Life and Biology : What Happens to a Stagnant Cell? : Here Comes the Boom – Video


Life and Biology : What Happens to a Stagnant Cell? : Here Comes the Boom
A slightly different video, where I attempt to edu-tain and inspire you with power of SCIENCE! Video inspired by Here Comes the Boom : http://www.sonypictures.com ======================================================= CALL ME, BEEP ME: Second Channel: http://www.youtube.com Collab Channel: http://www.youtube.com Tumblr: itsgonnabeathing.tumblr.com Facebook facebook.com Google+: gplus.to Twitter: twitter.com ======================================================= HEY! Thanks for watching my videos! I make videos that are funny, nerdy, random and awkward...that sounded way more appealing in my head. If you like my videos, consider subscribing, but take your time. Don #39;t rush into this relationship too fast ๐Ÿ˜‰ MY PLAYLISTS! It #39;s Gonna Be a Things :: http://www.youtube.com Sketches and Stuff :: http://www.youtube.com Stewdippin #39;s Playlist Show :: http://www.youtube.com In this video you will learn: What Happens when a cell stagnates What happens to a stagnant cell/ Here Comes the boom The Power of one How to Be the change you want to see in the world How one person can make a difference How to pay it forward How to inspire people with biology

By: stewdippin

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Life and Biology : What Happens to a Stagnant Cell? : Here Comes the Boom - Video

biology undiscovered: episode 1 – ecological backlash – Video


biology undiscovered: episode 1 - ecological backlash
hey ๐Ÿ™‚ here #39;s a short commentary for our biology class. ps we filmed on a windy place, so if you couldn #39;t hear it, were sorry ๐Ÿ™‚ we #39;ll just add some cc #39;s soon this episode focuses on the topic of ecological backlash. its not much, but we did our best. special thanks to mrs. mary jean sabanal for sharing her knowledge to us ๐Ÿ™‚ all rights reserved: One-Natomy group; II- Aristotle PACITA COMPLEX NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

By: Seandale Rodrichson Vista

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biology undiscovered: episode 1 - ecological backlash - Video

biology undiscovered: episode 2 – the body atlas – Video


biology undiscovered: episode 2 - the body atlas
hey ๐Ÿ™‚ here #39;s a short commentary for our biology class. ps we filmed on a windy place, so if you couldn #39;t hear it, were sorry ๐Ÿ™‚ we #39;ll just add some cc #39;s soon this episode focuses on the topic of our body and its systems. its not much, but we did our best. special thanks to mrs. mary jean sabanal for sharing her knowledge to us ๐Ÿ™‚ all rights reserved: One-Natomy group; II- Aristotle PACITA COMPLEX NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

By: Seandale Rodrichson Vista

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biology undiscovered: episode 2 - the body atlas - Video

biology undiscovered: episode 4 – legos of life – Video


biology undiscovered: episode 4 - legos of life
hey ๐Ÿ™‚ here #39;s a short commentary for our biology class. this episode focuses on the topic of the DNA and the concept of genetics and heredity. its not much, but we did our best. special thanks to mrs. mary jean sabanal for sharing her knowledge to us ๐Ÿ™‚ all rights reserved: One-Natomy group; II- Aristotle PACITA COMPLEX NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

By: Seandale Rodrichson Vista

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biology undiscovered: episode 4 - legos of life - Video

biology undiscovered: episode 3 – plant life – Video


biology undiscovered: episode 3 - plant life
hey ๐Ÿ™‚ here #39;s a short commentary for our biology class. ps we filmed on a windy place, so if you couldn #39;t hear it, were sorry ๐Ÿ™‚ we #39;ll just add some cc #39;s soon this episode focuses on the topic of plants, and how they help us humans. its not much, but we did our best. special thanks to mrs. mary jean sabanal for sharing her knowledge to us ๐Ÿ™‚ all rights reserved: One-Natomy group; II- Aristotle PACITA COMPLEX NATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL

By: Seandale Rodrichson Vista

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biology undiscovered: episode 3 - plant life - Video

Glencoe Software Announces Extensive Design, Usability and Data DOI Upgrades for The Journal of Cell Biology's JCB …

SEATTLE, Feb. 21, 2013 /PRNewswire/ --Glencoe Software, The Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), and The Rockefeller University are pleased to announce their next enhancements to the JCB DataViewer, the world's first system for presentation, sharing and archiving published scientific image data.The JCB DataViewer archives data for authors and makes them available for query and re-use by other scientists. In this update, Glencoe Software's team has completely re-worked the design and layout of the JCB DataViewer, to improve the access to and use of complex multi-dimensional image datasets associated with papers published in JCB. In addition, all JCB DataViewer datasets have an associated DOI, the standard unique identifier used to identify published scientific information. This new version of the JCB DataViewer provides an improved workflow for users, streamlined upload for authors, and, most importantly, improved presentation of large, complex datasets from high content screening (HCS) and large tiled arrays. Publication of these data is critical for the scientific community. Improving the workflow and user experience and adding unique identifiers help to ensure productive re-use of these unique data.

First released in December 2008, the JCB DataViewer (http://jcb-dataviewer.rupress.org) has been under continuous development to support new data types and to provide new functionality for its users. The JCB DataViewer currently contains original image data associated with 288 manuscripts published in JCB, and the image data submission rate by authors is steadily increasing.Improved, stream-lined upload of and access to data should substantially increase the amount of data hosted and the use of those data within the JCB DataViewer. Both Glencoe Software, Inc., and JCB welcome and are prepared for the growth of this resource. Liz Williams, Executive Editor of JCB, said, "We are proud of the JCB DataViewer's new look and think it is an important step forward that all JCB DataViewer datasets now are assigned unique DOIs. These updates will make these data even more accessible to the scientific community." Mike Rossner, Director of The Rockefeller University Press, added, "This update to the JCB DataViewer is part of our ongoing development of this critical resource for JCB authors and readers."

The JCB DataViewer is based on open source software built by the Open Microscopy Environment (OME; http://openmicroscopy.org).Founded in 2000, OME builds and releases specifications and software tools for scientific image data, and its tools are used throughout the academic and commercial communities.Glencoe Software, Inc. has used OME's resources to build the JCB DataViewer and is a proud member of the OME Consortium.

Jason Swedlow, President of Glencoe Software, Inc., and co-founder of OME, said, "OME and Glencoe Software are excited to be a part of this important development and milestone in scientific publishing. The use of modern design and user experience principles to enhance the JCB DataViewer is an example of our commitment to develop the most useful and usable software for image data management, sharing, and publication."

Glencoe Software, Inc., provides commercial access to and customization of OME resources. With increasing proliferation and complexity of research image datasets and the need for secure sharing, analysis, and visualization, Glencoe Software is well placed to deliver secure, scalable solutions based on an open-source, community-driven foundation. http://www.glencoesoftware.com

The JCB DataViewer hosts image data associated with articles published in The Journal of Cell Biology. JCB is published by The Rockefeller University Press, which also publishes The Journal of Experimental Medicine and The Journal of General Physiology. All editorial decisions on manuscripts submitted to the Press journals are made by active scientists in conjunction with in-house scientific editors. All published content is available for free six months after publication. Authors retain copyright to their publications, and third parties may reuse the content under a Creative Commons license. http://www.rupress.org

Contact Information:

Glencoe Software, Inc. Jason Swedlow Tel: +1 206-973-8025 Email: info@glencoesoftware.com

Journal of Cell Biology Liz Williams Tel: +1 212-327-8011 Email: lwilliams@rockefeller.edu

This press release was issued through eReleases Press Release Distribution. For more information, visit http://www.ereleases.com.

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Glencoe Software Announces Extensive Design, Usability and Data DOI Upgrades for The Journal of Cell Biology's JCB ...

David Herring, JD โ€” Law and Behavioral Biology Research: Kinship Foster Care as a Case Study – Video


David Herring, JD mdash; Law and Behavioral Biology Research: Kinship Foster Care as a Case Study
David Herring, JD, presenting at the Ancestral Health Symposium 2012 (AHS12) Law and Behavioral Biology Research: Kinship Foster Care as a Case Study Abstract: This presentation begins with an overview of applied evolutionary psychology in the context of law and policy. The overview includes several concrete examples of legal scholars #39; use of behavioral biology research to explore law and policy related to subjects such as child maltreatment, rape, and employment discrimination. The presentation then moves to a detailed description of the use of behavioral biology research to examine kinship foster care law and policy. The focus is on grandparent investment research. Based on evolutionary theory, there have been several studies indicating that maternal grandparents tend to invest heavily in grandchildren, enhancing child nutrition and lowering the risk of mortality. In contrast, the presence of other grandparent types tends to increase the risk of child mortality. This latter effect seems to be especially pronounced for paternal grandmothers. The research in this area has implications for law and policy related to kinship foster care placements. Bio: David J. Herring is professor of law and former dean at the University of Pittsburgh School of Law. He has written extensively on child welfare law issues. His most recent work focuses on behavioral biology research and its implications for children placed in foster care.

By: AncestryFoundation

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David Herring, JD โ€” Law and Behavioral Biology Research: Kinship Foster Care as a Case Study - Video

UT Tyler Biology Department Faculty Awarded Nearly $70,000 to Study Endangered East Texas Species

UT Tyler Biology Department Faculty Awarded Nearly $70,000 to Study Endangered East Texas Species

The $69,113 Endangered Species Section 6 Grant was awarded to four biology faculty. They will assist TPWD, in collaboration with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, to identify fish hosts for East Texas freshwater mussels in the Neches, Sabine and Sulphur Rivers using genetic and ecological niche modeling methods.

Dr. John Placyk, assistant professor of biology, serves as principal investigator on the three-year project. Co-investigators are Dr. Neil Ford, professor of biology; Dr. Lance Williams, associate professor; Dr. Josh Banta, assistant professor and Marsha Williams, research associate.

Freshwater mussels have a very interesting life cycle. When they are born, they must live and feed off of a fishs gills before they can live on their own. Different mussel species rely on different fish hosts for their young, known as glochidia, but we do not know which fish are important for which mussel species, said Banta, whose research areas include genetic and ecological mapping. We are using DNA fingerprints of the different mussels to be able to determine which species are on which fish. We will then use this information to predict where different mussel species are found based on where their fish hosts are found. This work will improve the predictions of where particular mussel species are, which is important to land managers and conservation agencies.

Section 6 grants are funded by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for states to gain information about their endangered species.

Mussels are very important to us because they literally clean pollutants out of our rivers. Many of these species are federally listed as threatened or endangered because they are very rare; their habitats are declining. The state and federal government are very interested in understanding why this is happening and what can be done to protect these species, Banta added.

A UT Tyler faculty member since 2007, Placyk holds a Ph.D. in ecology and evolutionary biology from the University of Tennessee Knoxville and a master of science in biology from Northern Michigan University. During his tenure at UT Tyler, Placyk already has received research grants totaling about $150,000. He also serves as a UT System Louis Stokes Alliance for Minority Participation faculty mentor at UT Tyler.

Bantas research focuses on the mechanisms of variation in the wild, using techniques such as genetic mapping, quantitative genetics and ecological niche modeling. He has been a faculty member since 2011.

Fords research expertise is in life-history evolution. He has been conducting mussel surveys in East Texas for more than 10 years.

Marsha Williams will oversee the projects computer modeling components. She is an expert in river geomorphology and Geographic Information System applications. Prior to serving UT Tyler, she worked for the Mississippi Extension Service and served as a researcher for Ohio State University. Lance Williams research expertise is in aquatic ecology.

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UT Tyler Biology Department Faculty Awarded Nearly $70,000 to Study Endangered East Texas Species

Biology to leave Jefferson Scholars

Biology majors in the Thomas Jefferson Scholars Program are unsure about their future due to changes to the undergraduate program.`

The N.C. State biology program is being moved from the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences to the College of Sciences.

The Thomas Jefferson Scholars Program provides money to students pursuing a dual degree between any College of Agricultural and Life Sciences program and any College of Humanities and Social Sciences program.

Members of the Thomas Jefferson Scholars Program sent a letter to the University asking to admit future College of Sciences students into the program. The University replied telling members to calm down, according to a source who wishes to remain anonymous.

Dana Moeller, fundraising chair for the Jefferson Scholars, said the program will no longer accept biology students.

Under the current structure, approximately half of the programs members major in biology.

Next year, biology students will not be allowed into the program since it will fall under College of Sciences instead of the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences.

Students who are moving into College of Sciences and are already in the program will be grandfathered into the program and will not lose their status as Thomas Jefferson Scholars, Moeller said.

Thomas Jefferson Scholars Service Co-chair Kaitlyn Rogers said if this had been implemented earlier, she herself would not have been able to join the program.

Im disappointed [because] about half of our members would not be included in the programand we couldnt work something out between COS and CALS, Rogers, a senior in biology and Spanish, said. Now we are just trying to make the best of the situation.

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Biology to leave Jefferson Scholars

A Lesson for Apple from High School Biology

By Palwasha Saaim - February 19, 2013 | Tickers: AMZN, AAPL, GOOG, MSFT, NOK | 0 Comments

Palwasha is a member of The Motley Fool Blog Network -- entries represent the personal opinions of our bloggers and are not formally edited.

Apple's (NASDAQ: AAPL) downward spiral that started in late September eroded billions of dollars from the market. The investors who remained loyal to the stock and didn't sell out then are now left in utter disappointment. One such investor, the famous hedge fund manager and founder of Greenlight Capital David Einhorn, just couldn't take it anymore. He's recently came out and decided to sue the tech giant in an effort to push the company management to return some of the lost value back to shareholders using the billions of dollars hoarded in cash.

Einhorn proposes a preferred stock issuance plan. Contrarily, Mad Money's Jim Cramer is proposing that Apple should instead use that cash in crossing-over to other industries. He proposes buying companies like Twitter or Netflix. And then we have our fellow Fool blogger, Andres Cardenal, who proposes a share buyback for Apple. The possibilities are endless and shareholders should rest assured that, now that they've been sued, Apple management is seriously considering each potential route at the moment.

Nonetheless, the last few months have been very unnerving for shareholders as they watched the biggest company (by market capitalization) in the world decline to dirt cheap valuation multiples for no good reason. Many analysts have been speculating the possible reasons for the sudden unwarranted selling activity. Here's my take on it.

Survival 101

Symbiosis, a biological term I learned in high school biology, explains the interaction between two different species in which both benefit (mutualism), one benefits and the other neither gets harmed nor benefits (commensalism), and one benefits and the other gets harmed (parasitism), as well as some other types. Interesting, sure, but why the biology lecture in a financial blog? Well, because I think there's a lesson for Apple to learn from it.

Technology Mutualism

In a space where almost every other competitor exists in symbiosis with one another, Apple is left alone, all by itself to survive in this huge, perpetually growing, and fast-evolving technology industry. Look, for instance, at Nokia(NYSE: NOK) which, at last, sensibly decided to give up its flopping Symbian OS to adopt its competitor's OS--Windows 8. Stephen Elop finally gave in to the fact that his company needed rival Microsoft's (NASDAQ: MSFT) assistance to survive. Together, the two benefit each other today. Nokia is finally selling 'smartphones,' not just phones, and Microsoft is starting to claw back some of its lost market share.

Out of the 6.6 million units Nokia sold in Q4, only 2.2 million were its Symbian phones. On the other hand, the Microsoft Windows 8 OS-based Lumia phones accounted for more than two thirds (4.4 million) of Nokia's total units sold. The stock more than doubled following the news of Lumia phones' sell-out. Likewise, Microsoft's Windows OS' fourth quarter market share also climbed to 2.6%, which is a 150% increase from the same quarter from the prior year. Both companies appear to be better positioned in this mutualistic relationship.

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A Lesson for Apple from High School Biology

The growing undercover effort to get God into biology class

Meet the new creationism-in-sheep's-clothing: The "academic freedom" bill

Imagine an American public school where science textbooks were obligated to debunk Charles Darwin; where students could deny global warming and still get an A, and where college professors could tell Biology 101 students that the world was born on the back of a giant turtle. Sounds a little backwards for 2013, right?

Frighteningly, these are all real scenarios that could occur under new education bills proposed this year. But the language in most of these bills is so obtuse that you might not evenknowif you live in one of thesix statesconsidering them (Montana, Colorado, Oklahoma, Arizona, Missouri, and Indiana.)

SEE MORE: Is preschool really a better investment than buying stock?

America, meet the new creationism-in-sheep's-clothing: The "academic freedom" bill.

Unlike bills that explicitly require intelligent design and religious curriculums to be taught in schools, academic freedom bills simply permit teachers, schools, and students to explore alternative theories without repercussions. Sounds harmless, right? But Eric Meikle, education project director at the National Center for Science Education, explains that what these bills really do is "open the door for creationist literature." And in the last few years, the number of these bills has skyrocketed, with51 proposed since 2004, and twice as many proposed this year than in all of 2012. (Remember, it's only February.)

SEE MORE: America's nosediving law-school applications: By the numbers

Needless to say, science teachers aren't thrilled. "Intelligent design and anti-global warming curriculums harm the general public's perceptions of science, which can decrease students' interest in pursuing science careers," says Kathy Trundle, president of theAssociation for Science Teacher Education. "In turn, U.S. advancements in science [are] negatively impacted." Rick Grosberg, an evolution and ecology professor at the University of California at Davis, points out that "the mere act of teaching intelligent design as if it were an alternative scientific explanation confuses students and the public about what science is."

The secret weapon in these bills is the idea that pupils should understand the "strengths and weaknesses" of different scientific theories. Which theories? Well, as abill proposed by four Republican state senators in Arizonamakes clear, that would be "biological evolution, the chemical origins of life, global warming and human cloning." Coincidentally, these are the exact same theories thatHouse Bill 1674in Oklahoma, proposed by GOP state Rep. Gus Blackwell, considers controversial. His legislation even prevents teachers from flunking students who write papers debunking their textbook material. Seriously.

SEE MORE: When parents pay for college, could kids' grades suffer?

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The growing undercover effort to get God into biology class

Synthetic biology: Stanford, Cal engineering a new frontier

Most people look at the cedar in Drew Endy's front yard and admire its graceful green boughs, heavy with needles, sap and cones.

Endy sees something much different: an industrial manufacturing platform, waiting to be exploited.

"I dream we could someday reprogram trees that could self-assemble a computer chip in your front yard," exudes the brilliant and intense Stanford University bioengineer, who has emerged as a leading evangelist in the new field of synthetic biology.

One gene at a time, Endy and other elite teams of Bay Area scientists are striving to design and build organisms unlike anything made by Mother Nature.

It's not yet possible to create artificial life from scratch. But it's getting closer, through projects that essentially swap out a cell's original operating system for a lab-designed one. These made-to-order creations then can be put to work.

The Human Genome Project gave us the ability to read nature's instruction manual -- DNA -- like words in a book. But the real opportunities, scientists say, lie in our ability to not only read genetic code, but to write it, then build it using off-the-shelf chemical ingredients, strung together like holiday lights. It is the creation of new genomes -- and a new frontier in bioengineering.

Synthetic biology works because biological creatures are, in essence, programmable manufacturing systems. The DNA instruction manual buried inside every cell -- its software, in a

This presages the distant day when Endy's big Menlo Park cedar churns out computer chips, not cones. Or makes cancer-fighting drugs. Or fuels. Or building materials. Or anything else.

There are concerns about safety and ethics. In the wrong hands, lone villains or rogue regimes could unleash dangerous life forms. A review in 2010 by a White House commission concluded the field needs monitoring, but the risks are still limited.

Synthetic biology is different from genetic engineering, which simply inserts a gene from one organism into another.

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Synthetic biology: Stanford, Cal engineering a new frontier