Super Stupid Case Fanatic; 1×40 – Read a freaking biology book. – Video


Super Stupid Case Fanatic; 1x40 - Read a freaking biology book.
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Super Stupid Case Fanatic; 1x40 - Read a freaking biology book. - Video

Synthetic biology: Engineering a new frontier

Most people look at the cedar in Drew Endy's front yard and admire its graceful green boughs, heavy with needles, sap and cones.

Endy sees something much different: an industrial manufacturing platform, waiting to be exploited.

"I dream we could someday reprogram trees that could self-assemble a computer chip in your front yard," exudes the brilliant and intense Stanford University scientist, who has emerged as a leading evangelist in the new field of synthetic biology.

One gene at a time, Endy and other elite teams of Bay Area scientists are striving to design and build organisms unlike anything made by Mother Nature.

It's not yet possible to create artificial life from scratch. But it's getting closer, through projects that essentially swap out a cell's original operating system for a lab-designed one. These made-to-order creations then can be put to work.

The Human Genome Project gave us the ability to read nature's instruction manual -- DNA -- like words in a book. But the real opportunities, scientists say, lie in our ability to not only read genetic code, but to write it, then build it using off-the-shelf chemical ingredients, strung together like holiday lights. It is the creation of new genomes -- and a new frontier in bioengineering.

Synthetic biology works because biological creatures are, in essence, programmable manufacturing systems. The DNA instruction manual buried inside every cell -- its software, in a

This presages the distant day when Endy's big Menlo Park cedar churns out computer chips, not cones. Or makes cancer-fighting drugs. Or fuels. Or building materials. Or anything else.

There are concerns about safety and ethics. In the wrong hands, lone villains or rogue regimes could unleash dangerous life forms. A review in 2010 by a White House commission concluded the field needs monitoring, but the risks are still limited.

Synthetic biology is different from genetic engineering, which simply inserts a gene from one organism into another.

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Synthetic biology: Engineering a new frontier

Synthetic biology: Stanford, UC Berkeley engineering a new frontier

Most people look at the cedar in Drew Endy's front yard and admire its graceful green boughs, heavy with needles, sap and cones.

Endy sees something much different: an industrial manufacturing platform, waiting to be exploited.

"I dream we could someday reprogram trees that could self-assemble a computer chip in your front yard," exudes the brilliant and intense Stanford University scientist, who has emerged as a leading evangelist in the new field of synthetic biology.

One gene at a time, Endy and other elite teams of Bay Area scientists are striving to design and build organisms unlike anything made by Mother Nature.

It's not yet possible to create artificial life from scratch. But it's getting closer, through projects that essentially swap out a cell's original operating system for a lab-designed one. These made-to-order creations then can be put to work.

The Human Genome Project gave us the ability to read nature's instruction manual -- DNA -- like words in a book. But the real opportunities, scientists say, lie in our ability to not only read genetic code, but to write it, then build it using off-the-shelf chemical ingredients, strung together like holiday lights. It is the creation of new genomes -- and a new frontier in bioengineering.

Synthetic biology works because biological creatures are, in essence, programmable manufacturing systems. The DNA instruction manual buried inside every cell -- its software, in a

This presages the distant day when Endy's big Menlo Park cedar churns out computer chips, not cones. Or makes cancer-fighting drugs. Or fuels. Or building materials. Or anything else.

There are concerns about safety and ethics. In the wrong hands, lone villains or rogue regimes could unleash dangerous life forms. A review in 2010 by a White House commission concluded the field needs monitoring, but the risks are still limited.

Synthetic biology is different from genetic engineering, which simply inserts a gene from one organism into another.

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Synthetic biology: Stanford, UC Berkeley engineering a new frontier

Scientist Recommends Research Method Change For Evolutionary Biology

April Flowers for redOrbit.com Your Universe Online

Shozo Yokoyama, a biologist at Emory University, says evolutionary biologists need to shift their focus from present-day molecules to synthesized, ancestral ones to truly understand the mechanisms of natural selection.

Yokoyama presented evidence to support his claim at the American Academy of Arts and Sciences (AAAS) meeting in Boston this week.

This is not just an evolutionary biology problem, its a science problem, says Yokoyama, a leading expert in the natural selection of color vision. If you want to understand the mechanisms of an adaptive phenotype, the function of a gene and how that function changes, you have to look back in time. That is the secret. Studying ancestral molecules will give us a better understanding of genes that could be applied to medicine and other areas of science.

Yokoyama notes positive Darwinian selection has been studied for years almost exclusively using comparative sequence analysis of present-day molecules, an approach fueled by increasingly fast and cheap genome sequencing techniques. Faster and easier, says Yokoyama, are not always best if you want to arrive at a true, quantitative result.

If you only study present-day molecules, youre only getting part of the picture, and that picture is often wrong, he says.

Studying fish and other vertebrates, Yokoyama has spent two decades teasing out secrets of the adaptive evolution of vision.

There are five classes of opsin genes that encode visual pigments. They are also responsible for dim-light and color vision. Since the available light at various ocean depths is well quantified, fish provide valuable clues for how environmental factors can lead to vision changes. For example, the common vertebrate ancestor possessed ultraviolet vision, suited to both shallow water and land.

As the environment of a species sinks deeper in the ocean, or rises closer to the surface and moves to land, bits and pieces of the opsin genes change and vision adapts, Yokoyama says. Im interested in exactly how that happens at the molecular level.

Molecular biologists construct a specific visual pigment by taking DNA from an animal, isolating and cloning its opsin genes, then using in vitro assays to create the pigment that can then be manipulated by changing the positions of the amino acids. This allows the scientists to study the regulation of the genes functions.

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Scientist Recommends Research Method Change For Evolutionary Biology

Intrexon and AquaBounty to Collaborate on Leveraging Synthetic Biology to Increase Productivity Across the Aquaculture …

Exclusive Channel Collaboration Driven by Need to Meet Growing World Food Demand

Intrexon Proposes to Invest Up to $6.0 Million in AquaBounty

GERMANTOWN, Md. and MAYNARD, Mass., Feb. 15, 2013 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Intrexon Corporation, a synthetic biology company that utilizes its proprietary technologies to provide control over cellular function, and AquaBounty Technologies, Inc. (AIM:ABTX.L), a biotechnology company focused on enhancing the productivity in aquaculture, today announced the formation of an exclusive channel collaboration (ECC) to enhance productivity in aquaculture and develop products that decrease the time to market and address growing environmental issues.

As part of the ECC, Intrexon has proposed investing up to $6 million in AquaBounty to fund its operations and research. The investment is subject to shareholder approvals including the waiver of pre-emptive rights.

Thomas Kasser, President of Intrexon's Animal Science Division, said, "Today's developing world population is faced with increasing demand across a broad spectrum of markets including food, fuel and healthcare. Intrexon's mission is to apply its synthetic biology expertise and know how to provide solutions to these major global issues. Our agreement with AquaBounty demonstrates this commitment and focus in the food arena.

"The ECC with AquaBounty places Intrexon in strong position to revolutionize the aquaculture industry with faster growing, environmentally friendly products to meet the strong and growing demand for finfish. Our priority will be to develop the next generation of AquaBounty's existing product, AquAdvantage(R) Salmon, and to identify other products where our synthetic biology can implement leading edge technology to advance the sustainability and efficiency of fish production. AquAdvantage(R) Salmon is capable of reaching marketable size in about half of the conventional time, reduced from approximately 28 to 36 months to 18 months, with a 30% reduction in feed required to reach market weight. The FDA has published a draft Environmental Assessment and a preliminary draft of a Finding of No Significant Impact as one of the last steps in the approval process. The public comment period for these documents will close on April 25, 2013."

Ron Stotish, Chief Executive Officer of AquaBounty commented, "This collaboration with Intrexon is a transformative event for AquaBounty by providing access to one of the most innovative genetic sciences in the world today. It allows us to produce the next generation of existing products and new finfish products that meet today's demand for global consumption and environmental challenges."

Under terms of the agreements:

AquaBounty also announced the appointment to its board of directors of three individuals designated by Intrexon. The appointed board members are Thomas Barton, Managing Partner, White Rock Capital Management, L.P., Thomas R. Kasser, Ph.D., President of Intrexon's Animal Sciences Division, and James C. Turk, Jr., Partner, Harrison & Turk, P.C.

About Intrexon Corporation

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Intrexon and AquaBounty to Collaborate on Leveraging Synthetic Biology to Increase Productivity Across the Aquaculture ...

NIBI Conference for teachers in biology, 12 January 2013, dissection of fulmar stomach – Video


NIBI Conference for teachers in biology, 12 January 2013, dissection of fulmar stomach
Lunteren, Netherlands Jan van Franeker, Elisa Bravo Rebolledo, IMARES Wageningen UR Participants were shown how to dissect a Fulmar stomach, and had their personal amazing and appauling plastic experience! Music: The great pacific garbage patch - Plastic Soup

By: Wageningenur1

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NIBI Conference for teachers in biology, 12 January 2013, dissection of fulmar stomach - Video

BBC Jim AL Khalili – Quantum Biology: Is Life Quantum Mechanical? – Video


BBC Jim AL Khalili - Quantum Biology: Is Life Quantum Mechanical?
Jim AL Khalili delivers this years prestige Kelvin lecture: Is Life Quantum Mechanical? IET: Savoy Place, London 18th April 2013 Attend in person: conferences.theiet.org Watch live from Savoy Place: tv.theiet.org This lecture introduces the speculative yet exciting new field of Quantum Biology". Jim Al-Khalili is one of a growing number of physicists struggling to understand how fragile quantum mechanical phenomena previously thought to be confined to highly rarefied laboratory systems at temperatures close to absolute zero, manage to survive in the wet, warm biological world. More YouTube Video from The IET: http://www.youtube.com LET #39;S CONNECT! http://www.facebook.com twitter.com http://www.theiet.org http

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BBC Jim AL Khalili - Quantum Biology: Is Life Quantum Mechanical? - Video

FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Melatonin Biology: Actions & Therapeutics

Public release date: 11-Feb-2013 [ | E-mail | Share ]

Contact: Robin Crawford, CMP src@faseb.org 301-634-7010 Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology

Bethesda, MD The Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology (FASEB) announces the opening of registration for the Science Research Conference (SRC): Melatonin Biology: Actions & Therapeutics.

The 2013 FASEB SRC on Melatonin Biology: Actions & Therapeutics is an important and unique scientific conference where new and exciting discoveries regarding melatonin as a cytoprotective molecule and a physiological marker of circadian phase will be explored in talks, poster sessions, and intensive scientific discussion. This gathering of researchers from around the world to share cutting edge results and to discuss the functions of melatonin and its receptors in illness and health is key for accelerating breakthrough outcomes in melatonin biology and therapeutics.

FASEB SRC has announced a total of 34 SRCs in 2013. To register for an SRC, view preliminary programs, or find a listing of all our 2013 SRCs, please visit http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

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Since 1982, FASEB SRC has offered a continuing series of inter-disciplinary exchanges that are recognized as a valuable complement to the highly successful society meetings. Divided into small groups, scientists from around the world meet intimately and without distractions to explore new approaches to those research areas undergoing rapid scientific changes.

In efforts to expand the SRC series, potential organizers are encouraged to contact SRC staff at SRC@faseb.org. Proposal guidelines can be found at http://www.faseb.org/SRC.

AAAS and EurekAlert! are not responsible for the accuracy of news releases posted to EurekAlert! by contributing institutions or for the use of any information through the EurekAlert! system.

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FASEB SRC announces conference registration open for: Melatonin Biology: Actions & Therapeutics

Biology student at Cal Poly SLO dies outside residence hall

A second-year student at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo died over the weekend after collapsing outside a residence hall on campus, authorities said Monday.

Brandon Huang, 20, a biology student, was returning to the residence hall late Saturday night when he collapsed, according to the university. Authorities tried to revive him on scene but were unsuccessful, and he was taken to Sierra Vista Regional Medical Center, where he was pronounced dead.

In a letter addressed to the Cal Poly community, the university officials said "police have found no evidence of foul play."

The letter, dated Sunday, added that "this is a sad day for the entire community."

"We care about each member of our Cal Poly community," the letter read,"and our thoughts are with Brandon's family and loved ones."

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Biology student at Cal Poly SLO dies outside residence hall

U. biophysicists hope to change biology field

Three biophysicists at the Rutgers University BioMaPS Institute for Quantitative Biology are changing the field of modern biology from guesswork into a more theoretical and computational science.

Alexandre Morozov, George Locke and Michael Manhart work at the Hill Center on Busch campus and are attempting to change the way biologists approach the field.

Theres lots of data but theres not any good theoretical understanding of [it], said Manhart, a fourth-year Ph.D candidate in the Department of Physics studying molecular evolution.

He said there are not enough theories, models and computational techniques that are up to speed to address the excess of data.

Being able to do something with this excess of data and being able to extract meaning from it is a really big undertaking unto itself that really requires huge advancements in theory, Manhart said.

Morozov, an associate professor in the Department of Physics, said they are moving away from the old notion of biology, which has always been an experimental science where scientists look at phenomenon and try to classify it.

We have started putting numbers on it in hopes of it becoming more like physics in the 21st century, Morozov said.

He said he wants it to be more precise and controlled.

Its an interesting area where physics and biology come together, he said.

Morozov said he, along with Manhart and Locke, a Ph.D student in the Department of Physics, tried to merge ideas of polymer physics and DNA processing, focusing on the way proteins and DNA interact.

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U. biophysicists hope to change biology field

AP Biology Online Help with Educator.com

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Los Angeles, CA (PRWEB) February 12, 2013

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This course is indispensable for any student looking for a professor who can effectively explain important concepts with fully illustrated diagrams before going over problems like those encountered in the multiple choice and free response sections on the exam. Biology is fascinating when topics such as Cell Structure, Genetics, Plants, Physiology, Behavior, and Ecology come to life on screen. Free full examples are available, such as Glycolysis and Anaerobic Respiration. A customized, dual-screen interface creates a unique one-to-one online learning environment that enables students to see both the professor and the whiteboard at the same time.

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Educator.com is determined to meet the demands of todays scholars. New and exciting courses are frequently added. At this time Educators AP Biology courses are available for immediate viewing.

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AP Biology Online Help with Educator.com