generate electricity. Peeling paint can reduce efficiencies and prompt costly days-long maintenance outages.

To drive down the cost of thermal solar energy, engineers also are striving to run solar towers at higher operating temperatures and conserve that heat to produce power after sundown.

"Instead of 550 Celsium, they want to operated this at 750 Celsius," said Sungho Jin, a Jacobs School professor expert in mechanical and aerospace engineering. "And at 750 degrees, things can get red hot. ... We came up system compositions and a structure which makes the materials stable."

Those higher temperatures can translate into a 30 percent improvement in solar efficiencies, Jin explained.

The new material utilizes tiny particles of many sizes ranging from 10 nanometers to 10 micrometers. It absorbs about 90 percent of approaching sunlight. Engineers nicknamed the paint color "black hole."

The project was funded by the Department of Enegy's Sunshot Initiative for accelerating solar-energy technologies.

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1,300 degrees? No sweat for solar paint

Senior Reservoir Engineering Advisor – E&P Technology Focus

CLIENT:

Reputable international client looking to expand exploitation efforts in the US and internationally. This role will focus within the T&E (Technology & Excellence) team. This is a technology focused in-house consulting business unit to work with the industries highest talent on the forefront of cutting edge unconventional technology. Opportunity to work on a plethora of different assets within an integrated team of experts. Very stable company offering long term opportunities to work internationally and to work on multiple assets of your choice. Collaborative award winning environment with extremely competitive compensation packages. H1B, TN Visas can be transferred.

POSITION SUMMARY:

Opportunity to work within the Technology & Excellence (T&E) Unconventional Technology Team. Primarily focused on characterizing tight oil, shale gas, and liquid-rich shale reservoirs, and assisting the asset teams with incorporation of these data into reservoir characterization and modeling tools. The candidate is required to work with geoscientists, petrophysicists, geomechanic specialists, geochemists, and production and reservoir engineers to ensure that estimates of hydrocarbon-in-place and performance forecasts include all parameters and considerations related to unconventional reservoirs. Part of the role will be to design appropriate field core and fluid capture and handling procedures and ensure fit-for-purpose laboratory testing programs for core and fluid samples. This will require a high level of interaction with vendors and research institutes offering laboratory analyses for such rock samples.

The candidate is a seasoned professional with a track record of delivering fit-for-purpose rock and fluid characterizations in support of estimating hydrocarbon-in-place, production rates, and recovery volumes for unconventional and conventional reservoirs. This will require frequent coordination with the geoscientists, petrophysicists, geomechanics, geochemists, and reservoir and completion engineers working in the Unconventional Technology team and the unconventional reservoir asset teams in Exploration, Developments, and Production.

A chief role will be to improve the understanding of rock and fluid properties and how they relate to flow in nano-Darcy rocks. The candidate will be required to interact with scientists in professional societies, industry, and academia to ensure that research efforts are aimed at developing technologies that can be leveraged to positive effect in assets. As part of this technology monitoring, the candidate must also serve as a champion for testing, evaluating, and sharing best practices and value-improving-practices with unconventional reservoir asset teams.

ROLES & RESPONSIBILITIES:

- Define coring and core analysis programs for new wells being drilled in unconventional reservoirs and assist in planning.

- Define fluid sampling and analysis program for new wells being drilled in unconventional reservoirs and assist in planning.

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Senior Reservoir Engineering Advisor - E&P Technology Focus

Delegation of Moscow industrial manufacture managers participated in the 56th International Engineering Fair MSV-2014

Thedelegation ofMoscow industrial manufacture managers participated inthe 56th International Engineering Fair MSV-2014 which took place inBrno, theCzech Republic, inearly October. TheMoscow exposition andthe delegation participation was arranged bythe Department ofScience, Industrial Policy andEntrepreneurship forthe City ofMoscow.

International Engineering Fair MSV-2014 is thelargest international industrial event inthe Central andEastern Europe. Theevent included alarge-scale industrial fair, highly informative business program, conclusion ofinternational contracts andvisits toinnovation enterprises ofthe Czech Republic.

Inorder toestablish new business contacts andexpand theproduct market thedepartment ofScience, Industrial Policy andEntrepreneurship forMoscow arranged thegroup stand exposition ofthe leading industrial andscientific enterprises. Within theframework ofthe group stand exposition thegains inindustry had been presented byorganizations ofMoscow, forexample NIIAS JSC presented thesafe locomotive combined complex (BLOK); Alitir LLC presented theanticorrosion protection technology with theuse ofpulse current; Concern Nanoindustry incooperation with Institute forNanotechnology ofConversion International Fund introduced tothe exposition guests thedepth filters forhigh purification ofvarious environments anddisinfectants ofnew generation onthe basis ofnano-silver AgBion-2; A. A. Bochvar VNIINM JSC presented thetechnology ofgas-dynamic coating sputtering; LLC InnTechPro demonstrated acomposition Zinoferr () water-based non-organic zinc-filled silicate coating, made onthe basis ofhigh-modulus modified liquid glass, etc. Innovent company presented its innovative development with high operational characteristics radial duct booster UNIVENT () forventilation systems ofinhabited buildings, public places andindustrial premises; STANDARTINFORM Institute as ROSSTANDARD's authorized company presented its data bases ofregulatory andtechnical documents necessary forCzech companies that enter theRussian market. EcoCat Company presented equipment forcatalytic room heating. NCP Association ofRailway Equipment Manufactures presented developments ofits enterprises.

Theformal ceremony ofMoscow exhibition display opening atthe Fair was onSeptember 29, then exhibitors were visited byMr. Andrey Sharashkin, Counsel-general ofthe Russian Federation inBrno, Mr. Sergey Stupar, trading agent ofthe Russian Federation inthe Czech Republic, andMs. Natalya Popkova, Head ofMoscow Government delegation, Deputy head ofindustry policy authority ofDSPE forthe city ofMoscow. Theexhibition stand was very popular among international fair participants, during theevent execution theMoscow stand was visited bymore than 1,300 persons.

TheMoscow delegation participated inthe Business day ofthe Russian Federation atthe International Engineering Fair MSV-2014 onSeptember 30. Theprogram within theframework ofthe Business Day ofRussia was not limited byinformative discussions; several cooperation agreements were signed with Czech partners between participants ofMoscow exposition participants Non-Commercial Partnership Association ofRailway Equipment Manufactures (NCP OPZhT), Scientific Research andDesign andEngineering Institution ofInformation, Automation andCommunication inRailway Vehicles (JSC NIIAS) andthe Czech company UniControls a.s., RACOM s.r.o., Association ofRailway Industry Enterprises ofthe Czech Republic, onjoint adaptation andimplementation ofonboard andstationary control systems onthe basis ofsatellite navigation system, andon integration JSC NIIAS Company developments inthe field ofsmart devices ofdigital radio communication with automated control systems.

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Delegation of Moscow industrial manufacture managers participated in the 56th International Engineering Fair MSV-2014

New solar power material converts 90 percent of captured light into heat

A multidisciplinary engineering team at the University of California, San Diego developed a new nanoparticle-based material for concentrating solar power plants designed to absorb and convert to heat more than 90 percent of the sunlight it captures. The new material can also withstand temperatures greater than 700 degrees Celsius and survive many years outdoors in spite of exposure to air and humidity. Their work, funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's SunShot program, was published recently in two separate articles in the journal Nano Energy.

By contrast, current solar absorber material functions at lower temperatures and needs to be overhauled almost every year for high temperature operations.

"We wanted to create a material that absorbs sunlight that doesn't let any of it escape. We want the black hole of sunlight," said Sungho Jin, a professor in the department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering at UC San Diego Jacobs School of Engineering. Jin, along with professor Zhaowei Liu of the department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Mechanical Engineering professor Renkun Chen, developed the Silicon boride-coated nanoshell material. They are all experts in functional materials engineering.

The novel material features a "multiscale" surface created by using particles of many sizes ranging from 10 nanometers to 10 micrometers. The multiscale structures can trap and absorb light which contributes to the material's high efficiency when operated at higher temperatures.

Concentrating solar power (CSP) is an emerging alternative clean energy market that produces approximately 3.5 gigawatts worth of power at power plants around the globe -- enough to power more than 2 million homes, with additional construction in progress to provide as much as 20 gigawatts of power in coming years. One of the technology's attractions is that it can be used to retrofit existing power plants that use coal or fossil fuels because it uses the same process to generate electricity from steam.

Traditional power plants burn coal or fossil fuels to create heat that evaporates water into steam. The steam turns a giant turbine that generates electricity from spinning magnets and conductor wire coils. CSP power plants create the steam needed to turn the turbine by using sunlight to heat molten salt. The molten salt can also be stored in thermal storage tanks overnight where it can continue to generate steam and electricity, 24 hours a day if desired, a significant advantage over photovoltaic systems that stop producing energy with the sunset.

One of the most common types of CSP systems uses more than 100,000 reflective mirrors to aim sunlight at a tower that has been spray painted with a light absorbing black paint material. The material is designed to maximize sun light absorption and minimize the loss of light that would naturally emit from the surface in the form of infrared radiation.

The UC San Diego team's combined expertise was used to develop, optimize and characterize a new material for this type of system over the past three years. Researchers included a group of UC San Diego graduate students in materials science and engineering, Justin Taekyoung Kim, Bryan VanSaders, and Jaeyun Moon, who recently joined the faculty of the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. The synthesized nanoshell material is spray-painted in Chen's lab onto a metal substrate for thermal and mechanical testing. The material's ability to absorb sunlight is measured in Liu's optics laboratory using a unique set of instruments that takes spectral measurements from visible light to infrared.

Current CSP plants are shut down about once a year to chip off the degraded sunlight absorbing material and reapply a new coating, which means no power generation while a replacement coating is applied and cured. That is why DOE's SunShot program challenged and supported UC San Diego research teams to come up with a material with a substantially longer life cycle, in addition to the higher operating temperature for enhanced energy conversion efficiency. The UC San Diego research team is aiming for many years of usage life, a feat they believe they are close to achieving.

Modeled after President Kennedy's moon landing program that inspired widespread interest in science and space exploration, then-Energy Secretary Steven P. Chu launched the Sunshot Initiative in 2010 with the goal of making solar power cost competitive with other means of producing electricity by 2020.

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New solar power material converts 90 percent of captured light into heat

"Reverse Engineering" Materials for More Efficient Heating and Cooling

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Newswise WASHINGTON, D.C., October 28, 2014 If youve ever gone for a spin in a luxury car and felt your back being warmed or cooled by a seat-based climate control system, then youve likely experienced the benefits of a class of materials called thermoelectrics. Thermoelectric materials convert heat into electricity, and vice versa, and they have many advantages over more traditional heating and cooling systems.

Recently, researchers have observed that the performance of some thermoelectric materials can be improved by combining different solid phases -- more than one material intermixed like the clumps of fat and meat in a slice of salami. The observations offer the tantalizing prospect of significantly boosting thermoelectrics energy efficiency, but scientists still lack the tools to fully understand how the bulk properties arise out of combinations of solid phases.

Now a research team based at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has developed a new way to analyze the electrical properties of thermoelectrics that have two or more solid phases. The new technique could help researchers better understand multi-phase thermoelectric properties and offer pointers on how to design new materials to get the best properties.

The team describes their new technique in a paper published in the journal Applied Physics Letters, from AIP Publishing.

An Old Theory Does a 180

Because its sometimes difficult to separately manufacture the pure components that make up multi-phase materials, researchers cant always measure the pure phase properties directly. The Caltech team overcame this challenge by developing a way to calculate the electrical properties of individual phases while only experimenting directly with the composite.

Its like youve made chocolate chip cookies, and you want to know what the chocolate chips and the batter taste like by themselves, but you cant, because every bite you take has both chocolate chips and batter, said Jeff Snyder, a researcher at Caltech who specializes in thermoelectric materials and devices.

To separate the "chips" and "batter" without un-baking the cookie, Snyder and his colleagues turned to a decades old theory, called effective medium theory, and they gave it a new twist.

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"Reverse Engineering" Materials for More Efficient Heating and Cooling

CeNTAB director chosen for Young Career Award

THE HINDU S. Swaminathan, Director, Centre for Nanotechnology and Advanced Biomaterials (CeNTAB) at the SASTRA University, Thanjavur.

S. Swaminathan, Director, Centre for Nanotechnology and Advanced Biomaterials (CeNTAB) at the SASTRA University, Thanjavur, has been selected for the Young Career Award in Nano Science and Technology for 2015.

The award, instituted by the Union Ministry of Science and Technology, is a recognition for the ongoing research works undertaken at the CeNTAB under his stewardship.

The CeNTAB is involved in cutting-edge research to develop technologies for healthcare, specifically in tissue engineering, and drug delivery. At present, research was focused on the development of novel three-dimensional polymeric nano fibre scaffolds for tissue engineering of skin, cardiovascular arteries, and nerve regeneration using aligned and random nano fibres.

Dr. Swaminathan received his Ph.D. from the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at the Drexel University, Philadelphia, U.S., and worked on the development low temperature setting polymer ceramic composite cements for bone tissue engineering and the thesis was nominated for the Best Dissertation Award.

He received the Deans Fellowship for his doctoral studies. After his Ph. D., he joined as a Research Associate in the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, U.S., where he studied the application of low temperature setting cements for spinal fusions.

Dr. Swaminathan is the recipient of Materials Research Society of India Medal for 2009 in recognition of excellence in a particular field of expertise within the domain of material and processes. He received the Innovative Young Biotechnologist Award from the Department of Biotechnology in 2006 to develop a targeted drug delivery system for anti-cancer drugs.

The award would be presented to him in January 2015 during the Nano India Meet.

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CeNTAB director chosen for Young Career Award

NYU researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber

PUBLIC RELEASE DATE:

23-Oct-2014

Contact: Kathleen Hamilton kathleen.hamilton@nyu.edu 718-260-3792 New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering @nyupoly

Researchers at the New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscalea leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers.

Jin Kim Montclare, an associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU School of Engineering, led a group of researchers who published the results of successful trials in the creation of engineered microfiber proteins in the journal Biomacromolecules.

Many materials used in medicine and nanotechnology rely on proteins engineered to form fibers with specific properties. For example, the scaffolds used in tissue engineering depend on engineered fibers, as do the nanowires used in biosensors. These fibers can also be bound with small molecules of therapeutic compounds and used in drug delivery.

Montclare and her collaborators began their experiments with the intention of designing nanoscale proteins bound with the cancer therapeutic curcumin. They successfully created a novel, self-assembling nanoscale protein, including a hydrophobic pore capable of binding small molecules. To their surprise, after incubating the fibers with curcumin, the protein not only continued to assemble, but did so to a degree that the fibers crossed the diameter barrier from the nanoscale to the microscale, akin to the diameter of collagen or spider silk.

"This was a surprising and thrilling achievement," said Montclare, explaining that this kind of diameter increase in the presence of small molecules is unprecedented. "A microscale fiber that is capable of delivering a small molecule, whether it be a therapeutic compound or other material, is a major step forward."

Montclare explained that biomaterials embedded with small molecules could be used to construct dual-purpose scaffolds for tissue engineering or to deliver certain drugs more efficiently, especially those that are less effective in an aqueous environment. Using microscopy, the team was able to observe the fibers in three dimensions and to confirm that the curcumin, which fluoresces when bound to structural protein, was distributed homogeneously throughout the fiber.

Despite the enormity of the jump from nano- to microscale, the research team believes they can devise even larger fibers. The next step, Montclare says, is developing proteins that can assemble on the milliscale, creating fibers large enough to see with the naked eye. "It's even possible to imagine generating hair out of cell assembly," she says.

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NYU researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber

Researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber

19 hours ago

Researchers at the New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscalea leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers.

Jin Kim Montclare, an associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU School of Engineering, led a group of researchers who published the results of successful trials in the creation of engineered microfiber proteins in the journal Biomacromolecules.

Many materials used in medicine and nanotechnology rely on proteins engineered to form fibers with specific properties. For example, the scaffolds used in tissue engineering depend on engineered fibers, as do the nanowires used in biosensors. These fibers can also be bound with small molecules of therapeutic compounds and used in drug delivery.

Montclare and her collaborators began their experiments with the intention of designing nanoscale proteins bound with the cancer therapeutic curcumin. They successfully created a novel, self-assembling nanoscale protein, including a hydrophobic pore capable of binding small molecules. To their surprise, after incubating the fibers with curcumin, the protein not only continued to assemble, but did so to a degree that the fibers crossed the diameter barrier from the nanoscale to the microscale, akin to the diameter of collagen or spider silk.

"This was a surprising and thrilling achievement," said Montclare, explaining that this kind of diameter increase in the presence of small molecules is unprecedented. "A microscale fiber that is capable of delivering a small molecule, whether it be a therapeutic compound or other material, is a major step forward."

Montclare explained that biomaterials embedded with small molecules could be used to construct dual-purpose scaffolds for tissue engineering or to deliver certain drugs more efficiently, especially those that are less effective in an aqueous environment. Using microscopy, the team was able to observe the fibers in three dimensions and to confirm that the curcumin, which fluoresces when bound to structural protein, was distributed homogeneously throughout the fiber.

Despite the enormity of the jump from nano- to microscale, the research team believes they can devise even larger fibers. The next step, Montclare says, is developing proteins that can assemble on the milliscale, creating fibers large enough to see with the naked eye. "It's even possible to imagine generating hair out of cell assembly," she says.

Explore further: Chemists create nanofibers using unprecedented new method

More information: "Engineered Coiled-Coil Protein Microfibers." Biomacromolecules, 2014, 15 (10), pp 35033510 DOI: 10.1021/bm5004948

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Researchers break nano barrier to engineer the first protein microfiber

First protein microfiber engineered: New material advances tissue engineering and drug delivery

Researchers at the New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering have broken new ground in the development of proteins that form specialized fibers used in medicine and nanotechnology. For as long as scientists have been able to create new proteins that are capable of self-assembling into fibers, their work has taken place on the nanoscale. For the first time, this achievement has been realized on the microscale -- a leap of magnitude in size that presents significant new opportunities for using engineered protein fibers.

Jin Kim Montclare, an associate professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the NYU School of Engineering, led a group of researchers who published the results of successful trials in the creation of engineered microfiber proteins in the journal Biomacromolecules.

Many materials used in medicine and nanotechnology rely on proteins engineered to form fibers with specific properties. For example, the scaffolds used in tissue engineering depend on engineered fibers, as do the nanowires used in biosensors. These fibers can also be bound with small molecules of therapeutic compounds and used in drug delivery.

Montclare and her collaborators began their experiments with the intention of designing nanoscale proteins bound with the cancer therapeutic curcumin. They successfully created a novel, self-assembling nanoscale protein, including a hydrophobic pore capable of binding small molecules. To their surprise, after incubating the fibers with curcumin, the protein not only continued to assemble, but did so to a degree that the fibers crossed the diameter barrier from the nanoscale to the microscale, akin to the diameter of collagen or spider silk.

"This was a surprising and thrilling achievement," said Montclare, explaining that this kind of diameter increase in the presence of small molecules is unprecedented. "A microscale fiber that is capable of delivering a small molecule, whether it be a therapeutic compound or other material, is a major step forward."

Montclare explained that biomaterials embedded with small molecules could be used to construct dual-purpose scaffolds for tissue engineering or to deliver certain drugs more efficiently, especially those that are less effective in an aqueous environment. Using microscopy, the team was able to observe the fibers in three dimensions and to confirm that the curcumin, which fluoresces when bound to structural protein, was distributed homogeneously throughout the fiber.

Despite the enormity of the jump from nano- to microscale, the research team believes they can devise even larger fibers. The next step, Montclare says, is developing proteins that can assemble on the milliscale, creating fibers large enough to see with the naked eye. "It's even possible to imagine generating hair out of cell assembly," she says.

Researchers from three institutions collaborated on this work. In addition to Montclare, NYU School of Engineering doctoral candidate Jasmin Hume, graduate student Rudy Jacquet, and undergraduate student Jennifer Sun co-authored the paper. Richard Bonneau, an associate professor in NYU's Department of Biology and a member of the computer science faculty at NYU's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, and postdoctoral scholar P. Douglas Renfrew also contributed, along with M. Lane Gilchrist, associate professor of chemical engineering at City College of New York and master's degree student Jesse A. Martin, also from City College. Their work was supported by the Army Research Office and the National Science Foundation.

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The above story is based on materials provided by New York University Polytechnic School of Engineering. Note: Materials may be edited for content and length.

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First protein microfiber engineered: New material advances tissue engineering and drug delivery

Phayronet Develops Nano-robotic Treatment Customized to the Biological Characteristics of Each Patient

Karmiel, israel (PRWEB) October 20, 2014

Phayronet combines nanotechnology capabilities together with the achievements of genetic engineering for medical benefits. It develops the future direction of biomedical engineering developments. The Company leads the research efforts aimed at understanding the interactions between cells' functioning, blood flow and the behavior of blood vessel walls, and different molecular mechanisms, including the formation of cancer cells. The medical nano-robots will be able to detect disturbances in the cell structure and will perform repair operations. In the future, this will lead to "Personalized Nano-Medicine."

This month, Phayronet finishes developing Nano-robotic treatment customized to the biological characteristics of each patient. Phayronet leads the research aimed at understanding the interactions between cells' functioning, blood flow and the behavior of blood vessel walls, and different molecular mechanisms, including the formation of cancer cells. The medical nano-robots developed by the company will be able to detect disturbances in the cell structure and will perform repair operations. In the future, this will lead to "Personalized Nano-Medicine" - nano-robotic treatment customized to the biological characteristics of each patient.

Phayronet made inroads in search of advanced rehabilitation technologies, prioritizing on the capacity to conduct internal imaging and information gathering from live models throughout the trial. Phayronet unveils a whole new world on our type of studies and technologies that were only recently available to the academic community. A high-level presentation of the findings and the medical explanation for incidents that we witness enables us to observe the process and provide proof for the assumptions that stand at the basis of our research and development for a quick transition to clinical trials, which we can prove that Phayronet's treatment methods really do help people.

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Phayronet Develops Nano-robotic Treatment Customized to the Biological Characteristics of Each Patient

B.S./M.S. Contiguous Program (NENG) | NanoEngineering

A contiguous program leading to a bachelor of science and a master of science degree in nanoengineering is offered to a student with junior standing who has an upper-division GPA of 3.5 or better and a 3.0 overallUCSDGPA.

During the last quarter of their junior year (more specifically, the fourth quarter prior to the receipt of theB.S. degree), students interested in obtaining theM.S. degree within one year following receipt of theB.S. degree may apply to the Department of NanoEngineering for admission to the program. Students must submit 3 letters of reference from their professors with their application.

Students will meet the requirements of both theB.S. andM.S. program, such as courses and credits.There are no overlaps in courses.Upon completion of theB.S./M.S. program, students are not automatically eligible for admission to thePh.D. Program.

What are the advantages of students doing aB.S./M.S.?

- Students are admitted without having to take theGREsand will not need to pay the graduate application fee.

- Students can start taking theM.S. required courses their senior year and therefore, take more graduate courses overall.

- Students may be able to start aM.S. thesis project earlier. Note: Students still have bothM.S. plans as options (coursework or thesisM.S.). This does not reduce the number of courses to be taken in either degree.

- AllM.S. students need to take 5 core classes as stated in the catalog.

- Courses taken cannot be counted for both theB.S. and theM.S. program.

TheM.S. program is intended to extend and broaden an undergraduate background and/or equip practicing engineers with fundamental knowledge in their particular fields. The degree is offered under both the Thesis Plan I and the Comprehensive Examination Plan II.

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B.S./M.S. Contiguous Program (NENG) | NanoEngineering

Bio-Inspired 'Nano-Cocoons' Offer Targeted Drug Delivery Against Cancer Cells

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Newswise Biomedical engineering researchers have developed a drug delivery system consisting of nanoscale cocoons made of DNA that target cancer cells and trick the cells into absorbing the cocoon before unleashing anticancer drugs. The work was done by researchers at North Carolina State University and the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

This drug delivery system is DNA-based, which means it is biocompatible and less toxic to patients than systems that use synthetic materials, says Dr. Zhen Gu, senior author of a paper on the work and an assistant professor in the joint biomedical engineering program at NC State and UNC Chapel Hill.

This technique also specifically targets cancer cells, can carry a large drug load and releases the drugs very quickly once inside the cancer cell, Gu says.

In addition, because we used self-assembling DNA techniques, it is relatively easy to manufacture, says Wujin Sun, lead author of the paper and a Ph.D. student in Gus lab.

Each nano-cocoon is made of a single strand of DNA that self-assembles into what looks like a cocoon, or ball of yarn, that measures 150 nanometers across.

The core of the nano-cocoon contains the anticancer drug doxorubicin (DOX) and a protein called DNase. The DNase, an enzyme that would normally cut up the DNA cocoon, is coated in a thin polymer that traps the DNase like a sword in a sheath.

The surface of the nano-cocoon is studded with folic acid ligands. When the nano-cocoon encounters a cancer cell, the ligands bind the nano-cocoon to receptors on the surface of the cell causing the cell to suck in the nano-cocoon.

Once inside the cancer cell, the cells acidic environment destroys the polymer sheath containing the DNase. Freed from its sheath, the DNase rapidly slices through the DNA cocoon, spilling DOX into the cancer cell and killing it.

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Bio-Inspired 'Nano-Cocoons' Offer Targeted Drug Delivery Against Cancer Cells

Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems Progress on CubeSat Proximity Operations Demonstration

Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems, Inc., the industry leader in nano-satellites and turnkey SmallSat solutions, today announced that it successfully completed the development of the Cubesat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD) vehicles and has officially received the approval to continue into the Vehicle Assembly Integration and Testing (AI&T) Phase.

The Cubesat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD) mission will demonstrate rendezvous, proximity operations and docking using two three-unit (3U) cubesats. This mission will validate and characterize several miniature, low-power avionics technologies applicable to future NASA projects. The CPOD project is led by Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems, Inc. of Irvine, California with funding from NASA's Small Spacecraft Technology Program.

After undergoing multiple rigorous program reviews, the management team of the Small Spacecraft Technology Program (SSTP) at Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., determined that the Tyvak's team is actively retiring all the foreseeable risks and is demonstrating the required technical and programmatic capabilities to successfully complete this phase of the project. SSTP managers also recognized that with Tyvak's continued success, the team will be in an excellent position to proceed with the final phase of the project leading to the on-orbit operations.

"We are grateful for the support and trust that NASA has given us throughout the project's development." said Dr. Marco Villa, Tyvak's President and Chief Operating Officer. "Tyvak has established itself as a leader in the NanoSatellite segment by recognition of its advanced technical capabilities," Dr. Villa added, "but it is great to also be acknowledged for our attentiveness and diligence towards program management and mission assurance. Surely this wouldn't be possible if it weren't for our outstanding engineering team and our invaluable partners 406 Aerospace, Applied Defense Solutions, and VACCO Industries. "

With responsibility over the entire mission, from subsystems' design to operations, Tyvak announced to be still on-track with the original schedule, and to expect a full vehicle integrated by the end of the year with Flight Readiness Review as early as May 2015.

For more information about CPOD, go tohttp://www.nasa.gov/directorates/spacetech/small_spacecraft/cpod_project.html.

About Tyvak: Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems Inc. provides turnkey solutions for SmallSat customers, from innovations to operations, making space research and utilization more accessible today than it has ever been. Tyvak can handle all your satellite needs from design and build, to test, launch and operations. With decades of experience in all sectors of the industry, the Tyvak team is unmatched in the small satellite industry. Engineers work with clients to shrink payload specifications, enabling more cost-effective development and transport to orbit. Tyvak systems are adaptable, have low power consumption and are easily customizable to support multiple applications. For more information, go to http://www.tyvak.com.

The Cubesat Proximity Operations Demonstration (CPOD) mission will demonstrate rendezvous, proximity operations and docking using two three-unit (3U) cubesats. This mission will validate and characterize several miniature, low-power avionics technologies applicable to future NASA projects. The CPOD project is led by Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems, LLC of Irvine, California with funding from NASA's Small Spacecraft Technology Program. The three-year project was initiated in November 2012.

Each of the satellites has dimensions of 10 by 10 by 33 centimeters and has a mass of about 5 kilograms. The satellites also have deployable solar panels.

CPOD will demonstrate the ability of two small spacecraft to remain at determined points relative to each other (called station-keeping) as well as precision circumnavigation and docking using imaging sensors and a multi-thruster cold gas propulsion system. Docking will employ a novel universal docking mechanism.

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Tyvak Nano-Satellite Systems Progress on CubeSat Proximity Operations Demonstration

U-M hosts grand opening of new $46M nanomechanical science, engineering building

University of Michigan president Mark Schlissel, Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder, and several university administrators, staff, faculty and students were on hand Friday morning for the dedication andgrand opening of the new $46 million nanomechanial engineering building on North Campus.

The 62,880-square-foot, three-story Center of Excellence in Nano Mechanical Science and Engineering an addition to the G.G. Brown Laboratory Building was a structure more than four years in the making, as the Board of Regents approved it in 2010, and construction began in 2011.

"This addition is allowing us to take our work of mechanics and materials down to the micro and the nano scale, and extend our reach into the blossoming field of biomechanical science," Schlissel said.

"This project is a great example of how our federal, state and community partners can help us advance the mission of the University of Michigan."

University officials said the project was paid for with a $9.5 million grant from the National Institute of Standards and Technology, one of just two dozen facilities to receive construction grants from the organization.

There were also $15 million in contributions from U-M, $6.5 million from the College of Engineering and $15 million in private commitments.

In 2012, Snyder signed a capital outlay bill thatgave U-M $30 million for this and other projects. It was part of a $304 million allotment for capital improvement among public universities in the state.

"NIST and the University of Michigan have a long history of collaboration and partnership. Our researchers, in the past couple years alone, have co-authored well over 100 papers and top-tier journals," said Dr. Jason Boehm, director of the NIST program coordination office.

"I fully expect many more opportunities for NIST and the University of Michigan to collaborate in the future."

U-M professor Ellen Arruda said there is a part of the building called a "breaker space," where researchers will watch the degradation of materials that go into things like cars, airplanes and medical devices.

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U-M hosts grand opening of new $46M nanomechanical science, engineering building

University of Michigan opening $46 million nanotechnology research center

The University of Michigan is opening a $46 million complex for researchers to study nanotechnologies in energy, biotechnology and other fields.

The Center of Excellence in Nano Mechanical Science and Engineering is a 62,000-square-foot addition to laboratories on the Ann Arbor school's north campus. Researchers will be able to watch the degradation of materials that go into things like cars and medical devices.

Researchers also will be able to use tissue culture rooms to grow cells to do cancer research or test blood infections. Specially designed chambers will allow a team to study how a single molecule of DNA responds to slight forces, which could provide insight into genetic diseases.

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If you enjoy the content on the Crain's Detroit Business Web site and want to see more, try 8 issues of our print edition risk-free. If you wish to continue, you will receive 44 more issues (for a total of 52 in all), including the annual Book of Lists for just $59. That's over 55% off the cover price. If you decide Crain's is not for you, just write "Cancel" on the invoice, return it and owe nothing. The 8 issues are yours to keep with no further obligation to us. Sign up below.

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University of Michigan opening $46 million nanotechnology research center



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